Atherosclerosis News and Research RSS Feed - Atherosclerosis News and Research

Atherosclerosis is the progressive buildup of plaque - the fatty deposits and other cells - in the inner walls of the arteries. The condition is a consequence of elevated cholesterol and for many it's a silent disease, with no visible signs or symptoms. The disease can begin in early adulthood and continues to progress for the rest of a person's life. Despite the serious nature of atherosclerosis, many people do not understand how it develops and progresses.
Neighborhood physical and social environments may affect type 2 diabetes risk

Neighborhood physical and social environments may affect type 2 diabetes risk

Neighborhood resources to support greater physical activity and, to a lesser extent, healthy diets appear to be associated with a lower incidence of type 2 diabetes, although the results vary by the method of measurement used, according to an article published online by JAMA Internal Medicine. [More]
Omega-3 Coalition forms scientific advisory council to educate consumers about benefits, safety of omega-3s

Omega-3 Coalition forms scientific advisory council to educate consumers about benefits, safety of omega-3s

The Omega-3 Coalition, a group of industry stakeholders working to improve consumer knowledge of omega-3s, today announced the formation of a scientific advisory council. [More]
Cytokine levels may help distinguish patients with suicidality

Cytokine levels may help distinguish patients with suicidality

One American dies from suicide every 12.8 minutes, making suicide the tenth leading cause of death in the United States according to the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention. [More]
Johns Hopkins scientists use experimental therapy to reverse progression of atherosclerosis in rodents

Johns Hopkins scientists use experimental therapy to reverse progression of atherosclerosis in rodents

In what may be a major leap forward in the quest for new treatments of the most common form of cardiovascular disease, scientists at Johns Hopkins report they have found a way to halt and reverse the progression of atherosclerosis in rodents by loading microscopic nanoparticles with a chemical that restores the animals’ ability to properly handle cholesterol. [More]
DalCor, MHI partner to conduct Phase III clinical trial of investigational cardiovascular drug

DalCor, MHI partner to conduct Phase III clinical trial of investigational cardiovascular drug

DalCor Pharmaceuticals and the Montreal Heart Institute announced today a collaboration in principle to conduct an international Phase III clinical trial which could result in a major clinical advance in cardiovascular personalised medicine. [More]
Novel strategy shows aptamer-based modular delivery of microRNA in endothelial, breast cancer cells

Novel strategy shows aptamer-based modular delivery of microRNA in endothelial, breast cancer cells

Researchers have shown that a novel delivery strategy can efficiently introduce a functional microRNA that has anti-cancer and angiogenic activities into two different types of cells--breast cancer cells to inhibit tumor growth and metastasis, and cells that line blood vessels to protect against atherosclerosis. [More]
New data on Resverlogix RVX-208 for CKD treatment presented at ERA-EDTA Congress

New data on Resverlogix RVX-208 for CKD treatment presented at ERA-EDTA Congress

Resverlogix Corp. today announced that new data on RVX-208 was presented at the ERA-EDTA Congress in London, England in a poster entitled: "Effects of RVX-208, a First-in-Class Epigenetic BET-Inhibitor, on Key Renal Parameters in Subjects with a History of CVD, and Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD); a Post-hoc Analysis of Patients from the ASSERT, SUSTAIN and ASSURE Clinical Trials." [More]
Vascular surgeries provide relief from two debilitating conditions

Vascular surgeries provide relief from two debilitating conditions

When Carol Werkman first saw Loyola University Medical Center vascular surgeon Bernadette Aulivola, MD, she was suffering from two debilitating conditions: Every time she ate, Mrs. Werkman felt terrible abdominal pain. And whenever she walked more than a few hundred feet, her legs would begin to hurt. [More]
Regular use of aspirin may slow the progression of early emphysema, new research shows

Regular use of aspirin may slow the progression of early emphysema, new research shows

Regular use of aspirin may help slow the progression of early emphysema, according to new research presented at the 2015 American Thoracic Society International Conference. [More]
Volkan Sayin receives Assar Gabrielsson Award for ground-breaking study on use of anti-oxidants

