Arginine News and Research RSS Feed - Arginine News and Research

Arginine is considered a semi-essential amino acid because even though the body normally makes enough of it, supplementation is sometimes needed. For example, people with protein malnutrition, excessive ammonia production, excessive lysine intake, burns, infections, peritoneal dialysis, rapid growth, urea synthesis disorders, or sepsis may not have enough arginine. Symptoms of arginine deficiency include poor wound healing, hair loss, skin rash, constipation, and fatty liver.

Arginine changes into nitric oxide, which causes blood vessel relaxation (vasodilation). Early evidence suggests that arginine may help treat medical conditions that improve with vasodilation, such as chest pain, clogged arteries (called atherosclerosis), coronary artery disease, erectile dysfunction, heart failure, intermittent claudication/peripheral vascular disease, and blood vessel swelling that causes headaches (vascular headaches). Arginine also triggers the body to make protein and has been studied for wound healing, bodybuilding, enhancement of sperm production (spermatogenesis), and prevention of wasting in people with critical illnesses.

Arginine hydrochloride has a high chloride content and has been used to treat metabolic alkalosis. This use should be under the supervision of a qualified healthcare professional.
UAB research explores neurofibromatosis type 1

UAB research explores neurofibromatosis type 1

It is easy to tell a medical research story that has a simple and dramatic moment. But disease is often much more complex, and the work to understand it can be painstaking. A vivid example of that is seen in the University of Alabama at Birmingham Medical Genomics Laboratory, headed by Ludwine Messiaen, Ph.D., professor of genetics. This lab offers clinical genetic testing for a broad array of common and rare genetic disorders. [More]
New mechanism of differentiation may offer novel therapeutic approaches to blood malignancies, solid tumors

New mechanism of differentiation may offer novel therapeutic approaches to blood malignancies, solid tumors

In humans the differentiation of stem cells into hundreds of specialized cell types is vital. Differentiation drives development from fertilized egg to a newborn, and it underlies the continuous replacement of the 5 billion cells that die every hour in an adult. On the downside, mutations in differentiation pathways of different cell types can be drivers of cancers. [More]
TUM scientists develop small molecule that may allow future patient-specific treatment of cancer tumours

TUM scientists develop small molecule that may allow future patient-specific treatment of cancer tumours

Integrins help cells communicate with and adapt to their environment. Also cancer cells depend on their properties to survive and spread throughout the body. Now scientists at the Technical University of Munich have successfully developed a small, highly active molecule that binds to a specific integrin which operates in many types of cancer. [More]
New research could lead to diagnosis of preeclampsia in the first trimester

New research could lead to diagnosis of preeclampsia in the first trimester

Preeclampsia is generally diagnosed later in pregnancy, but new research could lead to diagnosis in the first trimester, improving care and potentially leading to the development of preventative measures. [More]
FDA awards research grants to boost product development for patients with rare diseases

FDA awards research grants to boost product development for patients with rare diseases

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today announced it has awarded 18 new research grants totaling more than $19 million to boost the development of products for patients with rare diseases, which affect the lives of nearly 30 million Americans. [More]
People who eat high protein foods have lower blood pressure and arterial stiffness

People who eat high protein foods have lower blood pressure and arterial stiffness

Eating foods rich in amino acids could be as good for your heart as stopping smoking or getting more exercise - according to new research from the University of East Anglia. [More]
Study may lead to effective antimicrobial treatment strategies for people with uncontrolled diabetes

Study may lead to effective antimicrobial treatment strategies for people with uncontrolled diabetes

Case Western Reserve scientists may have uncovered a molecular mechanism that sets into motion dangerous infection in the feet and hands often occurring with uncontrolled diabetes. It appears that high blood sugar unleashes destructive molecules that interfere with the body's natural infection-control defenses. [More]

Childhood cancer cells produce molecule that affects body's immune system to fight disease

Cancer cells in neuroblastoma contain a molecule that breaks down a key energy source for the body's immune cells, leaving them too physically drained to fight the disease, according to new research published in the journal Cancer Research today (Saturday). [More]

