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New findings can help scientists generate tailor-made proteins optimized for use in optogenetics

New findings can help scientists generate tailor-made proteins optimized for use in optogenetics

Optogenetics techniques, which allow scientists to map and control nerve cells using light stimulation, are being used to study neural circuits in the brain with unprecedented precision. This revolutionary technology relies on light-sensitive proteins such as channelrhodopsins, and researchers at UC Santa Cruz have now determined the molecular mechanism involved in the light-induced activation of one of these proteins. [More]
Unique diagnostic test could help detect world's deadliest superbugs, infectious diseases

Unique diagnostic test could help detect world's deadliest superbugs, infectious diseases

Infectious diseases such as hepatitis C and some of the world's deadliest superbugs--C. difficile and MRSA among them--could soon be detected much earlier by a unique diagnostic test, designed to easily and quickly identify dangerous pathogens. [More]
Researchers unravel mechanisms that enable accumulation of tumour promoting protease in stressed cancer cells

Researchers unravel mechanisms that enable accumulation of tumour promoting protease in stressed cancer cells

A mechanism beyond the level of gene regulation, which is often the underlying reason for changes in protein levels, does enable the strong accumulation of a tumour promoting protease in stressed cancer cells. The group of BIOSS researcher Prof. Dr. Thomas Reinheckel teamed up with BIOSS investigator Prof. Dr. Sabine Rospert and their colleagues from the University Medical Center Freiburg, Prof. Dr. Elmar Stickeler and Dr. Peter Bronsert, in order to unravel mechanisms by which stress-resistant production of cancer promoting proteins occurs. [More]
UTHealth researchers discover new light-activated proteins that work as 'off switches' for brain cells

UTHealth researchers discover new light-activated proteins that work as 'off switches' for brain cells

Light switches for neurons have made enormous contributions to brain research by giving investigators access to "on switches" for brain cells. But, finding "off switches" has been much more challenging. [More]
HIV capsid protein plays crucial role in the virus' life cycle

HIV capsid protein plays crucial role in the virus' life cycle

HIV, or human immunodeficiency virus, is the retrovirus that leads to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome or AIDS. Globally, about 35 million people are living with HIV, which constantly adapts and mutates creating challenges for researchers. Now, scientists at the University of Missouri are gaining a clearer idea of what a key protein in HIV looks like, which will help explain its vital role in the virus' life cycle. [More]
UNSW Australia to co-host sixth International Nanomedicine Conference in Sydney

UNSW Australia to co-host sixth International Nanomedicine Conference in Sydney

Advances in nanotechnology and nano-fabrication are fundamentally changing the future of medicine, enabling more effective diagnostics and targeted drugs, and new bioactive materials that can help repair our bodies. [More]
ASHG declares 2015 recipients of annual Award for Excellence in Human Genetics Education

ASHG declares 2015 recipients of annual Award for Excellence in Human Genetics Education

The American Society of Human Genetics (ASHG) has named Robert L. Nussbaum, M.D., chief medical officer of invitae and clinical professor of medicine (volunteer) at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF); Roderick R. McInnes, CM, M.D., Ph.D., director of the Lady Davis Institute at the Jewish General Hospital and Alva chair in human genetics, Canada Research chair in neurogenetics, and professor of human genetics and biochemistry at McGill University; and Huntington F. Willard, Ph.D., president and director of the Marine Biological Laboratory and professor of human genetics at the University of Chicago; as the 2015 recipients of its annual Award for Excellence in Human Genetics Education. [More]
Angiography and MPI: an interview with Professor Mauro Magnani University of Urbino

Angiography and MPI: an interview with Professor Mauro Magnani University of Urbino

I am Mauro Magnani, Professor of Biochemistry at the University of Urbino, Italy. My background is essentially the transition of activity from the lab to application. I am also the founder of a spin-off company called EryDel, which uses technology to load materials or drugs inside cells. [More]
University of Cambridge, AstraZeneca announce new joint schemes to support PhD scholarships, clinical lectureships

University of Cambridge, AstraZeneca announce new joint schemes to support PhD scholarships, clinical lectureships

