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BU researchers find possible way to prevent Alzheimer's disease

BU researchers find possible way to prevent Alzheimer's disease

Boston University School of Medicine researchers may have found a way to delay or even prevent Alzheimer's disease (AD). They discovered that pre-treatment of neurons with the anti-aging protein Klotho can prevent neuron death in the presence of the toxic amyloid protein and glutamate. [More]
Protein once seen as promising anti-cancer compound helps to stabilize neural circuits

Protein once seen as promising anti-cancer compound helps to stabilize neural circuits

Researchers at UC San Francisco (UCSF) have discovered that endostatin, a protein that once aroused intense interest as a possible cancer treatment, plays a key role in the stable functioning of the nervous system. [More]
New treatment fights respiratory syncytial virus in children

New treatment fights respiratory syncytial virus in children

Researchers at Le Bonheur Children's Hospital and the University of Tennessee Health Science Center announced results of a clinical trial of a new drug shown to safely reduce the viral load and clinical illness of healthy adult volunteers intranasally infected with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). [More]
Deleting enzyme favorably impacts behaviors associated with autistic behaviors

Deleting enzyme favorably impacts behaviors associated with autistic behaviors

Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is a genetic disorder that causes obsessive-compulsive and repetitive behaviors, and other behaviors on the autistic spectrum, as well as cognitive deficits. It is the most common inherited cause of mental impairment and the most common cause of autism. [More]
Vanderbilt-led research team identifies protein "signatures" that drive colorectal cancer

Vanderbilt-led research team identifies protein "signatures" that drive colorectal cancer

A Vanderbilt University-led research team has identified protein "signatures" of genetic mutations that drive colorectal cancer, the nation's second leading cause of cancer deaths after lung cancer. [More]
New molecules and biopharmaceuticals enhance patient's immune response against tumors

New molecules and biopharmaceuticals enhance patient's immune response against tumors

Researchers at the University of Arkansas have been awarded $1.5 million from the National Cancer Institute at the National Institutes of Health to develop new molecules and biopharmaceuticals that enhance a patient's immune response against tumors. [More]
Study: L-carnitine has neuroprotective effects on injured sciatic nerve of rats

Study: L-carnitine has neuroprotective effects on injured sciatic nerve of rats

Several studies have demonstrated that L-carnitine exhibits neuroprotective effects on injured sciatic nerve of rats with diabetes mellitus. [More]
Researchers identify group of cells in brain that plays important role in Down syndrome

Researchers identify group of cells in brain that plays important role in Down syndrome

Researchers from UC Davis School of Medicine and Shriners Hospitals for Children - Northern California have identified a group of cells in the brain that they say plays an important role in the abnormal neuron development in Down syndrome. [More]
Marmoset's unique rapid reproductive system sheds new light on evolution and primate biology

Marmoset's unique rapid reproductive system sheds new light on evolution and primate biology

A team of scientists from around the world led by Baylor College of Medicine and Washington University in St. Louis has completed the genome sequence of the common marmoset - the first sequence of a New World Monkey - providing new information about the marmoset's unique rapid reproductive system, physiology and growth, shedding new light on primate biology and evolution. [More]
Three leading universities join forces to find better solutions for patients with craniofacial defects

Three leading universities join forces to find better solutions for patients with craniofacial defects

One in every 2,000 babies is born with a skull that can't grow normally. Various sections of these babies' skulls are fused together at joints called sutures, constricting the developing brain and disrupting vision, sleep, eating and IQ. For these young patients, risky skull-expanding surgeries become an almost annual event. [More]
UT Southwestern researcher named recipient of ASBMB Merck Award for research on molecular biology

UT Southwestern researcher named recipient of ASBMB Merck Award for research on molecular biology

Dr. Zhijian "James" Chen, Professor of Molecular Biology and a Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator at UT Southwestern Medical Center, has been named the 2015 recipient of the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Merck Award, which recognizes outstanding contributions to research in biochemistry and molecular biology. [More]
Consumption of probiotics during 30 days helps diminish accumulation of fat in liver

Consumption of probiotics during 30 days helps diminish accumulation of fat in liver

Spanish scientists have demonstrated through an experiment on obese rats that the consumption of probiotics during thirty days helps diminish the accumulation of fat in the liver. [More]
Starvation can affect health of descendants of famished individuals

Starvation can affect health of descendants of famished individuals

Evidence from human famines and animal studies suggests that starvation can affect the health of descendants of famished individuals. But how such an acquired trait might be transmitted from one generation to the next has not been clear. [More]
Lipoic acid appears to reset and synchronize circadian rhythms

Lipoic acid appears to reset and synchronize circadian rhythms

Researchers have discovered a possible explanation for the surprisingly large range of biological effects that are linked to a micronutrient called lipoic acid: It appears to reset and synchronize circadian rhythms, or the "biological clock" found in most life forms. [More]
Cholesterol-lowering statins may prolong lives of people with diabetic cardiovascular disease

Cholesterol-lowering statins may prolong lives of people with diabetic cardiovascular disease

Heart disease and stroke are the leading causes of death and disability among people with Type 2 diabetes. In fact, at least 65 percent of people with diabetes die from some form of heart disease or stroke, according to the American Heart Association. [More]
Biochemists find groups of tiny protein loops that help bacteria to establish infection

Biochemists find groups of tiny protein loops that help bacteria to establish infection

When it comes to infecting humans and animals, bacteria need a helping hand. Kansas State University biochemists have found the helping hand: groups of tiny protein loops on the surface of cells. [More]
Research shows promise to speed up drug discovery for deadly diseases

Research shows promise to speed up drug discovery for deadly diseases

Antibiotic resistance is depleting our arsenal against deadly diseases and infections, such as tuberculosis and Staph infections, but recent research shows promise to speed up the drug discovery process. [More]
Study: Stress can disrupt process of fat tissue development

Study: Stress can disrupt process of fat tissue development

Using experimental models, researchers at Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) showed that adenosine, a metabolite released when the body is under stress or during an inflammatory response, stops the process of adipogenesis, when adipose (fat) stem cells differentiate into adult fat cells. [More]
AMSBIO introduces revolutionary magnetic technology for bioseparations

AMSBIO introduces revolutionary magnetic technology for bioseparations

AMSBIO announces MagSi-Direct - a revolutionary technology that brings the power, simplicity, and convenience of magnetic separation to researchers involved in cell biology, protein chemistry, flow cytometry, diagnostics development and many other fields. [More]
Scientists develop RNA that binds cGMP

Scientists develop RNA that binds cGMP

The transmission of signals within cells is dependent on cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) as an important secondary messenger. German scientists have now developed an RNA that binds cGMP. As reported in the journal Angewandte Chemie, it is possible to suppress the cGMP signal cascade in genetically modified cells that produce this RNA. [More]