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Scientists redraw traditional brain map of language comprehension

Scientists redraw traditional brain map of language comprehension

For 140 years, scientists' understanding of language comprehension in the brain came from individuals with stroke. Based on language impairments caused by stroke, scientists believed a single area of the brain -- a hotdog shaped section in the temporal lobe of the left hemisphere called Wernicke's region -- was the center of language comprehension. [More]
Findings open pathway to studying bat brains to understand certain human language disorders

Findings open pathway to studying bat brains to understand certain human language disorders

Researchers from Georgetown University Medical Center and American University have shown that, like humans, mustached bats use the left and right sides of their brains to process different aspects of sounds. Aside from humans, no other animal that has been studied, not even monkeys or apes, has proved to use such hemispheric specialization for sound processing -- meaning that the left brain is better at processing fast sounds, and the right processing slow ones. [More]
Upsher-Smith presents favorable data from PREVAIL OLE study of Qudexy XR capsules

Upsher-Smith presents favorable data from PREVAIL OLE study of Qudexy XR capsules

Upsher-Smith Laboratories, Inc. presented data from a 52-week, open-label extension study (PREVAIL OLE) showing that Qudexy XR (topiramate) extended-release capsules offered a long-term adjunctive treatment option with a favorable tolerability profile for a high proportion of patients with refractory partial-onset seizures (POS). [More]
Study provides detailed brain map of language impairments in aphasia after stroke

Study provides detailed brain map of language impairments in aphasia after stroke

The exchange of words, speaking and listening in conversation, may seem unremarkable for most people, but communicating with others is a challenge for people who have aphasia, an impairment of language that often happens after stroke or other brain injury. [More]
Swiss teenager with classic sudden symptoms of stroke diagnosed with Lyme disease

Swiss teenager with classic sudden symptoms of stroke diagnosed with Lyme disease

A Swiss teenager, recently returned home from a discotheque, came to the emergency department with classic sudden symptoms of stroke, only to be diagnosed with Lyme disease. [More]
Christopher & Dana Reeve Foundation announces Quality of Life grants for 75 nonprofit organizations

Christopher & Dana Reeve Foundation announces Quality of Life grants for 75 nonprofit organizations

The Christopher & Dana Reeve Foundation, a leading nonprofit dedicated to improving quality of life for individuals living with paralysis, announced it has awarded $600,137 in Quality of Life grants to 75 nonprofit organizations nationwide. [More]
Declarative memory helps individuals with neurodevelopmental disorders compensate for dysfunction

Declarative memory helps individuals with neurodevelopmental disorders compensate for dysfunction

Individuals with five neurodevelopmental disorders -- autism spectrum disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, Tourette syndrome, dyslexia, and Specific Language Impairment -- appear to compensate for dysfunction by relying on a single powerful and nimble system in the brain known as declarative memory. [More]
Therapy Box releases app that allows people with limited vocal ability to use own voices

Therapy Box releases app that allows people with limited vocal ability to use own voices

The UK-based Therapy Box has released the first app that allows people who have limited vocal ability or are losing their voices due to ALS and other disabling conditions to replace generic text-to-speech synthesis with a synthesizer based on their own voice. The app breaks new ground via the integration of ModelTalker, a program developed by Tim Bunnell, PhD and colleagues at the Nemours Speech Research Laboratory in Wilmington, DE. [More]
Novastem uses Stemedica's stem cell products to treat patient in ischemic stroke study

Novastem uses Stemedica's stem cell products to treat patient in ischemic stroke study

Novastem, a leader in regenerative medicine, announces the treatment of its first patient in its study for ischemic stroke at Clinica Santa Clarita. [More]

New SPANS assessment can help patients recover from traumatic brain injuries

A dynamic new assessment for helping victims of trauma to the brain, including those suffering from progressive conditions such as dementia, has been developed by a clinical neuropsychologist at the University of Leicester. [More]
Children's oral language can be a good predictor of future writing difficulties

Children's oral language can be a good predictor of future writing difficulties

Children's future writing difficulties can be identified before they even learn how to begin writing, according to a new study by Professor Phaedra Royle and Postdoctoral fellow Alexandra Marquis of the University of Montreal's School of Speech Language Pathology and Audiology. [More]
Researchers receive $2.098 million grant to study recovery of language after stroke

Researchers receive $2.098 million grant to study recovery of language after stroke

An interdisciplinary group of researchers at the University of Arizona has been awarded a $2 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to study language abilities in patients recovering from a stroke. [More]

California scholar receives Wrawemeyer Award for Psychology for proposed somatic marker hypothesis

A California scholar who proposed that emotions play an integral role in human reasoning and decision-making has won the 2014 University of Louisville Grawemeyer Award for Psychology. [More]
Treatments based on behavioral or non-invasive physiological stimulation show greatest potential

Treatments based on behavioral or non-invasive physiological stimulation show greatest potential

Because the concept of permanent neurological injury has given way to recognition of the brain's potential for long-term regeneration ad reorganization, rehabilitations strategies are undergoing radical changes. The potential for five new translational interventions was examined in an article published ahead of print on November 13 by Neurology Clinical Practice: Barrett AM, Oh-Park M, Chen P, Ifejika NL: Five New Things in Neurorehabilitation. [More]
Patients with rare epilepsy aphasia share mutations on same gene

Patients with rare epilepsy aphasia share mutations on same gene

Some patients with a rare type of epilepsy called epilepsy aphasia have something else in common. They have mutations in the same gene. Epilepsy aphasia disorders are characterized by seizures and speech abnormalities. [More]
Simple tests to recognize ability of famous people may help doctors identify early dementia

Simple tests to recognize ability of famous people may help doctors identify early dementia

A new study suggests that simple tests that measure the ability to recognize and name famous people such as Albert Einstein, Bill Gates or Oprah Winfrey may help doctors identify early dementia in those 40 to 65 years of age. [More]
Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and emotional memories: an interview with Dr. Fiona Kumfor and Assoc. Prof. Olivier Piguet, NeuRA

Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and emotional memories: an interview with Dr. Fiona Kumfor and Assoc. Prof. Olivier Piguet, NeuRA

Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is a progressive neurodegenerative brain disorder, which affects the frontal and temporal lobes. Unlike other types of dementia, it more commonly occurs in individuals in their 50s and 60s, and is therefore referred to as a “younger-onset dementia”. [More]
UCSF researchers develop assessment tool to predict patient's risk of delirium

UCSF researchers develop assessment tool to predict patient's risk of delirium

UC San Francisco researchers have developed a two-minute assessment tool to help hospital staff predict a patient-s risk of delirium, a change in mental cognition characterized by severe confusion and disorientation that can prolong hospital stays. [More]

Researchers develop stimulation technique to improve language function in stroke patients with aphasia

On July 2nd, JoVE will publish a video article showing the details of a technique developed by researchers to improve language function in stroke patients with chronic speech-language impairment. [More]

Intense speech therapy shows potential in post-ischemic aphasia

Patients who have post-stroke aphasia might achieve slightly enhanced improvement in language and functional communication if they receive intensive – versus regular – speech and language therapy, a study finds. [More]
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