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New book details role of astrocytes in epileptic brain tissue

New book details role of astrocytes in epileptic brain tissue

Present throughout human history, epilepsy is a devastating group of neurological disorders characterized by periodic and unpredictable seizure activity in the brain. [More]
Groundbreaking research opens door for prevention of cardiac fibrosis

Groundbreaking research opens door for prevention of cardiac fibrosis

Groundbreaking research from the University of Alberta and McGill University has opened the door towards the future prevention of cardiac fibrosis—a condition leading to heart failure for which there is currently no treatment. [More]
Salmonella protein can reduce drug resistant molecule found in cancer cells

Salmonella protein can reduce drug resistant molecule found in cancer cells

A surprising result in an experiment on Salmonella bacteria has led to a discovery that may make drug resistant cancer cells more treatable by conventional chemotherapies. [More]
DPUK brings organisations together to tackle dementia across the UK

DPUK brings organisations together to tackle dementia across the UK

Dementia, is an overall term that describes a wide range of symptoms that includes memory loss and difficulties with thinking, is caused when the brain cells degenerate and die more quickly than they would as part of the normal ageing process. [More]
Iowa State dietetic interns to connect virtually with low-income families for providing health care

Iowa State dietetic interns to connect virtually with low-income families for providing health care

A group of Iowa State University dietetic interns will provide nutrition coaching and wellness information to low-income families as part of a national health initiative. [More]
Penn researchers develop plant-based oral vaccine booster

Penn researchers develop plant-based oral vaccine booster

Jonas Salk created a vaccine against polio that has been used since 1955; Albert Sabin created another version that has been on the market since 1961. Together, these two vaccines have nearly eliminated polio from the face of the earth. [More]
Scientists undertake major biomedical research initiative to escalate problem of sepsis

Scientists undertake major biomedical research initiative to escalate problem of sepsis

A multidisciplinary team of scientists -- including two UC Santa Barbara faculty members -- is poised to undertake a major biomedical research initiative focused on the escalating problem of sepsis, the body's abnormal response to severe infections. [More]
New technique could help produce enhanced imaging results with ordinary microscopes

New technique could help produce enhanced imaging results with ordinary microscopes

Research completed through a collaboration with University of Missouri engineers, biologists, and chemists could transform how scientists study molecules and cells at sub-microscopic (nanoscale) levels. [More]
New method using electrical conductivity could be effective in measuring blood present in dry blood spots

New method using electrical conductivity could be effective in measuring blood present in dry blood spots

Researchers from The University of Texas at Arlington have demonstrated that electrical conductivity can be an effective means to precisely measure the amount of blood present in dry blood spot analysis, providing a new alternative to the current preferred approach of measuring sodium levels. [More]
Biochemists design genetic poison pill to thwart coxsackievirus B3

Biochemists design genetic poison pill to thwart coxsackievirus B3

It has a funny name - coxsackievirus - but there's nothing funny about how this tiny germ and its close relatives sicken their hosts. [More]
Scientists capture new images of calcium-shuttling molecule linked to aggressive cancers

Scientists capture new images of calcium-shuttling molecule linked to aggressive cancers

Scientists have captured new images of a calcium-shuttling molecule that has been linked to aggressive cancers. The three-dimensional structure could help researchers develop novel therapies and diagnostic tools for diseases that are caused by a malfunction in calcium adsorption. [More]
Scientists uncover structure of cold virus linked to severe asthma, respiratory infections in children

Scientists uncover structure of cold virus linked to severe asthma, respiratory infections in children

The atomic structure of an elusive cold virus linked to severe asthma and respiratory infections in children has been solved by a team of researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and Purdue University. [More]
Scientists use machine learning to interpret mosquito genome

Scientists use machine learning to interpret mosquito genome

Scientists are using machine learning to identify important sequences of DNA within the mosquito genome that regulate how the insect's cells develop and behave. [More]
Five-year NIH grant awarded to four NYC medical centers for PMI Cohort Program

Five-year NIH grant awarded to four NYC medical centers for PMI Cohort Program

Columbia University Medical Center and Weill Cornell Medicine, in collaboration with NewYork-Presbyterian and NYC Health + Hospitals/Harlem, have been awarded a grant from the NIH for approximately $4 million in fiscal year 2016 to enroll participants in the Cohort Program of President Barack Obama's Precision Medicine Initiative (PMI)—a large-scale research effort to improve our ability to prevent and treat disease based on individual differences in lifestyle, environment and genetics. [More]
Extra-coding RNA modulates neuronal DNA methylation patterns

Extra-coding RNA modulates neuronal DNA methylation patterns

The creation of memories in the brain involves addition or removal of methyl groups at precise spots on chromosomal DNA. But what controls the careful targeting of these neuronal DNA methylation dynamics? [More]
Mitochondrial stress can trigger tumor-related metabolic shifts, study finds

Mitochondrial stress can trigger tumor-related metabolic shifts, study finds

Cancerous tumors must be fed. Their unregulated growth requires a steady stream of blood flow and nutrients. Thus, one way that researchers have tried to wipe out cancer is to target cells undergoing the metabolic shifts that enable a tumor's rapid growth. [More]
New research reveals b1-integrin protein as promising therapeutic target for muscle aging

New research reveals b1-integrin protein as promising therapeutic target for muscle aging

As we age, the function and regenerative abilities of skeletal muscles deteriorate, which means it is difficult for the elderly to recover from injury or surgery. New work from Carnegie's Michelle Rozo, Liangji Li, and Chen-Ming Fan demonstrates that a protein called b1-integrin is crucial for muscle regeneration. [More]
Researchers uncover sensing mechanism of food poisoning bacteria found in shellfish

Researchers uncover sensing mechanism of food poisoning bacteria found in shellfish

UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers have uncovered a mechanism that a type of pathogenic bacteria found in shellfish use to sense when they are in the human gut, where they release toxins that cause food poisoning. [More]
Key differences in immune response may explain young children’s proneness to infecion

Key differences in immune response may explain young children’s proneness to infecion

Schools are commonly known as breeding grounds for viruses and bacteria, but this may not necessarily be linked to hygiene. [More]
Scientists develop light-activated injectable device to stimulate nerve cells

Scientists develop light-activated injectable device to stimulate nerve cells

In the campy 1966 science fiction movie "Fantastic Voyage," scientists miniaturize a submarine with themselves inside and travel through the body of a colleague to break up a potentially fatal blood clot. Right. Micro-humans aside, imagine the inflammation that metal sub would cause. [More]
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