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Broad Institute of MIT researcher honored for groundbreaking research using new gene editing tool

Broad Institute of MIT researcher honored for groundbreaking research using new gene editing tool

The newest gene editing tool - called CRISPR-Cas9 - is leading to new research possibilities in cell biology and neuroscience. This includes the ability to make transgenic animal models more quickly, which helps researchers better study diseases that affect thousands of people each year. [More]
Researchers find Pom1 protein regulates different processes of cell growth and division

Researchers find Pom1 protein regulates different processes of cell growth and division

Investigators from Dartmouth's Norris Cotton Cancer Center led by James Moseley, PhD have found that the protein Pom1 possesses the ability to modify different sets of proteins to coordinate the processes of cell growth and division. [More]
Saccharin could potentially lead to development of drugs for difficult-to-treat cancers

Saccharin could potentially lead to development of drugs for difficult-to-treat cancers

Saccharin, the artificial sweetener that is the main ingredient in Sweet 'N Low, Sweet Twin and Necta, could do far more than just keep our waistlines trim. According to new research, this popular sugar substitute could potentially lead to the development of drugs capable of combating aggressive, difficult-to-treat cancers with fewer side effects. [More]
New technology developed to determine resistance to rabies virus

New technology developed to determine resistance to rabies virus

Researchers at Texas A&M AgriLife Research have developed a new technology to determine sensitivity or resistance to rabies virus. [More]
New in vitro study examines benefits of pear-enriched diet on chronic diseases

New in vitro study examines benefits of pear-enriched diet on chronic diseases

A new in vitro (test tube) study, "Dietary functional benefits of Bartlett and Starkrimson pears for potential management of hyperglycemia, hypertension and ulcer bacteria Helicobacter pylori while supporting beneficial probiotic bacterial response," was published in the March issue of Food Research International. [More]
RUB biochemists gain new insights into generation, maintenance of circadian rhythms

RUB biochemists gain new insights into generation, maintenance of circadian rhythms

Biochemists at the Ruhr-Universität Bochum have gained new insights into the generation and maintenance of circadian rhythms. They demonstrated that the Ras protein is important for setting the phase of such a circadian clock, as its activity determines the period length of the rhythm. [More]
OSU researchers find link between low levels of vitamin D and depression in young women

OSU researchers find link between low levels of vitamin D and depression in young women

A new study from Oregon State University suggests there is a relationship between low levels of vitamin D and depression in otherwise healthy young women. [More]
UH professor part of personalized medicine panel session at SXSW Health and MedTech Expo

UH professor part of personalized medicine panel session at SXSW Health and MedTech Expo

University of Houston professor Preethi Gunaratne will be part of a panel addressing personalized medicine at the South by Southwest (SXSW) Health and MedTech Expo in Austin Tuesday, March 17. [More]
New device can detect cyanide exposure within 70 seconds

New device can detect cyanide exposure within 70 seconds

A victim of cyanide poisoning can die within 30 minutes. The diagnostic test to determine cyanide exposure takes 24 hours. [More]
Wistar awarded grant to create Jayne Koskinas Ted Giovanis Breast Cancer Research Consortium

Wistar awarded grant to create Jayne Koskinas Ted Giovanis Breast Cancer Research Consortium

The Jayne Koskinas Ted Giovanis Foundation awarded The Wistar Institute a $1.1 million grant to create The Jayne Koskinas Ted Giovanis Breast Cancer Research Consortium at The Wistar Institute. The Consortium will support the highly synergistic, multidisciplinary research projects of three Wistar scientists dedicated to advancing breast cancer research. [More]

Xylem’s YSI biochemistry analyzer ideal for food process applications

The 2900 Series Biochemistry Analyzers from YSI, a Xylem brand, deliver rapid, accurate biochemistry analysis and provide several data management solutions for making process and quality assurance decisions in food process applications. [More]
UTSA professor named Gold Fellow of the Association for Research in Vision and Ophthamology

UTSA professor named Gold Fellow of the Association for Research in Vision and Ophthamology

Andrew Tsin, professor of biology in the UTSA College of Sciences, has been named a Gold Fellow of the Association for Research in Vision and Ophthamology for his dedication and exemplary contributions in the field. Tsin will receive the honor at the 2015 ARVO Annual Meeting, May 3-7 in Denver. [More]
M-MDSCs may be effective in treating arthritis in humans

M-MDSCs may be effective in treating arthritis in humans

Using a mouse model of rheumatoid arthritis, scientists have discovered that a form of cellular immunotherapy by intravenous administration of monocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cells, or M-MDSCs, might be an effective treatment for the disease in humans. [More]
CPRIT awards research and recruitment grants to improve cancer research

CPRIT awards research and recruitment grants to improve cancer research

The Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas (CPRIT) has awarded UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers more than $7.5 million in research grants to improve diagnostic and therapeutic services and research relating to cancers of the brain, breast, throat, and bone, as well as to improve scientific understanding of cancer biology. [More]
Severe mortality-associated diseases less prevalent in members of long-lived families

Severe mortality-associated diseases less prevalent in members of long-lived families

Recent research from the Long Life Family Study (LLFS) confirms that severe mortality-associated diseases are less prevalent in the families of long-lived individuals than in the general population. The Journals of Gerontology, Series A will publish these findings in the article titled, "Are Members of Long-Lived Families Healthier than Their Equally Long-Lived Peers? Evidence from the Long Life Family Study" on March 5, 2015. [More]
Common flame retardants linked to obesity, say UH researchers

Common flame retardants linked to obesity, say UH researchers

Could your electronics be making you fat? According to University of Houston researchers, a common flame retardant used to keep electronics from overheating may be to blame. [More]
Data provides better understanding of genetic activity during lung cancer development

Data provides better understanding of genetic activity during lung cancer development

Scientists at the University of Granada, incollaboration with the universities of Harvard and Yale (United States) have provided new data for a better understanding of the alterations produced during the development of lung cancer, the tumour with the highest yearly death rate in Spain. [More]
Bielefeld University chemists develop copper molecule that could help prevent spread of cancer

Bielefeld University chemists develop copper molecule that could help prevent spread of cancer

Chemists at Bielefeld University have developed a molecule containing copper that binds specifically with DNA and prevents the spread of cancer. First results show that it kills the cancer cells more quickly than cisplatin - a widely used anti-cancer drug that is frequently administered in chemotherapy. [More]
Study focuses on improving therapeutic outcomes in cancer patients through diet-drug combination

Study focuses on improving therapeutic outcomes in cancer patients through diet-drug combination

Boosting anti-cancer immunity through diet and novel drug therapies—that's the idea behind a collaborative project involving researchers from the South Dakota State University College of Pharmacy and Sanford Research in Sioux Falls. [More]
UK scientists find new approach to treat Parkinson's disease

UK scientists find new approach to treat Parkinson's disease

UK scientists have developed a peptide that sticks to the protein that causes Parkinson's disease, stopping it from killing brain cells. The research highlights a potential new route for slowing the progress of this incurable disease. [More]
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