Atherosclerosis News and Research RSS Feed - Atherosclerosis News and Research

Atherosclerosis is the progressive buildup of plaque - the fatty deposits and other cells - in the inner walls of the arteries. The condition is a consequence of elevated cholesterol and for many it's a silent disease, with no visible signs or symptoms. The disease can begin in early adulthood and continues to progress for the rest of a person's life. Despite the serious nature of atherosclerosis, many people do not understand how it develops and progresses.
African-American patients with connective tissue diseases at risk for cardiovascular disease

African-American patients with connective tissue diseases at risk for cardiovascular disease

A study based on medical records from more than a quarter million adult patients found that African-American patients with connective tissue diseases such as lupus or rheumatoid arthritis were twice as likely as white patients to suffer from narrowed or atherosclerotic blood vessels, which increase the risk of a heart attack, stroke or death. [More]
LMU researchers reveal how crystalline deposits induce cell death

LMU researchers reveal how crystalline deposits induce cell death

Crystal formation plays a defining role in the pathogenesis of a range of common diseases, such as gout and atherosclerosis. Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich researchers led by Hans-Joachim Anders have now elucidated how the insoluble deposits induce cell death. [More]
Parathyroid hormone may mediate antihypertensive fracture risk

Parathyroid hormone may mediate antihypertensive fracture risk

Parathyroid hormone levels may be elevated by use of some antihypertensive agents but reduced by others, analysis of the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis suggests. [More]
Cardiovascular considerations crucial for CML TKI patients

Cardiovascular considerations crucial for CML TKI patients

A review of BCR–ABL1 tyrosine kinase inhibitors highlights the need to consider cardiovascular adverse event risk profiles when prescribing for patients with chronic myeloid leukaemia. [More]
Levels of mitochondrial DNA in the blood may predict chronic kidney disease risk

Levels of mitochondrial DNA in the blood may predict chronic kidney disease risk

The health of blood cells' energy-producing mitochondria may predict a person's risk of developing chronic kidney disease (CKD), according to a study appearing in an upcoming issue of the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology. [More]
Amgen announces approval of cholesterol-lowering medication Repatha (evolocumab) Injection in Japan

Amgen announces approval of cholesterol-lowering medication Repatha (evolocumab) Injection in Japan

Amgen today announced that the Japanese Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare has approved the cholesterol-lowering medication Repatha (evolocumab) Injection, the first proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) inhibitor to be approved in Japan. [More]
Aged Garlic Extract beneficial for preventing heart disease

Aged Garlic Extract beneficial for preventing heart disease

The supplement Aged Garlic Extract can reverse the buildup of deadly plaque in arteries and help prevent the progression of heart disease, according to a new study scheduled for publication in the Journal of Nutrition. [More]
Bradycardia does not increase cardiovascular disease risk

Bradycardia does not increase cardiovascular disease risk

Bradycardia - a slower than normal heartbeat - does not increase the risk of developing cardiovascular disease, according to a study conducted by researchers at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center. The study is published in the Jan.19 online edition of the Journal of American Medical Association Internal Medicine. [More]
Mount Sinai Heart starts TANSNIP-PESA study to determine how workplace-based lifestyle intervention reduces CV risk

Mount Sinai Heart starts TANSNIP-PESA study to determine how workplace-based lifestyle intervention reduces CV risk

World-renowned cardiologist Valentin Fuster, MD, PhD, Director of Mount Sinai Heart and Physician-in-Chief of The Mount Sinai Hospital, is undertaking a three-year study, known as the TANSNIP-PESA study, to determine whether a workplace-based lifestyle intervention, accompanied by imaging data, will lead to a reduction in the prevalence of cardiovascular (CV) disease risk factors related to lifestyle. [More]
PK molecule could be a target for vascular complications linked to type 1 diabetes

PK molecule could be a target for vascular complications linked to type 1 diabetes

