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Arsenic is a naturally occurring element widely distributed in the earth’s crust. In the environment, arsenic is combined with oxygen, chlorine, and sulfur to form inorganic arsenic compounds. Arsenic in animals and plants combines with carbon and hydrogen to form organic arsenic compounds.

Breathing high levels of inorganic arsenic can give you a sore throat or irritated lungs.

Ingesting very high levels of arsenic can result in death. Exposure to lower levels can cause nausea and vomiting, decreased production of red and white blood cells, abnormal heart rhythm, damage to blood vessels, and a sensation of “pins and needles” in hands and feet.

Ingesting or breathing low levels of inorganic arsenic for a long time can cause a darkening of the skin and the appearance of small “corns” or “warts” on the palms, soles, and torso.
Effects of PectaSol-C modified citrus pectin in prostate cancer patients to be studied in phase III trial

Effects of PectaSol-C modified citrus pectin in prostate cancer patients to be studied in phase III trial

A phase III clinical trial conducted at the Meir Medical Center in Kfar-Saba, Israel is now recruiting participants to study the effects of dietary supplement PectaSol-C modified citrus pectin (MCP) in controlling prostate specific antigen (PSA) levels in prostate cancer patients. [More]

Exposure to arsenic in drinking water negatively associated with child intelligence, shows study

A study by researchers at Columbia University reports that schoolchildren from three school districts in Maine exposed to arsenic in drinking water experienced declines in child intelligence. [More]
Research reveals 2 key mechanisms of oxidative stress regulation

Research reveals 2 key mechanisms of oxidative stress regulation

Regulation of oxidative stress is critical to cell survival. New preclinical research from Roswell Park Cancer Institute (RPCI) has revealed two key mechanisms by which oxidative stress is regulated in normal and cancerous cells. [More]

Metallic toys, low-cost jewelry can affect children's health

We know that babies and young children often put non-food items in their mouths, a behaviour that occasionally leads to swallowing of foreign objects. Metallic toys and low-cost jewelry often contain toxic substances such as lead and cadmium. [More]

Arsenic, selenium, mercury in bighead and silver carp do not appear to be health concern

Researchers at the Prairie Research Institute's Illinois Natural History Survey have found that overall, concentrations of arsenic, selenium, and mercury in bighead and silver carp from the lower Illinois River do not appear to be a health concern for a majority of human consumers. [More]
Poisonous bacteria may one day become useful tool for industry and environmental protection

Poisonous bacteria may one day become useful tool for industry and environmental protection

Buried deep in the mud along the banks of a remote salt lake near Yosemite National Park are colonies of bacteria with an unusual property: they breathe a toxic metal to survive. [More]
Researchers receive $8M grant to expand research in arsenic toxicity in children, pregnant women

Researchers receive $8M grant to expand research in arsenic toxicity in children, pregnant women

​The Children's Environmental Health and Disease Prevention Research Center at Dartmouth and its partner universities have received an $8 million grant to expand their research into arsenic toxicity in children and pregnant women. [More]

Cell Therapeutics gets $5 million payment from Teva for TRISENOX

Cell Therapeutics, Inc. today announced that it has received a $5 million milestone payment from Teva Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd. related to the achievement of a sales milestone for TRISENOX (arsenic trioxide). [More]

State highlights: Dispute over what doctors can say at Catholic hospital

A dispute between a Colorado cardiologist and a Catholic hospital over what he says is a ban on discussing abortion with patients, even when a pregnancy threatens a woman's life, is part of today's health policy roundup from Colorado and California. [More]

New method for checking medicines for elemental impurities

For the first time in more than 100 years, drug and dietary supplement manufacturers are updating the tests used to ensure that their products contain safe levels of metal impurities, and the stringent new requirements, instruments and costs are the topic of the cover story in the current edition of Chemical & Engineering News. C&EN is the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, the world's largest scientific society. [More]

Millions of Chinese face risk of chronic arsenic poisoning

Since the 1960s, it has been known that groundwater resources in certain provinces of China are contaminated with arsenic. Estimates of the numbers of affected people have risen year by year. In the most recent survey - conducted by the Chinese Ministry of Health between 2001 and 2005 - more than 20,000 (5%) of the 445,000 wells tested showed arsenic concentrations higher than 50 -g/L. [More]
Study confirms exposure to arsenic in drinking water can impair lung function

Study confirms exposure to arsenic in drinking water can impair lung function

A new study confirms that exposure to low to moderate amounts of arsenic in drinking water can impair lung function. Doses of about 120 parts per billion of arsenic in well water-about 12 times the dose generally considered safe-produced lung damage comparable to decades of smoking tobacco. Smoking, especially by males, made arsenic-related damage even worse. [More]

Study explores factors affecting public-supply-well vulnerability to contamination

Key factors have been identified that help determine the vulnerability of public-supply wells to contamination. A new USGS report describes these factors, providing insight into which contaminants in an aquifer might reach a well and when, how and at what concentration they might arrive. [More]
Build-up of harmful chemicals in the body affects people of all social standings

Build-up of harmful chemicals in the body affects people of all social standings

A new study published this week has found that the build-up of harmful chemicals in the body is affecting people of all social standings -- not just those from economically deprived backgrounds as previously thought. [More]

High levels of arsenic in rice associated with elevated genetic damage in humans

High levels of arsenic in rice have been shown to be associated with elevated genetic damage in humans, a new study has found. [More]

High arsenic levels in rice pose potential threat to human health: Study

High levels of arsenic in rice have been shown to be associated with elevated genetic damage in humans, a new study has found. [More]

Inorganic arsenic in apple juice: FDA sets new limits

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today proposed an "action level" of 10 parts per billion (ppb) for inorganic arsenic in apple juice. This is the same level set by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for arsenic in drinking water. [More]
WHO includes new paediatric therapeutic options to EMLc

WHO includes new paediatric therapeutic options to EMLc

This week the World Health Organization released its newly updated 4th WHO Model List of Essential Medicines for Children, in which three treatments developed by the Drugs for Neglected Diseases initiative and its partners have now been included. [More]

Low doses of arsenic and estrogen can cause cancer in prostate cells, study finds

Science knows that arsenic and estrogen can cause cancer. At certain very low levels, the chemicals offer little to no threats to human health. [More]

Sustained engagement, partnership needed to implement new treatments for neglected diseases

Days after two landmark resolutions were adopted at the World Health Assembly - on neglected tropical diseases and on research and development, financing and coordination for the health needs of developing countries - over 400 scientists, representatives and ministers of health, ambassadors, national control programme representatives, African regulators, health workers, public health experts, and activists from 21 African countries and 10 others from around the world gather in Nairobi to take stock of health innovation for neglected diseases in Africa over the past decade. [More]