Arrhythmia News and Research RSS Feed - Arrhythmia News and Research

An arrhythmia is a problem with the speed or rhythm of the heartbeat. During an arrhythmia, the heart can beat too fast, too slow, or with an irregular rhythm. A heartbeat that is too fast is called tachycardia. A heartbeat that is too slow is called bradycardia. Most arrhythmias are harmless, but some can be serious or even life threatening. When the heart rate is too slow, too fast, or irregular, the heart may not be able to pump enough blood to the body. Lack of blood flow can damage the brain, heart, and other organs.
Jianmin Cui receives $1.7 million NIH grant to study heart's inner mechanisms

Jianmin Cui receives $1.7 million NIH grant to study heart's inner mechanisms

Jianmin Cui, PhD, has received a nearly $1.7 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to study the molecular bases for the function of potassium channels vital for the heart, brain, inner ear and other tissues. [More]
Scientists combine principles of butterfly effect and computer simulation to predict heart disease

Scientists combine principles of butterfly effect and computer simulation to predict heart disease

Scientists from Cardiff and Swansea Universities are combining the principles of the butterfly effect and computer simulation to explore new ways of predicting and controlling the beginnings of heart disease. [More]

Study demonstrates high compliance among patients using iRhythm's ECG patch monitors to detect AFib

iRhythm Technologies, Inc., a leading digital health care solutions company focusing on the advancement of cardiac care, presented study results that demonstrate high compliance among patients using long term electrocardiogram (ECG) patch monitors to detect atrial fibrillation (AFib). [More]
ISP shows promise in stopping fatal arrhythmias after heart attack

ISP shows promise in stopping fatal arrhythmias after heart attack

Case Western Reserve's chemical compound aimed at restoring spinal cord function may have an additional purpose: stopping potentially fatal arrhythmias after heart attack. [More]
Study finds decline in re-hospitalization rates after AVR surgery

Study finds decline in re-hospitalization rates after AVR surgery

Fewer patients undergoing aortic valve replacement (AVR) are being re-hospitalized in the year following surgery, indicating the surgery is safer and the recovery has become easier, according to an article in the February 2015 issue of The Annals of Thoracic Surgery. [More]
VATS lobectomy best for NSCLC patient short-term outcomes

VATS lobectomy best for NSCLC patient short-term outcomes

Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery lobectomy offers better short-term outcomes for patients with early-stage non-small-cell lung cancer than open lobectomy, multi-institutional research confirms. [More]
Moderate drinking may reduce heart failure risk

Moderate drinking may reduce heart failure risk

Evidence already exists for the beneficial effects of drinking moderate amounts of alcohol on the risk of developing a number of heart conditions; however, the role it plays in the risk of developing heart failure has been under-researched with conflicting results. [More]
Daiichi Sankyo receives FDA approval for SAVAYSA (edoxaban) Tablets

Daiichi Sankyo receives FDA approval for SAVAYSA (edoxaban) Tablets

Daiichi Sankyo Company, Limited (hereafter, Daiichi Sankyo) today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved SAVAYSA (edoxaban) Tablets, an oral, once-daily selective factor Xa-inhibitor, to reduce the risk of stroke and systemic embolism (SE) in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF). [More]
Innovative software predicts sudden cardiac death in patients at risk of arrhythmia

Innovative software predicts sudden cardiac death in patients at risk of arrhythmia

At Galway Hospital, in Ireland, a device is currently used to "predict" cardiac events in people at risk of sudden cardiac death. [More]
Arrhythmia patients who manage lifestyle factors more likely to have long-term survival

Arrhythmia patients who manage lifestyle factors more likely to have long-term survival

Patients suffering from the world's most common heart rhythm disorder can have their long-term outcomes significantly improved with an aggressive management of their underlying cardiac risk factors, according to University of Adelaide researchers. [More]
Daiichi Sankyo releases new formulation of LIXIANA 60 mg Tablets

