Autophagy News and Research RSS Feed - Autophagy News and Research

Autophagy is a normal process in which a cell destroys proteins and other substances in its cytoplasm (the fluid inside the cell membrane but outside the nucleus), which may lead to cell death. Autophagy may prevent normal cells from developing into cancer cells, but it may also protect cancer cells by destroying anticancer drugs or substances taken up by them.
Researchers reveal integrins could be key to survival mechanism in cancer cells

Researchers reveal integrins could be key to survival mechanism in cancer cells

Cancer cells appear to depend on an unusual survival mechanism to spread around the body, according to an early study led by Queen Mary University of London. The discovery could help with future development of novel treatments to prevent metastasis and secondary tumours. [More]
Novel combination therapy slows cancer growth in patients with advanced solid tumors

Novel combination therapy slows cancer growth in patients with advanced solid tumors

A phase 1 clinical trial testing a novel combination therapy developed by scientists at VCU Massey Cancer Center slowed the growth of cancer in the majority of trial participants, which were patients with advanced solid tumors. [More]
Mitofusin 2 protein could serve as therapeutic target to ameliorate sarcopenia in older adults

Mitofusin 2 protein could serve as therapeutic target to ameliorate sarcopenia in older adults

One of the alterations that most affects the quality of life of the elderly is muscle wastage and the resulting loss of strength, a condition known as sarcopenia. At about 55 years old, people begin to lose muscle mass, this loss continues into old age, at which point it becomes critical. [More]
Stroke can cause long-term damage to blood-spinal cord barrier, study finds

Stroke can cause long-term damage to blood-spinal cord barrier, study finds

A team of researchers at the University of South Florida investigating the short and long-term effects of ischemic stroke in a rodent model has found that stroke can cause long-term damage to the blood-spinal cord barrier (BSCB), creating a "toxic environment" in the spinal cord that might leave stroke survivors susceptible to motor dysfunction and disease pathology. [More]
Researchers aim to protect kidneys while improving cisplatin's efficacy against cancer

Researchers aim to protect kidneys while improving cisplatin's efficacy against cancer

Cisplatin is a common, powerful chemotherapy agent used for a wide range of cancers such as breast, ovarian and lung, that in a handful of days can also permanently damage or destroy patients' kidneys. [More]
Buck researchers identify new, potential drug targets for sporadic PD

Buck researchers identify new, potential drug targets for sporadic PD

Research at the Buck Institute shows the same mechanisms that lead to neuronal cell death in mice genetically fated to develop Parkinson's disease (PD) are involved in the much more common sporadic form of the age-related, neurodegenerative disorder that robs people of the ability to move normally. [More]
ULK1, ULK2 enzymes play key role in maintaining cellular homeostasis

ULK1, ULK2 enzymes play key role in maintaining cellular homeostasis

Researchers at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital have uncovered how two enzymes, ULK1 and ULK2, which are best known for their role in the degradation and recycling of proteins, control the trafficking of specific proteins. [More]
Inhibiting autophagy can effectively block tumor cell migration, breast cancer metastasis

Inhibiting autophagy can effectively block tumor cell migration, breast cancer metastasis

Researchers from the University of Chicago have shown that inhibiting autophagy, a self-devouring process used by cells to degrade large intra-cellular cargo, effectively blocks tumor cell migration and breast cancer metastasis in tumor models. [More]
Researchers discover new function of genes in Fanconi anemia pathway

Researchers discover new function of genes in Fanconi anemia pathway

Researchers from UT Southwestern Medical Center have identified an important new function of genes in the Fanconi anemia pathway - a finding that could have implications for development of new therapies to treat this disorder and some cancers. [More]
LAP defects may lead to lupus-like autoimmune disorder

LAP defects may lead to lupus-like autoimmune disorder

A casual observation about size differences in mice has led to the discovery that defects in a process for digesting dead cells called LC3-associated phagocytosis (LAP) may lead to a lupus-like autoimmune disorder. St. Jude Children's Research Hospital scientists led the research, which appears as an advance online publication today in the scientific journal Nature. [More]
Study describes precise mechanisms that enable TB bacteria to persist in the body

Study describes precise mechanisms that enable TB bacteria to persist in the body

Bacteria that cause tuberculosis trick immune cells meant to destroy them into hiding and feeding them instead. This is the result of a study led by researchers from NYU Langone Medical Center and published online April 18 in Nature Immunology. [More]
Neuroscientists decipher new pathway in stem cell differentiation

Neuroscientists decipher new pathway in stem cell differentiation

How do neurons become neurons? They all begin as stem cells, undifferentiated and with the potential to become any cell in the body.Until now, however, exactly how that happens has been somewhat of a scientific mystery. New research conducted by UC Santa Barbara neuroscientists has deciphered some of the earliest changes that occur before stems cells transform into neurons and other cell types. [More]
WSU researcher explores new drugs to treat neurological disorders linked to autophagic dysfunction

WSU researcher explores new drugs to treat neurological disorders linked to autophagic dysfunction

Repairing the brain's "house-cleaning function," which could help people with Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and 100 other diseases, is the focus of recently funded research at Washington State University. [More]
Researchers find new innate immunity pathway that protects mammals from viral oncogenesis

Researchers find new innate immunity pathway that protects mammals from viral oncogenesis

Building upon earlier research, investigators at UT Southwestern Medical Center and their collaborators have identified a new innate immunity pathway that protects mammals from viral oncogenesis, the process by which viruses cause normal cells to become cancerous. [More]
Inhibition of mitochondrial calcium uptake specifically toxic to cancer cells

Inhibition of mitochondrial calcium uptake specifically toxic to cancer cells

Inhibiting the transfer of calcium ions into the cell's powerhouse is specifically toxic to cancer cells, according to an article published this week in Cell Reports by researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. [More]
UAB researchers focus on five key areas to improve care of CVD patients

UAB researchers focus on five key areas to improve care of CVD patients

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, approximately 610,000 people die of heart disease in the United States every year — that's one in every four deaths. The impact of cardiovascular diseases is quite large. [More]
Intracellular process of autophagy plays role in prostate cancer development, shows research

Intracellular process of autophagy plays role in prostate cancer development, shows research

Research from investigators at Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey and the Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center at Columbia University Medical Center, shows the intracellular process of autophagy plays a role in the development of prostate cancer. [More]
Fasudil improves memory in rats, promotes degradation of toxic tau in the eyes of fruit flies

Fasudil improves memory in rats, promotes degradation of toxic tau in the eyes of fruit flies

Could a kinase inhibitor some doctors prescribe to keep blood flowing after brain surgery be used to treat neurodegeneration? New research suggests it might be worth exploring the question. [More]
The mechanism behind protective cells protecting themselves

The mechanism behind protective cells protecting themselves

Researchers at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital have discovered the mechanism by which immune cells called regulatory T cells keep themselves intact and functional during their demanding task of holding the immune system in check. Such T cells are key to preventing the immune system from attacking the body in autoimmune disease. [More]
Johns Hopkins study shows high doses of cocaine kill brain cells

Johns Hopkins study shows high doses of cocaine kill brain cells

Working with mice, researchers at Johns Hopkins have contributed significant new evidence to support the idea that high doses of cocaine kill brain cells by triggering overactive autophagy, a process in which cells literally digest their own insides. Their results, moreover, bring with them a possible antidote, an experimental compound dubbed CGP3466B. [More]
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