Atherosclerosis News and Research RSS Feed - Atherosclerosis News and Research

Atherosclerosis is the progressive buildup of plaque - the fatty deposits and other cells - in the inner walls of the arteries. The condition is a consequence of elevated cholesterol and for many it's a silent disease, with no visible signs or symptoms. The disease can begin in early adulthood and continues to progress for the rest of a person's life. Despite the serious nature of atherosclerosis, many people do not understand how it develops and progresses.
Study examines mechanism of bone-protective properties of California dried plums

Study examines mechanism of bone-protective properties of California dried plums

Fifty-seven million Americans suffer from low bone density or osteoporosis, a disease which causes bones to become so weak and brittle that even a minor fall or other stresses may cause fractures. [More]
Surgeon explains who needs screening for abdominal aortic aneurysms

Surgeon explains who needs screening for abdominal aortic aneurysms

Bulges in body's major blood vessel can cause potentially lethal ruptures, blood clots. An abdominal aortic aneurysm is a potentially life-threatening condition: If the body's major blood vessel ruptures, it can prove deadly. [More]
Researchers develop world's first T-cell peptide-based vaccine for heart disease

Researchers develop world's first T-cell peptide-based vaccine for heart disease

Researchers at Wayne State University have made a fundamental discovery and, in subsequent collaboration with scientists at La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology (LIAI), are one step closer to the goal of developing the world's first T-cell peptide-based vaccine for heart disease - the number one killer in the nation. [More]
Study finds 20% overall drop per decade in deaths after stroke

Study finds 20% overall drop per decade in deaths after stroke

Fewer Americans are having strokes and those who do have a lower risk of dying from them finds a new study led by Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health researchers. [More]
Rates of stroke incidence, subsequent death decrease among black and white U.S. adults

Rates of stroke incidence, subsequent death decrease among black and white U.S. adults

In a study that included a large sample of black and white U.S. adults from several communities, rates of stroke incidence and subsequent death decreased from 1987 to 2011, with decreases varying across age-groups, according to a study in the July 16 issue of JAMA. [More]
Cordis launches SABER Catheter for treatment of patients with Peripheral Arterial Disease

Cordis launches SABER Catheter for treatment of patients with Peripheral Arterial Disease

Cordis Corporation announced today the launch of its SABER PTA Dilatation Catheter ("SABER Catheter") for the treatment of patients with Peripheral Arterial Disease (PAD). [More]
Non-surgical gum disease treatment reduces thickness of wall of arteries

Non-surgical gum disease treatment reduces thickness of wall of arteries

A simple non-surgical gum disease treatment markedly reduces the thickness of the wall of the arteries, a risk factor for heart disease, according to a first of its kind study among Aboriginal Australians. [More]
African American women respond differently to anti-inflammatory effect of aspirin than white women

African American women respond differently to anti-inflammatory effect of aspirin than white women

African American women respond differently to the anti-inflammatory effect of aspirin than do white American women, new research finds. [More]
Study reveals that inflammasomes remain active even after cell death

Study reveals that inflammasomes remain active even after cell death

Even after a cell dies, components of the immune system remain active and continue to fuel inflammatory reactions. [More]
New driver of atherosclerosis may prove to be promising therapeutic target

New driver of atherosclerosis may prove to be promising therapeutic target

A new driver of atherosclerosis has been identified by researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center. This molecule, known as 27HC (27-hydroxycholesterol), has been found to exacerbate the development of the condition, and may prove to be a promising therapeutic target. [More]
La Jolla Institute researchers advance work toward vaccine for heart disease

La Jolla Institute researchers advance work toward vaccine for heart disease

Research toward the world's first vaccine for heart disease continues to advance at the La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology, with researchers demonstrating significant arterial plaque reduction in concept testing in mice. [More]
Lowering systolic blood pressure below 120 does not appear to provide additional benefit

Lowering systolic blood pressure below 120 does not appear to provide additional benefit

For decades, common medical wisdom has been "the lower the better" in treating the approximately one in three people in this country who have high blood pressure. [More]
Outpatient diabetes care quality matters after limb revascularisation

Outpatient diabetes care quality matters after limb revascularisation

High quality outpatient diabetes care improves diabetic patients’ chances of avoiding major ischaemic events and amputation after undergoing limb revascularisation, a study shows. [More]
Exercise transiently suppresses inflammation in rheumatic disease

Exercise transiently suppresses inflammation in rheumatic disease

Research findings presented today at the European League Against Rheumatism Annual Congress suggest that exercise transiently suppresses local and systemic inflammation, reinforcing the beneficial effects of exercise and the need for this to be regular in order to achieve clinical efficacy in rheumatic disease. [More]
Bacteria must be considered part of overall pathology of atherosclerosis

Bacteria must be considered part of overall pathology of atherosclerosis

Scientists believe they have an explanation for the axiom that stress, emotional shock, or overexertion may trigger heart attacks in vulnerable people. Hormones released during these events appear to cause bacterial biofilms on arterial walls to disperse, allowing plaque deposits to rupture into the bloodstream, according to research published in published today in mBio-, the online open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology. [More]
Advances in understanding of genetics of CAD lead to more therapeutic targets

Advances in understanding of genetics of CAD lead to more therapeutic targets

Advances in the understanding of the genetics of coronary artery disease, or CAD, will revitalize the field and lead to more therapeutic targets for new medicines to combat this common disease, suggests a genetics expert from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania in a Perspective article in the new issue of Science Translational Medicine. [More]
Concise analysis of robotics and surgical navigation systems in the U.S. market

Concise analysis of robotics and surgical navigation systems in the U.S. market

Reportlinker.com announces that a new market research report is available in its catalogue: U.S. Market for Surgical Navigation Systems and Robotics [More]
Study reveals molecular mechanism of cell death

Study reveals molecular mechanism of cell death

Researchers at VIB and Ghent University have unraveled the mechanism of necroptosis. This is a type of cell death that plays a crucial role in numerous diseases, from viral infections and loss of auditory nerve cells to multiple sclerosis, acute heart failure and organ transplantation. [More]
FCVB 2014 to feature cutting edge research in basic cardiovascular science

FCVB 2014 to feature cutting edge research in basic cardiovascular science

Cutting edge research in basic cardiovascular science will be presented at Frontiers in CardioVascular Biology (FCVB) 2014, held 4-6 July at the Palau de Congressos de Catalunya in Barcelona, Spain. [More]
High dose vitamin C therapy may have positive effect on Epstein-Barr virus infection

High dose vitamin C therapy may have positive effect on Epstein-Barr virus infection

The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a member of the herpes family that targets lymphocytes and epithelial cells. While the infection is usually benign, it can in some cases lead to acute infectious mononucleosis and can impair the immune system. EBV is also linked to several malignancies. There is currently no cure for removing EBV infections and very little success treating acute EBV infection and mononucleosis with drugs. [More]