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Researchers explore effectiveness of neurorehabilitation for individuals with brain injury or stroke

Researchers explore effectiveness of neurorehabilitation for individuals with brain injury or stroke

In the current issue of NeuroRehabilitation leading researchers explore the effectiveness of several neurorehabilitation treatments for individuals with brain injury or stroke. A number of published articles have covered the issue of efficacy of neurorehabilitation, but only a few have discussed the issue of effectiveness. [More]
Connectome imaging could help predict severity of language deficits after stoke

Connectome imaging could help predict severity of language deficits after stoke

Loss or impairment of the ability to speak is one of the most feared complications of stroke--one faced by about 20% of stroke patients. Language, as one of the most complex functions of the brain, is not seated in a single brain region but involves connections between many regions. [More]
Memory test offers clue to pathological diagnosis in primary progressive aphasia

Memory test offers clue to pathological diagnosis in primary progressive aphasia

Patients with primary progressive aphasia show selective vulnerabilities in effortless learning and delayed retrieval of verbal information if their syndrome is related to Alzheimer's disease rather than frontotemporal lobar degeneration, research indicates. [More]
Right brain predicts post-stroke speech recovery

Right brain predicts post-stroke speech recovery

White matter integrity in the right hemisphere may help to predict speech fluency recovery following a stroke, research indicates. [More]
Right side of the brain reorganizes itself after stroke to help recover speech-motor functions

Right side of the brain reorganizes itself after stroke to help recover speech-motor functions

New research suggests that looking at structures in the right side of the brain may help predict who will better recover from language problems after a stroke, according to a study published in Neurology, a medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Research provides important new insights into beginning stages of primary progressive aphasia

Research provides important new insights into beginning stages of primary progressive aphasia

The recent ability to peer into the brain of living individuals with a rare type of language dementia, primary progressive aphasia (PPA), provides important new insights into the beginning stages of this disease -- which results in language loss -- when it is caused by a buildup of a toxic protein found in Alzheimer's disease. [More]
Damage to language network structural hubs can affect severity of aphasia following stroke

Damage to language network structural hubs can affect severity of aphasia following stroke

When brain regions that control speech and reading comprehension are destroyed due to blockage of blood flow, patients are often unable to speak or comprehend spoken or written language. These difficulties with language, or "aphasia," are a common symptom in the aftermath of stroke. However, in a new study published in Restorative Neurology and Neuroscience, researchers report that damage to the underlying connections among different areas of the brain can also affect the severity of aphasia. [More]
Mayo Clinic researchers uncover clues to apraxia of speech

Mayo Clinic researchers uncover clues to apraxia of speech

It may start with a simple word you can't pronounce. Your tongue and lips stumble, and gibberish comes out. Misspeaking might draw a chuckle from family and friends. But, then, it keeps happening. Progressively, more and more speech is lost. Some patients eventually become mute from primary progressive apraxia of speech, a disorder related to degenerative neurologic disease. [More]
New analysis method may help categorise stroke patients with language problem

New analysis method may help categorise stroke patients with language problem

Brain researcher Karsten Specht has found a new method of analysis to distinguish between stroke patients with language problem. The result may be individualised treatment for each patient. [More]
Diseases that cause skin-related problems can also trigger serious neurological conditions

Diseases that cause skin-related problems can also trigger serious neurological conditions

Diseases such as lupus that cause rashes and other skin problems also can trigger migraine headaches, strokes and other serious neurological conditions, according to an article by Loyola University Medical Center physicians. [More]
Amgen’s Phase 2 data supports safety, efficacy of BLINCYTO in ALL patients with minimal residual disease

Amgen’s Phase 2 data supports safety, efficacy of BLINCYTO in ALL patients with minimal residual disease

Amgen today announced that new data from three Phase 2 trials support the efficacy and safety of BLINCYTO (blinatumomab) in adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). [More]
Scientists explain the evolutionary roots of language in the brain

Scientists explain the evolutionary roots of language in the brain

A team led at Newcastle University, UK, has shed light on the evolutionary roots of language in the brain. Publishing in Nature Communications, the team led by Dr Ben Wilson and Professor Chris Petkov explain how using an imaging technique to explore the brain activity in humans and monkeys has identified the evolutionary origins of cognitive functions in the brain that underpin language and allow us to evaluate orderliness in sequences of sounds. [More]
Study shows post-stroke loss of speech can be recovered

Study shows post-stroke loss of speech can be recovered

After a debate that has lasted more than 130 years, researchers at Georgetown University Medical Center have found that loss of speech from a stroke in the left hemisphere of the brain can be recovered on the back, right side of the brain. This contradicts recent notions that the right hemisphere interferes with recovery. [More]
More research needed before recommending antidepressants, Alzheimer's disease drugs for stroke recovery: Study

More research needed before recommending antidepressants, Alzheimer's disease drugs for stroke recovery: Study

Evidence is mounting that drugs used to treat depression and Alzheimer's disease also can help patients recover from strokes. But there are conflicting findings from studies of these and other drugs given to recovering stroke patients. [More]
Others consider our moral traits, not memory, to be core component of our identity

Others consider our moral traits, not memory, to be core component of our identity

We may view our memory as being essential to who we are, but new findings suggest that others consider our moral traits to be the core component of our identity. Data collected from family members of patients suffering from neurodegenerative disease showed that it was changes in moral behavior, not memory loss, that caused loved ones to say that the patient wasn't "the same person" anymore. [More]
Focal symptoms may be prognostic in generalised epilepsies

Focal symptoms may be prognostic in generalised epilepsies

Symptoms consistent with focal seizures are often reported by patients who have idiopathic generalised epilepsies and are associated with a short duration of freedom from seizures, say researchers. [More]
Scientists redraw traditional brain map of language comprehension

Scientists redraw traditional brain map of language comprehension

For 140 years, scientists' understanding of language comprehension in the brain came from individuals with stroke. Based on language impairments caused by stroke, scientists believed a single area of the brain -- a hotdog shaped section in the temporal lobe of the left hemisphere called Wernicke's region -- was the center of language comprehension. [More]
Findings open pathway to studying bat brains to understand certain human language disorders

Findings open pathway to studying bat brains to understand certain human language disorders

Researchers from Georgetown University Medical Center and American University have shown that, like humans, mustached bats use the left and right sides of their brains to process different aspects of sounds. Aside from humans, no other animal that has been studied, not even monkeys or apes, has proved to use such hemispheric specialization for sound processing -- meaning that the left brain is better at processing fast sounds, and the right processing slow ones. [More]
Upsher-Smith presents favorable data from PREVAIL OLE study of Qudexy XR capsules

Upsher-Smith presents favorable data from PREVAIL OLE study of Qudexy XR capsules

Upsher-Smith Laboratories, Inc. presented data from a 52-week, open-label extension study (PREVAIL OLE) showing that Qudexy XR (topiramate) extended-release capsules offered a long-term adjunctive treatment option with a favorable tolerability profile for a high proportion of patients with refractory partial-onset seizures (POS). [More]
Study provides detailed brain map of language impairments in aphasia after stroke

Study provides detailed brain map of language impairments in aphasia after stroke

The exchange of words, speaking and listening in conversation, may seem unremarkable for most people, but communicating with others is a challenge for people who have aphasia, an impairment of language that often happens after stroke or other brain injury. [More]
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