Avastin News and Research RSS Feed - Avastin News and Research

Avastin is a biologic antibody designed to specifically bind to a protein called vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) that plays an important role throughout the lifecycle of the tumor to develop and maintain blood vessels, a process known as angiogenesis. Avastin is designed to interfere with the blood supply to a tumor by directly binding to the VEGF protein to prevent interactions with receptors on blood vessel cells. Avastin does not bind to receptors on normal or cancer cells. The tumor blood supply is thought to be critical to a tumor’s ability to grow and spread in the body (metastasize).
Scottish women with metastatic carcinoma of cervix could now benefit from Avastin treatment

Scottish women with metastatic carcinoma of cervix could now benefit from Avastin treatment

From today, women in Scotland with an advanced and incurable form of cervical cancer could benefit from the targeted treatment Avastin, which has been given the green light by the Scottish Medicines Consortium (SMC) for routine use on the NHS. [More]
NEI-funded study analyzes outcomes of anti-VEGF therapy for AMD

NEI-funded study analyzes outcomes of anti-VEGF therapy for AMD

In a study of nearly 650 people with the eye disease age-related macular degeneration (AMD), half still had vision 20/40 or better, typically good enough to drive or to read standard print, after five years of treatment with anti-VEGF drugs that are injected into the eye. The authors of the study, funded by the National Eye Institute (NEI) at the National Institutes of Health, say those outcomes would have been unimaginable about 10 years ago, prior to the drugs' availability. [More]
Research unveils standard front-line treatment for advanced ovarian cancer

Research unveils standard front-line treatment for advanced ovarian cancer

Research led by a Dignity Health St. Joseph's Hospital and Medical Center physician on ovarian cancer was published in the Feb. 24, 2016 issue of New England Journal of Medicine. The research was directed by Bradley J. Monk, M.D. and researchers at 12 other medical facilities around the nation. [More]
Bevacizumab extends survival of pleural mesothelioma patients

Bevacizumab extends survival of pleural mesothelioma patients

Patients with unresectable, malignant pleural mesothelioma derive a significant survival benefit from the addition of bevacizumab to standard treatment according to phase III trial findings published in The Lancet. [More]
New campaign raises awareness of City of Hope's life-saving mission and impact

New campaign raises awareness of City of Hope's life-saving mission and impact

Imagine being diagnosed with one of the most rare and aggressive forms of breast cancer, given a five percent chance to live and told having children will never be an option. Southern California local Kommah McDowell was told just that— and then she went to City of Hope. [More]
NAM announces election of three new members from UC San Diego School of Medicine

NAM announces election of three new members from UC San Diego School of Medicine

The National Academy of Medicine announced today the election of three new members from University of California, San Diego School of Medicine: Napoleone Ferrara, MD; Christopher K. Glass, MD, PhD; and Roberto Malinow, MD, PhD. Election to NAM is considered among the highest honors in the fields of health and medicine. [More]
Specific biomarker predicts which HER2-negative breast cancer patients respond to targeted therapy

Specific biomarker predicts which HER2-negative breast cancer patients respond to targeted therapy

A multicenter team led by Case Western Reserve has demonstrated that brief exposure to a targeted therapy can tell doctors which HER2-negative patients will respond — and which should switch to another kind of treatment. [More]
DelMar presents updated VAL-083 Phase I/II trial data at GBM2015 meeting

DelMar presents updated VAL-083 Phase I/II trial data at GBM2015 meeting

DelMar Pharmaceuticals, Inc., a biopharmaceutical company focused on the development and commercialization of new cancer therapies, today presented updated clinical data from its Phase I/II study of lead product candidate VAL-083 (dianhydrogalactitol), in patients with refractory glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), at GBM2015: 2nd International Symposium on Clinical and Basic Investigation in Glioblastoma in Toledo, Spain. [More]
Risk for endophthalmitis no higher with Avastin, finds study

Risk for endophthalmitis no higher with Avastin, finds study

Eye injections of the drug Avastin, used to treat retinal diseases, bring no greater risk of endophthalmitis, a potentially blinding eye infection, than injections with the much more expensive drug Lucentis made by the same company, according to new research from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. Their findings are published today in JAMA Ophthalmology. [More]
UCLA's Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center named among top 10 cancer centers in nation

UCLA's Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center named among top 10 cancer centers in nation

UCLA's Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center is ranked among the top 10 cancer centers in the nation, according to a U.S. News & World Report survey of board-certified physicians from across the country. The survey reviewed patient outcomes, the cancer center's reputation among physicians, mortality rates and other care-related factors. [More]
Low BMI linked to poorer survival in advanced colorectal cancer

