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Researchers receive $2.098 million grant to study recovery of language after stroke

Researchers receive $2.098 million grant to study recovery of language after stroke

An interdisciplinary group of researchers at the University of Arizona has been awarded a $2 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to study language abilities in patients recovering from a stroke. [More]
California scholar receives Wrawemeyer Award for Psychology for proposed somatic marker hypothesis

California scholar receives Wrawemeyer Award for Psychology for proposed somatic marker hypothesis

A California scholar who proposed that emotions play an integral role in human reasoning and decision-making has won the 2014 University of Louisville Grawemeyer Award for Psychology. [More]
Treatments based on behavioral or non-invasive physiological stimulation show greatest potential

Treatments based on behavioral or non-invasive physiological stimulation show greatest potential

Because the concept of permanent neurological injury has given way to recognition of the brain's potential for long-term regeneration ad reorganization, rehabilitations strategies are undergoing radical changes. The potential for five new translational interventions was examined in an article published ahead of print on November 13 by Neurology Clinical Practice: Barrett AM, Oh-Park M, Chen P, Ifejika NL: Five New Things in Neurorehabilitation. [More]
Patients with rare epilepsy aphasia share mutations on same gene

Patients with rare epilepsy aphasia share mutations on same gene

Some patients with a rare type of epilepsy called epilepsy aphasia have something else in common. They have mutations in the same gene. Epilepsy aphasia disorders are characterized by seizures and speech abnormalities. [More]
Simple tests to recognize ability of famous people may help doctors identify early dementia

Simple tests to recognize ability of famous people may help doctors identify early dementia

A new study suggests that simple tests that measure the ability to recognize and name famous people such as Albert Einstein, Bill Gates or Oprah Winfrey may help doctors identify early dementia in those 40 to 65 years of age. [More]
Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and emotional memories: an interview with Dr. Fiona Kumfor and Assoc. Prof. Olivier Piguet, NeuRA

Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and emotional memories: an interview with Dr. Fiona Kumfor and Assoc. Prof. Olivier Piguet, NeuRA

Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is a progressive neurodegenerative brain disorder, which affects the frontal and temporal lobes. Unlike other types of dementia, it more commonly occurs in individuals in their 50s and 60s, and is therefore referred to as a “younger-onset dementia”. [More]
UCSF researchers develop assessment tool to predict patient's risk of delirium

UCSF researchers develop assessment tool to predict patient's risk of delirium

UC San Francisco researchers have developed a two-minute assessment tool to help hospital staff predict a patient-s risk of delirium, a change in mental cognition characterized by severe confusion and disorientation that can prolong hospital stays. [More]
Researchers develop stimulation technique to improve language function in stroke patients with aphasia

Researchers develop stimulation technique to improve language function in stroke patients with aphasia

On July 2nd, JoVE will publish a video article showing the details of a technique developed by researchers to improve language function in stroke patients with chronic speech-language impairment. [More]

Intense speech therapy shows potential in post-ischemic aphasia

Patients who have post-stroke aphasia might achieve slightly enhanced improvement in language and functional communication if they receive intensive – versus regular – speech and language therapy, a study finds. [More]

Study shows why some stroke patients recover from aphasia and others do not

In a study designed to differentiate why some stroke patients recover from aphasia and others do not, investigators have found that a compensatory reorganization of language function to right hemispheric brain regions bodes poorly for language recovery. [More]

Non-musicians who speak tonal languages may have a better ear for learning musical notes

Non-musicians who speak tonal languages may have a better ear for learning musical notes, according to Canadian researchers. [More]
New research shows dystextia may become vital tool for diagnosing stroke

New research shows dystextia may become vital tool for diagnosing stroke

Difficulty or inability to write a coherent text message, even in patients who have no problem speaking, may become a "vital" tool in diagnosing a type of crippling stroke, according to new research at Henry Ford Hospital. [More]
Jones & Bartlett Learning publishes 'Introduction to Neurogenic Communication Disorders'

Jones & Bartlett Learning publishes 'Introduction to Neurogenic Communication Disorders'

M. Hunter Manasco, Ph.D., C.C.C.-S.L.P., assistant professor of speech-language pathology at Misericordia University, has had the textbook and video combination, "Introduction to Neurogenic Communication Disorders,'' published by Jones & Bartlett Learning. [More]

Researchers bring hope for patients with aphasia

Two groups of researchers have presented preliminary results of studies aiming to help in the treatment of aphasia at the conference of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in Boston, Massachusetts, USA, this month. [More]
New frontiers in trauma and stroke recovery

New frontiers in trauma and stroke recovery

Cynthia Thompson, a world-renowned researcher on stroke and brain damage, will discuss her groundbreaking research on aphasia and the neurolinguistic systems it affects Feb. 16 at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). An estimated one million Americans suffer from aphasia, affecting their ability to understand and/or produce spoken and/or written language. [More]
Speech entrainment benefits stroke victims with Broca's aphasia

Speech entrainment benefits stroke victims with Broca's aphasia

Stroke victims affected with loss of speech caused by Broca's aphasia have been shown to speak fluidly through the use of a process called "speech entrainment" developed by researchers at the University of South Carolina's Arnold School of Public Health. [More]
Jan. issue of Behavioural Neurology features papers on aphasia and hemispatial neglect

Jan. issue of Behavioural Neurology features papers on aphasia and hemispatial neglect

Approximately half a million individuals suffer strokes in the US each year, and about one in five develops some form of post-stroke aphasia, the partial or total loss of the ability to communicate. By comparing different types of aphasia, investigators have been able to gain new insights into the normal cognitive processes underlying language, as well as the potential response to interventions. [More]

‘Virtual language therapist’ set to benefit aphasia patients

Portuguese researchers have developed an online speech recognition tool for the treatment of word naming difficulties in patients with aphasia. [More]
Most people completely unaware of aphasia

Most people completely unaware of aphasia

Most people are completely unaware of one of stroke's most common, debilitating but invisible impairments, according to the first awareness survey of its kind in Canada released today at the Canadian Stroke Congress. [More]

Self-managed aphasia therapy after stroke feasible

A pilot study carried out in stroke patients with aphasia suggests that self-managed computer therapy is feasible and practical. [More]