Antihistamine News and Research RSS Feed - Antihistamine News and Research

Antihistamine is a type of drug that blocks the action of histamines, which can cause fever, itching, sneezing, a runny nose, and watery eyes. Antihistamines are used to prevent fevers in patients receiving blood transfusions and to treat allergies, coughs, and colds.
Now, women experiencing morning sickness can benefit from Diclegis drug

Now, women experiencing morning sickness can benefit from Diclegis drug

Up to 85 percent of pregnant women are affected by nausea and vomiting of pregnancy (NVP), more commonly known as morning sickness. [More]
Scientists develop chip for detection of RNA strand of dengue fever virus

Scientists develop chip for detection of RNA strand of dengue fever virus

Scientists at the Center for Research and Advanced Studies (Cinvestav) in Mexico developed a chip (also known as cDNA microarray) that allows detection of the RNA strand of the dengue fever virus. [More]

Wake Forest Baptist Physician offers tips to prevent bites and rashes in summer

When summer rolls around, nothing beats soaking up the rays, hiking in a forest or playing Frisbee with the family … until a mosquito, bee or poisonous plant ruins the fun. [More]
Researchers identify target molecules for development of new allergy drugs

Researchers identify target molecules for development of new allergy drugs

Researchers have identified several target molecules which are suitable for the development of new allergy drugs. The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, the most prestigious journal in the field of allergology, has recently published an extensive review article on the prospects of drug therapy for allergy. Completed in a large-scale EU project, the lead author of the review article is Professor Ilkka Harvima of the University of Eastern Finland and Kuopio University Hospital. [More]
Researchers identify several target molecules suitable for development of new allergy drugs

Researchers identify several target molecules suitable for development of new allergy drugs

Researchers have identified several target molecules which are suitable for the development of new allergy drugs. The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, the most prestigious journal in the field of allergology, has recently published an extensive review article on the prospects of drug therapy for allergy. [More]
FDA approves Xolair for treatment of chronic idiopathic urticaria

FDA approves Xolair for treatment of chronic idiopathic urticaria

Genentech, a member of the Roche Group, today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved Xolair (omalizumab) for the treatment of chronic idiopathic urticaria, a form of chronic hives. [More]
Loyola dermatologist offers skin care tips for holidays

Loyola dermatologist offers skin care tips for holidays

The holidays often bring freezing temperatures, limited sleep, sugary treats and cocktails. This combination can spell trouble for your skin, according to a dermatologist at Loyola University Health System. [More]
CTCA doctor presents cutting-edge treatments for cancer patients to medical colleagues

CTCA doctor presents cutting-edge treatments for cancer patients to medical colleagues

Walter Quan, Jr., MD Chief of Medical Oncology and Director of Immunotherapy at Cancer Treatment Centers of America- Western Regional Medical Center is presenting new findings that are showing a major benefit to cancer patients. [More]
Meclizine drug has the potential to treat certain infectious diseases and cancer

Meclizine drug has the potential to treat certain infectious diseases and cancer

Meclizine, an over-the-counter drug used for decades to treat nausea and motion sickness, has the potential for new uses to treat certain infectious diseases and some forms of cancer, according to Dr. Vishal M. Gohil, Texas A&M AgriLife Research biochemist. [More]
Pregnant women exposed to metoclopramide experience no increased risk of congenital malformations

Pregnant women exposed to metoclopramide experience no increased risk of congenital malformations

In an analysis that included more than 40,000 women exposed to the nausea medication metoclopramide in pregnancy, use of this drug was not associated with significantly increased risk of major congenital malformations overall, spontaneous abortion, and stillbirth, according to a study in the October 16 issue of JAMA. [More]
House dust mite allergy treatment: an interview with Steve Harris, CEO & Co-founder of Circassia

House dust mite allergy treatment: an interview with Steve Harris, CEO & Co-founder of Circassia

House dust mite allergy is a surprisingly prevalent problem. Something like 27% of the U.S. population and 20% of the European population are what’s called skin-prick test positive for house dust mites, which is a test for sensitivity to allergens to find out if a person is likely to get that allergy. [More]
FDA accepts, files Genentech's sBLA for subcutaneous use of Xolair in people with CIU

