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Natalizumab drug helps scientists confirm how 'viral reservoirs' form in HIV patients

Natalizumab drug helps scientists confirm how 'viral reservoirs' form in HIV patients

A drug used to treat patients with Crohn's disease and multiple sclerosis has helped scientists confirm how "viral reservoirs" form in patients living with HIV and also proven effective in animal trials at blocking the pathways to those reservoirs in the brain and gut, a team of researchers reported recently in the journal PLOS Pathogens. [More]
NIH-sponsored clinical trials examine safety, acceptability of HIV antiretroviral medicines

NIH-sponsored clinical trials examine safety, acceptability of HIV antiretroviral medicines

Two new clinical trials are examining the safety and acceptability of antiretroviral medicines administered via injection as a means of protecting against HIV infection. The studies are being funded by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, part of the National Institutes of Health, and conducted by the NIAID-funded HIV Prevention Trials Network (HPTN). [More]
New molecule shows promise in controlling HIV without using daily antiretroviral drugs

New molecule shows promise in controlling HIV without using daily antiretroviral drugs

Scientists have created a new molecule that shows promise for controlling HIV without daily antiretroviral drugs. The molecule foils a wider range of HIV strains in the laboratory than any known broadly neutralizing HIV antibody and is more powerful than some of the most potent of these antibodies. [More]
UNICEF and UNAIDS go ‘All In’ to end the AIDS epidemic among adolescents

UNICEF and UNAIDS go ‘All In’ to end the AIDS epidemic among adolescents

AIDS has become the second leading cause of death among adolescents globally. Just one in four children and adolescents under the age of 15 have access to life-saving antiretroviral treatment. Deaths are declining in all age groups, except among 10–19 year olds. [More]
UC San Diego School of Medicine project receives 2015 Avant-Garde Award for HIV/AIDS Research

UC San Diego School of Medicine project receives 2015 Avant-Garde Award for HIV/AIDS Research

A University of California, San Diego School of Medicine project involving the creation of miniature models of the human brain - developed with stem cells - to study neurological disorders caused by HIV and methamphetamine use has been named one of five recipients of the 2015 Avant-Garde Award for HIV/AIDS Research from the National Institute on Drug Abuse. [More]
Five researchers selected to receive 2015 Avant-Garde Award for HIV/AIDS Research

Five researchers selected to receive 2015 Avant-Garde Award for HIV/AIDS Research

With proposals ranging from innovative therapies to the development of unique organoid models of the brain, five scientists have been selected to receive the 2015 Avant-Garde Award for HIV/AIDS Research from the National Institute on Drug Abuse, part of the National Institutes of Health. The five scientists will each receive $500,000 per year for five years to support their research. [More]

Researchers identify immune biomarkers that could help predict complications in HIV/TB patients

Doctors treating patients battling both HIV and tuberculosis (TB)--many of whom live in Africa--are faced with the decision when to start those patients on antiretroviral therapy (ART) while they are being treated with antibiotics for active TB disease. Some patients fare well on both interventions, with the immune system in check and the TB controlled. [More]
CWRU researcher receives $3.9 million grant for HIV research

CWRU researcher receives $3.9 million grant for HIV research

A researcher at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine has been awarded $3.9 million to determine if the combination of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and drug abuse is a double kick in the gut, leading to organ damage throughout the body. [More]
Researchers develop smartphone accessory for rapid diagnosis of infectious diseases at point of care

Researchers develop smartphone accessory for rapid diagnosis of infectious diseases at point of care

A team of researchers, led by Samuel K. Sia, associate professor of biomedical engineering at Columbia Engineering, has developed a low-cost smartphone accessory that can perform a point-of-care test that simultaneously detects three infectious disease markers from a finger prick of blood in just 15 minutes. [More]
Research opens door to development of new therapies to block HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders

Research opens door to development of new therapies to block HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders

While antiretroviral therapies have significantly improved and extended the lives of many HIV patients, another insidious and little discussed threat looms for aging sufferers - HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). The disorders, which strike more often in HIV patients over age 50, can result in cognitive impairment, mild to severe, making everyday tasks a challenge. [More]
Theravance Biopharma, Mylan partner to develop and commercialize TD-4208 for COPD treatment

