Antioxidant News and Research RSS Feed - Antioxidant News and Research

Antioxidants are substances that protect cells from the damage caused by free radicals (unstable molecules made by the process of oxidation during normal metabolism). Free radicals may play a part in cancer, heart disease, stroke, and other diseases of aging. Antioxidants include beta-carotene, lycopene, vitamins A, C, and E, and other natural and manufactured substances.
Scientists unveil reasons why NSAIDs, pain killers may increase heart disease risk

Scientists unveil reasons why NSAIDs, pain killers may increase heart disease risk

Researchers have known for more than a decade that the risk of heart disease and stroke increases when people take pain relievers like ibuprofen and other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, or NSAIDs. Now, scientists from the University of California, Davis, have uncovered some of the reasons why these drugs can harm heart tissue. [More]
Studies on role of vitamin A in heart health have drawn opposite conclusions

Studies on role of vitamin A in heart health have drawn opposite conclusions

Vitamin A is involved in many bodily processes, including vision and skin health, but its role in the heart is unclear. While vitamin A is critical for heart development of embryos—vitamin A deficiency during pregnancy leads to an abnormal heart and prenatal death—studies on vitamin A's role in heart health have drawn opposite conclusions. [More]
Clinical study shows watercress extract inhibits carcinogen activation in cigarette smokers

Clinical study shows watercress extract inhibits carcinogen activation in cigarette smokers

Watercress extract taken multiple times a day significantly inhibits the activation of a tobacco-derived carcinogen in cigarette smokers, researchers at the University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, partner with UPMC Cancer Center, demonstrated in a phase II clinical trial presented today at the American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting in New Orleans. [More]
Researchers find way to attack a process that tumor cells use to escape effects of cancer drugs

Researchers find way to attack a process that tumor cells use to escape effects of cancer drugs

Cancer cells often devise ways to survive even in the presence of toxic chemotherapy. Now, a research team led by investigators at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center has found a way to attack a process that tumor cells use to escape the effects of standard cancer drugs. The discovery is published online today in the journal Nature Cell Biology. [More]
Willow herb extracts may be beneficial in treating multi-drug resistant bacterial and fungal infections

Willow herb extracts may be beneficial in treating multi-drug resistant bacterial and fungal infections

A common herb could help reduce antibiotic doses and result in less severe side effects in treatments against multi-drug resistant microorganisms. [More]
Investigational drug provides no improved protection to patients with contrast-induced acute kidney injury

Investigational drug provides no improved protection to patients with contrast-induced acute kidney injury

Patients treated with CMX-2043--an investigational drug that has previously shown some ability to protect heart muscle from damage during stenting--saw no improved protection in their kidneys compared to placebo, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology's 65th Annual Scientific Session. [More]
Aged tumor cells in melanoma behave in a different way than younger tumor cells

Aged tumor cells in melanoma behave in a different way than younger tumor cells

Cancer risk increases with one's age as accumulated damage to our cells and chronic inflammation occur over time. Now, an international team of scientists led by The Wistar Institute have shown that aged tumor cells in melanoma behave differently than younger tumor cells, according to study results published in the journal Nature. [More]
Tumor suppressor p53 gene twice as likely to be defective in autistic children

Tumor suppressor p53 gene twice as likely to be defective in autistic children

A large study by researchers with the UC Davis MIND Institute has found that a gene whose role is to suppress cellular damage from environmental stressors is nearly twice as likely to be defective in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), and that the deficit is also present in their fathers. [More]
New Rutgers study links protein that helps fight infection to heart and liver disease

New Rutgers study links protein that helps fight infection to heart and liver disease

A protein that should help fight infection and keep us healthy may be targeted for treating devastating illnesses like heart and liver disease, according to a new Rutgers study. [More]
High-intensity workout could do more harm than good

High-intensity workout could do more harm than good

High-intensity 'sprint training' may be gaining popularity at gyms, but if you're new to this form of exercise, the workout could do more harm than good. [More]
Diet and lifestyle may play greater role than genetics in cataract development, severity

Diet and lifestyle may play greater role than genetics in cataract development, severity

A diet rich in vitamin C could cut risk of cataract progression by a third, suggests a study being published online today in Ophthalmology, the journal of the American Academy of Ophthalmology. The research is also the first to show that diet and lifestyle may play a greater role than genetics in cataract development and severity. [More]
Global improvement in antioxidant capacity may delay ageing

Global improvement in antioxidant capacity may delay ageing

The gradual accumulation of cell damage plays a very important role in the origin of ageing. There are many sources of cellular damage, however, which ones are really responsible for ageing and which ones are inconsequential for ageing is a question that still lacks an answer [More]
Scientists synthesize novel selenohydantoins with anticancer and antioxidant activity

Scientists synthesize novel selenohydantoins with anticancer and antioxidant activity

A group of scientists from Moscow universities led by Yan Ivanenkov, the head of Laboratory of Medical Chemistry and Bioinformatics in MIPT, has succeeded in synthesizing a set of novel selenohydantoins with anticancer and antioxidant activity. [More]
Enhanced diet helps slow progression of hereditary deafness

Enhanced diet helps slow progression of hereditary deafness

An enhanced diet helped reduce hearing loss in mice with the genetic mutation most commonly responsible for childhood deafness, new research suggests. [More]
Consuming green tea with dietary iron may lessen health benefits of green tea

Consuming green tea with dietary iron may lessen health benefits of green tea

Green tea is touted for its many health benefits as a powerful antioxidant, but experiments in a laboratory mouse model of inflammatory bowel disease suggest that consuming green tea along with dietary iron may actually lessen green tea's benefits. [More]
Depression may be a systemic disease, say researchers

Depression may be a systemic disease, say researchers

An international team of researchers lead by the University of Granada has scientifically proven, for the first time, that depression is associated with important alterations of the oxidative stress, so it should be considered a systemic disease. [More]
Researchers show how increases in state and local social spending can reduce risk of dying

Researchers show how increases in state and local social spending can reduce risk of dying

Income inequality and government social spending. These are hot-??button issues in this year's presidential primaries: the rich getting richer, the poor getting poorer, and the government's role in closing the gap--or not. [More]
Novel mitochondria-specific ceria nanoparticles can effectively suppress neuronal cell death

Novel mitochondria-specific ceria nanoparticles can effectively suppress neuronal cell death

The brain is an enormous network of communication, containing over 100 billion nerve cells, or neurons, with branches that connect at more than 100 trillion points. They are constantly sending signals through a vast neuron forest that forms memories, thoughts and feelings; these patterns of activity form the essence of each person. [More]
Researchers develop effective technique for studying high-arched palate using mouse model

Researchers develop effective technique for studying high-arched palate using mouse model

Researchers from the laboratory of Paul Trainor, Ph.D., at the Stowers Institute of Medical Research have developed an effective and reliable technique for studying high-arched palate using a mouse model. The methodology could expand research into the genetic aspects of this craniofacial abnormality. [More]
NUS scientists formulate recipe for making healthier bread

NUS scientists formulate recipe for making healthier bread

A team of food scientists from the National University of Singapore has successfully formulated a recipe for making healthier bread by adding a natural plant pigment, called anthocyanin, extracted from black rice. This new bread option gets digested at a slower rate - hence improving blood glucose control - and is high in antioxidants, among other health benefits. [More]
Advertisement
Advertisement