Arrhythmia News and Research RSS Feed - Arrhythmia News and Research

An arrhythmia is a problem with the speed or rhythm of the heartbeat. During an arrhythmia, the heart can beat too fast, too slow, or with an irregular rhythm. A heartbeat that is too fast is called tachycardia. A heartbeat that is too slow is called bradycardia. Most arrhythmias are harmless, but some can be serious or even life threatening. When the heart rate is too slow, too fast, or irregular, the heart may not be able to pump enough blood to the body. Lack of blood flow can damage the brain, heart, and other organs.
Genmab/GSK receive FDA sBLA approval for Arzerra in combination with chlorambucil for treatment of CLL

Genmab/GSK receive FDA sBLA approval for Arzerra in combination with chlorambucil for treatment of CLL

GlaxoSmithKline plc and Genmab A/S announced today that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved a Supplemental Biologic License Application (sBLA) for the use of Arzerra® (ofatumumab), a CD20-directed cytolytic monoclonal antibody, in combination with chlorambucil for the treatment of previously untreated patients with chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) for whom fludarabine-based therapy is considered inappropriate. [More]
Interarm blood pressure measurement advised for diabetic patients

Interarm blood pressure measurement advised for diabetic patients

Initial blood pressure measurements in patients with diabetes should be taken from both arms, say researchers. [More]
Study of non-surgically implanted replacement pulmonary valve shows strong results

Study of non-surgically implanted replacement pulmonary valve shows strong results

The first post-FDA approval study of a non-surgically implanted replacement pulmonary valve showed strong short- and mid-term results for the device in patients with certain congenital heart defects, according to research presented by a U-M pediatric interventional cardiologist at the American College of Cardiology's 63rd Annual Scientific Session Sunday. [More]
Enrollment commences for Daiichi Sankyo's ENSURE-AF multinational phase 3 study in NVAF patients

Enrollment commences for Daiichi Sankyo's ENSURE-AF multinational phase 3 study in NVAF patients

Daiichi Sankyo Company, Limited today announced that it has started enrolling patients into the ENSURE-AF multinational phase 3 study, which will evaluate the efficacy and safety of its investigational oral, once-daily direct factor Xa-inhibitor edoxaban compared to enoxaparin/warfarin for the prevention of stroke and other blood clot complications in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF) undergoing electrical cardioversion (low-energy shocks to trigger normal heart rhythm). [More]
Study links broken heart syndrome to natural disasters

Study links broken heart syndrome to natural disasters

Dramatic spikes in cases of Takotsubo cardiomyopathy, also called broken heart syndrome, were found in two states after major natural disasters, suggesting the stress of disasters as a likely trigger, according to research to be presented at the American College of Cardiology's 63rd Annual Scientific Session. [More]

ZS Pharma starts patient enrollment in ZS-9 Phase 3 trial for treatment of hyperkalemia

ZS Pharma, a specialty pharmaceutical company developing novel treatments for kidney, cardiovascular and liver disorders, today announced that it has begun enrolling patients in ZS004, its second Phase 3 clinical trial of ZS-9, a novel investigational treatment for hyperkalemia. [More]
Scientists explore link between SCN10A and cardiac arrhythmia risk

Scientists explore link between SCN10A and cardiac arrhythmia risk

Although genome-wide association studies have linked DNA variants in the gene SCN10A with increased risk for cardiac arrhythmia, efforts to determine the gene's direct influence on the heart's electrical activity have been unproductive. Now, scientists from the University of Chicago have discovered that these SCN10A variants regulate the function of a different gene, SCN5A, which appears to be the primary gene responsible for cardiac arrhythmia risk. [More]
Stem cell therapy may benefit patients with debilitating heart failure

Stem cell therapy may benefit patients with debilitating heart failure

Researchers want to know whether patients with debilitating heart failure can benefit by having their own stem cells injected into their ailing heart muscle. [More]

University of Michigan uses Medtronic Reveal LINQ ICM System to monitor heart-related problems

