Arginine News and Research RSS Feed - Arginine News and Research

Arginine is considered a semi-essential amino acid because even though the body normally makes enough of it, supplementation is sometimes needed. For example, people with protein malnutrition, excessive ammonia production, excessive lysine intake, burns, infections, peritoneal dialysis, rapid growth, urea synthesis disorders, or sepsis may not have enough arginine. Symptoms of arginine deficiency include poor wound healing, hair loss, skin rash, constipation, and fatty liver.

Arginine changes into nitric oxide, which causes blood vessel relaxation (vasodilation). Early evidence suggests that arginine may help treat medical conditions that improve with vasodilation, such as chest pain, clogged arteries (called atherosclerosis), coronary artery disease, erectile dysfunction, heart failure, intermittent claudication/peripheral vascular disease, and blood vessel swelling that causes headaches (vascular headaches). Arginine also triggers the body to make protein and has been studied for wound healing, bodybuilding, enhancement of sperm production (spermatogenesis), and prevention of wasting in people with critical illnesses.

Arginine hydrochloride has a high chloride content and has been used to treat metabolic alkalosis. This use should be under the supervision of a qualified healthcare professional.
ARCA biopharma announces genetic screening of first patient in GENETIC-AF Phase 2B/3 clinical trial

ARCA biopharma announces genetic screening of first patient in GENETIC-AF Phase 2B/3 clinical trial

ARCA biopharma, Inc., a biopharmaceutical company developing genetically targeted therapies for cardiovascular diseases, today announced that the first patient has been genetically screened in GENETIC-AF, its Phase 2B/3 adaptive design clinical trial. [More]

TSRI announces formation of Scripps Advance

The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) today announced the formation of Scripps Advance, a new drug discovery initiative to translate early-stage biomedical research projects, both internal and external to TSRI, into clinical development candidates. [More]
Eating watermelon reduces blood pressure in overweight individuals

Eating watermelon reduces blood pressure in overweight individuals

Be sure to pick up a watermelon - or two - at your neighborhood farmers' market. It could save your life. [More]
Neuropeptide receptors could provide treatment target for chemoresistant SCLC

Neuropeptide receptors could provide treatment target for chemoresistant SCLC

The discovery of a novel broad spectrum neuropeptide antagonist, peptide–1, which is related to the substance P analogue SP-G, could help develop treatments targeted at chemoresistant small-cell lung cancer, indicate study results. [More]
Peanut consumption offers significant benefits to people with elevated serum lipids and blood pressure

Peanut consumption offers significant benefits to people with elevated serum lipids and blood pressure

A new study just released in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition found that different flavors of peanuts – salted, spicy, honey-roasted, or unsalted – result in positive health benefits. The study, "A Randomized Trial on the Effects of Flavorings on the Health Benefits of Daily Peanut Consumption," was conducted at Purdue University and included over 150 men and women who incorporated peanuts into their daily diet for 12 weeks. [More]

Study identifies promising target for new drugs to treat lethal form of brain cancer

A molecule in cells that shuts down the expression of genes might be a promising target for new drugs designed to treat the most frequent and lethal form of brain cancer, according to a new study by researchers at The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center - Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute. [More]
Scientists propose improved method of screening salmonella vaccines in small animal studies

Scientists propose improved method of screening salmonella vaccines in small animal studies

An innovative vaccine technology makes use of reengineered salmonella to deliver protective immunity. If such recombinant attenuated salmonella vaccines or RASVs can be perfected, they hold the promise of safe, lost-cost, orally administered defenses against viral, bacterial, fungal and parasitic infections. [More]
Splicing findings offer lung cancer clues

Splicing findings offer lung cancer clues

Researchers from Spain have identified several new splicing events regulated by the oncogenic splicing factor SRSF1 in lung cancer, suggesting that their dysregulation is involved in the pathogenesis of the disease. [More]
Scientists reveal how MRSA strain rapidly rises to prominence

