Arrhythmia News and Research RSS Feed - Arrhythmia News and Research

An arrhythmia is a problem with the speed or rhythm of the heartbeat. During an arrhythmia, the heart can beat too fast, too slow, or with an irregular rhythm. A heartbeat that is too fast is called tachycardia. A heartbeat that is too slow is called bradycardia. Most arrhythmias are harmless, but some can be serious or even life threatening. When the heart rate is too slow, too fast, or irregular, the heart may not be able to pump enough blood to the body. Lack of blood flow can damage the brain, heart, and other organs.
Duke, Wisconsin and UAB researchers create bioengineered patches to treat heart failure

Duke, Wisconsin and UAB researchers create bioengineered patches to treat heart failure

The heart cannot regenerate muscle tissue after a heart attack has killed part of the muscle wall, and that dead tissue can strain surrounding muscle, leading to a lethal heart enlargement. [More]
Three-dimensional heart patches may soon move closer to clinical application

Three-dimensional heart patches may soon move closer to clinical application

The promise of stem cells to treat cardiovascular disease may soon be a step closer to clinical application as scientists from three institutions seek to perfect and test three-dimensional "heart patches" in a large animal model — the last big hurdle before trials in human patients. [More]
VTT researchers develop new mobile device that helps prevent cerebral infarctions

VTT researchers develop new mobile device that helps prevent cerebral infarctions

VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland has developed a mobile app and thumb-size device that help to prevent cerebral infarctions at an early stage, during asymptomatic atrial fibrillation. [More]
Benefits of cardioprotective drugs may extend beyond preventing acute coronary syndromes

Benefits of cardioprotective drugs may extend beyond preventing acute coronary syndromes

Medications prescribed to prevent heart attacks such as statins and aspirin are also associated with reduced heart attack severity, according to research published in PLOS ONE. [More]
UCL PhD students show progress in developing ground-breaking medical devices

UCL PhD students show progress in developing ground-breaking medical devices

Two PhD students, who secured sponsorship from leading medical device designer and manufacturer ITL, have revealed progress on the development of ground-breaking medical devices. [More]
New Focused Update to CCS atrial fibrillation guidelines released

New Focused Update to CCS atrial fibrillation guidelines released

The Canadian Journal of Cardiology has just released the 2016 Focused Update to the Canadian Cardiovascular Society's atrial fibrillation (AF) guidelines. [More]
New research sheds light on underlying genetic basis of heart arrhythmias

New research sheds light on underlying genetic basis of heart arrhythmias

In the August 31 issue of Science Translational Medicine, new research from the University of Chicago shows how deficits in a specific pathway of genes can lead to the development of atrial fibrillation, a common irregular heartbeat, which poses a significant health risk. [More]
Remote monitoring shows no improvement in outcomes for heart failure patients with CIEDs

Remote monitoring shows no improvement in outcomes for heart failure patients with CIEDs

For heart failure patients with cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs), remote monitoring of their condition does not improve outcomes compared to usual care, according to Hot Line results presented at ESC Congress 2016 and to be simultaneously published in JAMA. [More]
Risk of motor vehicle accidents increased by 50% in ICD patients

Risk of motor vehicle accidents increased by 50% in ICD patients

The risk of traffic accidents is increased by 50% in patients with an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) compared to age and gender matched controls, according to a Danish nationwide registry study presented at ESC Congress 2016 today. [More]
Alcohol-related hospitalisation linked to increased risk of ischaemic stroke in atrial fibrillation patients

Alcohol-related hospitalisation linked to increased risk of ischaemic stroke in atrial fibrillation patients

Alcohol related hospitalisation is associated with a doubled risk of ischaemic stroke risk in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation, according to a study presented at ESC Congress 2016 today by Dr Faris Al-Khalili, cardiologist, Karolinska Institutet, Danderyd Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. [More]
Direct catheter-based thrombectomy equally effective to bridging thrombolysis in acute ischaemic stroke

Direct catheter-based thrombectomy equally effective to bridging thrombolysis in acute ischaemic stroke

Direct catheter-based thrombectomy is equally effective to bridging thrombolysis in the treatment of acute ischaemic stroke, according to results from the observational PRAGUE-16 registry study presented at ESC Congress 2016 today. [More]
New oral anticoagulants offer same stroke prevention, but cause less intracranial bleeding than warfarin

New oral anticoagulants offer same stroke prevention, but cause less intracranial bleeding than warfarin

The new oral anticoagulants provide the same stroke prevention as warfarin but cause less intracranial bleeding, reports an observational study in more than 43 000 patients presented at ESC Congress 2016 today by Dr Laila Staerk, a research fellow at Herlev and Gentofte University Hospital, Denmark. [More]
Smartphones can be used to identify atrial fibrillation with existing hardware

Smartphones can be used to identify atrial fibrillation with existing hardware

Smartphones can be used to detect atrial fibrillation with existing hardware, according to research presented at ESC Congress 2016 today.1 A low-cost application (app) has been developed that uses the phone's own accelerometer and gyroscope to check for atrial fibrillation. [More]
First ESC Guidelines on Atrial Fibrillation published online

First ESC Guidelines on Atrial Fibrillation published online

The first European Society of Cardiology (ESC) Guidelines on Atrial Fibrillation developed in collaboration with the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery (EACTS) are published online today in European Heart Journal and the European Journal of Cardio-Thoracic Surgery, and on the ESC Website. [More]
New report reveals high levels of caffeine in energy drinks could lead to cardiac complications

New report reveals high levels of caffeine in energy drinks could lead to cardiac complications

The high levels of caffeine in energy drinks may lead to cardiac complications, suggests a case report in the July/August Journal of Addiction Medicine, the official journal of the American Society of Addiction Medicine. The journal is published by Wolters Kluwer. [More]
Research shows clear link between heart and the brain of LQTS patients

Research shows clear link between heart and the brain of LQTS patients

Researchers at the University of Rochester Medical Center recently discovered a genetic link between Long QT Syndrome (LQTS), a rare cardiac rhythm disease, and an increased risk for seizures. [More]
Study finds link between AF and reduced frontal lobe brain volumes

Study finds link between AF and reduced frontal lobe brain volumes

According to a recent Framingham Heart Study, people who experience the heart arrhythmia atrial fibrillation (AF), may also suffer from a smaller brain, specifically reduced frontal lobe volume. [More]
'Comprehensive' management approach needed for AF

'Comprehensive' management approach needed for AF

Death is a bigger risk than stroke among patients with atrial fibrillation, particularly during the first 4 months after diagnosis, research shows. [More]
Omega-3 PUFA biomarkers demonstrate benefits for fatal CHD

Omega-3 PUFA biomarkers demonstrate benefits for fatal CHD

Regular consumption of seafood and plant-based omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids could help lower the risk of fatal coronary heart disease, confirm findings from a pooled analysis of 19 studies. [More]
Pharmacotherapy reduces conduction system disease risk

Pharmacotherapy reduces conduction system disease risk

Lisinopril therapy significantly reduces incident conduction system disease, indicates a post-hoc analysis of ALLHAT data. [More]
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