Volkan Sayin receives Assar Gabrielsson Award for ground-breaking study on use of anti-oxidants

The Assar Gabrielsson Award is given to someone who has written an excellent thesis on cancer research. The 2015 award-winner is Volkan Sayin, and he receives the award for his ground-breaking discoveries about the risks of over-consumption of anti-oxidants. [More]
Study: Rheumatoid arthritis nearly doubles risk of surprise heart attack

Study: Rheumatoid arthritis nearly doubles risk of surprise heart attack

Patients with rheumatoid arthritis are at increased risk of a surprise heart attack, according to new research presented today at ICNC 12 by Dr Adriana Puente, a cardiologist in the National Medical Centre "20 de Noviembre" ISSSTE in Mexico City, Mexico. [More]
Novel method predicts risk of sudden cardiac death in hemodialysis patients

Novel method predicts risk of sudden cardiac death in hemodialysis patients

A new test has been developed to predict sudden cardiac death in hemodialysis patients in whom such forecasts were previously impossible. The novel method was presented at ICNC 12 by Dr Akiyoshi Hashimoto, a cardiologist at Sapporo Medical University in Japan. The test uses a combination of nuclear medicine, C-reactive protein and electrocardiogram (ECG). [More]
UTHealth scientists use new methods to explore naturally occurring 'knockout humans'

UTHealth scientists use new methods to explore naturally occurring 'knockout humans'

Researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston are helping to make precision medicine a reality by sequencing entire exomes of people to assess chronic disease risk and drug efficacy. The results of a study on this topic were published in Nature Genetics on Monday. [More]
Global market for cardiac rhythm management devices worth $13 billion for 2015

Global market for cardiac rhythm management devices worth $13 billion for 2015

The global market for cardiac rhythm management devices such as pacemakers and defibrillators is worth about $13 billion for 2015, according to Kalorama Information. The market research publisher said the market has benefited from the demand to move to a more mobile, wireless and efficient system both within major health facilities and in the home treatment markets. There is also an increasing trend to upgrade to more portable devices and devices which have added benefits such as MRI compatibility. [More]
Atrial fibrillation linked to only one type of heart attack

Atrial fibrillation linked to only one type of heart attack

Refining the results of a 2013 study, researchers have found that atrial fibrillation, or irregular heartbeat, is associated with only one type of heart attack - the more common of the two types. [More]
New method offers quick spectral analysis of blood and melanin contents in skin sites

New method offers quick spectral analysis of blood and melanin contents in skin sites

Many factors can change skin pigmentation, including aging, exposure to UV light, certain drugs, as well as certain diseases. A simple technique for measuring skin pigmentation could be a helpful tool for research and diagnostics. The same goes for measuring the skin blood content. [More]

Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease can promote development of coronary artery calcification

Data revealed today at The International Liver Congress 2015 show that non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) plays a role in the early stages of coronary atherosclerosis and in its more severe form it can also promote the development of coronary artery calcification (CAC). [More]
NIH-supported clinical trial to test statin use in patients with HIV-related cardiovascular disease

NIH-supported clinical trial to test statin use in patients with HIV-related cardiovascular disease

Researchers have begun enrolling participants in a multicenter international clinical trial to test whether statin administration can reduce the risk for major adverse cardiovascular events, such as heart attacks, strokes, and heart disease, in people with HIV infection. The trial is supported by the National Institutes of Health's National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute and National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. [More]
TOAST classification remains effective, easy-to-use system to classify strokes

TOAST classification remains effective, easy-to-use system to classify strokes

In 1993, neurologists Harold P. Adams Jr., MD, and Jose Biller, MD, and colleagues proposed a new way to classify strokes. It became known as the TOAST classification. Twenty-two years later, the TOAST classification remains an effective and easy-to-use system that is routinely employed in stroke studies around the world, Drs. Adams and Biller report in the journal Stroke, published online ahead of print. [More]
Combination of pomegranate juice and dates protects against heart disease

Combination of pomegranate juice and dates protects against heart disease

Glorious, red pomegranates and their Middle Eastern sister, luscious toffee-like dates, are delicious, increasingly trendy, and healthy to boot. [More]
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