Arginine News and Research RSS Feed - Arginine News and Research

Arginine is considered a semi-essential amino acid because even though the body normally makes enough of it, supplementation is sometimes needed. For example, people with protein malnutrition, excessive ammonia production, excessive lysine intake, burns, infections, peritoneal dialysis, rapid growth, urea synthesis disorders, or sepsis may not have enough arginine. Symptoms of arginine deficiency include poor wound healing, hair loss, skin rash, constipation, and fatty liver.

Arginine changes into nitric oxide, which causes blood vessel relaxation (vasodilation). Early evidence suggests that arginine may help treat medical conditions that improve with vasodilation, such as chest pain, clogged arteries (called atherosclerosis), coronary artery disease, erectile dysfunction, heart failure, intermittent claudication/peripheral vascular disease, and blood vessel swelling that causes headaches (vascular headaches). Arginine also triggers the body to make protein and has been studied for wound healing, bodybuilding, enhancement of sperm production (spermatogenesis), and prevention of wasting in people with critical illnesses.

Arginine hydrochloride has a high chloride content and has been used to treat metabolic alkalosis. This use should be under the supervision of a qualified healthcare professional.
Researchers to study effect of watermelon juice in reducing heart disease

Researchers to study effect of watermelon juice in reducing heart disease

University of Alabama researchers soon will launch a study that looks at watermelon juice as a way to reduce heart disease. [More]
Researchers explore how polymeric nanoparticles can be used to transport quantum dots into cells

Researchers explore how polymeric nanoparticles can be used to transport quantum dots into cells

Nanoparticles are particles that are smaller than 100 nanometers. They are typically obtained from metals and, because of their tiny size, have unique properties that make them useful for biomedical applications. [More]
Study provides new insights into how the social brain works differently in males and females

Study provides new insights into how the social brain works differently in males and females

The brain regulates social behavior differently in males and females, according to a new study published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. [More]
Researchers discover how toxic proteins linked to neurological diseases impair membrane-less organelles

Researchers discover how toxic proteins linked to neurological diseases impair membrane-less organelles

Researchers at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital have discovered the way toxic proteins linked to the most common forms of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD) incapacitate membrane-less organelles inside cells. [More]
Oral antidiabetic drug modulates the body's nitrogen and urea metabolism

Oral antidiabetic drug modulates the body's nitrogen and urea metabolism

The most frequently prescribed oral antidiabetic drug metformin significantly affects metabolic pathways. [More]
Study underscores importance of developing PRMT5 inhibitors as promising treatment for GB patients

Study underscores importance of developing PRMT5 inhibitors as promising treatment for GB patients

A new study suggests that blocking an enzyme called PRMT5 in tumor cells could be a promising new strategy for the treatment of glioblastoma (GB), the most aggressive and lethal form of brain cancer. [More]
Fluctuations in tRNA may play vital role in cancer metastasis

Fluctuations in tRNA may play vital role in cancer metastasis

At any given moment, the human genome spells out thousands of genetic words telling our cells which proteins to make. Each word is read by a molecule known as a tRNA. [More]
Discovery of new strain of bacteria could aid in developing effective oral probiotic

Discovery of new strain of bacteria could aid in developing effective oral probiotic

University of Florida Health researchers have identified a new strain of bacteria in the mouth that may keep bad bacteria in check -- and could lead to a way to prevent cavities using probiotics.The researchers say the findings could lead to the development of a supplement that patients could take orally to prevent cavities [More]
P53 genetic variant heavily implicated in metabolism, new research finds

P53 genetic variant heavily implicated in metabolism, new research finds

The study may also provide an evolutionary explanation for differences in populations living farther away from the Equator. Human ancestors may have undergone this change in R72 to promote energy storage in cold climates and during times of famine. However, in modern society, the need for this type of variant in our genes is unnecessary, leading instead to increased risk for obesity and type 2 diabetes. Obesity is also a risk factor for certain types of cancer, so these findings may also explain why the R72 variant of p53 might predispose certain people to cancer. [More]
Food-based proteins can help address child malnutrition in developing countries

