Autophagy News and Research RSS Feed - Autophagy News and Research

Autophagy is a normal process in which a cell destroys proteins and other substances in its cytoplasm (the fluid inside the cell membrane but outside the nucleus), which may lead to cell death. Autophagy may prevent normal cells from developing into cancer cells, but it may also protect cancer cells by destroying anticancer drugs or substances taken up by them.
TMDU researchers identify novel type of cell death in Huntington's disease

TMDU researchers identify novel type of cell death in Huntington's disease

In Huntington's disease (HD), the huntingtin gene is mutated, causing progressive neuronal death. [More]
New study describes role of protein that is crucial for melanoma cell survival

New study describes role of protein that is crucial for melanoma cell survival

The main goals of the Melanoma Group at the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre are to identify biomarkers of tumour progression and to validate novel therapeutic targets in melanoma. [More]
BAG3 protein plays protective role by limiting reperfusion injury to the heart

BAG3 protein plays protective role by limiting reperfusion injury to the heart

The inability of cells to eliminate damaged proteins and organelles following the blockage of a coronary artery and its subsequent re-opening with angioplasty or medications - a sequence known as ischemia/reperfusion - often results in irreparable damage to the heart muscle. [More]
New study raises serious safety concerns in clinical use of caspase inhibitors for liver injury

New study raises serious safety concerns in clinical use of caspase inhibitors for liver injury

Many acute and chronic liver diseases, including alcoholic hepatitis, result from apoptotic (programmed) cell death mediated by the enzyme caspase. [More]
Researchers discover how appetite is controlled and influenced by the brain

Researchers discover how appetite is controlled and influenced by the brain

Researchers from Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology in Korea have uncovered the mechanisms behind the enzyme that controls our appetite in response to low glucose availability in the brain. [More]
GUMC receives FDA clearance to begin clinical study of cancer drug in patients with Alzheimer's disease

GUMC receives FDA clearance to begin clinical study of cancer drug in patients with Alzheimer's disease

Georgetown University Medical Center today announces the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has completed its review of an investigational new drug application (IND) for the use of nilotinib in a phase II clinical trial for patients with mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease. [More]
ADDF awards $2.1 million grant for clinical study of cancer drug in Alzheimer's patients

ADDF awards $2.1 million grant for clinical study of cancer drug in Alzheimer's patients

The Alzheimer's Drug Discovery Foundation announces a $2.1 million grant awarded to R. Scott Turner, MD, PhD, of Georgetown University Medical Center to conduct a phase II clinical trial of low-dose nilotinib (marketed as Tasigna for use as a cancer therapy) in patients with Alzheimer's disease. [More]
DGIST researchers uncover mechanisms that control appetite during low glucose conditions in the brain

DGIST researchers uncover mechanisms that control appetite during low glucose conditions in the brain

Researchers from Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology (DGIST) in Korea have uncovered the mechanisms behind the enzyme that controls our appetite in response to low glucose availability in the brain. [More]
New study identifies potential therapeutic option for treatment of Huntington's disease

New study identifies potential therapeutic option for treatment of Huntington's disease

A new scientific study reveals one way to stop proteins from triggering an energy failure inside nerve cells during Huntington's disease. Huntington's disease is an inherited genetic disorder caused by mutations in the gene that encodes huntingtin protein. [More]
Cold plasma therapy may help treat non-healing wounds

Cold plasma therapy may help treat non-healing wounds

Russian scientists at the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, the Joint Institute for High Temperatures of the Russian Academy of Sciences, and Gamaleya Research Centre of Epidemiology and Microbiology found that treating cells with cold plasma leads to their regeneration and rejuvenation. [More]
New study raises safety concerns on clinical use of caspase inhibitors for liver diseases

New study raises safety concerns on clinical use of caspase inhibitors for liver diseases

Many acute and chronic liver diseases, including alcoholic hepatitis, result from apoptotic (programmed) cell death mediated by the enzyme caspase. Caspase inhibitors have therapeutic potential to treat and prevent apoptosis-mediated liver injury, and some are currently in clinical trials. [More]
Multi-purpose protein may offer clues for successful treatment of Alzheimer's disease

Multi-purpose protein may offer clues for successful treatment of Alzheimer's disease

The tidal wave approaches. In the coming decades, Alzheimer's disease is projected to exact a devastating economic and emotional toll on society, with patient numbers in the US alone expected to reach 13.5 million by mid-century at a projected cost of over a trillion dollars. [More]
UCSF researchers identify new strategy to cultivate beneficial energy-burning fat

UCSF researchers identify new strategy to cultivate beneficial energy-burning fat

UC San Francisco researchers studying beige fat — a calorie-burning tissue that can help to ward off obesity and diabetes — have discovered a new strategy to cultivate this beneficial blubber. [More]
Novel innovation could help scientists study new treatments for mitochondrial diseases

Novel innovation could help scientists study new treatments for mitochondrial diseases

A new study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences from the University of Missouri has succeeded in creating embryos with "heteroplasmy," or the presence of both maternal and paternal mitochondrial DNA. [More]
USC researchers discover two Zika proteins potentially responsible for microcephaly

USC researchers discover two Zika proteins potentially responsible for microcephaly

USC researchers have tracked down two Zika proteins potentially responsible for thousands of microcephaly cases in Brazil and elsewhere — taking one small step toward preventing Zika-infected mothers from birthing babies with abnormally small heads. [More]
Pancreatic cancer cells find alternative source of nutrition to avoid starvation

Pancreatic cancer cells find alternative source of nutrition to avoid starvation

Pancreatic cancer cells avert starvation in dense tumors by ordering nearby support cells to supply them with an alternative source of nutrition. [More]
Cutting off fuel to cancer cells may be potential therapeutic strategy for Kras-driven lung cancers

Cutting off fuel to cancer cells may be potential therapeutic strategy for Kras-driven lung cancers

Research from investigators at Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey and Princeton University has identified a new approach to cancer therapy in cutting off a cancer cell's 'fuel supply' by targeting a cellular survival mechanism known as autophagy. [More]
SBP board member donates $1M for researchers to study pancreatic and prostate cancer

SBP board member donates $1M for researchers to study pancreatic and prostate cancer

Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute (SBP) has received a $1M donation from The Epstein Family Foundation for scientists to study pancreatic and prostate cancer. [More]
Research paves way for development of new drugs to prevent cancer and Alzheimer's

Research paves way for development of new drugs to prevent cancer and Alzheimer's

A new generation of drugs that prevent cancer and Alzheimer's could be developed, thanks to research from the University of Warwick. [More]
New study identifies alternative route for tuberculosis infection

New study identifies alternative route for tuberculosis infection

Researchers from UT Southwestern Medical Center have identified a new way that tuberculosis bacteria get into the body, revealing a potential therapeutic angle to explore. [More]
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