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Antihistamine is a type of drug that blocks the action of histamines, which can cause fever, itching, sneezing, a runny nose, and watery eyes. Antihistamines are used to prevent fevers in patients receiving blood transfusions and to treat allergies, coughs, and colds.
New molecule-building method may have great impact on pharmaceutical industry

New molecule-building method may have great impact on pharmaceutical industry

Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have devised a new molecule-building method that is likely to have a major impact on the pharmaceutical industry and many other chemistry-based enterprises. [More]
High dosages of antihistamines have dulling effect on genes associated with post-exercise recovery

High dosages of antihistamines have dulling effect on genes associated with post-exercise recovery

After vigorous exercise, some 3,000 genes go to work to aid recovery by boosting muscles and blood vessels, but in the presence of high doses of antihistamines almost 27 percent of the gene response is blunted, according to University of Oregon researchers. [More]
Common antihistamine may partially reverse damage to visual system in multiple sclerosis patients

Common antihistamine may partially reverse damage to visual system in multiple sclerosis patients

A common antihistamine used to treat symptoms of allergies and the common cold, called clemastine fumarate, partially reversed damage to the visual system in people with multiple sclerosis (MS) in a preliminary study released today that will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology's 68th Annual Meeting in Vancouver, Canada, April 15 to 21, 2016. [More]
Sedating antihistamines can intensify symptoms of restless legs syndrome

Sedating antihistamines can intensify symptoms of restless legs syndrome

Allergy season can be the worst time of year for people suffering with restless legs syndrome because popular over the counter medications can make symptoms much worse. [More]
Trimeprazine improves β cell function, slows progression of diabetes

Trimeprazine improves β cell function, slows progression of diabetes

β cells in pancreatic islets are responsible for producing insulin, which is essential to regulate blood glucose homeostasis. In type 1 diabetes, pancreatic β cells are destroyed due to an autoimmune attack, whereas in type 2 diabetes, pancreatic β cells may have deficiencies in secreting insulin or insulin-responding tissues can become insulin resistant. [More]
Pregnant women with acute migraine more likely to experience adverse birth outcomes

Pregnant women with acute migraine more likely to experience adverse birth outcomes

Women who have acute migraine attacks that are severe enough to prompt them to seek care may be more likely to have complications when giving birth, including preterm delivery, preeclampsia and low birthweight. Women 35 and older were seven times more likely to have these complications. [More]
Unituxin (dinutuximab) granted EC Marketing Authorisation for treatment of childhood neuroblastoma

Unituxin (dinutuximab) granted EC Marketing Authorisation for treatment of childhood neuroblastoma

United Therapeutics Corporation announced today that the European Commission (EC) has granted Marketing Authorisation for Unituxin (dinutuximab) for the treatment of high-risk neuroblastoma in patients aged 12 months to 17 years, who have previously received induction chemotherapy and achieved at least a partial response, followed by myeloablative therapy and autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT). [More]
Researchers identify new class of drugs that slows aging process

Researchers identify new class of drugs that slows aging process

A research team from The Scripps Research Institute, Mayo Clinic and other institutions has identified a new class of drugs that in animal models dramatically slows the aging process—alleviating symptoms of frailty, improving cardiac function and extending a healthy lifespan. [More]
Anticholinergic medications associated with pneumonia risk in older people

Anticholinergic medications associated with pneumonia risk in older people

Taking commonly used medications with anticholinergic effects is associated with a significantly higher risk for developing pneumonia in a study of more than 3,000 older Group Health patients living in the community--not in nursing homes. [More]
Now, women experiencing morning sickness can benefit from Diclegis drug

Now, women experiencing morning sickness can benefit from Diclegis drug

Up to 85 percent of pregnant women are affected by nausea and vomiting of pregnancy (NVP), more commonly known as morning sickness. [More]
Scientists develop chip for detection of RNA strand of dengue fever virus

Scientists develop chip for detection of RNA strand of dengue fever virus

Scientists at the Center for Research and Advanced Studies (Cinvestav) in Mexico developed a chip (also known as cDNA microarray) that allows detection of the RNA strand of the dengue fever virus. [More]
Wake Forest Baptist Physician offers tips to prevent bites and rashes in summer

Wake Forest Baptist Physician offers tips to prevent bites and rashes in summer

When summer rolls around, nothing beats soaking up the rays, hiking in a forest or playing Frisbee with the family … until a mosquito, bee or poisonous plant ruins the fun. [More]
Researchers identify target molecules for development of new allergy drugs

Researchers identify target molecules for development of new allergy drugs

Researchers have identified several target molecules which are suitable for the development of new allergy drugs. The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, the most prestigious journal in the field of allergology, has recently published an extensive review article on the prospects of drug therapy for allergy. Completed in a large-scale EU project, the lead author of the review article is Professor Ilkka Harvima of the University of Eastern Finland and Kuopio University Hospital. [More]
Researchers identify several target molecules suitable for development of new allergy drugs

Researchers identify several target molecules suitable for development of new allergy drugs

Researchers have identified several target molecules which are suitable for the development of new allergy drugs. The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, the most prestigious journal in the field of allergology, has recently published an extensive review article on the prospects of drug therapy for allergy. [More]
FDA approves Xolair for treatment of chronic idiopathic urticaria

FDA approves Xolair for treatment of chronic idiopathic urticaria

Genentech, a member of the Roche Group, today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved Xolair (omalizumab) for the treatment of chronic idiopathic urticaria, a form of chronic hives. [More]
Loyola dermatologist offers skin care tips for holidays

Loyola dermatologist offers skin care tips for holidays

The holidays often bring freezing temperatures, limited sleep, sugary treats and cocktails. This combination can spell trouble for your skin, according to a dermatologist at Loyola University Health System. [More]
CTCA doctor presents cutting-edge treatments for cancer patients to medical colleagues

CTCA doctor presents cutting-edge treatments for cancer patients to medical colleagues

Walter Quan, Jr., MD Chief of Medical Oncology and Director of Immunotherapy at Cancer Treatment Centers of America- Western Regional Medical Center is presenting new findings that are showing a major benefit to cancer patients. [More]
Meclizine drug has the potential to treat certain infectious diseases and cancer

Meclizine drug has the potential to treat certain infectious diseases and cancer

Meclizine, an over-the-counter drug used for decades to treat nausea and motion sickness, has the potential for new uses to treat certain infectious diseases and some forms of cancer, according to Dr. Vishal M. Gohil, Texas A&M AgriLife Research biochemist. [More]
Pregnant women exposed to metoclopramide experience no increased risk of congenital malformations

Pregnant women exposed to metoclopramide experience no increased risk of congenital malformations

In an analysis that included more than 40,000 women exposed to the nausea medication metoclopramide in pregnancy, use of this drug was not associated with significantly increased risk of major congenital malformations overall, spontaneous abortion, and stillbirth, according to a study in the October 16 issue of JAMA. [More]
House dust mite allergy treatment: an interview with Steve Harris, CEO & Co-founder of Circassia

House dust mite allergy treatment: an interview with Steve Harris, CEO & Co-founder of Circassia

House dust mite allergy is a surprisingly prevalent problem. Something like 27% of the U.S. population and 20% of the European population are what’s called skin-prick test positive for house dust mites, which is a test for sensitivity to allergens to find out if a person is likely to get that allergy. [More]
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