Aspirin News and Research RSS Feed - Aspirin News and Research

Aspirin also known as acetylsalicylic acid is a salicylate drug, often used as an analgesic to relieve minor aches and pains, as an antipyretic to reduce fever, and as an anti-inflammatory medication. Aspirin also has an antiplatelet, or "anti-clotting", effect and is used in long-term, low doses to prevent heart attacks, strokes and blood clot formation in people at high risk for developing blood clots. It has also been established that low doses of aspirin may be given immediately after a heart attack to reduce the risk of another heart attack or of the death of cardiac tissue.
Aspirin can improve efficacy of schizophrenia treatments

Aspirin can improve efficacy of schizophrenia treatments

A new study shows that some anti-inflammatory medicines, such as aspirin, estrogen, and Fluimucil, can improve the efficacy of existing schizophrenia treatments. This work is being presented at the European College of Neuropsychopharmacology conference in Berlin. [More]
New drug naming system to be presented at ECNP conference in Berlin

New drug naming system to be presented at ECNP conference in Berlin

What's in a name? Doctors have found that the name of the drug you are prescribed significantly influences how the patient sees the treatment. [More]
Preoperative IV ibuprofen improves quality of recovery after laparoscopic cholecystectomy surgery

Preoperative IV ibuprofen improves quality of recovery after laparoscopic cholecystectomy surgery

Cumberland Pharmaceuticals Inc. today announced that preoperative intravenous ibuprofen improved overall quality of recovery in patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy surgery. These results will be presented at the American Anesthesiology 2014 Annual Meeting in New Orleans, Louisiana. [More]
Views on giving flu shot to younger children

Views on giving flu shot to younger children

It's a common question parents ask themselves this time of year: Does my child really need a flu shot? Though the flu may seem harmless, the truth is on average 20,000 children age 5 and younger are hospitalized due to flu symptoms each year. [More]
Case Western Reserve researcher lands Director's New Innovator Awards from NIH

Case Western Reserve researcher lands Director's New Innovator Awards from NIH

For the second consecutive year, a Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine researcher has landed one of the year's much-coveted Director's New Innovator Awards from the National Institutes of Health. Principal investigator Rong Xu, PhD, assistant professor of medical informatics, will receive $2,377,000 for five years, starting immediately, to initiate computational analysis of thousands of drugs and their effects. [More]
Medac Pharma launches Rasuvo (methotrexate) injection for patients with RA, pJIA and psoriasis

Medac Pharma launches Rasuvo (methotrexate) injection for patients with RA, pJIA and psoriasis

Medac Pharma, Inc., a privately held pharmaceutical company, has announced the launch of its lead product Rasuvo (methotrexate) injection for patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), poly-articular-course juvenile idiopathic arthritis (pJIA) and psoriasis in the U.S. [More]
Care lags for people who have stroke in hospital, study finds

Care lags for people who have stroke in hospital, study finds

At the first sign of a stroke, time is of the essence. For every minute of delay in treatment, people typically lose almost two million brain cells. Yet a new study presented at the Canadian Stroke Congress reveals that those delays - in getting the right tests and the right drugs - can be longer when people experience a stroke in a hospital. [More]
Taking NSAIDs with other drugs can increase risk of upper GI bleeding, study finds

Taking NSAIDs with other drugs can increase risk of upper GI bleeding, study finds

Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) - such as ibuprofen and aspirin - increase one's risk of upper gastrointestinal bleeding. When taken in combination with other drugs, this risk is significantly higher, according to new research appearing in the October issue of Gastroenterology, the official journal of the American Gastroenterological Association. [More]
EMD Serono declares winners of first Grant for Oncology Innovation

EMD Serono declares winners of first Grant for Oncology Innovation

EMD Serono, the biopharmaceutical division of Merck KGaA, Darmstadt, Germany, today announced the winners of the first Grant for Oncology Innovation (GOI), who will receive grants totaling $1.3 million. [More]
UVA earns national award for enhancing care for heart attack patients

UVA earns national award for enhancing care for heart attack patients

The University of Virginia Health System has earned a national award from the American College of Cardiology for enhancing care for heart attack patients. [More]
Study suggests potential treatment for cardiovascular disease in people with apoE4 gene variant

