Arrhythmia News and Research RSS Feed - Arrhythmia News and Research

An arrhythmia is a problem with the speed or rhythm of the heartbeat. During an arrhythmia, the heart can beat too fast, too slow, or with an irregular rhythm. A heartbeat that is too fast is called tachycardia. A heartbeat that is too slow is called bradycardia. Most arrhythmias are harmless, but some can be serious or even life threatening. When the heart rate is too slow, too fast, or irregular, the heart may not be able to pump enough blood to the body. Lack of blood flow can damage the brain, heart, and other organs.
Study sheds light on the physical causes of sudden death

Study sheds light on the physical causes of sudden death

Sudden cardiac death accounts for approximately 10% of natural deaths, most of which are due to ventricular fibrillation. Each year it causes 300,000 deaths in the United States and 20,000 in Spain. [More]
Adapting new method to judge dementia perceptions can help improve care for south Asian people

Adapting new method to judge dementia perceptions can help improve care for south Asian people

Dementia care for south Asian people could be improved after researchers from The University of Manchester adapted a commonly used tool for judging perceptions of the disease. [More]
Study looks at dabigatran adherence across Veterans Health Administration sites

Study looks at dabigatran adherence across Veterans Health Administration sites

Among patients with atrial fibrillation who filled prescriptions for the anticoagulant dabigatran at Veterans Health Administration sites, there was variability in patient medication adherence across sites, with appropriate patient selection and pharmacist-led monitoring associated with greater adherence to the medication, according to a study in the April 14 issue of JAMA. [More]
Newly approved drug for rare blood cancer shows sustained benefit for 2 years

Newly approved drug for rare blood cancer shows sustained benefit for 2 years

The most recent results from a clinical trial show that ibrutinib, a newly approved drug for Waldenstrom's Macroglobulinemia, continued to control the rare blood cancer, with 95 percent of patients surviving for two years, report investigators from Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. [More]
CUMC researchers identify cellular defect that could lead to potential new treatment for diabetes

CUMC researchers identify cellular defect that could lead to potential new treatment for diabetes

A cellular defect that can impair the body's ability to handle high glucose levels and could point the way to a potential new treatment for diabetes has been identified by Columbia University Medical Center researchers. [More]
Study assesses factors that lead to inaccurate detection of frequency, duration of AF episodes

Study assesses factors that lead to inaccurate detection of frequency, duration of AF episodes

A new study shows how specific factors such as gender, age and mood disorders like anxiety and depression can lead patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) to inaccurately assess their heart rhythm. [More]
MHIF investigator performs first atrial fibrillation ablation in U.S. using SMARTTOUCH SF catheter

MHIF investigator performs first atrial fibrillation ablation in U.S. using SMARTTOUCH SF catheter

Dr. Daniel Melby, an investigator at the Minneapolis Heart Institute Foundation, performed the first atrial fibrillation ablation in the U.S. using Biosense Webster's new THERMOCOOL SMARTTOUCH SF contact force sensing catheter as part of an FDA regulated safety trial (SMART-SF). [More]
Penn surgeons develop new tools to identify joint replacement patients at risk for serious complications

Penn surgeons develop new tools to identify joint replacement patients at risk for serious complications

Orthopedic surgeons from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania have developed two new prediction tools aimed at identifying total hip and knee replacement patients who are at-risk of developing serious complications after surgery. [More]
Boston Scientific announces successful implantations of WATCHMAN Device in three US patients

Boston Scientific announces successful implantations of WATCHMAN Device in three US patients

This week, three patients in the United States received the first implants of the Boston Scientific Corporation WATCHMANâ„¢ Left Atrial Appendage Closure (LAAC) Device. [More]
Catheter ablation more beneficial to heart failure patients than Amiodarone treatment

Catheter ablation more beneficial to heart failure patients than Amiodarone treatment

Among patients with heart failure and atrial fibrillation, those who underwent catheter ablation were less likely to die, be hospitalized or have recurrent atrial fibrillation than patients taking a heart rhythm regulating drug, according to a study presented at the American College of Cardiology's 64th Annual Scientific Session. [More]
Scientists develop mathematical model to digitally map communication between heart cells

Scientists develop mathematical model to digitally map communication between heart cells

A team of scientists led by Johns Hopkins cardiologist and biomedical engineer Hiroshi Ashikaga, M.D., Ph.D., has developed a mathematical model to measure and digitally map the beat-sustaining electrical flow between heart cells. [More]
Jianmin Cui receives $1.7 million NIH grant to study heart's inner mechanisms

Jianmin Cui receives $1.7 million NIH grant to study heart's inner mechanisms

Jianmin Cui, PhD, has received a nearly $1.7 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to study the molecular bases for the function of potassium channels vital for the heart, brain, inner ear and other tissues. [More]
Scientists combine principles of butterfly effect and computer simulation to predict heart disease

Scientists combine principles of butterfly effect and computer simulation to predict heart disease

Scientists from Cardiff and Swansea Universities are combining the principles of the butterfly effect and computer simulation to explore new ways of predicting and controlling the beginnings of heart disease. [More]

Study demonstrates high compliance among patients using iRhythm's ECG patch monitors to detect AFib

iRhythm Technologies, Inc., a leading digital health care solutions company focusing on the advancement of cardiac care, presented study results that demonstrate high compliance among patients using long term electrocardiogram (ECG) patch monitors to detect atrial fibrillation (AFib). [More]
ISP shows promise in stopping fatal arrhythmias after heart attack

ISP shows promise in stopping fatal arrhythmias after heart attack

Case Western Reserve's chemical compound aimed at restoring spinal cord function may have an additional purpose: stopping potentially fatal arrhythmias after heart attack. [More]
Study finds decline in re-hospitalization rates after AVR surgery

Study finds decline in re-hospitalization rates after AVR surgery

Fewer patients undergoing aortic valve replacement (AVR) are being re-hospitalized in the year following surgery, indicating the surgery is safer and the recovery has become easier, according to an article in the February 2015 issue of The Annals of Thoracic Surgery. [More]
VATS lobectomy best for NSCLC patient short-term outcomes

VATS lobectomy best for NSCLC patient short-term outcomes

Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery lobectomy offers better short-term outcomes for patients with early-stage non-small-cell lung cancer than open lobectomy, multi-institutional research confirms. [More]
Moderate drinking may reduce heart failure risk

Moderate drinking may reduce heart failure risk

Evidence already exists for the beneficial effects of drinking moderate amounts of alcohol on the risk of developing a number of heart conditions; however, the role it plays in the risk of developing heart failure has been under-researched with conflicting results. [More]
Daiichi Sankyo receives FDA approval for SAVAYSA (edoxaban) Tablets

Daiichi Sankyo receives FDA approval for SAVAYSA (edoxaban) Tablets

Daiichi Sankyo Company, Limited (hereafter, Daiichi Sankyo) today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved SAVAYSA (edoxaban) Tablets, an oral, once-daily selective factor Xa-inhibitor, to reduce the risk of stroke and systemic embolism (SE) in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF). [More]
Innovative software predicts sudden cardiac death in patients at risk of arrhythmia

Innovative software predicts sudden cardiac death in patients at risk of arrhythmia

At Galway Hospital, in Ireland, a device is currently used to "predict" cardiac events in people at risk of sudden cardiac death. [More]
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