Atherosclerosis News and Research RSS Feed - Atherosclerosis News and Research

Atherosclerosis is the progressive buildup of plaque - the fatty deposits and other cells - in the inner walls of the arteries. The condition is a consequence of elevated cholesterol and for many it's a silent disease, with no visible signs or symptoms. The disease can begin in early adulthood and continues to progress for the rest of a person's life. Despite the serious nature of atherosclerosis, many people do not understand how it develops and progresses.
New method helps characterize immune cells in tumor tissues

New method helps characterize immune cells in tumor tissues

Despite recent achievements in the development of cancer immunotherapies, only a small group of patients typically respond to them. Predictive markers of disease course and response to immunotherapy are urgently needed. [More]
Sex-related difference could have impact on treatment of metabolic diseases

Sex-related difference could have impact on treatment of metabolic diseases

In health research, most preliminary studies in animals only examine effects of drug treatment in one sex, assuming that males and females will have few differences in how a drug works. [More]
Taking extra 1000 steps each day can improve health of children with type 1 diabetes

Taking extra 1000 steps each day can improve health of children with type 1 diabetes

Keeping count of daily steps and boosting physical activity can really pay off for children with type 1 diabetes, according to new research from the University of Adelaide and the Women's and Children's Hospital. [More]
Novel blood coagulation analyzer may help detect stroke risk in AF patients

Novel blood coagulation analyzer may help detect stroke risk in AF patients

Researchers at Tokyo Medical and Dental University show that an analyzer recently developed to measure blood coagulability has the sensitivity to detect hypercoagulatibility associated with stroke risk in those without atrial fibrillation [More]
Brain vessel diseases may contribute to Alzheimer's dementia

Brain vessel diseases may contribute to Alzheimer's dementia

While strokes are known to increase risk for dementia, much less is known about diseases of large and small blood vessels in the brain, separate from stroke, and how they relate to dementia. [More]
Race impacts adverse outcomes in atrial fibrillation

Race impacts adverse outcomes in atrial fibrillation

Black individuals with atrial fibrillation have markedly higher rates of stroke, heart failure, coronary heart disease and mortality than their White counterparts, data from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities study show. [More]
People with higher levels of IgG/IgM antibodies less likely to have heart attack

People with higher levels of IgG/IgM antibodies less likely to have heart attack

Measuring antibody levels in the blood could be used to detect a person's heart attack risk after researchers, part-funded by the British Heart Foundation, discovered that higher levels of these antibodies are linked to a lower heart attack risk. [More]
Cerebral vessel disease increases Alzheimer's dementia risk

Cerebral vessel disease increases Alzheimer's dementia risk

Cerebral vessel disease may be an under-recognised risk factor for Alzheimer's disease dementia, say researchers. [More]
IGF-1 protein may be key to prevent heart disease in older adults

IGF-1 protein may be key to prevent heart disease in older adults

As men and women grow older, their chances for coronary heart disease also increase. Atherosclerosis is a condition in which plaque builds up inside the arteries, which can lead to serious problems, including heart attacks, strokes or even death. [More]
Liraglutide drug effectively decreases cardiovascular disease risk in type 2 diabetes patients

Liraglutide drug effectively decreases cardiovascular disease risk in type 2 diabetes patients

Researchers have shown that the glucose-lowering drug liraglutide safely and effectively decreases the overall risk of heart attack, stroke, or cardiovascular death for people with type 2 diabetes. [More]
PET imaging can help identify autoimmune inflammation in MS

PET imaging can help identify autoimmune inflammation in MS

The triggers of autoimmune inflammation in multiple sclerosis (MS) have eluded scientists for many years, but molecular imaging is bringing researchers closer to identifying them, while providing a means of evaluating next-generation therapies for MS, say researchers introducing a study at the 2016 Annual Meeting of the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging. [More]
Temporal hs-cTNT changes may predict future heart disease

Temporal hs-cTNT changes may predict future heart disease

Temporal increases in high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T are associated with a significantly increased risk of coronary heart disease, heart failure and death among people initially free from cardiovascular disease, US study data show. [More]
Neutral atherosclerosis trial highlights effectiveness of optimal medical therapy

Neutral atherosclerosis trial highlights effectiveness of optimal medical therapy

Salsalate has no greater effect than placebo on the progression of coronary artery plaque, show the findings of the randomised TINSAL-CVD trial. [More]
Black men with high degree of West African genetic ancestry have less central adiposity

Black men with high degree of West African genetic ancestry have less central adiposity

Among black men, those with more genetic variants descended from West Africa may have a relatively lower risk of being overweight, obese and diabetic, according to a new study out of the University of Alabama at Birmingham and University of Arizona. [More]
Rare mutation may reduce risk of developing arteriosclerosis by 34%

Rare mutation may reduce risk of developing arteriosclerosis by 34%

According to new international research, just less than one per cent of the population is naturally protected against developing chronic coronary artery diseases. [More]
CSU researchers develop colorful potatoes that are high in antioxidants, rich in nutrients

CSU researchers develop colorful potatoes that are high in antioxidants, rich in nutrients

Purple potatoes might not be the first thing that comes to mind when trying to increase vitamin, mineral and antioxidant intake. However, a group of researchers from Colorado State University have recently developed potato varieties that satisfy these nutritional needs and could act as a preventive measure to several diseases. [More]
Four major phenotypes may help improve prediction, prevention of cardiometabolic risk in prediabetes

Four major phenotypes may help improve prediction, prevention of cardiometabolic risk in prediabetes

Prediabetes is associated with increased risk of diabetes, cardiovascular disease, dementia and cancer. However, the disease risk considerably varies among subjects. [More]
Researchers identify new culprit that may contribute to heart disease

Researchers identify new culprit that may contribute to heart disease

Medical professionals have long known that the buildup of plaque in arteries can cause them to narrow and harden, potentially leading to a whole host of health problems — including heart attack, heart disease and stroke. [More]
Consuming sesame-based ingredients may reduce oxidative stress

Consuming sesame-based ingredients may reduce oxidative stress

The antioxidant boosting properties of sesame, and especially sesame oil, can have a significant effect on oxidative stress, improving human health, according to a systematic review published in Journal of Medicinal Food, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. [More]
Pluristem completes enrollment in Phase II intermittent claudication trial

Pluristem completes enrollment in Phase II intermittent claudication trial

Pluristem Therapeutics Inc., a leading developer of placenta-based cell therapy products, today announced it has completed the planned enrollment of 150 patients in a global Phase II trial of its PLacental eXpanded (PLX)-PAD cells for the treatment of intermittent claudication (IC), a peripheral artery disease (PAD). The double blind, randomized, placebo controlled trial enrolled 50 patients since October 2015 in the U.S., Germany, Israel, and South Korea. [More]
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