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Dental problems linked to cleft lip and palate may be caused by abnormal salivary glands

Dental problems linked to cleft lip and palate may be caused by abnormal salivary glands

A new study in the Journal of Dental Research suggests that dental problems commonly associated with cleft lip and palate may be caused by abnormalities in salivary glands and an imbalance of immune compounds in the mouth. [More]
Prohibiting anonymous sperm donation could lead to decline in number of donors, study suggests

Prohibiting anonymous sperm donation could lead to decline in number of donors, study suggests

A new study published in the Journal of Law and the Biosciences suggests that prohibiting anonymous sperm donation would result in a decline in the number of donors, and that those willing to donate would likely demand compensation for donation. [More]
Researchers developing guidelines on ethics and best practices for biorepositories

Researchers developing guidelines on ethics and best practices for biorepositories

What if a patient gave permission to a researcher at her local hospital to use her blood or specimen for research, and later the researcher decided to share that sample with others? [More]
Seattle Children’s Hospital opens new clinic to provide gender care for children, teens and young adults

Seattle Children’s Hospital opens new clinic to provide gender care for children, teens and young adults

Seattle Children's Hospital has opened a new Gender Clinic for children, adolescents and young adults up to 21 years of age. [More]
University of Melbourne ethicist encourages doctors to respect parents’ opinions on treatment decisions for children

University of Melbourne ethicist encourages doctors to respect parents’ opinions on treatment decisions for children

A University of Melbourne ethicist is encouraging doctors to recognise the autonomy of parents, even if this could mean “less than optimal” treatment decisions for their children. [More]
UNC bioethicist addresses roadblocks to HIV research on pregnant women

UNC bioethicist addresses roadblocks to HIV research on pregnant women

UNC School of Medicine's Anne Lyerly is addressing the urgent need for effective HIV prevention and treatment for the estimated 1.5 million women worldwide with HIV who give birth each year. [More]
Revolutionary surgery improves airway and jaw position in children with Treacher Collins syndrome

Revolutionary surgery improves airway and jaw position in children with Treacher Collins syndrome

A revolutionary surgery developed by Dr. Richard Hopper, surgical director of Seattle Children's Craniofacial Center, called subcranial rotation distraction, is changing the lives of children who are tracheostomy dependent. [More]
WHO convenes Emergency Committee's 3rd meeting to discuss on Zika virus and associated complications

WHO convenes Emergency Committee's 3rd meeting to discuss on Zika virus and associated complications

On 14 June 2016, the World Health Organization will convene the 3rd meeting of the Emergency Committee under the International Health Regulations (2005) (IHR) on Zika and observed increase in neurological disorders and neonatal malformations. [More]
ISSCR releases updated guidelines for stem cell research, development of new therapies

ISSCR releases updated guidelines for stem cell research, development of new therapies

The International Society for Stem Cell Research, the world's largest professional organization of stem cell scientists, today released newly updated guidelines for stem cell research and the development of new clinical therapies. [More]
Experts focus on scientific complexities of individual and population health at iCOMOS 2016

Experts focus on scientific complexities of individual and population health at iCOMOS 2016

How do we balance the needs for individualized health care with the public health programs serving communities - especially in the context of environmental pollution and climate change? Given a fixed set of resources, maximizing the potential of both is challenging, indeed. [More]
OASIS study to investigate link between SIDS and alteration on newborn hearing screen test

OASIS study to investigate link between SIDS and alteration on newborn hearing screen test

Seattle Children's is partnering on the launch of a study called the 'Oto-Acoustic Signals in SIDS'study that will investigate a possible association between Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) and hearing alteration on the newborn hearing screen test. [More]
Interdisciplinary researchers to explore ethical issues of pregnant women during Zika crisis

Interdisciplinary researchers to explore ethical issues of pregnant women during Zika crisis

The emerging Zika virus epidemic is bringing to light a longstanding ethical challenge in medical research: the inclusion of pregnant women. With new funding from the Wellcome Trust, an interdisciplinary team of scholars will focus on issues of ethics and research in pregnancy and women of reproductive age, beginning with the current Zika context and later expanding to general public health research. [More]
Medical community has unique role to play in determining future use of mitochondrial replacement techniques

Medical community has unique role to play in determining future use of mitochondrial replacement techniques

There is a unique role for the United States medical community to play in determining the future application of, and ethically acceptable approach to, mitochondrial replacement techniques (MRTs), according to a commentary published online by the New England Journal of Medicine. [More]
Review of EAS cases among patients with psychiatric conditions in the Netherlands

Review of EAS cases among patients with psychiatric conditions in the Netherlands

A review of euthanasia or assisted suicide (EAS) cases among patients with psychiatric disorders in the Netherlands found that most had chronic, severe conditions, with histories of attempted suicides and hospitalizations, and were described as socially isolated or lonely, according to an article published online by JAMA Psychiatry. [More]
U.S. panel endorses “three-parent” IVF technique

U.S. panel endorses “three-parent” IVF technique

An expert committee have recommended that the U.S. government allows the clinical investigation of mitochondrial replacement techniques (MRT) to go ahead. [More]

Strong ethical culture needed within US military health system

The health professional community should urge the United States Secretary of Defense to adopt and implement the recent recommendations of the Defense Health Board, and in addition rescind directives authorizing participation of health professionals in interrogation and force-feeding because they are inconsistent with professional ethics according to Leonard Rubenstein, from Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, and Berman Institute of Bioethics, Baltimore, and colleagues in a new Essay published this week in PLOS Medicine. [More]

Nearly half of Muslim Americans face discrimination in health care workplace

While many studies have examined the impact of bias based on race, gender or sexual orientation, religious discrimination in the health care workplace has received little research attention. A new study funded by the John Templeton Foundation and conducted at the University of Chicago finds that for Muslim Americans, even those in one the nation's most highly regarded professions, encounter a less-than-inclusive and welcoming work environment during their career. [More]
Researchers discover drug target and genetic pathway for graft-versus-host disease

Researchers discover drug target and genetic pathway for graft-versus-host disease

A Seattle Children's Research Institute lab has discovered a genetic pathway that can be targeted with existing drugs to prevent graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), a common and deadly complication of bone marrow transplants. [More]
Loyola's Public Health Program receives accreditation from Council on Education for Public Health

Loyola's Public Health Program receives accreditation from Council on Education for Public Health

Loyola University Chicago's Public Health Program has received a five-year accreditation from the Council on Education for Public Health. [More]
Two Loyola professors explore ethical issues that arise with use of social media in health care

Two Loyola professors explore ethical issues that arise with use of social media in health care

In a recent AMA Journal of Ethics article titled "Why Can't We Be Friends? A Case-Based Analysis of Ethical Issues with Social Media in Health Care," two Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine professors analyze this issue. Kayhan Parsi, JD, PhD, and Nanette Elster, JD, MPH, who are part of Loyola's Neiswanger Institute for Bioethics, discuss the good, the bad, and the ugly of social media and health care. [More]
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