Antiretroviral News and Research RSS Feed - Antiretroviral News and Research

Incidence of HIV in Europe reaches record high

Incidence of HIV in Europe reaches record high

Results of recent surveillance conducted by the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) and the WHO Regional Office for Europe indicate that the annual number of newly diagnosed HIV infections in Europe reached an all-time high in 2014. [More]
Mylan releases Clozapine Orally Disintegrating Tablets in U.S.

Mylan releases Clozapine Orally Disintegrating Tablets in U.S.

Mylan N.V. today announced the U.S. launch of Clozapine Orally Disintegrating Tablets, 25 mg and 100 mg, the generic version of Jazz Pharmaceutical's FazaClo. [More]
12 months of liquid formula HIV drugs protect breastfeeding babies against HIV infection

12 months of liquid formula HIV drugs protect breastfeeding babies against HIV infection

A study from four countries in Africa, published in The Lancet, shows that providing babies with up to 12 months of liquid formula HIV drugs, while breastfeeding with their HIV-positive mothers, is highly effective at protecting them from infection, including in the 6–12 month period after birth which has not been analysed in previous research. [More]
NIAID launches major initiative to advance novel approaches to treat, prevent HIV infections

NIAID launches major initiative to advance novel approaches to treat, prevent HIV infections

The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, part of the National Institutes of Health, launched a major initiative to advance novel approaches to treat and prevent HIV infections based on broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) today. [More]
Low vitamin D levels may limit effectiveness of HIV treatment

Low vitamin D levels may limit effectiveness of HIV treatment

A University of Georgia researcher has found that low levels of vitamin D may limit the effectiveness of HIV treatment in adults. [More]
Mylan announces U.S. launch of generic AXERT tablets

Mylan announces U.S. launch of generic AXERT tablets

Mylan N.V. today announced the U.S. launch of Almotriptan Tablets USP, 6.25 mg and 12.5 mg, the generic version of Janssen Pharmaceutical's AXERT. [More]
Genvoya approved as complete regimen for HIV treatment

Genvoya approved as complete regimen for HIV treatment

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Genvoya (a fixed-dose combination tablet containing elvitegravir, cobicistat, emtricitabine, and tenofovir alafenamide) as a complete regimen for the treatment of HIV-1 infection in adults and pediatric patients 12 years of age and older. [More]
Study evaluates effectiveness of antiretroviral treatment in HIV-infected children

Study evaluates effectiveness of antiretroviral treatment in HIV-infected children

A study led by Louise Kuhn, PhD, professor of Epidemiology at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health, evaluated whether HIV-infected children in South Africa who had achieved viral suppression with one antiretroviral treatment could transition to efavirenz-based therapy, the recommended drug for children older than 3 years, without risk of viral failure. [More]

U.S. FTC clears Mylan's proposed transaction to acquire Perrigo

Mylan N.V. today announced the U.S. Federal Trade Commission has cleared the company's proposed transaction to acquire Perrigo Company plc subject to Mylan's divestiture of certain products following the consummation of the offer. [More]
Despite reduced HIV/AIDS deaths, disease still persists in South Africa

Despite reduced HIV/AIDS deaths, disease still persists in South Africa

After peaking in 2007, AIDS mortality in South Africa has decreased with the widespread introduction of effective antiretroviral therapy, according to updated estimates published in AIDS, official journal of the International AIDS Society. AIDS is published by Wolters Kluwer. [More]
WHO report reveals significant reduction in TB deaths, but detection, treatment gaps still exist

WHO report reveals significant reduction in TB deaths, but detection, treatment gaps still exist

The fight against tuberculosis is paying off, with this year’s death rate nearly half of what it was in 1990. Nevertheless, 1.5 million people died from TB in 2014. Most of these deaths could have been prevented, according to the World Health Organization’s Global Tuberculosis Report 2015, which was released today in Washington, DC. [More]
Denis Mukwege to be honored with 2016 Penn Nursing Renfield Foundation Award for Global Women's Health

Denis Mukwege to be honored with 2016 Penn Nursing Renfield Foundation Award for Global Women's Health

Decorated humanitarian and outspoken advocate for women's rights, Dr. Denis Mukwege, will receive the 2016 Penn Nursing Renfield Foundation Award for Global Women's Health for his work in treating and highlighting the plight of women in the war-torn eastern part of the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC). The award comes with a $100,000 cash prize. Mukwege will receive the honor during an event at the University of Pennsylvania on March 24, 2016. [More]
Mylan announces U.S. launch of generic Fusilev for Injection

Mylan announces U.S. launch of generic Fusilev for Injection

Mylan N.V. today announced the U.S. launch of Levoleucovorin Calcium Injection 10 mg (base)/mL; 175 mg (base)/17.5 mL and 250 mg (base)/25 mL Single-use Vials, which is the generic version of Spectrum Pharmaceuticals' Fusilev for Injection. [More]

LSTM's health economists sketch out the importance for universal access to medicines

LSTM's health economists Professor Louis Niessen and Dr Jahangir Khan outline the importance for universal access to medicines in the control of neglected diseases, other major infections, and chronic diseases. [More]
Study reveals poor levels of use, availability and affordability of cardiovascular disease medicines worldwide

Study reveals poor levels of use, availability and affordability of cardiovascular disease medicines worldwide

New research published in The Lancet shows that the use of vital life-saving generic (and supposedly inexpensive) medicines for prevention in people with existing heart disease is poor worldwide. In low-income and middle-income countries these medicines are not widely available and, when available, can often be unaffordable. In rich countries, although such medicines are both available and affordable, 35% to 50% of patients who have heart disease or a previous stroke still do not receive them. [More]
Radical shift required in use of heart medicine worldwide

Radical shift required in use of heart medicine worldwide

Many people in the world who need essential heart medicine do not get it, even in rich countries, says new research published today in the medical journal The Lancet. [More]
Rutgers School of Nursing takes lead in $6 million nationwide effort to prevent new HIV infections

Rutgers School of Nursing takes lead in $6 million nationwide effort to prevent new HIV infections

Rutgers School of Nursing is taking the lead in a $6 million nationwide effort to greatly reduce new HIV infections - a battle complicated by both the aging of career HIV health care professionals and a failure to engage all people living with HIV into treatment. [More]
Safe, effective douche-based rectal microbicide can prevent HIV in gay men

Safe, effective douche-based rectal microbicide can prevent HIV in gay men

Enemas are commonly used by men who have sex with men (MSM) and transwomen (TW) before sexual intercourse. But these groups are vulnerable to HIV and a host of other sexually transmitted infections because enemas -- even those that use tap water -- can seriously damage the thin tissue lining the rectum, allowing for easier transmission of harmful viruses and bacteria. [More]
Discovery may help scientists to better predict how quickly HIV virus returns after patients stop treatment

Discovery may help scientists to better predict how quickly HIV virus returns after patients stop treatment

Scientists are now better able to predict how quickly the HIV virus will return after individuals stop treatment following a discovery by researchers at UNSW Australia and the University of Oxford. [More]
Study suggests link between human endogenous retroviral genes and ALS

Study suggests link between human endogenous retroviral genes and ALS

Scientists at the National Institutes of Health discovered that reactivation of ancient viral genes embedded in the human genome may cause the destruction of neurons in some forms of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). [More]
Advertisement
Advertisement