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Antioxidants are substances that protect cells from the damage caused by free radicals (unstable molecules made by the process of oxidation during normal metabolism). Free radicals may play a part in cancer, heart disease, stroke, and other diseases of aging. Antioxidants include beta-carotene, lycopene, vitamins A, C, and E, and other natural and manufactured substances.
Feast-or-famine diet may extend lifespan, improve age-related diseases

Feast-or-famine diet may extend lifespan, improve age-related diseases

University of Florida Health researchers have found that putting people on a feast-or-famine diet may mimic some of the benefits of fasting, and that adding antioxidant supplements may counteract those benefits. [More]
Discovery demonstrates effect of exercise to prevent chronic health conditions

Discovery demonstrates effect of exercise to prevent chronic health conditions

A researcher at the University of Virginia School of Medicine has magnified a benefit of exercise in mice to provide a "profound" protection from diabetic cardiomyopathy, a potentially deadly heart condition that affects many people with diabetes. The discovery demonstrates the power of exercise to prevent chronic health conditions and suggests that one day some benefits of exercise may come in a pill or bottle. [More]
LSU Health New Orleans finalizes deal with CB BioSciences

LSU Health New Orleans finalizes deal with CB BioSciences

The Office of Technology Management at LSU Health New Orleans has finalized a deal with CB BioSciences, Inc., a startup drug development company to build a platform around the intellectual property portfolio of Chu Chen, PhD, LSU Health New Orleans Professor of Neuroscience. [More]
Industrial Biotechnology presents insights on cellulose nanocrystal toxicity

Industrial Biotechnology presents insights on cellulose nanocrystal toxicity

Novel nanomaterials derived from cellulose have many promising industrial applications, are biobased and biodegradable, and can be produced at relatively low cost. Their potential toxicity--whether ingested, inhaled, on contact with the skin, or on exposure to cells within the body--is a topic of intense discussion, and the latest evidence and insights on cellulose nanocrystal toxicity are presented in a Review article in Industrial Biotechnology, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. [More]
Women with multiple sclerosis may have lower levels of antioxidant, anti-inflammatory nutrients

Women with multiple sclerosis may have lower levels of antioxidant, anti-inflammatory nutrients

Women with multiple sclerosis (MS) may have lower levels of important antioxidant and anti-inflammatory nutrients, such as folate from food and vitamin E, than healthy people, according to a new study released today that will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology's 67th Annual Meeting in Washington, DC, April 18 to 25, 2015. [More]
New plant-derived agent protects skin from harmful effects of UV irradiation

New plant-derived agent protects skin from harmful effects of UV irradiation

The skin is constantly challenged, and very often harmed, by environmental stressors such as UV radiation and chemicals. To cope with UV radiation, various skin cells have evolved a complex protective antioxidant defense system. [More]
Scientists find that treating the uninjured side of brain can maximize stroke recovery

Scientists find that treating the uninjured side of brain can maximize stroke recovery

To maximize stroke recovery, researchers may want to focus more on ways to support the side of the brain where the injury didn't occur, scientists report. [More]
New research provides hope for treating stroke using HUCBCs

New research provides hope for treating stroke using HUCBCs

Researchers have known that transplanted human umbilical cord cells (HUCBCs) can have a restorative effect on the brain and brain function following a stroke. However, just how the cells exert their therapeutic effects has not been clear. Now, a research team from the University of South Florida using animal models of stroke has found that the HUCBCs are most beneficial in preventing neuron loss when the Akt signaling pathway is activated by secretions from the HUCBCs and that Akt activation subsequently impacts a specific gene involved in reducing inflammation. [More]
41% of the British population unaware of the role of diet in cancer development

41% of the British population unaware of the role of diet in cancer development

Surprising new statistics reveal that 41% of the British population are oblivious to the role that diet plays in the development of cancer - and even those with a family history of the disease are failing to consume potentially "cancer-preventing" compounds in their daily diet. [More]
Resveratrol found in red grapes, peanuts may help prevent age-related decline in memory

Resveratrol found in red grapes, peanuts may help prevent age-related decline in memory

A compound found in common foods such as red grapes and peanuts may help prevent age-related decline in memory, according to new research published by a faculty member in the Texas A&M Health Science Center College of Medicine. [More]
Women’s risk factors for heart disease

Women’s risk factors for heart disease

Heart disease is often thought of as a health problem for men, but more and more women die of heart disease each year than men, and from any other disease including breast cancer. [More]
Study opens door for development of tools to modulate CoQ10 synthesis in human cells

Study opens door for development of tools to modulate CoQ10 synthesis in human cells

A study which counts with the participation of University of Granada scientists has provided new data on the Q10 coenzyme (CoQ10), a molecule which is synthesized within the cells of the organism itself and which has essential functions for cellular metabolism. [More]
EyePromise® eye vitamins offers education guide to promote awareness on AMD

EyePromise® eye vitamins offers education guide to promote awareness on AMD

Due to the aging Baby Boomer population, AMD, or Age-related Macular Degeneration, is expected to double by the year 2020. [More]
Using antioxidant to reverse brain inflammation improves obesity, diabetes symptoms

Using antioxidant to reverse brain inflammation improves obesity, diabetes symptoms

Using an antioxidant to reverse inflammation in the brain caused by a high-fat diet greatly improves symptoms related to obesity and type II diabetes, a new study from New Zealand's University of Otago suggests. [More]
Study: Green tea compound may activate a cycle that kills oral cancer cells

Study: Green tea compound may activate a cycle that kills oral cancer cells

A compound found in green tea may trigger a cycle that kills oral cancer cells while leaving healthy cells alone, according to Penn State food scientists. The research could lead to treatments for oral cancer, as well as other types of cancer. [More]
Walnuts may improve cognitive function

Walnuts may improve cognitive function

Eating walnuts may improve performance on cognitive function tests, including those for memory, concentration and information processing speed according to new research from the David Geffen School of Medicine at The University of California, Los Angeles, led by Dr. Lenore Arab. Cognitive function was consistently greater in adult participants that consumed walnuts, regardless of age, gender or ethnicity. [More]
VisiVite reports upcoming release of ProVision macular health formula

VisiVite reports upcoming release of ProVision macular health formula

VisiVite, a world leader in ocular nutrition, today announced its upcoming January 2015 release of ProVision, a professional macular health formula designed to be easy for eye doctors to dispense and affordable for their patients to use. [More]
Using HIV drugs to treat AMD: an interview with Dr Mark Young

Using HIV drugs to treat AMD: an interview with Dr Mark Young

NRTIs are compounds which were originally developed in the 1960s as anti-cancer agents. They are similar in structure to the bases which make up DNA, and it was hoped that they would interfere with DNA replication in fast-growing cancer cells, slowing down or stopping tumour growth. [More]
Brazilian researchers find that nutrition education may help prevent reoccurrence of breast cancer

Brazilian researchers find that nutrition education may help prevent reoccurrence of breast cancer

Breast cancer is the most frequent cause of death among women worldwide, and five-year survival rates are just 58.4% in Brazil, lower than in many other regions. In a new study, however, researchers from Federal University of Santa Catarina provided Brazilian breast cancer patients with nutrition education and found it could benefit patients and may help prevent reoccurrence of the cancer. [More]
Researchers examining new antioxidant-based therapeutic approaches to hypertension

Researchers examining new antioxidant-based therapeutic approaches to hypertension

High blood pressure affects more than 70 million Americans and is a major risk factor for stroke, heart failure and other renal and cardiovascular diseases. Two University of Houston College of Pharmacy researchers are examining the role of intrinsic antioxidant pathways in mitigating hypertension. [More]