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'Simple' model predicts PegIFN response in chronic HBV

'Simple' model predicts PegIFN response in chronic HBV

Chinese researchers have developed a scoring system based on hepatitis B virus-related clinical parameters to predict response to pegylated-interferon in chronic HBV patients. [More]
HCC predictors identified for chronic HBV patients with newly diagnosed cirrhosis

HCC predictors identified for chronic HBV patients with newly diagnosed cirrhosis

In patients with chronic hepatitis B virus infection who have been newly diagnosed with cirrhosis, the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma development can be ascertained using several clinical and molecular factors, study findings indicate. [More]
Maternal HBsAg can serve as HBV vertical transmission marker

Maternal HBsAg can serve as HBV vertical transmission marker

Two studies have independently identified quantitative hepatitis B surface antigen as a marker to identify pregnant women with chronic hepatitis B virus infection whose infants are at high-risk of infection despite immunoprophylaxis. [More]
New CAR-based therapy using combined cancer target could be effective for solid tumors

New CAR-based therapy using combined cancer target could be effective for solid tumors

Chimeric antigen receptors (CARs), engineered from a patient's own immune cells, have been successful for treating blood cancers, but using CARs for solid tumors has been limited by side effects to normal tissues containing the protein targeted by the engineered cells. [More]
Salk Institute researchers use super-resolution microscope to image vital receptors in lymph nodes

Salk Institute researchers use super-resolution microscope to image vital receptors in lymph nodes

When the body is fighting an invading pathogen, white blood cells--including T cells--must respond. Now, Salk Institute researchers have imaged how vital receptors on the surface of T cells bundle together when activated. [More]
New immunotherapy treatment could change the way cancer is treated

New immunotherapy treatment could change the way cancer is treated

In late 2015, former President Jimmy Carter announced that he was free of the metastatic melanoma that had spread to his liver and brain. In addition to surgery and radiation, Carter was treated with an immunotherapy drug, a new approach in cancer treatment that has a promising outlook. [More]
FDG-PET imaging tracks ability of atezolizumab to bolster immunity against NSCLC

FDG-PET imaging tracks ability of atezolizumab to bolster immunity against NSCLC

Non-small cell lung cancers have a collective reputation for not responding very well to chemotherapy. Researchers at the 2016 Annual Meeting of the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (SNMMI) are presenting a means of evaluating an immunotherapy that fights off NSCLC by strengthening a patient's own immune system. [More]
Screening PSA levels in younger men could accurately predict future risk of prostate cancer

Screening PSA levels in younger men could accurately predict future risk of prostate cancer

Prostate cancer screening with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) has been shown to reduce death and the spread of prostate cancer to other parts of the body, but the PSA test remains highly controversial as it frequently leads to over diagnosis and over treatment of men who may not be at risk. [More]
Novel radioimmunotherapy may help cure colorectal cancer

Novel radioimmunotherapy may help cure colorectal cancer

An emerging cancer therapy has colorectal tumors surrounded. Presenters at the 2016 Annual Meeting of the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging are unveiling a novel radioimmunotherapy that combines a cancer-seeking antibody with potent radionuclide agents, resulting in complete remission of colorectal cancer in mouse models. [More]
Unique method opens door to development of simple diagnostic tests for myriad diseases

Unique method opens door to development of simple diagnostic tests for myriad diseases

Researchers at the University of Pittsburgh have developed a unique method for detecting antibodies in the blood of patients in a proof-of-principle study that opens the door to development of simple diagnostic tests for diseases for which no microbial cause is known, including auto-immune diseases, cancers and other conditions. [More]
BNPs have potential to enable early diagnosis, long-term treatment of RA with minimal side effects

BNPs have potential to enable early diagnosis, long-term treatment of RA with minimal side effects

The results of a study presented today at the European League Against Rheumatism Annual Congress showed that tiny particles made of a biodegradable polymer (BNPs -- biodegradable polymer nanoparticles) have the potential to enable early detection and efficient long-term treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), with minimal side effects. [More]
NaF-PET/CT scans can accurately detect bone metastases in advanced prostate cancer patients

NaF-PET/CT scans can accurately detect bone metastases in advanced prostate cancer patients

A recent pilot study reported in the June issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine found that sodium fluoride (Na-F-18) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (NaF-PET/CT) accurately detects bone metastases in patients with advanced prostate cancer, and follow-up scans over time correlate clearly with clinical outcomes and patient survival. [More]
New clinical study data could redefine treatment for mCRPC patients

New clinical study data could redefine treatment for mCRPC patients

Janssen-Cilag International NV today announced that data from an interim analysis of The Prostate Cancer Registry, Europe’s first and largest prospective study of men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC), indicate that the presence of distant metastases (M1) at initial diagnosis may be a critical indicator of future treatment and prognosis for mCRPC patients. [More]
Study provides insight to gene shuffling process

Study provides insight to gene shuffling process

Use of a new technique developed at the Babraham Institute has allowed researchers to take an in-depth look at the gene shuffling process that is responsible for our body's ability to recognise a vast range of foreign agents such as disease-causing microorganisms. [More]
HLA genetic risk burden extends to MS outcomes

HLA genetic risk burden extends to MS outcomes

Human leukocyte antigen alleles not only increase susceptibility to multiple sclerosis, but also influence the course of the disease, suggests research. [More]
Stimulating STING pathway to provoke life-extending immune response shows promise in AML

Stimulating STING pathway to provoke life-extending immune response shows promise in AML

A protein known as STING plays a crucial role in the immune system's ability to "sense" cancer by recognizing and responding to DNA from tumor cells. Injection of compounds that activate the STING pathway directly into solid tumors in mice has been shown in prior studies to result in very potent anti-tumor immune responses. [More]
Immunotherapy with experimental monoclonal antibody could reduce neuroblastoma tumors

Immunotherapy with experimental monoclonal antibody could reduce neuroblastoma tumors

Neuroblastoma tumors shrank, some dramatically, in 80 percent of newly diagnosed, young, high-risk patients enrolled in a Phase II clinical trial that included an experimental monoclonal antibody. The immunotherapy agent was produced on the St. Jude Children's Research Hospital campus where the study is still underway. [More]
Clinical trial to evaluate ability of MRI to improve prostate cancer diagnosis

Clinical trial to evaluate ability of MRI to improve prostate cancer diagnosis

The Movember Foundation, the Ontario Institute for Cancer Research and Prostate Cancer Canada today announced $3 million in funding for a new Phase III clinical trial to evaluate if magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can replace the current standard of care to diagnose prostate cancer. [More]
Researchers demonstrate decisive role of cholesterol in T cell activation

Researchers demonstrate decisive role of cholesterol in T cell activation

T cell receptors are an important part of the human immune system. They are able to switch their conformation from an inactive to an active state spontaneously without any antigens present. [More]
Certain HLA genes may increase ovarian cancer risk in women

Certain HLA genes may increase ovarian cancer risk in women

Researchers in the Center for Immunotherapy at Roswell Park Cancer Institute have evaluated the human leukocyte antigen (HLA), a group of genes that help regulate the body's immune system, for underlying differences in ovarian cancer patients' response to therapy. [More]
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