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Heptares Therapeutics announces recipients of Malcolm Campbell Memorial Prize for 2015

Heptares Therapeutics announces recipients of Malcolm Campbell Memorial Prize for 2015

Heptares Therapeutics, the clinical-stage GPCR structure-guided drug discovery and development company, is delighted to announce that the Malcolm Campbell Memorial Prize for 2015 has been awarded to Miles Congreve (Vice President of Chemistry), Fiona Marshall (Chief Scientific Officer and co-founder) and Malcolm Weir (Chief Executive Officer and co-founder) for the seminal contributions to GPCR drug discovery made by Heptares Therapeutics since the company was founded in 2007. [More]
TxCell to highlight success factors in cell therapy research at Cell & Gene Therapy Forum 2015

TxCell to highlight success factors in cell therapy research at Cell & Gene Therapy Forum 2015

TxCell SA, a biotechnology company developing innovative, cost-effective, personalized T cell immunotherapies using antigen specific regulatory T-cells (Ag-Tregs) for severe chronic inflammatory and autoimmune diseases, announces today that Dr. Miguel Forte, Sr. VP Clinical Development and Regulatory Affairs, TxCell, will present at the Cell & Gene Therapy Forum 2015, January 26 - 28, 2015 at Grand Hayatt in Washington DC, United States. [More]
Heptares Therapeutics, AstraZeneca report significant progress in drug discovery collaboration

Heptares Therapeutics, AstraZeneca report significant progress in drug discovery collaboration

Heptares Therapeutics, the clinical-stage GPCR structure-guided drug discovery and development company, announces significant progress in its drug discovery collaboration with AstraZeneca. [More]
Researchers explore how M6P deficiency affects different kinds of immune cells

Researchers explore how M6P deficiency affects different kinds of immune cells

A group of white blood cells known as B cells, which play a key role in the human immune response, need a protein-targeting signal called mannose 6-phosphate (M6P) in order to proliferate, differentiate, and present immune cell-activating antigens, according to a study in The Journal of Cell Biology. [More]
Tübingen researchers develop new way of labeling T-cells

Tübingen researchers develop new way of labeling T-cells

To better understand what happens during immune reactions in the body, researchers at Tübingen University have developed a new way of labeling T-cells, allowing them to track the T-cell movement in mice using non-invasive positron emission technology (PET). [More]
GenSpera reports encouraging results from mipsagargin Phase II study for HCC treatment

GenSpera reports encouraging results from mipsagargin Phase II study for HCC treatment

GenSpera Inc. today announced the encouraging results of a Phase II study of mipsagargin (G-202), an investigational agent for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). [More]
New colloidal gold test strip demonstrates great potential for early detection of heart attack

New colloidal gold test strip demonstrates great potential for early detection of heart attack

NYU Polytechnic School of Engineering professors have been collaborating with researchers from Peking University on a new test strip that is demonstrating great potential for the early detection of certain heart attacks. [More]
Mobile diagnosis device to help reduce unnecessary antibiotics prescribing

Mobile diagnosis device to help reduce unnecessary antibiotics prescribing

New biosensor-based technology could help to reduce the over-prescribing of antibiotics by giving GPs and other frontline healthcare staff an accurate and fast method of identifying the nature of infectious diseases. [More]
CAR T-cell therapy enters into Phase I clinical trial

CAR T-cell therapy enters into Phase I clinical trial

Cancer fighting chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells, developed in the Sentman laboratory of Dartmouth's Norris Cotton Cancer Center, are taking the next step into a Phase I clinical trial beginning early in 2015. [More]
Intrexon and ZIOPHARM Oncology sign exclusive licensing agreement with MD Anderson

Intrexon and ZIOPHARM Oncology sign exclusive licensing agreement with MD Anderson

Intrexon Corporation, a leader in synthetic biology and its oncology partner, ZIOPHARM Oncology, today announced a broad exclusive licensing agreement with The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, including an exclusive sublicensing agreement through MD Anderson for intellectual property developed at the University of Minnesota for the development of non-viral adoptive cellular cancer immunotherapies. [More]
Study finds difference between results from IHC and quantitative molecular techniques

Study finds difference between results from IHC and quantitative molecular techniques

