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Arsenic is a naturally occurring element widely distributed in the earth’s crust. In the environment, arsenic is combined with oxygen, chlorine, and sulfur to form inorganic arsenic compounds. Arsenic in animals and plants combines with carbon and hydrogen to form organic arsenic compounds.

Breathing high levels of inorganic arsenic can give you a sore throat or irritated lungs.

Ingesting very high levels of arsenic can result in death. Exposure to lower levels can cause nausea and vomiting, decreased production of red and white blood cells, abnormal heart rhythm, damage to blood vessels, and a sensation of “pins and needles” in hands and feet.

Ingesting or breathing low levels of inorganic arsenic for a long time can cause a darkening of the skin and the appearance of small “corns” or “warts” on the palms, soles, and torso.
UGA study helps solve mystery of how African trypanosomes communicate

UGA study helps solve mystery of how African trypanosomes communicate

While scientists have known for years that African trypanosomes cause sleeping sickness, they've been left scratching their heads as to how these tiny single-celled organisms communicate. A University of Georgia study, published Jan. 14 in the journal Cell, helps solve this mystery. [More]
Researchers identify transporters responsible for arsenic accumulation in plant seeds

Researchers identify transporters responsible for arsenic accumulation in plant seeds

Researchers from FIU's Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine Barry P. Rosen and Jian Chen, both from the Department of Cellular Biology and Pharmacology, are part of an international team that has identified how arsenic gets into the seeds of plants such as rice. T [More]

CTI BioPharma earns $10 million milestone payment from Teva for TRISENOX (arsenic trioxide)

CTI BioPharma Corp. today announced that it has received a $10 million milestone payment from Teva Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd. (Teva) related to the achievement of sales milestones for TRISENOX (arsenic trioxide). [More]
Air pollution accounts for over 430 000 premature deaths in Europe, shows new report

Air pollution accounts for over 430 000 premature deaths in Europe, shows new report

Air pollution is the single largest environmental health risk in Europe. It shortens people’s lifespan and contributes to serious illnesses such as heart disease, respiratory problems and cancer. [More]
Adding seaweed to processed foods reduces cardiovascular diseases

Adding seaweed to processed foods reduces cardiovascular diseases

Adding seaweed to processed foods such as frozen pizzas, hot dogs and dried pasta will reduce cardiovascular diseases, concludes a new scientific article. One suggestion is to replace 5% of the flour in pizza dough with dried and granulated seaweed. [More]
Arsenic exposure during pregnancy may increase risk of infections, respiratory symptoms in children

Arsenic exposure during pregnancy may increase risk of infections, respiratory symptoms in children

Children born to women who were exposed to higher arsenic during pregnancy have a greater risk of infections and respiratory symptoms within their first year of life, a Dartmouth College-led study shows. [More]
Binghamton University biochemist finds new way to fight cancer

Binghamton University biochemist finds new way to fight cancer

A Binghamton University biochemist has discovered a new way to fight cancer, one that attacks only the cancer cells and promises fewer side effects. He hunts hedgehogs. [More]
Arsenic trioxide feasible in low-, high-risk acute promyelocytic leukaemia

Arsenic trioxide feasible in low-, high-risk acute promyelocytic leukaemia

The use of arsenic trioxide instead of idarubicin in combination with all-trans retinoic acid is a feasible option in patients with acute promyelocytic leukaemia, regardless of risk level, suggests a phase III trial. [More]
Air pollution linked to overall increase in risk of death

Air pollution linked to overall increase in risk of death

In what is believed to be the largest, most detailed study of its kind in the United States, scientists at NYU Langone Medical Center and elsewhere have confirmed that tiny chemical particles in the air we breathe are linked to an overall increase in risk of death. [More]
DNDi announces successful completion of SCYX-7158 Phase I study for treatment of sleeping sickness

DNDi announces successful completion of SCYX-7158 Phase I study for treatment of sleeping sickness

