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Arsenic is a naturally occurring element widely distributed in the earth’s crust. In the environment, arsenic is combined with oxygen, chlorine, and sulfur to form inorganic arsenic compounds. Arsenic in animals and plants combines with carbon and hydrogen to form organic arsenic compounds.

Breathing high levels of inorganic arsenic can give you a sore throat or irritated lungs.

Ingesting very high levels of arsenic can result in death. Exposure to lower levels can cause nausea and vomiting, decreased production of red and white blood cells, abnormal heart rhythm, damage to blood vessels, and a sensation of “pins and needles” in hands and feet.

Ingesting or breathing low levels of inorganic arsenic for a long time can cause a darkening of the skin and the appearance of small “corns” or “warts” on the palms, soles, and torso.
Study reveals distribution of toxic arsenic in cell nuclei of plants

Study reveals distribution of toxic arsenic in cell nuclei of plants

Toxic arsenic initially accumulates in the nuclei of plants' cells. This has been revealed by an X-ray examination of the aquatic plant rigid hornwort (Ceratophyllum demersum) using DESY's X-ray source PETRA III. [More]
New European standard method can help measure inorganic arsenic content in foods

New European standard method can help measure inorganic arsenic content in foods

A new European standard method to determine the content of inorganic arsenic in foodstuffs has been developed at the National Food Institute, Technical University of Denmark. Inorganic arsenic is carcinogenic according to the World Health Organization, WHO. Being able to accurately measure the substance in different foods is necessary to ensure that the content is below the maximum levels recently set by the European Commission to protect consumers. [More]
Chinese medicines may contain hazardous chemicals

Chinese medicines may contain hazardous chemicals

Chinese medicines are manufactured and distributed all over the world. Many people perceive them as natural, even benign and with few side effects, but regulation of human medicines fluctuates widely in different countries. [More]
Austrian scientists detect new membrane-bound arsenic substances in herring caviar

Austrian scientists detect new membrane-bound arsenic substances in herring caviar

Seafish are known for their capability to accumulate toxic trace elements like mercury or arsenic. These elements are metabolized and end up chemically bound to organic compounds found in cell constituents like the membranes. [More]
Metrohm recognizes Top 5 applicants of 2016 Young Chemist award

Metrohm recognizes Top 5 applicants of 2016 Young Chemist award

Metrohm USA is proud to recognize the Top 5 applicants of its 2016 Young Chemist award. In addition to this year’s $10,000 award winner Amay Bandodkar from the University of California San Diego, the expert panel also awarded four honorable mention awards. [More]
Low levels of arsenic may influence fetal growth

Low levels of arsenic may influence fetal growth

Fetal growth may be impacted by low levels of arsenic that pregnant women consume in drinking water and food, a Dartmouth College study finds. [More]
NJIT students building low-cost water filter for people suffering from kidney disease in rural Sri Lanka

NJIT students building low-cost water filter for people suffering from kidney disease in rural Sri Lanka

Backed by a grant from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, an interdisciplinary, student-led team from New Jersey Institute of Technology is building a low-cost water filter for villagers in the north central farming region of Sri Lanka who are suffering from high rates of chronic kidney disease. [More]
UGA study helps solve mystery of how African trypanosomes communicate

UGA study helps solve mystery of how African trypanosomes communicate

While scientists have known for years that African trypanosomes cause sleeping sickness, they've been left scratching their heads as to how these tiny single-celled organisms communicate. A University of Georgia study, published Jan. 14 in the journal Cell, helps solve this mystery. [More]
Researchers identify transporters responsible for arsenic accumulation in plant seeds

Researchers identify transporters responsible for arsenic accumulation in plant seeds

Researchers from FIU's Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine Barry P. Rosen and Jian Chen, both from the Department of Cellular Biology and Pharmacology, are part of an international team that has identified how arsenic gets into the seeds of plants such as rice. T [More]

CTI BioPharma earns $10 million milestone payment from Teva for TRISENOX (arsenic trioxide)