The University of Michigan Frankel Cardiovascular Center is one of the nation's first hospitals to use the Medtronic Reveal LINQ Insertable Cardiac Monitor (ICM) System, the smallest implantable cardiac monitoring device available. [More]

Respicardia receives Best Innovation of 2014 award from CRT and CV Pipeline for remedē System

Respicardia, Inc., a developer of implantable therapies to improve respiratory and cardiovascular health, announced that it has been awarded the Best Innovation of 2014 from Cardiovascular Research Technologies (CRT) and CV Pipeline for the remedē System, the first and only implantable device for the treatment of central sleep apnea. [More]
Teen researcher wins top award from Intel Foundation for research on potential drugs to treat influenza

Teen researcher wins top award from Intel Foundation for research on potential drugs to treat influenza

From new cancer treatments to an exploration of how technology affects the adolescent brain, the innovative research of America's future scientists, engineers and inventors took center stage in the nation's capital today. [More]
Outbursts of anger may trigger heart attacks and strokes, shows study

Outbursts of anger may trigger heart attacks and strokes, shows study

Outbursts of anger may trigger heart attacks, strokes and other cardiovascular problems in the two hours immediately afterwards, according to the first study to systematically evaluate previous research into the link between the extreme emotion and all cardiovascular outcomes. [More]

Doctors devise new way to treat atrial fibrillation

Doctors in the U.S. and Japan have devised a way to treat atrial fibrillation by adding a little alcohol to minimally invasive therapies that target a cluster of misbehaving nerves known to trigger arrhythmia. In the most recent Journal of the American College of Cardiology (online before print), the researchers say the new therapy may dull or stop the transmission of electrical impulses that cause atrial fibrillation. [More]
Angry outbursts increase heart attack risk

Angry outbursts increase heart attack risk

Call it what you will - getting red in the face, hot under the collar, losing your cool, blowing your top - we all experience anger. And while we know that anger is a normal, sometimes even beneficial emotion, we're also aware of the often harmful connection between anger and health. New research from Beth Israel Deaconess Medical shows an even more compelling reason to think about getting anger in check - a nearly fivefold increase in risk for heart attack in the two hours following outbursts of anger. [More]
CCNAP highlights psychological issues related to cardiac diseases

CCNAP highlights psychological issues related to cardiac diseases

The congress will be held 4-5 April in Stavanger, Norway, at the Stavanger Forum. [More]

Scripps Green Hospital first to implant world's smallest implantable cardiac monitoring device

Scripps Green Hospital has become the first hospital in the United States to implant the world's smallest implantable cardiac monitoring device. Scripps Clinic cardiologist John Rogers, M.D., successfully completed the first implant of the Reveal LINQ- Insertable Cardiac Monitor (ICM) in 71-year-old San Diego resident Chuck Beal on Saturday. [More]
Scientists create 3-D elastic membrane that is precisely shaped to match heart's epicardium

Scientists create 3-D elastic membrane that is precisely shaped to match heart's epicardium

Igor Efimov, PhD, at the School of Engineering & Applied Science at Washington University in St. Louis and an international team of biomedical engineers and materials scientists have created a 3-D elastic membrane made of a soft, flexible, silicon material that is precisely shaped to match the heart's epicardium, or the outer layer of the wall of the heart. [More]

Study shows one-quarter of high risk patients do not receive anticoagulants after ablation of AF

​One-quarter of high risk patients do not receive anticoagulants after ablation of atrial fibrillation (AF), according to the latest survey of European practice. [More]
Discovery could lead to improved early detection, prevention strategies for sudden cardiac death

Discovery could lead to improved early detection, prevention strategies for sudden cardiac death

UC Irvine researchers have found a specific genetic flaw that is connected to sudden death due to heart arrhythmia - a leading cause of mortality for adults around the world. [More]

Study reveals overall success rate of AF ablation in Europe

One-quarter of high risk patients do not receive anticoagulants after ablation of atrial fibrillation (AF), according to the latest survey of European practice. [More]