The Drugs for Neglected Diseases initiative (DNDi) has announced today at the 9th European Congress on Tropical Medicine and International Health in Basel, Switzerland, the successful completion of Phase I human clinical trials for SCYX-7158 (AN5568), the first oral drug candidate specifically developed from the earliest drug discovery stage to combat human African trypanosomiasis, or sleeping sickness, a deadly parasitic disease transmitted by the tsetse fly. [More]
Pre-birth arsenic exposure associated with early puberty, obesity in mice

Pre-birth arsenic exposure associated with early puberty, obesity in mice

Female mice exposed in utero, or in the womb, to low levels of arsenic through drinking water displayed signs of early puberty and became obese as adults, according to scientists from the National Institutes of Health. [More]
Certain genes exposed to harsh environmental factors can increase diabetes risk

Certain genes exposed to harsh environmental factors can increase diabetes risk

Arsenic, which can be present in ground water, modifies an enzyme that alters the secretion of insulin in the pancreas. Physicians, usually, show type II diabetes as a consequence of an exaggerated food intake and lack of exercise; however, there are about 50 genes that cause changes in the DNA, known as polymorphisms, that when combined with harsh environmental factors are at increased risk of developing the disease, mentioned PhD Marta Ostrosky Wegman, director of the Institute for Biomedical Research the National University of Mexico (UNAM). [More]
Study: New material that mimics coral could help remove toxic heavy metals from the ocean

Study: New material that mimics coral could help remove toxic heavy metals from the ocean

A new material that mimics coral could help remove toxic heavy metals like mercury from the ocean, according to a new study published in the Journal of Colloid and Interface Science. The researchers, from Anhui Jianzhu University in China, say their new material could provide inspiration for other approaches to removing pollutants. [More]
Soil microbe prevents arsenic accumulation in rice plants

Soil microbe prevents arsenic accumulation in rice plants

University of Delaware researchers have discovered a soil microbe that mobilizes an "iron shield" to block the uptake of toxic arsenic in rice. [More]
Use of hookah steam stones could lead to dangerous, false sense of security

Use of hookah steam stones could lead to dangerous, false sense of security

New research suggests the use of hookah steam stones - commonly considered a safer alternative to cigarette smoking - could be leaving users with a dangerous, false sense of security. The findings out of the University of Cincinnati/Agilent Technologies Metallomics Center of the Americas are published this month in the Microchemical Journal. [More]
Study: Placenta can be used to measure arsenic exposure in pregnant women, fetuses

Study: Placenta can be used to measure arsenic exposure in pregnant women, fetuses

The placenta can be used to reliably measure arsenic exposure in pregnant women and how much of the toxic metal is transferred to their fetuses, a Dartmouth College study shows. [More]
Virginia Tech biochemists identify potential drug target against sleeping sickness

Virginia Tech biochemists identify potential drug target against sleeping sickness

Virginia Tech biochemists are trying to deliver a stern wake-up call to the parasite that causes sleeping sickness. [More]
Formula-fed infants have higher arsenic levels than breast-fed infants

Formula-fed infants have higher arsenic levels than breast-fed infants

In the first U.S. study of urinary arsenic in babies, Dartmouth College researchers found that formula-fed infants had higher arsenic levels than breast-fed infants, and that breast milk itself contained very low arsenic concentrations. [More]
New NIEHS grants to support independent biomedical research

New NIEHS grants to support independent biomedical research

New grants totaling $3 million will go to six outstanding early-career scientists, bridging a funding gap to independent biomedical research. The National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, part of the National Institutes of Health, created the award to encourage early stage researchers who want to discover how our environment influences human health. [More]
Arsenic present in private wells threatens people in many U.S. states

Arsenic present in private wells threatens people in many U.S. states

Naturally occurring arsenic in private wells threatens people in many U.S. states and parts of Canada, according to a package of a dozen scientific papers to be published next week. The studies, focused mainly on New England but applicable elsewhere, say private wells present continuing risks due to almost nonexistent regulation in most states, homeowner inaction and inadequate mitigation measures. [More]
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