Arrhythmia News and Research RSS Feed - Arrhythmia News and Research

An arrhythmia is a problem with the speed or rhythm of the heartbeat. During an arrhythmia, the heart can beat too fast, too slow, or with an irregular rhythm. A heartbeat that is too fast is called tachycardia. A heartbeat that is too slow is called bradycardia. Most arrhythmias are harmless, but some can be serious or even life threatening. When the heart rate is too slow, too fast, or irregular, the heart may not be able to pump enough blood to the body. Lack of blood flow can damage the brain, heart, and other organs.
First ESC recommendations for patients with cardiac arrhythmias, CKD published in EP Europace

First ESC recommendations for patients with cardiac arrhythmias, CKD published in EP Europace

The first ESC recommendations for patients with cardiac arrhythmias and chronic kidney disease (CKD) are presented today at EHRA EUROPACE - CARDIOSTIM 2015 and published in EP Europace. [More]
Research: Patients test drive pacemaker outside the skin before deciding on permanent implant

Research: Patients test drive pacemaker outside the skin before deciding on permanent implant

Patients are test driving a pacemaker outside the skin before deciding whether to have a permanent implant, reveals novel research presented today at EHRA EUROPACE - CARDIOSTIM 2015 by Professor Michael Giudici, director of arrhythmia services in the Department of Internal Medicine, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, US. [More]
Certain anti-nausea medications used after operation could increase risk for irregular heartbeat

Certain anti-nausea medications used after operation could increase risk for irregular heartbeat

Certain commonly prescribed anti-nausea medications given to patients during or after an operation could increase their risk of developing an irregular heartbeat, new research has found. [More]
AliveCor Mobile ECG now available in Canada

AliveCor Mobile ECG now available in Canada

AliveCor, Inc., the leader in FDA-cleared ECG technology for smartphones, announced today that the AliveCor Mobile ECG is now available for patients and physicians in Canada. With the AliveCor Mobile ECG and the AliveECG app users can instantly detect the presence of atrial fibrillation (AF or AFib), a leading cause of stroke, in an electrocardiogram (ECG or EKG) and manage their heart health with an FDA-cleared and Health Canada Licensed electrocardiogram ECG monitor, anywhere and at anytime. [More]
Simple process for obtaining induced pluripotent stem cells without use of reagents

Simple process for obtaining induced pluripotent stem cells without use of reagents

For their ability to differentiate into other cell types, the embryonic stem cells hold a large potential in the medical industry. Their use, however, poses ethical questions due to the fact that in order to obtain them, it is necessary to destroy the embryo. For this reason, medical researches use the so-called induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC). In fact, it is possible to reprogram adult cells that can be obtained by simply drawing blood and making them "regress" to a similar state to that of embryonic stem cells. [More]
Research reveals how a faulty gene can cause fatal abnormal heart rhythms during exercise

Research reveals how a faulty gene can cause fatal abnormal heart rhythms during exercise

University of Manchester research presented today at the British Cardiovascular Society Conference has revealed how a faulty gene can cause fatal abnormal heart rhythms that are brought on by exercise. [More]
Heart failure patient spearheads Heather Cartwright Inherited Cardiomyopathy and Arrhythmia Project

Heart failure patient spearheads Heather Cartwright Inherited Cardiomyopathy and Arrhythmia Project

Led by internationally-recognized cardiologists who are leaders in their field, the Peter Munk Cardiac Centre today announces the creation of an initiative to break ground in the cause, treatment and ongoing care of patients with an inherited, irregular heartbeat triggered by a rare cardiac structural condition. [More]
FDA approves Humalog 200 units/mL KwikPen to improve glycemic control in diabetic patients

FDA approves Humalog 200 units/mL KwikPen to improve glycemic control in diabetic patients

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved Humalog® 200 units/mL KwikPen® (insulin lispro 200 units/mL; U-200), a pre-filled pen containing a concentrated formulation of Lilly's rapid-acting insulin Humalog® (insulin lispro 100 units/mL) to improve glycemic control in people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes, Eli Lilly and Company announced today. Humalog U-200 KwikPen marks the first FDA approval of a concentrated mealtime insulin analog. [More]
Patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention at higher risk for sleep apnea

Patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention at higher risk for sleep apnea

Patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), a coronary artery widening procedureused to treat heart disease, are at high risk for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), according to new research presented at the 2015 American Thoracic Society International Conference. [More]
Recent CE Mark approvals expand St. Jude Medical’s MRI-compatible device portfolio in Europe

Recent CE Mark approvals expand St. Jude Medical’s MRI-compatible device portfolio in Europe

St. Jude Medical, Inc., a global medical device company, today announced CE Mark approval of expanded labelling for its Ellipse implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD), in addition to its Durata and Optisure defibrillation leads, allowing existing or future patients with these technologies to undergo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans without compromising device performance. [More]
Preventice Solutions announces commercial availability of BodyGuardian Heart and PatientCare Platform

Preventice Solutions announces commercial availability of BodyGuardian Heart and PatientCare Platform

Preventice Solutions announced today that BodyGuardian Heart Remote Patient Monitoring System and PatientCare platform will be commercially available in Q3, 2015. Testing with the BodyGuardian Remote Monitoring System is underway nationally to ensure ongoing improvements and care team efficiency. [More]
Young age and small body weight predispose pediatric CHD patients toward re-intervention

Young age and small body weight predispose pediatric CHD patients toward re-intervention

A retrospective review of 633 adults and children who underwent bioprosthetic pulmonary valve replacement (PVR) for congenital heart disease between 1996 and 2014 indicated that the risk of re-intervention was five times greater for children than adults, with the likelihood of re-intervention decreasing by 10% for each increasing year of age at surgery. [More]
CPAP use reduces atrial fibrillation recurrence in patients with obstructive sleep apnea

CPAP use reduces atrial fibrillation recurrence in patients with obstructive sleep apnea

The use of continuous positive airway pressure was associated with a significant reduction in the recurrence of atrial fibrillation in patients with obstructive sleep apnea, according to an analysis of data from past research published today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology: Clinical Electrophysiology. [More]
Study sheds light on the physical causes of sudden death

Study sheds light on the physical causes of sudden death

Sudden cardiac death accounts for approximately 10% of natural deaths, most of which are due to ventricular fibrillation. Each year it causes 300,000 deaths in the United States and 20,000 in Spain. [More]
Adapting new method to judge dementia perceptions can help improve care for south Asian people

Adapting new method to judge dementia perceptions can help improve care for south Asian people

Dementia care for south Asian people could be improved after researchers from The University of Manchester adapted a commonly used tool for judging perceptions of the disease. [More]
Study looks at dabigatran adherence across Veterans Health Administration sites

Study looks at dabigatran adherence across Veterans Health Administration sites

Among patients with atrial fibrillation who filled prescriptions for the anticoagulant dabigatran at Veterans Health Administration sites, there was variability in patient medication adherence across sites, with appropriate patient selection and pharmacist-led monitoring associated with greater adherence to the medication, according to a study in the April 14 issue of JAMA. [More]
Newly approved drug for rare blood cancer shows sustained benefit for 2 years

Newly approved drug for rare blood cancer shows sustained benefit for 2 years

The most recent results from a clinical trial show that ibrutinib, a newly approved drug for Waldenstrom's Macroglobulinemia, continued to control the rare blood cancer, with 95 percent of patients surviving for two years, report investigators from Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. [More]
CUMC researchers identify cellular defect that could lead to potential new treatment for diabetes

CUMC researchers identify cellular defect that could lead to potential new treatment for diabetes

A cellular defect that can impair the body's ability to handle high glucose levels and could point the way to a potential new treatment for diabetes has been identified by Columbia University Medical Center researchers. [More]
Study assesses factors that lead to inaccurate detection of frequency, duration of AF episodes

Study assesses factors that lead to inaccurate detection of frequency, duration of AF episodes

A new study shows how specific factors such as gender, age and mood disorders like anxiety and depression can lead patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) to inaccurately assess their heart rhythm. [More]
MHIF investigator performs first atrial fibrillation ablation in U.S. using SMARTTOUCH SF catheter

MHIF investigator performs first atrial fibrillation ablation in U.S. using SMARTTOUCH SF catheter

Dr. Daniel Melby, an investigator at the Minneapolis Heart Institute Foundation, performed the first atrial fibrillation ablation in the U.S. using Biosense Webster's new THERMOCOOL SMARTTOUCH SF contact force sensing catheter as part of an FDA regulated safety trial (SMART-SF). [More]
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