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Research highlights global burden of HIV and other infectious diseases among prisoners and detainees

Research highlights global burden of HIV and other infectious diseases among prisoners and detainees

Prisoners and detainees worldwide have higher burdens of HIV, viral hepatitis and tuberculosis than the communities from which they come, and the regular cycling of infected people in and out of incarceration is worsening the epidemics both inside and outside of prison, new Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health-led research suggests. [More]
New Global Fund report shows significant increase in HIV treatment

New Global Fund report shows significant increase in HIV treatment

Ahead of next week’s International AIDS Conference in Durban, South Africa, the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria today released results that show a significant increase in the number of people being treated for HIV. [More]
The Wistar Institute and partners receive HIV cure research grant to test novel immunotherapies

The Wistar Institute and partners receive HIV cure research grant to test novel immunotherapies

The Wistar Institute is pleased to announce that the National Institutes of Health has awarded a nearly $23 million Martin Delaney Collaboratories for HIV Cure Research grant to the BEAT-HIV: Delaney Collaboratory to Cure HIV-1 Infection by Combination Immunotherapy, a consortium of top HIV researchers led by co-principal investigators Luis J. Montaner, D.V.M., D.Phil., director of the HIV-1 Immunopathogenesis Laboratory at The Wistar Institute Vaccine Center, and James L. Riley, Ph.D., research associate professor at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. [More]
Community-level ART coverage, male circumcision linked to decline in new male HIV infections in Uganda

Community-level ART coverage, male circumcision linked to decline in new male HIV infections in Uganda

Increasing the number of men who undergo circumcision and increasing the rates at which women with HIV are given antiretroviral therapy (ART) were associated with significant declines in the number of new male HIV infections in rural Ugandan communities, new Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Health research suggests. [More]
Sugar-binding protein galectin-9 could be new weapon to fight HIV

Sugar-binding protein galectin-9 could be new weapon to fight HIV

The ultimate impediment to a cure for HIV infection is the presence of latent, HIV-infected cells, which can reawaken and produce new virus when antiretroviral drug therapy is stopped. [More]
New study finds whether HIV-infected people on antiretroviral treatment transmit virus to their partner

New study finds whether HIV-infected people on antiretroviral treatment transmit virus to their partner

A new study has found that neither gay men nor heterosexual people with HIV transmit the virus to their partner, provided they are on suppressive antiretroviral treatment. [More]
Study highlights ongoing global epidemic of HIV among gay men

Study highlights ongoing global epidemic of HIV among gay men

Gay, bisexual and other men who have sex with men continue to have disproportionately high burdens of HIV infection in countries of low, middle and high income around the world, a new study led by the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health suggests. [More]
Implementation science may help prevent mother-to-child HIV transmissions

Implementation science may help prevent mother-to-child HIV transmissions

An emerging field, known as implementation science, may help reduce the nearly 150,000 instances of mother-to-child HIV transmissions that occur annually around the world, mostly in developing countries. c [More]
Topical delivery of AVR drug combination can provide complete protection against HIV

Topical delivery of AVR drug combination can provide complete protection against HIV

Researchers are edging ever closer to discovering the perfect combination of drugs and drug delivery system that will stop the sexual transmission of HIV. [More]
Autologous stem cell transplant safe, effective for HIV-associated lymphoma patients

Autologous stem cell transplant safe, effective for HIV-associated lymphoma patients

New research published online today in Blood Journal of the American Society of Hematology (ASH), challenges the generally held belief that individuals with HIV and aggressive lymphoma are not candidates for standard treatment. [More]
Nearly half of newly-infected HIV patients experience neurologic issues

Nearly half of newly-infected HIV patients experience neurologic issues

A team led by researchers from UCSF and Yale has found that half of people newly infected with HIV experience neurologic issues. These neurologic findings are generally not severe and usually resolve after participants started anti-retroviral therapy. [More]
Study captures interactions of HIV-infected immune cells in living animal

Study captures interactions of HIV-infected immune cells in living animal

By watching brightly glowing HIV-infected immune cells move within mice, researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai have shown how infected immune cells latch onto an uninfected sister cell to directly transmit newly minted viral particles. [More]
Thailand certified free of mother-to-child transmission of HIV and syphilis

Thailand certified free of mother-to-child transmission of HIV and syphilis

Thailand has been officially certified free of the transmission of HIV and syphilis from mothers to their children. [More]
Sixty-ninth World Health Assembly comes to end after approving many new resolutions

Sixty-ninth World Health Assembly comes to end after approving many new resolutions

The Sixty-ninth World Health Assembly closed today after approving new resolutions on WHO's Framework for Engagement with Non-State Actors; the Sustainable Development Goals; the International Health Regulations; tobacco control; road traffic deaths and injuries; nutrition; HIV, hepatitis and STIs; mycetoma; research and development; access to medicines and integrated health services. [More]
UN’s 90-90-90 program could be a cost-effective way to control global AIDS epidemic

UN’s 90-90-90 program could be a cost-effective way to control global AIDS epidemic

A new study finds that implementing the United Nations targets for HIV testing and treatment would be an expensive but ultimately very cost-effective way to increase survival, reduce the number of children orphaned by HIV, and contain the global AIDS epidemic. [More]
ART alone not sufficient to reduce arterial inflammation among HIV-infected patients, study finds

ART alone not sufficient to reduce arterial inflammation among HIV-infected patients, study finds

Initiating antiretroviral therapy (ART) soon after diagnosis of an HIV infection did not prevent the progression of significant arterial inflammation in a small group of previously untreated patients. [More]
Understanding structure of HIV-1 protease vital to development of next-generation HIV drugs

Understanding structure of HIV-1 protease vital to development of next-generation HIV drugs

HIV, the virus that causes AIDS, has become one of the world’s most serious health and development challenges. [More]
Gene editing technology helps excise segment of HIV-1 DNA from genomes of living animals

Gene editing technology helps excise segment of HIV-1 DNA from genomes of living animals

Using gene editing technology, researchers at the Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University have, for the first time, successfully excised a segment of HIV-1 DNA - the virus responsible for AIDS - from the genomes of living animals. [More]
Study shows expression of high-affinity TCRs linked with spontaneous control of HIV infection

Study shows expression of high-affinity TCRs linked with spontaneous control of HIV infection

A small number of patients infected by HIV spontaneously control viral replication without antiretroviral therapy, and do not develop the disease. The ability of these rare patients, known as "HIV controllers", to suppress HIV replication appears to be down to a highly effective immune response. [More]
Altered coagulation caused by HIV virus linked to increased risk of non-AIDS diseases

Altered coagulation caused by HIV virus linked to increased risk of non-AIDS diseases

With more than 36.9 million people infected globally, HIV continues to be a major public health issue. Those living with the virus are at an increased risk for other non-AIDS diseases, such as cardiovascular disease and cancer, and though it's not entirely clear why, this has been associated with inflammation and abnormal blood clotting. [More]
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