Atherosclerosis News and Research RSS Feed - Atherosclerosis News and Research

Atherosclerosis is the progressive buildup of plaque - the fatty deposits and other cells - in the inner walls of the arteries. The condition is a consequence of elevated cholesterol and for many it's a silent disease, with no visible signs or symptoms. The disease can begin in early adulthood and continues to progress for the rest of a person's life. Despite the serious nature of atherosclerosis, many people do not understand how it develops and progresses.
New study finds that statins may not reduce risk for Parkinson's disease

New study finds that statins may not reduce risk for Parkinson's disease

The use of statins may not be associated with lowering risk for Parkinson's disease, according to a new study led by researchers at Penn State College of Medicine and National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences. The findings cast doubts on reports suggesting that the cholesterol-lowering medications may protect against this neurodegenerative brain disorder. [More]
Targeted nanomedicines could help prevent heart attacks caused by atherosclerosis

Targeted nanomedicines could help prevent heart attacks caused by atherosclerosis

Nanometer-sized "drones" that deliver a special type of healing molecule to fat deposits in arteries could become a new way to prevent heart attacks caused by atherosclerosis, according to a study in pre-clinical models by scientists at Brigham and Women's Hospital and Columbia University Medical Center. [More]
Trinity scientists reveal new marvel molecule that can block key process in inflammatory diseases

Trinity scientists reveal new marvel molecule that can block key process in inflammatory diseases

Scientists at Trinity College Dublin have uncovered a marvel molecule that blocks a key driver of inflammatory diseases. The finding could meet a major unmet clinical need by inspiring new non-invasive treatments for arthritis, multiple sclerosis and Muckle-Wells syndrome, among a myriad of other inflammatory diseases. [More]
Study: Most risk calculators used by clinicians overestimate risk of heart attack

Study: Most risk calculators used by clinicians overestimate risk of heart attack

Most "risk calculators" used by clinicians to gauge a patient's chances of suffering a heart attack and guide treatment decisions appear to significantly overestimate the likelihood of a heart attack, according to results of a study by investigators at Johns Hopkins and other institutions. [More]
BHB compound produced during dieting blocks part of immune system involved in inflammatory disorders

BHB compound produced during dieting blocks part of immune system involved in inflammatory disorders

Researchers at Yale School of Medicine have found that a compound produced by the body when dieting or fasting can block a part of the immune system involved in several inflammatory disorders such as type 2 diabetes, atherosclerosis, and Alzheimer's disease. [More]
Widely used clinical calculators overrate heart attack risk

Widely used clinical calculators overrate heart attack risk

Most "risk calculators" used by clinicians to gauge a patient's chances of suffering a heart attack and guide treatment decisions appear to significantly overestimate the likelihood of a heart attack, according to results of a study by investigators at Johns Hopkins and other institutions. [More]
Study shows link between low vitamin D levels in childhood and occurrence of atherosclerosis in adulthood

Study shows link between low vitamin D levels in childhood and occurrence of atherosclerosis in adulthood

Low levels of 25-OH vitamin D in childhood were associated with subclinical atherosclerosis over 25 years later in adulthood, according to a new study published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. [More]
Newly found protein in naked mole rat helps ward off cancer

Newly found protein in naked mole rat helps ward off cancer

A protein newly found in the naked mole rat may help explain its unique ability to ward off cancer. [More]
Study reveals how the brain can use fatty acids to control liver lipid production

Study reveals how the brain can use fatty acids to control liver lipid production

Ways of keeping the heart healthy has widened, with the discovery that the brain can help fight off hardening of the arteries. [More]
Study finds no evidence that testosterone replacement therapy increases cardiovascular risk

Study finds no evidence that testosterone replacement therapy increases cardiovascular risk

Fears of a link between testosterone replacement therapy and cardiovascular risk are misplaced, according to a review published in this month's Mayo Clinic Proceedings. The therapy has come under widespread scrutiny in recent months, including by a federal Food and Drug Administration panel convened last fall. [More]
Moderate drinking may reduce heart failure risk

