Biochemistry News and Research RSS Feed - Biochemistry News and Research

ITJ researchers develop new hydrating beverage for athletes

ITJ researchers develop new hydrating beverage for athletes

Jiquiquilpan's Institute of Technology in Mexico developed a hydrating beverage for athletes that is based on agave's fructans, that not only supplies the adequate water levels to the organisms, but also offers other benefits such as dietetic fiber. [More]
New research shows molecular, cellular processes in human embroyo development

New research shows molecular, cellular processes in human embroyo development

Despite significant biomedical advances in recent decades, the very earliest events of human development¬--those that occur during a critical window just after fertilization--have remained an unobservable mystery, until now. [More]
Controlling cholesterol metabolism could help reduce pancreatic cancer spread

Controlling cholesterol metabolism could help reduce pancreatic cancer spread

Researchers have shown how controlling cholesterol metabolism in pancreatic cancer cells reduces metastasis, pointing to a potential new treatment using drugs previously developed for atherosclerosis. [More]
Combination of existing chemotherapy drugs can reduce breast cancer stem cells, improve survival

Combination of existing chemotherapy drugs can reduce breast cancer stem cells, improve survival

Two existing chemotherapy drugs appear to be a powerful pair in targeting errant stem cells that are making breast cancer and enabling its spread and recurrence, scientists report. [More]
Elusive brain receptor may play vital role in death of neurons from neurological diseases

Elusive brain receptor may play vital role in death of neurons from neurological diseases

Strokes, seizures, traumatic brain injury and schizophrenia: these conditions can cause persistent, widespread acidity around neurons in the brain. But exactly how that acidity affects brain function isn't well understood. [More]
UW-Madison researchers develop quick, saliva-based test for measuring fertility hormone levels

UW-Madison researchers develop quick, saliva-based test for measuring fertility hormone levels

Doubts about their ability to become pregnant affect as many as 25 percent of American women, and solving that problem is the basic business plan for BluDiagnostics. Although the startup company was born in the University of Wisconsin-Madison Biochemistry Department, co-founder Katie Brenner says the idea came directly from her own difficulty with conception. [More]
Black raspberry intake can lower key measure of arterial stiffness in patients with metabolic syndrome

Black raspberry intake can lower key measure of arterial stiffness in patients with metabolic syndrome

A new study shows that black raspberry extract can significantly lower a key measure of arterial stiffness-an indicator of cardiovascular disease. Black raspberry intake was also associated with increased levels of circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), which help repair and regenerate damaged arteries, according to the study published in Journal of Medicinal Food, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. The article is available free on the Journal of Medicinal Food website until May 28, 2016. [More]
Musashi-2 protein regulates function, development of blood stem cells

Musashi-2 protein regulates function, development of blood stem cells

Researchers at McMaster University's Stem Cell and Cancer Research Institute have made significant steps forward in understanding the stem cells of the human blood system after discovering how a key protein allows for better control and regeneration of these cells. [More]
Innovations in pre-clinical MRI: an interview with Priv. Doz. Dr. Dominik von Elverfeldt

Innovations in pre-clinical MRI: an interview with Priv. Doz. Dr. Dominik von Elverfeldt

To me the most exciting aspect of pre-clinical imaging is its broad range, from very basic science up to applied science. You deal with a range of disciplines including biology, chemistry, physics, biochemistry, biophysics, cell biology and of course medicine, as the aim is the translation of research to humans. [More]
Soy peptides, isoflavones can be more effective antimicrobial agent

Soy peptides, isoflavones can be more effective antimicrobial agent

Soy isoflavones and peptides may inhibit the growth of microbial pathogens that cause food-borne illnesses, according to a new study from University of Guelph researchers. [More]
Beckman Coulter Life Sciences to unveil Vi-CELL MetaFLEX for bioprocessing market at INTERPHEX 2016

Beckman Coulter Life Sciences to unveil Vi-CELL MetaFLEX for bioprocessing market at INTERPHEX 2016

Beckman Coulter Life Sciences will unveil a fast, low sample volume bioanalyte analyzer, the Vi-CELL MetaFLEX, at INTERPHEX 2016. This year’s event, showcasing pharmaceutical and bioprocessing innovation, is being held in the Jacob K. Javits Convention Center, New York, April 26-28 2016. [More]
New photo-switchable molecule for PDT could help treat rapidly growing tumors

New photo-switchable molecule for PDT could help treat rapidly growing tumors

Photoswitchable agents might reduce side effects of a chemotherapy. So far, photodynamic therapies have been dependent on oxygen in the tissue. But hardly any oxygen exists in malignant, rapidly growing tumors. [More]
Researchers determine 3-D structure of RlmN protein from bacteria

Researchers determine 3-D structure of RlmN protein from bacteria

The structure of a bacterial RNA-binding protein has been determined in the act of modifying a molecule of RNA -- an achievement that provides researchers with a unique view of the protein's function in action and could lead to clues that would help in the fight against the development of antibiotic-resistant infections. [More]
Scientists develop CRISPRainbow to study genome structure in real time

Scientists develop CRISPRainbow to study genome structure in real time

CRISPRainbow, a new technology using CRISPR/Cas9 developed by scientists at UMass Medical School, allows researchers to tag and track up to seven different genomic locations in live cells. This labeling system, details of which were published in Nature Biotechnology, will be an invaluable tool for studying the structure of the genome in real time. [More]
Study describes precise mechanisms that enable TB bacteria to persist in the body

Study describes precise mechanisms that enable TB bacteria to persist in the body

Bacteria that cause tuberculosis trick immune cells meant to destroy them into hiding and feeding them instead. This is the result of a study led by researchers from NYU Langone Medical Center and published online April 18 in Nature Immunology. [More]
Actin filaments may be key to molecular machinery that forms, stores long-term memories

Actin filaments may be key to molecular machinery that forms, stores long-term memories

Thank the little "muscles" in your neurons for allowing you to remember where you live, what your friends and family look like and a lot more. [More]
Newly discovered player in epigenetic regulation closely linked to known cancer promoters

Newly discovered player in epigenetic regulation closely linked to known cancer promoters

If genes form the body's blueprint, then the layer of epigenetics decides which parts of the plan get built. Unfortunately, many cancers hijack epigenetics to modulate the expression of genes, thus promoting cancer growth and survival. [More]
UNC scientists develop new optogenetic tool to study function of different proteins

UNC scientists develop new optogenetic tool to study function of different proteins

Scientists at the University of North Carolina School of Medicine have developed a way to embed light-responsive switches into proteins so that researchers can use lasers to manipulate protein movement and activity within living cells and animals. [More]
Specific intake levels of xanthohumol reduces obesity, cholesterol and elevated glucose

Specific intake levels of xanthohumol reduces obesity, cholesterol and elevated glucose

A recent study at Oregon State University has identified specific intake levels of xanthohumol, a natural flavonoid found in hops, that significantly improved some of the underlying markers of metabolic syndrome in laboratory animals and also reduced weight gain. [More]
African sleeping sickness parasite has defence mechanism against potential pharmaceuticals

African sleeping sickness parasite has defence mechanism against potential pharmaceuticals

Researchers from Umea University in Sweden have discovered that the single-celled parasite causing African sleeping sickness has a defence mechanism against potential pharmaceuticals under development against the disease. The deadly parasite has an enzyme that can cleave and hence disarm adenosine analogue pharmaceuticals. This according to a study recently published in the Journal of Biological Chemistry. [More]
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