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HIV-infected transgender women in US have unmet basic needs, less likely to achieve viral suppression

HIV-infected transgender women in US have unmet basic needs, less likely to achieve viral suppression

A new CDC study that combines 3 years of data to produce nationally representative estimates characterizing HIV-infected adults receiving care in the U.S. shows that those who identify as transgender women are significantly less likely to adhere to anti-HIV medication regimens and to achieve viral suppression. [More]
Protective antibody response could be effective in preventing mother-to-child HIV transmission

Protective antibody response could be effective in preventing mother-to-child HIV transmission

How most babies are protected from acquiring HIV from their infected mothers has been a matter of scientific controversy. [More]

Tentative FDA approval of lopinavir/ritonavir oral pellet formulation closes treatment gap for children with HIV

Infants and young children living with HIV will finally have access to an improved formulation of an antiretroviral (ARV) treatment, following the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's tentative approval last week of lopinavir/ritonavir (LPV/r) oral pellets developed by the Indian generic company Cipla. [More]
Better treatment, prevention strategies still needed for opportunistic infections related to AIDS

Better treatment, prevention strategies still needed for opportunistic infections related to AIDS

Although treatment advances have dramatically reduced deaths from opportunistic infections related to AIDS, a new study drawing on 30 years of data from more than 20,000 patients in San Francisco suggests there is still ample room to improve. About a third--35 percent--of AIDS patients diagnosed with their first opportunistic infection from 1997 to 2012 in that city died within five years, according to the study, published in the Journal of Infectious Diseases. [More]
Earlier antiretroviral treatment benefits HIV-infected individuals

Earlier antiretroviral treatment benefits HIV-infected individuals

A major international randomized clinical trial has found that HIV-infected individuals have a considerably lower risk of developing AIDS or other serious illnesses if they start taking antiretroviral drugs sooner, when their CD4+ T-cell count--a key measure of immune system health--is higher, instead of waiting until the CD4+ cell count drops to lower levels. Together with data from previous studies showing that antiretroviral treatment reduced the risk of HIV transmission to uninfected sexual partners, these findings support offering treatment to everyone with HIV. [More]
Specific bacterial community in female genital tract induces inflammation, increases HIV risk

Specific bacterial community in female genital tract induces inflammation, increases HIV risk

A team led by researchers from Massachusetts General Hospital and the Ragon Institute of MGH, MIT and Harvard has found that the most common bacterial community in the genital tract among healthy South Africa women not only is significantly different from that of women in developed countries but also leads to elevated levels of inflammatory proteins. [More]
Study shows significant benefits of microclinics in rural Kenyan HIV patients

Study shows significant benefits of microclinics in rural Kenyan HIV patients

A team led by researchers from UC San Francisco, Organic Health Response, and Microclinic International is reporting results of a study that showed significant benefits of microclinics -- an innovative intervention that mobilized rural Kenyan HIV patients' informal social networks to support their staying in care. [More]
ART eligibility shorter for male HIV patients in rural South Africa

ART eligibility shorter for male HIV patients in rural South Africa

Male HIV patients in rural South Africa reach the low immunity levels required to become eligible for antiretroviral treatment in less than half the time it takes for immunity levels to drop to similar levels in women, according to new research from the University of Southampton. [More]
UNC-Chapel Hill, GSK partner to find cure for HIV/AIDS

UNC-Chapel Hill, GSK partner to find cure for HIV/AIDS

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, a leading global public research university with significant expertise in HIV basic and clinical research, and GSK, a global, research-based pharmaceutical and healthcare company with a legacy of success in developing treatments for HIV, today announced the creation of the dedicated HIV Cure center and a jointly owned new company that will focus on discovering a cure for HIV/AIDS. [More]
ViiV Healthcare initiates Phase III trial to evaluate dolutegravir and rilpivirine in HIV patients

ViiV Healthcare initiates Phase III trial to evaluate dolutegravir and rilpivirine in HIV patients

ViiV Healthcare today announced the start of a Phase III clinical trial programme to evaluate the safety and efficacy of dolutegravir (Tivicay) and rilpivirine (Edurant) as maintenance therapy for adult patients with HIV. [More]
Mylan releases generic version of Seasonale Tablets in the U.S.

