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Mitochondrial Pyruvate Carrier could potentially be a new drug target to treat diabetes

Mitochondrial Pyruvate Carrier could potentially be a new drug target to treat diabetes

High blood sugar is a defining characteristic of Type 2 diabetes and the cause of many of the condition's complications, including kidney failure, heart disease, and blindness. Most diabetes medications aim to maintain normal blood sugar (glucose) levels and prevent high blood sugar by controlling insulin. [More]
USF, FARA to jointly host scientific symposium on Friedreich's ataxia

USF, FARA to jointly host scientific symposium on Friedreich's ataxia

The University of South Florida will again bring together leading researchers and patients searching for a treatment for Friedreich's ataxia and related disorders at the seventh annual scientific symposium "Understanding Energy for A Cure." The symposium will be held 5 to 8:30 p.m., Thursday, Sept. 17, at the USF Marshall Student Center Ballroom, USF Cedar Circle, Tampa, FL 33620. [More]
Altering protein recycling complexes in human cells may help overcome chemotherapy resistance

Altering protein recycling complexes in human cells may help overcome chemotherapy resistance

Altering the protein recycling complexes in human cells, including cancer cells, allows the cells to resist treatment with a class of drugs known as proteasome inhibitors, according to Whitehead Institute scientists. [More]
Mouse study shows active ingredient in marijuana may delay rejection of incompatible organs

Mouse study shows active ingredient in marijuana may delay rejection of incompatible organs

Here's another discovery to bolster the case for medical marijuana: New research in mice suggests that THC, the active ingredient in marijuana, may delay the rejection of incompatible organs. [More]
Breakthrough discovery provides better understanding of Alzheimer’s disease

Breakthrough discovery provides better understanding of Alzheimer’s disease

Alzheimer's disease is associated with the appearance of characteristic neurotoxic protein aggregates in various regions in the brain. [More]
KAIST scientists predict how biological circuits sustain rhythms

KAIST scientists predict how biological circuits sustain rhythms

Our bodies have a variety of biological clocks that follow rhythms or oscillations with periods ranging from seconds to days. For example, our hearts beat every second, and cells divide periodically. The circadian clock located in the hypothalamus generates twenty-four hour rhythms, timing our sleep and hormone release. [More]
Researchers successfully use alcohols as reagents in alkylation reaction

Researchers successfully use alcohols as reagents in alkylation reaction

Researchers at Princeton have developed a dual catalyst system that directly installs alkyl groups--fragments containing singly bonded carbon and hydrogen atoms that have extremely useful properties for drug discovery--onto compounds called heteroarenes. The new reaction uses simple and abundant alcohols and offers a milder and more widely applicable alternative to existing strategies. [More]
Researchers find fatty acid deposits in brains of Alzheimer's patients

Researchers find fatty acid deposits in brains of Alzheimer's patients

People with Alzheimer's disease have fat deposits in the brain. For the first time since the disease was described 109 years ago, researchers affiliated with the University of Montreal Hospital Research Centre (CRCHUM) have discovered accumulations of fat droplets in the brain of patients who died from the disease and have identified the nature of the fat. [More]
Researchers uncover important cellular functions that help regulate inflammation

Researchers uncover important cellular functions that help regulate inflammation

Researchers at the Virginia Bioinformatics Institute at Virginia Tech have uncovered key cellular functions that help regulate inflammation -- a discovery that could have important implications for the treatment of allergies, heart disease, and certain forms of cancer. [More]
Discovery could open up door for cancer research and treatment

Discovery could open up door for cancer research and treatment

Florida State University researchers have taken a big step forward in the fight against cancer with a discovery that could open up the door for new research and treatment options. [More]
Purple potatoes may help prevent colon cancer

Purple potatoes may help prevent colon cancer

Compounds found in purple potatoes may help kill colon cancer stem cells and limit the spread of the cancer, according to a team of researchers. [More]
UH research points to promising target in treatment of pancreatic cancer

UH research points to promising target in treatment of pancreatic cancer

Pancreatic cancer is extremely deadly and often has a poor prognosis. Ranked as the fourth deadliest cancer in the U.S. and poised to move up within the next few years, pancreatic cancer is very difficult to detect in its early stages. Seldom diagnosed early and typically spreading rapidly, the disease has no effective treatment once it advances. [More]
Karolinska Institutet study may lead to development of better immune-based cancer therapies

Karolinska Institutet study may lead to development of better immune-based cancer therapies

A study by researchers at Sweden's Karolinska Institutet is the first to suggest that cells in the tumour blood vessels contribute to a local environment that protects the cancer cells from tumour-killing immune cells. The results, which are being published in the 'Journal of the National Cancer Institute', can contribute to the development of better immune-based cancer therapies. [More]
Researchers report new breakthrough in countering deadly effects of radiation exposure

Researchers report new breakthrough in countering deadly effects of radiation exposure

An interdisciplinary research team led by The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston reports a new breakthrough in countering the deadly effects of radiation exposure. A single injection of a regenerative peptide was shown to significantly increase survival in mice when given 24 hours after nuclear radiation exposure. [More]
H1N1 vaccine developed at UNMC to be evaluated in animal study

H1N1 vaccine developed at UNMC to be evaluated in animal study

An H1N1 vaccine developed at the University of Nebraska Medical Center will enter a definitive round of testing this month, and researchers hope to establish its ability to ward off the virus. [More]
University of Otago research backs the belief that eating tomatoes can cause gout to flare up

University of Otago research backs the belief that eating tomatoes can cause gout to flare up

People who maintain that eating tomatoes can cause their gout to flare up are likely to welcome new research from New Zealand's University of Otago that has, for the first time, found a biological basis for this belief. [More]
Reducing amyloid fibril levels in semen may help reduce transmission of HIV

Reducing amyloid fibril levels in semen may help reduce transmission of HIV

There may be two new ways to fight AIDS -- using a heat shock protein or a small molecule - to attack fibrils in semen associated with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) during the initial phases of infection, according to new research from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. [More]
FSU study reveals new method for treating diabetes

FSU study reveals new method for treating diabetes

A new Florida State University study is changing how researchers look at diabetes research and the drugs used to treat the disease. [More]
Determining the dynein-dynactin complex structure: an interview with Dr Gabriel C. Lander

Determining the dynein-dynactin complex structure: an interview with Dr Gabriel C. Lander

This is a macromolecular assembly is made up of two components, dynein and dynactin, that works to move molecular cargo (organelles, RNA, vesicles, proteins, viruses) along microtubule highways within our cells. [More]
Kentucky researcher awarded NCI grant to study potential link between obesity and breast cancer

Kentucky researcher awarded NCI grant to study potential link between obesity and breast cancer

The National Cancer Institute recently awarded a $750,000 grant to University of Kentucky researcher Fredrick Onono to study the potential link between obesity and breast cancer. [More]
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