Low BMI linked to poorer survival in advanced colorectal cancer

Although being overweight with a high body-mass index (BMI) has long been associated with a higher risk for colorectal cancer, thinner patients might not fare as well after treatment for advanced cancer, according to a new study from Duke Medicine. [More]
Study may predict which glioblastoma patients may respond well to dasatinib drug treatment

Study may predict which glioblastoma patients may respond well to dasatinib drug treatment

Clinicians testing the drug dasatinib, approved for several blood cancers, had hoped it would slow the aggressive growth of the deadly brain cancer glioblastoma; however, clinical trials to date have not found any benefit. Researchers at Mayo Clinic, who conducted one of those clinical trials, believe they know why dasatinib failed — and what to do about it. [More]
Value of Colorectal Cancer therapeutics market expected to increase $9.4 billion by 2020

Value of Colorectal Cancer therapeutics market expected to increase $9.4 billion by 2020

Analysis from business intelligence provider GBI Research - Colorectal Cancer Therapeutics in Major Developed Markets to 2020 - states that the Colorectal Cancer (CRC) treatment market value will increase at a moderate Compound Annual Growth Rate (CAGR) of 1.8%, from $8.3 billion in 2013 to $9.4 billion by 2020. [More]
Celldex’s lead program RINTEGA demonstrates overall survival benefit in patients with recurrent glioblastoma

Celldex’s lead program RINTEGA demonstrates overall survival benefit in patients with recurrent glioblastoma

Celldex Therapeutics, Inc. today presented positive results from the Company’s randomized, double‐blind Phase 2 study of RINTEGA (rindopepimut) in patients with EGFRvIII‐positive, recurrent glioblastoma at the 2015 American Society of Clinical Oncology in Chicago. [More]
Medicare physician reimbursement data could be confusing to the public

Medicare physician reimbursement data could be confusing to the public

The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services today released to the public data relating to 2013 Medicare payments made to physicians and other providers. In response, the American Academy of Ophthalmology is providing necessary context for the reimbursement data, which in its raw form are often complex and difficult to understand. [More]
VBL Therapeutics reports positive results from VB-111 Phase 1/2a study in recurrent platinum-resistant Müllerian cancer

VBL Therapeutics reports positive results from VB-111 Phase 1/2a study in recurrent platinum-resistant Müllerian cancer

VBL Therapeutics, a late-stage clinical biotechnology company focused on the discovery, development and commercialization of first-in-class treatments for cancer, today announced positive interim results from an investigator-initiated, Phase 1/2a trial of multiple dose VB-111 in recurrent platinum-resistant Müllerian (ovarian) cancer. [More]
Additional preclinical data on DelMar’s VAL-083 to treat temozolomide-resistant GBM presented at AACR

Additional preclinical data on DelMar’s VAL-083 to treat temozolomide-resistant GBM presented at AACR

DelMar Pharmaceuticals, Inc., a biopharmaceutical company focused on developing and commercializing proven cancer therapies in new orphan drug indications, presented additional preclinical data at the American Association of Cancer Research (AACR) Advances in Brain Cancer Research Conference on the potential for its lead product candidate VAL-083 (dianhydrogalactitol) to treat patients with temozolomide-resistant glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). [More]
DelMar to present new data on development of VAL-083 at 2015 ASCO Annual Meeting

DelMar to present new data on development of VAL-083 at 2015 ASCO Annual Meeting

DelMar Pharmaceuticals, Inc., today announced that it will be presenting new data related to the development of lead product candidate VAL-083 (dianhydrogalactitol) at the 2015 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting, being held May 29-June 2, 2015, in Chicago, Illinois. [More]
First new treatment authorised in a decade for advanced cervical cancer patients in the UK

First new treatment authorised in a decade for advanced cervical cancer patients in the UK

The European Commission has licensed Avastin in combination with standard chemotherapy for the treatment of women with advanced cervical cancer. Until now, the treatment has been available ahead of licence to eligible patients in England via individual requests to the Cancer Drugs Fund (CDF). [More]
Imperial scientists develop new test that uses human stem cells to predict side effects of drugs

Imperial scientists develop new test that uses human stem cells to predict side effects of drugs

Scientists at Imperial College London have developed a test that uses combinations of cells from a single donor's blood to predict whether a new drug will cause a severe immune reaction in humans. [More]
Advertisement
Advertisement