Food-based proteins can help address child malnutrition in developing countries

Contrary to popular belief among world relief workers, children in developing countries may not be eating enough protein, which could contribute to stunted growth, a Johns Hopkins-directed study suggests. [More]
Scientists discover role of nucleocytoplasmic transport in specific forms of ALS and FTD

Scientists discover role of nucleocytoplasmic transport in specific forms of ALS and FTD

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD) are two devastating adult-onset neurodegenerative disorders. [More]
UAB research explores neurofibromatosis type 1

UAB research explores neurofibromatosis type 1

It is easy to tell a medical research story that has a simple and dramatic moment. But disease is often much more complex, and the work to understand it can be painstaking. A vivid example of that is seen in the University of Alabama at Birmingham Medical Genomics Laboratory, headed by Ludwine Messiaen, Ph.D., professor of genetics. This lab offers clinical genetic testing for a broad array of common and rare genetic disorders. [More]
New mechanism of differentiation may offer novel therapeutic approaches to blood malignancies, solid tumors

New mechanism of differentiation may offer novel therapeutic approaches to blood malignancies, solid tumors

In humans the differentiation of stem cells into hundreds of specialized cell types is vital. Differentiation drives development from fertilized egg to a newborn, and it underlies the continuous replacement of the 5 billion cells that die every hour in an adult. On the downside, mutations in differentiation pathways of different cell types can be drivers of cancers. [More]
TUM scientists develop small molecule that may allow future patient-specific treatment of cancer tumours

TUM scientists develop small molecule that may allow future patient-specific treatment of cancer tumours

Integrins help cells communicate with and adapt to their environment. Also cancer cells depend on their properties to survive and spread throughout the body. Now scientists at the Technical University of Munich have successfully developed a small, highly active molecule that binds to a specific integrin which operates in many types of cancer. [More]
New research could lead to diagnosis of preeclampsia in the first trimester

New research could lead to diagnosis of preeclampsia in the first trimester

Preeclampsia is generally diagnosed later in pregnancy, but new research could lead to diagnosis in the first trimester, improving care and potentially leading to the development of preventative measures. [More]
FDA awards research grants to boost product development for patients with rare diseases

FDA awards research grants to boost product development for patients with rare diseases

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today announced it has awarded 18 new research grants totaling more than $19 million to boost the development of products for patients with rare diseases, which affect the lives of nearly 30 million Americans. [More]
People who eat high protein foods have lower blood pressure and arterial stiffness

People who eat high protein foods have lower blood pressure and arterial stiffness

Eating foods rich in amino acids could be as good for your heart as stopping smoking or getting more exercise - according to new research from the University of East Anglia. [More]
Study may lead to effective antimicrobial treatment strategies for people with uncontrolled diabetes

Study may lead to effective antimicrobial treatment strategies for people with uncontrolled diabetes

Case Western Reserve scientists may have uncovered a molecular mechanism that sets into motion dangerous infection in the feet and hands often occurring with uncontrolled diabetes. It appears that high blood sugar unleashes destructive molecules that interfere with the body's natural infection-control defenses. [More]
Childhood cancer cells produce molecule that affects body's immune system to fight disease

Childhood cancer cells produce molecule that affects body's immune system to fight disease

Cancer cells in neuroblastoma contain a molecule that breaks down a key energy source for the body's immune cells, leaving them too physically drained to fight the disease, according to new research published in the journal Cancer Research today (Saturday). [More]

ForeverGreen Worldwide earns BSCG's anti-doping certification for PowerStrips

ForeverGreen Worldwide Corporation, a leading direct marketing company and provider of health-centered products, today announced the company has received an anti-doping certification from the Banned Substances Control Group for PowerStrips, indicating the product is free of banned substances. [More]
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