ForeverGreen Worldwide earns BSCG's anti-doping certification for PowerStrips

ForeverGreen Worldwide Corporation, a leading direct marketing company and provider of health-centered products, today announced the company has received an anti-doping certification from the Banned Substances Control Group for PowerStrips, indicating the product is free of banned substances. [More]
Natural substance could help people avoid cavities, gum disease

Natural substance could help people avoid cavities, gum disease

Arginine, a common amino acid found naturally in foods, breaks down dental plaque, which could help millions of people avoid cavities and gum disease, researchers at the University of Michigan and Newcastle University have discovered. [More]
New study identifies enzyme that causes obesity-related hypertension

New study identifies enzyme that causes obesity-related hypertension

Obesity is a serious health problem affecting approximately one-third of the adult population in the United States. Obese individuals have an increased risk of diabetes and cardiovascular disease, including hypertension. A recent study led by a University of Missouri researcher has identified the enzyme responsible for obesity-related hypertension -- a finding that could lead to new treatment options. [More]
Regular consumption of nuts reduce mortality by more than 20%

Regular consumption of nuts reduce mortality by more than 20%

Nuts are a key element of a healthy diet. According to The World Health Organization (WHO), a healthy diet including nuts, regular exercise, the maintenance of ideal weight and staying away from tobacco and alcohol could be sufficient to prevent cancer cases. [More]

Medunik announces availability of PHEBURANE drug in Canada for chronic management of UCD

Medunik Canada, a Canadian pharmaceutical company specialized in rare diseases, is pleased to announce that PHEBURANE (a tasteless oral formulation of sodium phenylbutyrate), is now available for distribution in Canada. PHEBURANE is the first drug to be approved in Canada for the chronic management of urea cycle disorders (UCD) after receiving market authorisation on January 27th, 2015. [More]
Peanuts may lower risk of deaths from heart disease

Peanuts may lower risk of deaths from heart disease

If you're looking for a simple way to lower your risk of dying from a heart attack, consider going nuts. [More]
MD Anderson awarded more than $22 million in research grants from CPRIT

MD Anderson awarded more than $22 million in research grants from CPRIT

The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center has received more than $22 million in research grants this week from the Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas. Approximately half of the funds awarded for Individual Investigator Research Awards went to MD Anderson faculty as well as 40 percent of total IIRA awards that include those for children's and adolescent cancer and early detection and prevention. [More]
Discoveries by WA research team offer further treatment hope for victims of stroke

Discoveries by WA research team offer further treatment hope for victims of stroke

A West Australian research team has made a series of discoveries which may help to minimise the damage that a stroke can cause. [More]
Doctor's Best adds three new sports nutrition powders to its science-based supplement portfolio

Doctor's Best adds three new sports nutrition powders to its science-based supplement portfolio

Doctor's Best has introduced three new sports nutrition powders – Creatine, Branched Chain Amino Acids (BCAA) and L-Arginine - into its science-based supplement portfolio. [More]
UAB Research Probes Molecular Basis Of Rare Genetic Disorder

UAB Research Probes Molecular Basis Of Rare Genetic Disorder

An international group co-led by University of Alabama at Birmingham researcher Mary MacDougall, Ph.D., has unraveled the molecular basis for the rare, inherited genetic disorder, Singleton-Merten Syndrome (SMS). Individuals with SMS develop extreme, life-threatening calcification of the aorta and heart valves, early-onset periodontitis and root resorption of the teeth, decreases in bone density, and loss of bone tissue at the tips of fingers and toes. [More]
Researchers gain new insight into how motor neurons in the brain die during ALS

Researchers gain new insight into how motor neurons in the brain die during ALS

Researchers look to understand the causes of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), in the hope of finding new ways to treat the disease. A new study published online today (December 17th) in the Cell Press journal Neuron shows that a common gene mutation in ALS generates a deadly protein that may cause the damage in the brain that leads to ALS. [More]
New study reveals how COX-2 inhibitors can increase risk of heart attack in arthritis patients

New study reveals how COX-2 inhibitors can increase risk of heart attack in arthritis patients

A class of drug for treating arthritis - all but shelved over fears about side effects - may be given a new lease of life, following the discovery of a possible way to identify which patients should avoid using it. [More]
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