CTI BioPharma Corp. today announced that it has received a $10 million milestone payment from Teva Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd. (Teva) related to the achievement of sales milestones for TRISENOX (arsenic trioxide). [More]
Air pollution accounts for over 430 000 premature deaths in Europe, shows new report

Air pollution accounts for over 430 000 premature deaths in Europe, shows new report

Air pollution is the single largest environmental health risk in Europe. It shortens people’s lifespan and contributes to serious illnesses such as heart disease, respiratory problems and cancer. [More]
Adding seaweed to processed foods reduces cardiovascular diseases

Adding seaweed to processed foods reduces cardiovascular diseases

Adding seaweed to processed foods such as frozen pizzas, hot dogs and dried pasta will reduce cardiovascular diseases, concludes a new scientific article. One suggestion is to replace 5% of the flour in pizza dough with dried and granulated seaweed. [More]
Arsenic exposure during pregnancy may increase risk of infections, respiratory symptoms in children

Arsenic exposure during pregnancy may increase risk of infections, respiratory symptoms in children

Children born to women who were exposed to higher arsenic during pregnancy have a greater risk of infections and respiratory symptoms within their first year of life, a Dartmouth College-led study shows. [More]
Binghamton University biochemist finds new way to fight cancer

Binghamton University biochemist finds new way to fight cancer

A Binghamton University biochemist has discovered a new way to fight cancer, one that attacks only the cancer cells and promises fewer side effects. He hunts hedgehogs. [More]
Arsenic trioxide feasible in low-, high-risk acute promyelocytic leukaemia

Arsenic trioxide feasible in low-, high-risk acute promyelocytic leukaemia

The use of arsenic trioxide instead of idarubicin in combination with all-trans retinoic acid is a feasible option in patients with acute promyelocytic leukaemia, regardless of risk level, suggests a phase III trial. [More]
Air pollution linked to overall increase in risk of death

Air pollution linked to overall increase in risk of death

In what is believed to be the largest, most detailed study of its kind in the United States, scientists at NYU Langone Medical Center and elsewhere have confirmed that tiny chemical particles in the air we breathe are linked to an overall increase in risk of death. [More]
DNDi announces successful completion of SCYX-7158 Phase I study for treatment of sleeping sickness

DNDi announces successful completion of SCYX-7158 Phase I study for treatment of sleeping sickness

The Drugs for Neglected Diseases initiative (DNDi) has announced today at the 9th European Congress on Tropical Medicine and International Health in Basel, Switzerland, the successful completion of Phase I human clinical trials for SCYX-7158 (AN5568), the first oral drug candidate specifically developed from the earliest drug discovery stage to combat human African trypanosomiasis, or sleeping sickness, a deadly parasitic disease transmitted by the tsetse fly. [More]
Pre-birth arsenic exposure associated with early puberty, obesity in mice

Pre-birth arsenic exposure associated with early puberty, obesity in mice

Female mice exposed in utero, or in the womb, to low levels of arsenic through drinking water displayed signs of early puberty and became obese as adults, according to scientists from the National Institutes of Health. [More]
Certain genes exposed to harsh environmental factors can increase diabetes risk

Certain genes exposed to harsh environmental factors can increase diabetes risk

Arsenic, which can be present in ground water, modifies an enzyme that alters the secretion of insulin in the pancreas. Physicians, usually, show type II diabetes as a consequence of an exaggerated food intake and lack of exercise; however, there are about 50 genes that cause changes in the DNA, known as polymorphisms, that when combined with harsh environmental factors are at increased risk of developing the disease, mentioned PhD Marta Ostrosky Wegman, director of the Institute for Biomedical Research the National University of Mexico (UNAM). [More]
Study: New material that mimics coral could help remove toxic heavy metals from the ocean

Study: New material that mimics coral could help remove toxic heavy metals from the ocean

A new material that mimics coral could help remove toxic heavy metals like mercury from the ocean, according to a new study published in the Journal of Colloid and Interface Science. The researchers, from Anhui Jianzhu University in China, say their new material could provide inspiration for other approaches to removing pollutants. [More]
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