Daiichi Sankyo releases new formulation of LIXIANA 60 mg Tablets

Daiichi Sankyo Company, Limited (hereafter, Daiichi Sankyo) today announced that it has launched a new formulation of LIXIANA 60 mg Tablets (JAN: Edoxaban Tosilate Hydrate, INN: edoxaban, approval to market: September 26, 2014; NHI drug price listing: November 25, 2014) in Japan for the recently approved indications: the prevention of ischemic stroke and systemic embolism in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF) and the treatment and recurrence prevention of venous thromboembolism (VTE) [deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary thromboembolism (PE)]. [More]
Study shows link between cardiac abnormalities, sudden unexpected death in epilepsy

Study shows link between cardiac abnormalities, sudden unexpected death in epilepsy

Groundbreaking findings describing the link between cardiac abnormalities and sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) will be presented at the American Epilepsy Society's Annual Meeting in December. [More]
Study on hospital alarm fatigue records more than 2.5 million alarms in one month

Study on hospital alarm fatigue records more than 2.5 million alarms in one month

Jessica Zègre-Hemsey, a cardiac monitoring expert at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and her colleagues at the University of California San Francisco, revealed more than 2.5 million alarms were triggered on bedside monitors in a single month - the first figure ever reported from a real-world hospital setting. [More]
Digoxin drug associated with higher risk of death, hospitalization among adults with atrial fibrillation

Digoxin drug associated with higher risk of death, hospitalization among adults with atrial fibrillation

Digoxin, a drug commonly used to treat heart conditions, was associated with a 71 percent higher risk of death and a 63 percent higher risk of hospitalization among adults with diagnosed atrial fibrillation and no evidence of heart failure, according to a Kaiser Permanente study that appears in the current online issue of Circulation: Arrhythmia and Electrophysiology. [More]
Findings illustrate need to monitor all races of heart failure patients for atrial fibrillation

Findings illustrate need to monitor all races of heart failure patients for atrial fibrillation

Black patients who have been diagnosed with heart failure are no less likely than white patients to get atrial fibrillation (an irregular heartbeat, or arrhythmia), according to a new study led by researchers in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, which was presented today at the 2014 Scientific Sessions of the American Heart Association. [More]
Study reveals association between high burden of AFib and lower cognitive function

Study reveals association between high burden of AFib and lower cognitive function

iRhythm Technologies, Inc. announced today that study results presented during the American Heart Association Scientific Sessions showed an association between a high burden of atrial fibrillation (AFib) and lower cognitive function, specifically executive and verbal function. [More]
Cardiome Pharma announces results from Phase 3 clinical study of BRINAVESS

Cardiome Pharma announces results from Phase 3 clinical study of BRINAVESS

Cardiome Pharma Corp. today announced results from a Phase 3 clinical study conducted with BRINAVESS (vernakalant intravenous, RSD 1235) in the Asia-Pacific (A-P) region. [More]
FDA recommens approval of Daiichi Sankyo's once-daily SAVAYSA for patients with NVAF

FDA recommens approval of Daiichi Sankyo's once-daily SAVAYSA for patients with NVAF

Daiichi Sankyo Company, Limited (hereafter, Daiichi Sankyo) today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's Cardiovascular and Renal Drugs Advisory Committee voted 9 to 1 to recommend approval of once-daily SAVAYSA (edoxaban) 60 mg dosing regimen for the reduction in risk of stroke and systemic embolic events (SEE) in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF). [More]
University Medical Center's first atrial fibrillation unit opens in Germany

University Medical Center's first atrial fibrillation unit opens in Germany

Nearly 1.8 million people in Germany suffer from atrial fibrillation. This is the most common and clinically significant form of heart rhythm disorder. Shortness of breath, a sudden sense of dizziness, a feeling of pressure in the chest, and palpitations or thumping of the heart so extreme it can be felt beating rapidly and irregularly - this is how many patients describe their first episode of atrial fibrillation. [More]
QT Medical partners with LA BioMed to identify infants at risk of long QT syndrome

QT Medical partners with LA BioMed to identify infants at risk of long QT syndrome

Each year, some 2,000 babies are born in the U.S. with a genetic heart condition, known as long QT syndrome. If not diagnosed in time, babies with long QT syndrome can die from a sudden arrhythmia, or irregular heartbeat. [More]