AstraZeneca and the University of Cambridge today announced three new joint schemes to support more than 80 PhD scholarshipsand eight clinical lectureships over the next five years spanning translational science, basic and clinical research. [More]

Biochemistry professor examines the perceived success of Theranos test procedure

The press is hailing it as a revolution in the healthcare industry: The fingerprick test procedure developed by Theranos can assess up to 200 different values from a single drop of blood and show indicators of potential medical conditions. [More]
New species of tRNA-derived small RNAs contribute to cell proliferation in cancer

New species of tRNA-derived small RNAs contribute to cell proliferation in cancer

Since their discovery in the 1950s, transfer RNAs (tRNAs) have been best known for their role in helping the cell make proteins from messenger RNA templates. However, recent studies have led to a previously-unsuspected concept that tRNAs are not always the end product; namely, they further serve as a source of small RNAs. [More]
New discovery could lead to personalized treatment for colon cancer

New discovery could lead to personalized treatment for colon cancer

A UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center discovery of just how a certain tumor suppressor molecule works to prevent tumor growth could lead to a personalized treatment approach for colon cancer. [More]
University of Oklahoma professor finds key mosquito protein for development of new malaria vaccine

University of Oklahoma professor finds key mosquito protein for development of new malaria vaccine

A University of Oklahoma professor studying malaria mosquito interaction has discovered a new mosquito protein for the development of a new vaccine that is expected to stop the spread of the disease in areas where it is considered endemic. [More]
Elsevier announces highlights of 2014 Impact Factor performance

Elsevier announces highlights of 2014 Impact Factor performance

Elsevier, a world-leading provider of scientific, technical and medical information products and services, today announced the highlights of its journal Impact Factor performance in 2014. According to the 2014 Journal Citation Reports (JCR) published by Thomson Reuters, Elsevier saw 55% of its journal Impact Factors increase from 2013 to 2014, ahead of the aggregate across other journals. [More]
New 3D cell culture system could facilitate search for therapeutic agents for Parkinson's disease

New 3D cell culture system could facilitate search for therapeutic agents for Parkinson's disease

The progressive loss of neurons in the brain of Parkinson's patients is slow yet inexorable. So far, there are no drugs that can halt this insidious process. [More]
NHS access - are you ready? An interview with Dr Keith Morris, Morris Healthcare Consulting

NHS access - are you ready? An interview with Dr Keith Morris, Morris Healthcare Consulting

The NHS is under immense pressure not only to continue to deliver improved care but also to change how it is delivering care to meet rising and changing demand with an essentially fixed amount of money and resources - all at the same time. Patience and persistence with good humour are thus vital characteristics to have. [More]
UMass Amherst reports how two molecular pathways get together to ensure normal bacterial growth

UMass Amherst reports how two molecular pathways get together to ensure normal bacterial growth

As part of their long-term investigation of regulatory factors in the bacterial cell cycle, molecular biologists at the University of Massachusetts Amherst now report finding a surprising new role for one factor, CpdR, an adaptor that helps to regulate selective protein destruction, the main control mechanism of cell cycle progression in bacteria, at specific times. [More]
UT Southwestern researchers identify two proteins within fetal lungs that initiate labor process

UT Southwestern researchers identify two proteins within fetal lungs that initiate labor process

Researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center have identified two proteins in a fetus' lungs responsible for initiating the labor process, providing potential new targets for preventing preterm birth. [More]
Preventing neutrophils from producing NETs can accelerate wound healing in diabetic mice

Preventing neutrophils from producing NETs can accelerate wound healing in diabetic mice

One of the body's tools for fighting off infection in a wound may actually slow down the healing process, according to new research by a team of Harvard University, Boston Children's Hospital, and Penn State University scientists. [More]
Melanoma patients with high levels of H2A.Z.2 protein less likely to survive

Melanoma patients with high levels of H2A.Z.2 protein less likely to survive

Melanoma patients with high levels of a protein that controls the expression of pro-growth genes are less likely to survive, according to a study led by researchers at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and published online in the journal Molecular Cell. [More]
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