Moderate drinking may reduce heart failure risk

Evidence already exists for the beneficial effects of drinking moderate amounts of alcohol on the risk of developing a number of heart conditions; however, the role it plays in the risk of developing heart failure has been under-researched with conflicting results. [More]
UH Case Medical Center researchers find that coenzyme A plays key role in cell metabolism

UH Case Medical Center researchers find that coenzyme A plays key role in cell metabolism

Case Western Reserve and University Hospitals Case Medical Center researchers and physicians have discovered that the molecule known as coenzyme A plays a key role in cell metabolism by regulating the actions of nitric oxide. Cell metabolism is the ongoing process of chemical transformations within the body's cells that sustains life, and alterations in metabolism are a common cause of human disease, including cancer and heart disease. [More]
Exposure to nanoparticles can play major role in development of cardiovascular diseases

Exposure to nanoparticles can play major role in development of cardiovascular diseases

Nanoparticles, extremely tiny particles measured in billionths of a meter, are increasingly everywhere, and especially in biomedical products. Their toxicity has been researched in general terms, but now a team of Israeli scientists has for the first time found that exposure nanoparticles (NPs) of silicon dioxide (SiO2) can play a major role in the development of cardiovascular diseases when the NP cross tissue and cellular barriers and also find their way into the circulatory system. [More]
Healthy Nordic diet reduces expression of inflammation-associated genes in adipose tissue

Healthy Nordic diet reduces expression of inflammation-associated genes in adipose tissue

A Nordic study led by the Institute of Public Health and Clinical Nutrition at the University of Eastern Finland discovered that the health-promoting Nordic diet reduces the expression of inflammation-associated genes in subcutaneous adipose tissue. In overweight persons, the expression of these genes reduced without weight loss. [More]
Study: Sugar molecule promotes spontaneous cancers in mice

Study: Sugar molecule promotes spontaneous cancers in mice

While people who eat a lot of red meat are known to be at higher risk for certain cancers, other carnivores are not, prompting researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine to investigate the possible tumor-forming role of a sugar called Neu5Gc, which is naturally found in most mammals but not in humans. [More]
EMA validates Synageva's sebelipase alfa MAA for LAL Deficiency

EMA validates Synageva's sebelipase alfa MAA for LAL Deficiency

Synageva BioPharma Corp., a biopharmaceutical company developing therapeutic products for rare disorders, today announced validation by the European Medicines Agency of the Marketing Authorization Application for sebelipase alfa for LAL Deficiency. [More]
Broccoli can help reduce HGPS-related defects

Broccoli can help reduce HGPS-related defects

Children who suffer from Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria syndrome age prematurely due to a defective protein in their cells. Scientists at Technische Universit√§t M√ľnchen have now identified another important pathological factor: the system responsible for removing cellular debris and for breaking down defective proteins operates at lower levels in HGPS cells than in normal cells. The researchers have succeeded in reactivating protein breakdown in HGPS cells and thus reducing disease-related defects by using a substance from broccoli. [More]
Researchers pinpoint rare gene mutations that increase risk of heart attack early in life

Researchers pinpoint rare gene mutations that increase risk of heart attack early in life

A team of investigators from the Broad Institute, Massachusetts General Hospital and other leading biomedical research institutions has pinpointed rare mutations in a gene called APOA5 that increase a person's risk of having a heart attack early in life. These mutations disable the APOA5 gene and also raise the levels in the blood of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins, a type of fat. [More]
New technique shows promise for early diagnosis of cardiovascular disease

New technique shows promise for early diagnosis of cardiovascular disease

A new technique developed at Sweden's KTH Royal Institute of Technology shows promise for early diagnosis and treatment of cardiovascular disease. [More]
Mediterranean diet improves cardiovascular performance in patients with erectile dysfunction

Mediterranean diet improves cardiovascular performance in patients with erectile dysfunction

The Mediterranean diet is linked to improved cardiovascular performance in patients with erectile dysfunction, according to research presented at EuroEcho-Imaging 2014 by Dr Athanasios Angelis from Greece. Patients with erectile dysfunction who had poor adherence to the Mediterranean diet had more vascular and cardiac damage. [More]