Scientists reveal how MRSA strain rapidly rises to prominence

Scientists believe they have an explanation for how the most common strain of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus rapidly rose to prominence. Research published in mBio-, the online open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology, suggests that the strain recently acquired a number of genes from common skin bacteria that allow it to grow and thrive on the skin where other strains of MRSA cannot. [More]

Polaris Group reports positive results from ADI-PEG 20 Phase 2 trial for malignant pleural mesothelioma

Polaris Group announced today that positive results from a randomized Phase 2 trial of ADI-PEG 20, arginine deiminase formulated with polyethylene glycol, for the treatment of malignant pleural mesothelioma were presented at the World Conference on Lung Cancer in Sydney, Australia. [More]

Making Cancerous Mr. Hyde Behave Like A Good Dr. Jekyll

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'Jekyll-and-Hyde' protein could be potent target for developing new cancer drugs

'Jekyll-and-Hyde' protein could be potent target for developing new cancer drugs

The mood changes of a 'Jekyll-and-Hyde' protein, which sometimes boosts tumour cell growth and at other times suppresses it, have been explained in a new study led by Oxford University researchers. [More]
Immune marker predicts transplant success, improves selection of bone marrow donors

Immune marker predicts transplant success, improves selection of bone marrow donors

The risk of death following bone marrow transplantation can be reduced about 60 percent using a new technique to identify bone marrow donors who make the most potent cancer-fighting immune cells, according to research from St. Jude Children's Research Hospital. The findings appear in the September 16 online issue of the Journal of Clinical Oncology. [More]
Arginine therapy may be safe treatment for patients with sickle cell disease

Arginine therapy may be safe treatment for patients with sickle cell disease

Arginine therapy may be a safe and inexpensive treatment for acute pain episodes in patients with sickle cell disease, according to results of a recent clinical study. The study was the first randomized placebo-controlled study to demonstrate benefits of arginine therapy in children with sickle cell disease hospitalized for severe pain. [More]
Amino acid arginine improves treatment for type 2 diabetes

Amino acid arginine improves treatment for type 2 diabetes

More than 371 million people worldwide suffer from diabetes, of whom 90% are affected by lifestyle-related diabetes mellitus type 2 (type 2 diabetes). [More]
UCLA researchers receives $13M Early Translational grants to advance innovative discoveries using stem cells

UCLA researchers receives $13M Early Translational grants to advance innovative discoveries using stem cells

Four researchers from UCLA's Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research have received Early Translational Research Awards totaling approximately $13 million from the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine, the state's stem cell agency. The UCLA researchers received four of the 12 total awards; no other institution received more than one. [More]
Stem cell researchers receive Early Translational research awards from CIRM

Stem cell researchers receive Early Translational research awards from CIRM

Four prominent researchers from UCLA's Eli & Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research have received Early Translational research awards totaling approximately $13 million from the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine (CIRM) the state stem cell agency. The UCLA researchers received four of the 12 total awards; no other applicant institution received more than one award. [More]
Researchers improve efficacy of RASV by modifying pathogen’s ability to survive in hostile environment

Researchers improve efficacy of RASV by modifying pathogen’s ability to survive in hostile environment

The bacterial pathogen Salmonella has a notorious capacity for infection. Last year alone, according to the Center for Disease Control, various species of Salmonella caused multistate disease outbreaks linked with contaminated peanut butter, mangoes, ground beef, cantaloupe, poultry, tuna fish, small turtles and dry dog food. [More]
Researchers explain how gut bacteria can inactivate cardiac drugs

Researchers explain how gut bacteria can inactivate cardiac drugs

For decades, doctors have understood that microbes in the human gut can influence how certain drugs work in the body - by either activating or inactivating specific compounds, but questions have long remained about exactly how the process works. [More]
Researchers identify novel biomarkers for predicting mortality in ICU patients

Researchers identify novel biomarkers for predicting mortality in ICU patients

A metabolic profile of intensive care unit patients based on biomarkers of four metabolites can be used to accurately predict mortality, according to a new study. [More]