Arginine News and Research RSS Feed - Arginine News and Research

Arginine is considered a semi-essential amino acid because even though the body normally makes enough of it, supplementation is sometimes needed. For example, people with protein malnutrition, excessive ammonia production, excessive lysine intake, burns, infections, peritoneal dialysis, rapid growth, urea synthesis disorders, or sepsis may not have enough arginine. Symptoms of arginine deficiency include poor wound healing, hair loss, skin rash, constipation, and fatty liver.

Arginine changes into nitric oxide, which causes blood vessel relaxation (vasodilation). Early evidence suggests that arginine may help treat medical conditions that improve with vasodilation, such as chest pain, clogged arteries (called atherosclerosis), coronary artery disease, erectile dysfunction, heart failure, intermittent claudication/peripheral vascular disease, and blood vessel swelling that causes headaches (vascular headaches). Arginine also triggers the body to make protein and has been studied for wound healing, bodybuilding, enhancement of sperm production (spermatogenesis), and prevention of wasting in people with critical illnesses.

Arginine hydrochloride has a high chloride content and has been used to treat metabolic alkalosis. This use should be under the supervision of a qualified healthcare professional.
Natural substance could help people avoid cavities, gum disease

Natural substance could help people avoid cavities, gum disease

Arginine, a common amino acid found naturally in foods, breaks down dental plaque, which could help millions of people avoid cavities and gum disease, researchers at the University of Michigan and Newcastle University have discovered. [More]
New study identifies enzyme that causes obesity-related hypertension

New study identifies enzyme that causes obesity-related hypertension

Obesity is a serious health problem affecting approximately one-third of the adult population in the United States. Obese individuals have an increased risk of diabetes and cardiovascular disease, including hypertension. A recent study led by a University of Missouri researcher has identified the enzyme responsible for obesity-related hypertension -- a finding that could lead to new treatment options. [More]
Regular consumption of nuts reduce mortality by more than 20%

Regular consumption of nuts reduce mortality by more than 20%

Nuts are a key element of a healthy diet. According to The World Health Organization (WHO), a healthy diet including nuts, regular exercise, the maintenance of ideal weight and staying away from tobacco and alcohol could be sufficient to prevent cancer cases. [More]
Medunik announces availability of PHEBURANE drug in Canada for chronic management of UCD

Medunik announces availability of PHEBURANE drug in Canada for chronic management of UCD

Medunik Canada, a Canadian pharmaceutical company specialized in rare diseases, is pleased to announce that PHEBURANE (a tasteless oral formulation of sodium phenylbutyrate), is now available for distribution in Canada. PHEBURANE is the first drug to be approved in Canada for the chronic management of urea cycle disorders (UCD) after receiving market authorisation on January 27th, 2015. [More]
Peanuts may lower risk of deaths from heart disease

Peanuts may lower risk of deaths from heart disease

If you're looking for a simple way to lower your risk of dying from a heart attack, consider going nuts. [More]
MD Anderson awarded more than $22 million in research grants from CPRIT

MD Anderson awarded more than $22 million in research grants from CPRIT

The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center has received more than $22 million in research grants this week from the Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas. Approximately half of the funds awarded for Individual Investigator Research Awards went to MD Anderson faculty as well as 40 percent of total IIRA awards that include those for children's and adolescent cancer and early detection and prevention. [More]
Discoveries by WA research team offer further treatment hope for victims of stroke

Discoveries by WA research team offer further treatment hope for victims of stroke

A West Australian research team has made a series of discoveries which may help to minimise the damage that a stroke can cause. [More]
Doctor's Best adds three new sports nutrition powders to its science-based supplement portfolio

Doctor's Best adds three new sports nutrition powders to its science-based supplement portfolio

Doctor's Best has introduced three new sports nutrition powders – Creatine, Branched Chain Amino Acids (BCAA) and L-Arginine - into its science-based supplement portfolio. [More]
UAB Research Probes Molecular Basis Of Rare Genetic Disorder