The cause of type 1 diabetes remains unknown. Several studies using immunohistochemistry (IHC) have independently reported hyperexpression of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I on pancreatic islet cells in young patients with recent-onset type 1 diabetes. Investigators have therefore suggested that HLA hyperexpression may be an important first step in the development of type 1 diabetes. [More]
Family history could help physicians identify prostate cancer risk

Family history could help physicians identify prostate cancer risk

A discovery by researchers at Huntsman Cancer Institute shows that looking at whether a man's uncles and great-grandparents, among other second- and third-degree relatives, had prostate cancer could be as important as looking at whether his father had prostate cancer. A more complete family history would give physicians a new tool to decide whether or not a PSA test was appropriate. [More]
Testosterone therapy suppresses some advanced prostate cancers, find Johns Hopkins scientists

Testosterone therapy suppresses some advanced prostate cancers, find Johns Hopkins scientists

In a surprising paradox, the male hormone testosterone, generally thought to be a feeder of prostate cancer, has been found to suppress some advanced prostate cancers and also may reverse resistance to testosterone-blocking drugs used to treat prostate cancer. [More]
Real-time RT-PCR TaqMan assay helps differentiate active pulmonary TB from LTBI

Real-time RT-PCR TaqMan assay helps differentiate active pulmonary TB from LTBI

One of the roadblocks to the eradication of tuberculosis (TB) is the difficulty in identifying patients with latent TB infections (LTBI). Neither the tuberculin skin test (TST) nor interferon-gamma release assays (IGRAs) are capable of distinguishing active from latent infection or predicting the chance of reactivation. [More]
TxCell announces further enhancement to development of Ovasave for IBD treatment

TxCell announces further enhancement to development of Ovasave for IBD treatment

Paulsen Foundation to provide specialist management and scientific and development expertise that is dedicated to advanced therapies, i.e. cellular and gene therapies. This new class of highly promising biological therapies includes TxCell’s Ovasave. [More]
Final Phase 1 data of zoptarelin doxorubicin Phase 1/2 trial published in Clinical Cancer Research

Final Phase 1 data of zoptarelin doxorubicin Phase 1/2 trial published in Clinical Cancer Research

Aeterna Zentaris Inc. today announced that an article on final data for the Phase 1 portion of the ongoing Phase 1/2 trial in prostate cancer with zoptarelin doxorubicin (formerly AEZS-108), a hybrid molecule composed of a synthetic peptide carrier and a well-known chemotherapy agent, doxorubicin, has been published in the December issue of Clinical Cancer Research. [More]
Protein Sciences earns Frost & Sullivan 2013 Global New Product Innovation Award

Protein Sciences earns Frost & Sullivan 2013 Global New Product Innovation Award

Based on its recent analysis of the influenza vaccines market, Frost & Sullivan recognises Protein Sciences with the 2013 Global New Product Innovation Award. Flublok is the world's first recombinant protein vaccine for the prevention of seasonal influenza disease to gain U.S. FDA approval. [More]
Penn, UGA scientists awarded new contract to develop genome database for microbial pathogens

Penn, UGA scientists awarded new contract to develop genome database for microbial pathogens

At the turn of the millennium, the cost to sequence a single human genome exceeded $50 million, and the process took a decade to complete. Microbes have genomes, too, and the first reference genome for a malaria parasite was completed in 2002 at a cost of roughly $15 million. But today researchers can sequence a genome in a single afternoon for just a few thousand dollars. Related technologies make it possible to capture information about all genes in the genome, in all tissues, from multiple individuals. [More]
Antigens and antibodies for an optimised ELISA test kit for Ebola

Antigens and antibodies for an optimised ELISA test kit for Ebola

AMSBIO has announced several products suitable for the development of an ELISA detection assay for the Ebola virus. [More]
Inovio begins hTERT DNA immunotherapy trial in adults with breast, lung and pancreatic cancer

Inovio begins hTERT DNA immunotherapy trial in adults with breast, lung and pancreatic cancer

Inovio Pharmaceuticals, Inc. announced it has initiated a phase I trial of its hTERT DNA immunotherapy (INO-1400) alone or in combination with Inovio's IL-12 immune activator (INO-9012) in adults with breast, lung, or pancreatic cancer at high risk of relapse after surgery and other cancer treatments. [More]