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Addressing the evolution of diversity in medical education

Addressing the evolution of diversity in medical education

A perspective piece in this week's issue of the New England Journal of Medicine from a student at the University of Pennsylvania's Perelman School of Medicine addresses the evolution of diversity in medical education. [More]
SCD patients who experience discrimination are less likely to follow physician recommendations

SCD patients who experience discrimination are less likely to follow physician recommendations

Sickle Cell Disease (SCD) is the most common genetic condition detected by newborn screening in the United States - a physically devastating and painful illness affecting an estimated 100,000 individuals currently nationwide. [More]

Study looks at reasons why sickle cell patients do not adhere to available treatment

Experiencing discrimination because of their race or health condition can influence just how much trust people put into the health profession. [More]
Scientists discover area of brain that could control person's motivation to exercise

Scientists discover area of brain that could control person's motivation to exercise

Scientists at Seattle Children's Research Institute have discovered an area of the brain that could control a person's motivation to exercise and participate in other rewarding activities - potentially leading to improved treatments for depression. [More]
Communications about the benefits of vaccination influence parents' intentions to immunize children

Communications about the benefits of vaccination influence parents' intentions to immunize children

How do parents decide whether to vaccinate their child? In a study designed to formally look at the content of parent-targeted communications about the benefits of vaccination for measles, mumps and rubella, Indiana University School of Medicine investigators report that the framing of these messages influences parents' intentions to immunize their children. [More]
Women seek hormonal treatments for menopausal symptoms from anti-aging clinicians

Women seek hormonal treatments for menopausal symptoms from anti-aging clinicians

Feeling that conventional doctors did not take their suffering seriously, women instead sought out hormonal treatments for menopausal symptoms from anti-aging clinicians, according to a Case Western Reserve University study that investigated the appeal of anti-aging medicine. [More]
Researcher finds genetic identifier that may allow clinicians to determine babies at risk for autism

Researcher finds genetic identifier that may allow clinicians to determine babies at risk for autism

A researcher at Seattle Children's Hospital and Research Institute has found a genetic identifier for autism that includes physical features that may eventually allow clinicians to identify babies who are at risk for autism before they are born. [More]
Research reveals why HIV remains a long-lasting infection

Research reveals why HIV remains a long-lasting infection

HIV, the virus that causes AIDS, has the ability to integrate into the human genome, making it extremely difficult to cure the infection. A new study by scientists at Seattle Children's Research Institute, University of Washington and Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center found that when HIV integrates into genes involved with cancer, these cells tend to reproduce to a greater extent than others HIV-infected cells. [More]
New research collaboration aims to develop better therapies for autoimmune diseases

New research collaboration aims to develop better therapies for autoimmune diseases

Seattle Children's Research Institute and biotechnology company Kineta, Inc. today launched the Alliance for Children's Therapeutics (ACT), a first-of-its-kind pediatric research and funding collaboration designed to speed development of new medications for children and teens with lupus nephritis and other autoimmune diseases like multiple sclerosis, Type 1 diabetes and rheumatoid arthritis. [More]
New report raises important questions about transcranial direct current stimulation

New report raises important questions about transcranial direct current stimulation

Over the past several decades, neurostimulation techniques such as transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) have gradually gained favour in the public eye. In a new report, published yesterday in the prestigious scientific journal Neuron, IRCM ethics experts raise important questions about the rising tide of tDCS coverage in the media, while regulatory action is lacking and ethical issues need to be addressed. [More]

Medical schools need to guide students on use of social media, say Penn researchers

Medical students use social media extensively, but medical schools may need to offer more guidance in potential pitfalls, according to Penn State College of Medicine researchers. [More]
$15 million pledged for creation of Johns Hopkins Greenberg Bladder Cancer Institute

$15 million pledged for creation of Johns Hopkins Greenberg Bladder Cancer Institute

Baltimore-area commercial real estate developer Erwin L. Greenberg and his wife Stephanie Cooper Greenberg have pledged a $15 million gift to create the Johns Hopkins Greenberg Bladder Cancer Institute. [More]
Longer looks: AIDS epidemic in the U.S.; how public health and the recession connect

Longer looks: AIDS epidemic in the U.S.; how public health and the recession connect

I pull out my phone and check the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website, which tells me that, in the United States, 636,000 people have died since the epidemic began. That's 23 times higher than Germany, for a country with four times the population. This makes no sense. Germany has big cities, it has gay men and sex workers and drug users, it has all the same temptations for them to be uncareful that the United States does. How could so many fewer people have died? (Michael Hobbes, 5/12). [More]
Ethics experts issue decision-making guidelines to aid NASA for higher risk human spaceflights

Ethics experts issue decision-making guidelines to aid NASA for higher risk human spaceflights

Nearly two years after the conclusion of its space shuttle program left Americans wondering what would become of the spacefaring dreams of decades past, NASA has sought the advice of health and ethics experts for protecting astronauts on its "next generation" of long duration and exploration-class human spaceflights. [More]
Researchers to discuss implications of genomic sequencing at ACMG meeting

Researchers to discuss implications of genomic sequencing at ACMG meeting

Researchers from the Mayo Clinic Center for Individualized Medicine will present results of three different studies evaluating implications and feasibility of genome sequencing at the ACMG Annual Clinical Genetics Meeting this week in Nashville, Tenn. [More]
Desperate patients offered untested, risky stem cell treatments, says Wisconsin professor

Desperate patients offered untested, risky stem cell treatments, says Wisconsin professor

Desperate patients are easy prey for unscrupulous clinics offering untested and risky stem cell treatments, says law and bioethics Professor Alta Charo of the University of Wisconsin-Madison, who is studying "stem cell tourism." [More]
Sports medicine physicians to convene at 2014 AMSSM Annual Meeting

Sports medicine physicians to convene at 2014 AMSSM Annual Meeting

More than 1,400 sports medicine physicians from the United States and abroad will attend the 23rd Annual Meeting of the American Medical Society for Sports Medicine (AMSSM), the largest primary care sports medicine physician organization in the nation. [More]
Informed consent is not required for certain health research, say bioethics experts

Informed consent is not required for certain health research, say bioethics experts

Under the right conditions, full informed consent is not ethically required for some types of health research, according to leading bioethics experts. [More]
Rowan University gets RWJF support to transform health care delivery

Rowan University gets RWJF support to transform health care delivery

Rowan University is launching an ambitious plan to transform health care delivery with support from a $3.05 million grant from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. Through new education and research programs, the 18-month project will develop innovative approaches that respond to the region's emerging needs for access to affordable and effective health care services. [More]

SSOM to receive Moral Courage award from Faith in Public Life in recognition to accept qualified DACA

Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine (SSOM) will receive the Moral Courage award from Faith in Public Life, a non-profit organization devoted to lifting up the voices of progressive faith leaders. [More]