UAB Research Probes Molecular Basis Of Rare Genetic Disorder

An international group co-led by University of Alabama at Birmingham researcher Mary MacDougall, Ph.D., has unraveled the molecular basis for the rare, inherited genetic disorder, Singleton-Merten Syndrome (SMS). Individuals with SMS develop extreme, life-threatening calcification of the aorta and heart valves, early-onset periodontitis and root resorption of the teeth, decreases in bone density, and loss of bone tissue at the tips of fingers and toes. [More]
Researchers gain new insight into how motor neurons in the brain die during ALS

Researchers gain new insight into how motor neurons in the brain die during ALS

Researchers look to understand the causes of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), in the hope of finding new ways to treat the disease. A new study published online today (December 17th) in the Cell Press journal Neuron shows that a common gene mutation in ALS generates a deadly protein that may cause the damage in the brain that leads to ALS. [More]
New study reveals how COX-2 inhibitors can increase risk of heart attack in arthritis patients

New study reveals how COX-2 inhibitors can increase risk of heart attack in arthritis patients

A class of drug for treating arthritis - all but shelved over fears about side effects - may be given a new lease of life, following the discovery of a possible way to identify which patients should avoid using it. [More]
Epizyme's PRMT5 inhibitor shows efficacy in pre-clinical models of mantle cell lymphoma

Epizyme's PRMT5 inhibitor shows efficacy in pre-clinical models of mantle cell lymphoma

Epizyme, Inc., a clinical stage biopharmaceutical company creating innovative personalized therapeutics for patients with genetically defined cancers, announced today the results from a preclinical study showing in vitro and in vivo activity of its first-in-class PRMT5 inhibitor EPZ015666 in mantle cell lymphoma (MCL), an aggressive form of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). [More]
New treatment could halt growth of tumours in prostate cancer patients

New treatment could halt growth of tumours in prostate cancer patients

Scientists believe a new treatment, shown to be effective in mice, could halt the growth of tumours in patients with prostate cancer. [More]
Discovery reveals promising target for treatment of end-stage heart failure

Discovery reveals promising target for treatment of end-stage heart failure

As a heart fails, losing its ability to squeeze blood through the circulatory system, the body releases a neurohormone that interferes with the heart's best chance to improve contractility, a team of Temple University School of Medicine researchers show in a study published September 9th in the American Heart Association journal, Circulation. [More]
'Good' cholesterol turns 'bad' by sugar-derived substance

'Good' cholesterol turns 'bad' by sugar-derived substance

Scientists at the University of Warwick have discovered that 'good' cholesterol is turned 'bad' by a sugar-derived substance. [More]
Study identifies novel gene that controls nerve conduction velocity linked with MS

Study identifies novel gene that controls nerve conduction velocity linked with MS

A new study published in The American Journal of Pathology identifies a novel gene that controls nerve conduction velocity. [More]
Researchers discover how arginine starvation specifically kills cancer cells

Researchers discover how arginine starvation specifically kills cancer cells

Researchers at UC Davis, City of Hope, Taipai Medical University and National Health Research Institutes in Taiwan have discovered how a drug that deprives the cells of a key amino acid specifically kills cancer cells. [More]
Researchers discover novel biomarker that could help predict preeclampsia

Researchers discover novel biomarker that could help predict preeclampsia

University of Iowa researchers have discovered a biomarker that could give expecting mothers and their doctors the first simple blood test to reliably predict that a pregnant woman may develop preeclampsia, at least as early as 6 weeks into the pregnancy. [More]
Scientists report first successful step toward vaccine that targets mutation in brain cancer

Scientists report first successful step toward vaccine that targets mutation in brain cancer

Astrocytomas and oligodendrogliomas are subtypes of a brain cancer called 'glioma'. These incurable brain tumors arise from glial cells, a type of support cell found in the central nervous system. [More]

SP Scientific announces LyoLearn program of free educational webinars

SP Scientific has announced its Summer 2014 program of LyoLearn webinars. [More]
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