In an article published ahead of print on November 24, 2015 in the journal Diabetes (available at http://dx.doi.org/10.2337/db15-0930), researchers from the Medical University of South Carolina, the American University of Beirut, and Case Western Reserve University report that a molecule called pre-kallikrein (PK) could be a target for the vascular complications associated with type 1 diabetes. [More]
UT Southwestern pediatric researchers identify key trigger of neonatal lung disease

UT Southwestern pediatric researchers identify key trigger of neonatal lung disease

Pediatric researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center have identified a key component of the pathogenesis of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), a devastating and sometimes fatal lung disease that affects premature infants. Their findings clarify what prompts the inflammatory response that results in BPD, which previously had been unclear. [More]
Novel anti-inflammatory agents could control hyper-inflammatory responses to fungal infection

Novel anti-inflammatory agents could control hyper-inflammatory responses to fungal infection

The most frequent fungal threat to humans, Candida albicans, is a common cause oral and genital infection. The fungal infections are often worsened by overwhelming inflammatory responses in the body and cause high mortality among risk groups. Umeå University doctoral student Ava Hosseinzadeh has discovered two novel anti-inflammatory agents, an antioxidant and an anti-inflammatory molecule, which could be used to control the hyper-inflammatory responses to the fungal infection. [More]
AngioDefender holds much promise for personalized cardiac care

AngioDefender holds much promise for personalized cardiac care

For a non-descript box it wields a mighty name and even more impressive possibilities for people with heart disease. Called the AngioDefender, the machine - no bigger than a shoebox - holds much promise in the ability to personalize cardiac care, say researchers at Lawson Health Research Institute, the research arm of St. Joseph's Health Care London. [More]
Infusing small dose of cytokine can prevent or reverse diabetes-related kidney failure

Infusing small dose of cytokine can prevent or reverse diabetes-related kidney failure

Diabetes is the leading cause of kidney failure, and scientists have found that infusing just a small dose of a cytokine, thought to help cause that failure, can instead prevent or reverse it. [More]
Novel antibody improves glucose regulation and reduces fatty liver in obese mice

Novel antibody improves glucose regulation and reduces fatty liver in obese mice

A new study by researchers from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and colleagues describes the pre-clinical development of a therapeutic that could potentially be used to treat type 2 diabetes, fatty liver disease, and other metabolic diseases. [More]
Mount Sinai cardiologist honored with Spain's highest health distinction

Mount Sinai cardiologist honored with Spain's highest health distinction

Valentin Fuster, MD, PhD, Director of Mount Sinai Heart and Physician-in-Chief of The Mount Sinai Hospital, was honored by the Government of Spain with the highest health distinction awarded in Spain. [More]
New MRI-based technology could help identify patients at risk of recurrent stroke

New MRI-based technology could help identify patients at risk of recurrent stroke

Patients who have had a stroke in the back of the brain are at greater risk of having another within two years if blood flow to the region is diminished, according to results of a multicenter study led by researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago. [More]
New mobile app empowers individuals to assess, enhance daily overall heart health

New mobile app empowers individuals to assess, enhance daily overall heart health

Leading cardiologist Valentin Fuster, MD, PhD, has developed a free mobile application called "Circle of Health" to empower individuals around the globe to take action to comprehensively assess and enhance their daily overall heart health. Cardiovascular diseases are the number one cause of mortality in the world. [More]
Researchers discover first broad spectrum drug that can potently kill aging cells in culture

Researchers discover first broad spectrum drug that can potently kill aging cells in culture

Researchers from the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences and other institutions are reporting the discovery of the first broad spectrum drug that can potently kill senescent (or aging) cells in culture and effectively clear the cells in animals by specifically targeting a pathway that is critical for the survival of senescent cells. [More]
ASU-led researchers add new worldwide resource to explore genes' deep and hidden messages

ASU-led researchers add new worldwide resource to explore genes' deep and hidden messages

After a decade-long $3 billion international effort, scientists heralded the 2001 completion of the human genome as a moon landing achievement for biology and the key to finally solving intractable diseases like cancer. [More]
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