Study suggests potential treatment for cardiovascular disease in people with apoE4 gene variant

Researchers at UT-Southwestern Medical Center have found that the most common variant of the circulating protein apolipoprotein E, called apoE3, helps repair the lining of blood vessels. Individuals with another variant, called apoE4, do not get the benefit of this repair, putting them at higher risk for cardiovascular disease. [More]
Researcher discovers that aspirin prevents first attack

Researcher discovers that aspirin prevents first attack

The first researcher in the world to discover that aspirin prevents a first attack, Charles H. Hennekens, M.D., Dr.P.H., the first Sir Richard Doll professor and senior academic advisor to the dean in the Charles E. Schmidt College of Medicine at Florida Atlantic University, has published a comprehensive review in the current issue of the journal Trends in Cardiovascular Medicine. [More]
Novel polypill increases patient adherence to treatment following heart attack

Novel polypill increases patient adherence to treatment following heart attack

New research shows a novel polypill increases patient adherence to treatment following a myocardial infarction (MI) or heart attack, according to new study results reported at the European Society of Cardiology's ESC Congress 2014 in Barcelona, Spain. [More]
Ambulance administration of antiplatelet medication may help heart attack patients

Ambulance administration of antiplatelet medication may help heart attack patients

Ambulance administration of the antiplatelet medication ticagrelor to patients with a type of heart attack known as ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) is not better than hospital administration, in terms of improving blood flow in blocked arteries before a revascularisation procedure, according to a new study presented at ESC Congress 2014 today. [More]
Morbidity, mortality of AF patients remains high at 1 year even with good use of oral anticoagulants

Morbidity, mortality of AF patients remains high at 1 year even with good use of oral anticoagulants

Mortality and morbidity of atrial fibrillation (AF) patients remains high at one year despite good use of oral anticoagulants, according to the one year follow up of the Atrial Fibrillation General Pilot Registry. [More]
Janssen, Bayer announce expansion of EXPLORER global cardiovascular research program for XARELTO

Janssen, Bayer announce expansion of EXPLORER global cardiovascular research program for XARELTO

Janssen Research & Development, LLC and its development partner, Bayer HealthCare, announced today the expansion of the EXPLORER global cardiovascular research program for XARELTO (rivaroxaban) to include additional high-risk patient populations. [More]
Three commonly used NSAIDs affect cell membranes, produce unwanted side effects

Three commonly used NSAIDs affect cell membranes, produce unwanted side effects

Researchers have discovered that three commonly used nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, or NSAIDs, alter the activity of enzymes within cell membranes. Their finding suggests that, if taken at higher-than-approved doses and/or for long periods of time, these prescription-level NSAIDs and other drugs that affect the membrane may produce wide-ranging and unwanted side effects. [More]
DNA testing for congenital cataracts can accurately diagnose diseases linked to childhood blindness

DNA testing for congenital cataracts can accurately diagnose diseases linked to childhood blindness

Researchers in the United Kingdom have demonstrated that advanced DNA testing for congenital cataracts can quickly and accurately diagnose a number of rare diseases marked by childhood blindness, according to a study published online today in Ophthalmology, the journal of the American Academy of Ophthalmology. [More]
Researchers shed light on the dual action of aspirin

Researchers shed light on the dual action of aspirin

Hugely popular non-steroidal anti-inflammation drugs like aspirin, naproxen (marketed as Aleve) and ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin) all work by inhibiting or killing an enzyme called cyclooxygenase - a key catalyst in production of hormone-like lipid compounds called prostaglandins that are linked to a variety of ailments, from headaches and arthritis to menstrual cramps and wound sepsis. [More]
Experts provide advice on safe fun in the sun

Experts provide advice on safe fun in the sun

While everybody needs some sun exposure to produce vitamin D (not to mention fun) sunburn and excessive ultra violet (UV) light exposure can not only cause damage to your skin, but sometimes lead to cancer. Michael Marchetti, M.D., of the Emergency Department at Bayshore Community Hospital, and Kevin Roma, M.D. of Riverview Medical Center's Emergency Department share their advice on safe fun in the sun. [More]