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Eminent molecular cell biologist awarded GRC fellowship

Eminent molecular cell biologist awarded GRC fellowship

The Gutenberg Research College of Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz has awarded the coveted GRC fellowship to Professor Krishnaraj Rajalingam. In the upcoming years, he will lead a research team at the Research Center for Immunotherapy at Mainz University. [More]
Dry powdered measles vaccine triggers no adverse side effects in early human testing

Dry powdered measles vaccine triggers no adverse side effects in early human testing

A measles vaccine made of fine dry powder and delivered with a puff of air triggered no adverse side effects in early human testing and it is likely effective, according to a paper to be published November 28 in the journal Vaccine. [More]
Choosing the best way to verify the quality and quantity of Chromatin Immunoprecipitation DNA

Choosing the best way to verify the quality and quantity of Chromatin Immunoprecipitation DNA

Porvair Sciences has published a new guide to help laboratories choose the best way to verify the quality and quantity of their Chromatin Immunoprecipitation (ChIP) DNA. [More]
Study finds that starting ART treatment soon after HIV infection improves immune health

Study finds that starting ART treatment soon after HIV infection improves immune health

HIV-1-infected U.S. military members and beneficiaries treated with antiretroviral therapy (ART) soon after infection were half as likely to develop AIDS and were more likely to reconstitute their immune-fighting CD4+ T-cells to normal levels, researchers reported Nov. 24 in JAMA Internal Medicine. [More]
Two UH scientists named as fellows of AAAS

Two UH scientists named as fellows of AAAS

Two scientists from the University of Houston have been elected as fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. [More]
New approach to fighting breast, thyroid cancers

New approach to fighting breast, thyroid cancers

A team of researchers from the University of Alberta has discovered a new approach to fighting breast and thyroid cancers by targeting an enzyme they say is the culprit for the "vicious cycle" of tumour growth, spread and resistance to treatment. [More]
Authors review current progress in developing transgenic pig models for human diseases

Authors review current progress in developing transgenic pig models for human diseases

Genetically engineered pigs, minipigs, and microminipigs are valuable tools for biomedical research, as their lifespan, anatomy, physiology, genetic make-up, and disease mechanisms are more similar to humans than the rodent models typically used in drug discovery research. [More]
Elsevier launches new journal Current Opinion in Food Science

Elsevier launches new journal Current Opinion in Food Science

Elsevier, a world-leading provider of scientific, technical and medical information products and services, is pleased to announce the launch of the latest title in the Current Opinion journal series : Current Opinion in Food Science. [More]
NUS researchers make breakthrough discovery that could lead to future treatment for multiple sclerosis

NUS researchers make breakthrough discovery that could lead to future treatment for multiple sclerosis

A multi-disciplinary research team from the National University of Singapore has made a breakthrough discovery of a new type of immune cells that may help in the development of a future treatment for multiple sclerosis (MS). [More]
UCLA creates largest-ever protein that self-assembles into molecular 'cage'

UCLA creates largest-ever protein that self-assembles into molecular 'cage'

UCLA biochemists have created the largest-ever protein that self-assembles into a molecular "cage." The research could lead to synthetic vaccines that protect people from the flu, HIV and other diseases. [More]
Researchers discover new method to deliver drugs into aggressive tumors

Researchers discover new method to deliver drugs into aggressive tumors

A multi-disciplinary team of Yale Cancer Center researchers has discovered a promising new method for delivering drugs into aggressive tumors by exploiting a unique feature of tumors themselves. [More]
Cocaine disrupts woman's estrus cycle, may explain sex differences in cocaine addiction

Cocaine disrupts woman's estrus cycle, may explain sex differences in cocaine addiction

Women are more sensitive to the effects of cocaine and more susceptible to cocaine abuse than men. Cocaine's ability to disrupt a woman's estrus cycle may explain the sex differences in cocaine addiction, and new evidence that caffeine may be neuroprotective and able to block cocaine's direct effects on the estrus cycle reveals novel treatment possibilities, according to an article published in Journal of Caffeine Research: The International Multidisciplinary Journal of Caffeine Science, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. [More]
New research may help develop drug for celiac disease

New research may help develop drug for celiac disease

Celiac disease patients suffer from gluten intolerance and must adjust to a life without gluten from food sources like wheat, rye and barley. [More]
Type 3 interferons and T helper 2 cells: an interview with Grant Gallagher, Managing Director, HUMIGEN

Type 3 interferons and T helper 2 cells: an interview with Grant Gallagher, Managing Director, HUMIGEN

The type 3 interferons - usually called the “lambda” interferons, or “IFNL” - are the most recently identified IFNs. We (myself and Sergei Kotenko) originally identified the receptor and then the three ligands (IFNL1,2,3; very recently a fourth, IFNL4, was discovered); the key paper was published in 2003. [More]
Common antimicrobial in household items causes liver fibrosis, cancer in mice

Common antimicrobial in household items causes liver fibrosis, cancer in mice

Triclosan is an antimicrobial commonly found in soaps, shampoos, toothpastes and many other household items. Despite its widespread use, researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine report potentially serious consequences of long-term exposure to the chemical. [More]
UT Southwestern researchers identify new gene mutations involved in certain kidney cancers

UT Southwestern researchers identify new gene mutations involved in certain kidney cancers

Using next generation gene sequencing techniques, cancer researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center have identified more than 3,000 new mutations involved in certain kidney cancers, findings that help explain the diversity of cancer behaviors. [More]
Preterm birth becomes world's number one killer of young children

Preterm birth becomes world's number one killer of young children

For the first time in history, the complications of preterm birth outrank all other causes as the world's number one killer of young children. [More]
Researchers use cutting-edge software to predict aggressive breast cancer tumours

Researchers use cutting-edge software to predict aggressive breast cancer tumours

Researchers at Western University are using cutting-edge genetic mutation-analysis software developed in their lab to interpret mutations in tumour genome that may provide insight into determining which breast cancer tumours are more likely spread to other parts of the body and which ones won't. [More]
Cholesterol-fighting statins inhibit uterine fibroid tumors that account for 50% of hysterectomies

Cholesterol-fighting statins inhibit uterine fibroid tumors that account for 50% of hysterectomies

Researchers at the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, in collaboration with The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth), Baylor College of Medicine and the Georgia Regents University, report for the first time that the cholesterol-lowering drug simvastatin inhibits the growth of human uterine fibroid tumors. [More]
Research shows mustard and garlic receptor is linked to cold-induced pain

Research shows mustard and garlic receptor is linked to cold-induced pain

Some people experience cold not only as feeling cold, but actually as a painful sensation. This applies even to fairly mild temperatures - anything below 20°C. [More]