FDA accepts, files Genentech's sBLA for subcutaneous use of Xolair in people with CIU

Genentech, a member of the Roche Group, today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has accepted and filed the company's supplemental Biologics License Application for subcutaneous use of Xolair (omalizumab) in people with Chronic Idiopathic Urticaria who remained symptomatic despite treatment with H1-antihistamine therapy at approved doses. [More]
New class of antidepressants appears potentially effective in combating deadly form of lung cancer

New class of antidepressants appears potentially effective in combating deadly form of lung cancer

A little-used class of antidepressants appears potentially effective in combating a particularly deadly form of lung cancer, according to a new study from researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine. [More]
Improved lung function in patients with moderate asthma severity observed with investigational Tiotropium

Improved lung function in patients with moderate asthma severity observed with investigational Tiotropium

Boehringer Ingelheim will present a pooled analysis of new data from the Phase 3 UniTinA-asthma® program at the European Respiratory Society (ERS) Annual Congress 2013 in Barcelona. The data from the individual MezzoTinA-asthma® Phase 3 studies (NCT01340209 and NCT00565266), from which the pooled data are derived, show the addition of tiotropium delivered via the Respimat® inhaler to medium-dose maintenance inhaled corticosteroid (ICS) therapy (defined as 400-800 µg budesonide/day or equivalent) improved lung function and provided sustained bronchodilation over 24 hours in patients with moderate asthma and airflow limitation. Tiotropium is being investigated to determine the medicine’s efficacy in treating asthma patients and is not currently approved for this indication. [More]
Symptoms, first-aid treatments and prevention tips for insect bites

Symptoms, first-aid treatments and prevention tips for insect bites

Whether they are invading your picnic, hitching a ride on your skin or just buzzing around your head, bugs are an annoying and unavoidable part of summer. Still, there are times when bugs are just a nuisance and times when they can cause serious illness or injury. [More]
Diclegis delayed-release tablets for NVP treatment now eligible for Medicaid coverage

Diclegis delayed-release tablets for NVP treatment now eligible for Medicaid coverage

Duchesnay USA today announced that Diclegis (doxylamine succinate 10mg, pyridoxine hydrochloride 10mg) delayed-release tablets for the treatment of nausea and vomiting of pregnancy, more commonly known as morning sickness, is now available for coverage under the state and federal Medicaid program effective July 1st, 2013. [More]
Findings link antihistamine use to adverse pregnancy outcomes

Findings link antihistamine use to adverse pregnancy outcomes

Women with a severe form of morning sickness who take antihistamines to help them sleep through their debilitating nausea are significantly more likely to experience adverse pregnancy outcomes, including low birth weight babies and premature births, a UCLA study has found. [More]
Allergic rhinitis treatments: an interview with Dr Dermot Ryan, GP and allergy expert

Allergic rhinitis treatments: an interview with Dr Dermot Ryan, GP and allergy expert

Allergic rhinitis is most commonly recognized as hay fever in the United Kingdom and it is due to the impact of an allergen, in the case of hay fever a pollen, setting off an inflammatory response in the lungs, causing typical symptoms... [More]
Review on new, hazardous drugs of abuse presented in Journal of Addiction Medicine

Review on new, hazardous drugs of abuse presented in Journal of Addiction Medicine

The last few years have seen the emergence of a new drug problem in so-called "bath salts"-actually "designer stimulants," packaged and sold in ways that skirt drug laws. A review and update on these designer drugs is presented in the June Journal of Addiction Medicine, the official journal of the American Society of Addiction Medicine. [More]
Ragweed allergy sublingual immunotherapy: an interview with Dr. Peter Creticos, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

Ragweed allergy sublingual immunotherapy: an interview with Dr. Peter Creticos, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

Ragweed is a dominant seasonal allergen in North America (~26% of US and North American population is allergic to this noxious weed which pollinates from early August to early October). [More]