Mylan releases generic version of Seasonale Tablets in the U.S.

Mylan N.V. today announced the U.S. launch of Levonorgestrel and Ethinyl Estradiol Tablets USP, 0.15 mg/0.03 mg, which is the generic version of Teva's Seasonale Tablets. Mylan's partner Famy Care Ltd. received final approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for its Abbreviated New Drug Application (ANDA) for this product, which is indicated for the prevention of pregnancy in women who elect to use oral contraceptives as a method of contraception. [More]
AIDS patients at increased risk of developing intermediate-stage AMD

AIDS patients at increased risk of developing intermediate-stage AMD

Patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) have a four-fold increase in their risk of developing intermediate-stage age-related macular degeneration (AMD) compared to people of the same age who are not infected with HIV, according to results from the Longitudinal Study of the Ocular Complications of AIDS (LSOCA) presented today at the 2015 ARVO Annual Meeting in Denver, CO. [More]
Chickenpox virus can cause strokes in patients with compromised immune systems

Chickenpox virus can cause strokes in patients with compromised immune systems

Patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) can, in rare cases, experience bleeding on the brain that causes a type of stroke called intracerebral hemorrhage. [More]
Novel subdermal implant delivering potent ARV drugs shows promise in stopping HIV

Novel subdermal implant delivering potent ARV drugs shows promise in stopping HIV

Is the end of HIV near? Findings published this week in Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy report that a novel, subdermal implant delivering potent antiretroviral (ARV) drugs shows extreme promise in stopping the spread of HIV. [More]
Enrollment begins for first major cardiovascular prevention trial for people infected with HIV

Enrollment begins for first major cardiovascular prevention trial for people infected with HIV

The first clinical trial to investigate whether treatment with a statin drug can reduce the increased cardiovascular disease risk in people infected with HIV has begun enrolling patients. Based at Massachusetts General Hospital, the six-year, $40 million REPRIEVE (Randomized Study to Prevent Vascular Events in HIV) trial will be conducted at around 100 sites in the U.S., Canada, Puerto Rico and Thailand with funding from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute in collaboration with the AIDS Clinical Trials Group and support from the National Institutes of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. [More]

Daclatasvir-sofosbuvir treatment highly effective in patients with HCV and HIV co-infection

Phase III results revealed today at The International Liver Congress 2015 show that once-daily treatment with daclatasvir (DCV) plus sofosbuvir (SOF) resulted in an overall 97% sustained virologic response (SVR) at 12 weeks post-treatment in patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV) and HIV co-infection, including cirrhotic patients. [More]
Mylan introduces generic Sofosbuvir 400 mg tablets in India under brand name MyHep

Mylan introduces generic Sofosbuvir 400 mg tablets in India under brand name MyHep

Mylan N.V. today announced that its subsidiary, Mylan Pharmaceuticals Private Limited, has launched generic Sofosbuvir 400 mg tablets under the brand name MyHep in India. [More]
NIH-supported clinical trial to test statin use in patients with HIV-related cardiovascular disease

NIH-supported clinical trial to test statin use in patients with HIV-related cardiovascular disease

Researchers have begun enrolling participants in a multicenter international clinical trial to test whether statin administration can reduce the risk for major adverse cardiovascular events, such as heart attacks, strokes, and heart disease, in people with HIV infection. The trial is supported by the National Institutes of Health's National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute and National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. [More]
Researchers use new gene editing tool to cut HIV DNA

Researchers use new gene editing tool to cut HIV DNA

The virus that causes AIDS is an efficient and crafty retrovirus. Once HIV inserts its DNA into the genome of its host cells, it has a long incubation period, and can remain dormant and hidden for years. [More]
Computer model provides policy prescription to optimize early HIV treatment

Computer model provides policy prescription to optimize early HIV treatment

When a whole country's public health is at stake, making the wrong policy choices can cost lives and money. That's why researchers have worked to develop computer simulations of epidemics that can model individual behaviors and interactions to predict the spread of disease and the efficacy of interventions. [More]
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