Autoimmune Disease News and Research RSS Feed - Autoimmune Disease News and Research

Autoimmune Disease is a condition in which the body recognizes its own tissues as foreign and directs an immune response against them.
Using a nanotech microchip to diagnose type 1 diabetes: an interview with Dr. Brian Feldman, Stanford School of Medicine

Using a nanotech microchip to diagnose type 1 diabetes: an interview with Dr. Brian Feldman, Stanford School of Medicine

The most common form of diabetes is sometimes referred to as metabolic diabetes, which is the diabetes most people are very familiar with, type 2 diabetes. This form of diabetes is most prevalent in people that are overweight or obese. Historically, it has been confined to adults or older patients but it has been on the rise as the global obesity problem has continued to worsen. [More]
FDA-approved drug eliminates immune cells that destroys hair follicles in people with alopecia areata

FDA-approved drug eliminates immune cells that destroys hair follicles in people with alopecia areata

Researchers at Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC) have identified the immune cells responsible for destroying hair follicles in people with alopecia areata, a common autoimmune disease that causes hair loss, and have tested an FDA-approved drug that eliminated these immune cells and restored hair growth in a small number of patients. [More]
Loyola dermatopathologist recognized by ASCP for achievements in the medical laboratory field

Loyola dermatopathologist recognized by ASCP for achievements in the medical laboratory field

Dermatopathologist, Jodi J. Speiser MD, Assistant Professor of Pathology, Loyola University Stritch School of Medicine, has been named one of the American Society for Clinical Pathology's "40 Under 40" for her achievements in the medical laboratory field. [More]
Phase 2 study: Rigel's R348 fails to meet endpoints in patients with dry eye disease

Phase 2 study: Rigel's R348 fails to meet endpoints in patients with dry eye disease

Rigel Pharmaceuticals, Inc. today announced that R348, its ophthalmic JAK/SYK inhibitor, did not meet the primary or secondary endpoints in a recently completed Phase 2 clinical study in patients with dry eye disease. [More]
Experts examine how molecule in parasitic worms can effectively treat autoimmune diseases

Experts examine how molecule in parasitic worms can effectively treat autoimmune diseases

Experts believe a molecule in parasitic worms could help explain why worm infections can effectively treat a range of autoimmune diseases, including multiple sclerosis, psoriasis, rheumatoid arthritis and lupus. [More]
Black and Hispanic SLE patients are more likely to be readmitted than white patients

Black and Hispanic SLE patients are more likely to be readmitted than white patients

A new study reveals that one in six patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is readmitted to the hospital within 30 days of being discharged. [More]
Researchers confirm for the first time that achalasia is autoimmune in origin

Researchers confirm for the first time that achalasia is autoimmune in origin

Achalasia is a rare disease - it affects 1 in 100,000 people - characterized by a loss of nerve cells in the esophageal wall. [More]
New version of drug successfully treats lupus in mice

New version of drug successfully treats lupus in mice

Expanding on his work with a new drug that successfully treated lupus in mice, a biomedical engineer at the University of Houston has received a $250,000 grant to expand his research to a new version of the drug in an effort to treat a wider range of autoimmune diseases. [More]
Lyfebulb, Immune collaborate to increase awareness of bullous pemphigoid

Lyfebulb, Immune collaborate to increase awareness of bullous pemphigoid

Lyfebulb, the International Pemphigus Pemphigoid Foundation (IPPF) and Immune Pharmaceuticals Inc., announced a collaboration to increase awareness of unmet needs in treating bullous pemphigoid last night at an event attended by more than sixty patients, physicians, scientists and other interested parties. [More]
Autoimmune diseases share certain pathogenic mechanisms with cancer

Autoimmune diseases share certain pathogenic mechanisms with cancer

Autoimmune disorders may share certain pathogenic mechanisms with cancer, according to a new report by George Washington University researcher Linda Kusner, Ph.D., published in PLOS ONE on July 22. [More]
Thirteen scientists receive grant to identify new treatments, cure for psoriasis

Thirteen scientists receive grant to identify new treatments, cure for psoriasis

Thirteen scientists received a total of $1.05 million in funding from the National Psoriasis Foundation for projects that aim to identify new treatments and a cure for psoriasis—an autoimmune disease that appears on the skin, affecting 7.5 million Americans—and psoriatic arthritis—an inflammatory arthritis that affects the joints and tendons, occurring in up to 30 percent of people with psoriasis. [More]
Virobay announces closing of expanded Series B second tranche financing

Virobay announces closing of expanded Series B second tranche financing

Virobay, Inc., a clinical stage pharmaceutical company with a platform of cathepsin protease inhibitors being developed for the treatment of neuropathic pain, autoimmune disease and fibrosis, today announced the closing of an expanded Series B second tranche financing of $8.0 million. [More]
Rigel initiates Phase 3 clinical program for fostamatinib in patients with ITP

Rigel initiates Phase 3 clinical program for fostamatinib in patients with ITP

Rigel Pharmaceuticals, Inc. today announced the initiation of a Phase 3 clinical program for its oral SYK inhibitor, fostamatinib, in patients with ITP (immune thrombocytopenic purpura). [More]
Researchers reveal molecular interplay between Roquin and RNA

Researchers reveal molecular interplay between Roquin and RNA

The Roquin protein, discovered in 2005, controls T-cell activation and differentiation by regulating the expression of certain mRNAs. In doing so, it helps to guarantee immunological tolerance and prevents immune responses against the body's own structures that can lead to autoimmune disease. [More]
Hydroxychloroquine treatment not effective for primary Sjögren syndrome

Hydroxychloroquine treatment not effective for primary Sjögren syndrome

Among patients with the systemic autoimmune disease primary Sjögren syndrome, use of hydroxychloroquine, the most frequently prescribed treatment for the disorder, did not improve symptoms during 24 weeks of treatment compared with placebo, according to a study in the July 16 issue of JAMA. [More]
Study to understand molecular interplay between Roquin and RNA to treat autoimmune diseases

Study to understand molecular interplay between Roquin and RNA to treat autoimmune diseases

Scientists at the Helmholtz Zentrum München, the Ludwig-Maximilians University of Munich (LMU) and the Technische Universität München (TUM) have moved an important step closer to understanding molecular mechanisms of autoimmune diseases. [More]
Portable, microchip-based test for diagnosing type-1 diabetes

Portable, microchip-based test for diagnosing type-1 diabetes

An inexpensive, portable, microchip-based test for diagnosing type-1 diabetes could improve patient care worldwide and help researchers better understand the disease, according to the device's inventors at the Stanford University School of Medicine. [More]

National Psoriasis Foundation to double the number of researchers studying psoriasis

National Psoriasis Foundation will double the number of researchers studying psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis while also cutting in half the number of people who say these chronic conditions are a problem in their daily lives as part of its new five-year strategic plan and mission to cure psoriatic disease and improve the lives of those affected. [More]
Maternal inflammation in maternal blood linked with greater risk for schizophrenia in offspring

Maternal inflammation in maternal blood linked with greater risk for schizophrenia in offspring

Maternal inflammation as indicated by the presence in maternal blood of early gestational C-reactive protein-an established inflammatory biomarker-appears to be associated with greater risk for schizophrenia in offspring, according to researchers at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University Medical Center, and the New York State Psychiatric Institute. [More]
Screening genetically susceptible infants can help detect celiac disease at a very early age

Screening genetically susceptible infants can help detect celiac disease at a very early age

Physicians from the University of Colorado School of Medicine in collaboration with an international team of researchers have demonstrated that screening of genetically susceptible infants can lead to the diagnosis of celiac disease at a very early age. [More]