Theravance Biopharma, Mylan partner to develop and commercialize TD-4208 for COPD treatment

Theravance Biopharma, Inc. and Mylan Inc. today announced that the two companies will partner on the development and, subject to FDA approval, commercialization of TD-4208, a novel investigational once-daily nebulized long-acting muscarinic antagonist (LAMA) for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and other respiratory diseases. [More]
Mylan signs definitive agreement to acquire Famy Care's female health care businesses

Mylan signs definitive agreement to acquire Famy Care's female health care businesses

Mylan Inc. today announced that it has, through its Indian subsidiary Mylan Laboratories Limited, signed a definitive agreement to acquire certain female health care businesses from Famy Care Limited, a specialty women's health care company with global leadership in generic oral contraceptive products (OCPs) for $750 million in cash plus additional contingent payments of up to $50 million. [More]
Researchers gain new insight on immune cells that harbor latent HIV virus

Researchers gain new insight on immune cells that harbor latent HIV virus

Drugs for HIV have become adept at suppressing infection, but they still can't eliminate it. That's because the medication in these pills doesn't touch the virus' hidden reserves, which lie dormant within infected white blood cells. Unlock the secrets of this pool of latent virus, scientists believe, and it may become possible to cure - not just control - HIV. [More]
Study shows only 15% of newly diagnosed adults seek HIV care

Study shows only 15% of newly diagnosed adults seek HIV care

Between December 2009 and February 2011, health workers with the AMPATH Consortium sought to test and counsel every adult resident in the Bunyala subcounty of Kenya for HIV. [More]
Researchers receive $2.2M grant to study links between depression and cardiovascular disease in HIV patients

Researchers receive $2.2M grant to study links between depression and cardiovascular disease in HIV patients

Jesse Stewart, Ph.D., associate professor of psychology in the School of Science at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, and two colleagues have received a $2.2 million National Institutes of Health grant to investigate the links between depression, depression treatment and cardiovascular disease in adults with HIV. [More]
Johnson & Johnson announces sales of $18.3 billion for Q4 2014

Johnson & Johnson announces sales of $18.3 billion for Q4 2014

Johnson & Johnson today announced sales of $18.3 billion for the fourth quarter of 2014, a decrease of 0.6% as compared to the fourth quarter of 2013. Operational results increased 3.9% and the negative impact of currency was 4.5%. Domestic sales increased 7.4%. [More]
AbbVie gets European Commission's approval to market VIEKIRAX + EXVIERA for HCV treatment

AbbVie gets European Commission's approval to market VIEKIRAX + EXVIERA for HCV treatment

AbbVie announced that the European Commission has granted marketing authorizations for its all-oral, short-course, interferon-free treatment of VIEKIRAX (ombitasvir/paritaprevir/ritonavir tablets) + EXVIERA (dasabuvir tablets). The treatment has been approved with or without ribavirin (RBV) for patients with genotype 1 (GT1) chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, including those with compensated liver cirrhosis, HIV-1 co-infection, patients on opioid substitution therapy and liver transplant recipients. [More]
Janssen, Gilead to jointly develop darunavir-based, single-tablet regimen for HIV treatment

Janssen, Gilead to jointly develop darunavir-based, single-tablet regimen for HIV treatment

Janssen R&D Ireland announced today an amendment to its existing agreement with Gilead Sciences, Inc., initially established in 2011, for the development of a once daily, darunavir-based, single-tablet regimen (STR) for the treatment of people living with HIV. [More]
FDA approves AbbVie's VIEKIRA PAK for treatment of patients with GT1 HCV infection

FDA approves AbbVie's VIEKIRA PAK for treatment of patients with GT1 HCV infection

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved AbbVie's VIEKIRA PAK, an all-oral, interferon-free treatment, with or without ribavirin (RBV), for the treatment of patients with chronic genotype 1 (GT1) hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, including those with compensated cirrhosis. [More]
Heroin use impacts HIV disease progression

Heroin use impacts HIV disease progression

Researchers at Yale and Boston University and their Russian collaborators have found that occasional heroin use by HIV-positive patients may be particularly harmful to the immune system and worsens HIV disease, compared to persistent or no heroin use. [More]
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