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Congress needs to act to incentivize development of genomic data systems

Congress needs to act to incentivize development of genomic data systems

The latest generation of genomic testing offers a chance for significant improvements in patient care, disease prevention, and possibly even the cost-effectiveness of healthcare, but Congress needs to act to incentivize the development of the massive data systems that doctors and regulators will need in order to make these tests safe and effective for patients. [More]
Sangamo BioSciences to present data on ZFP Therapeutic platform at ASGCT meeting

Sangamo BioSciences to present data on ZFP Therapeutic platform at ASGCT meeting

Sangamo BioSciences, Inc. announced that data from clinical, preclinical and research-stage programs focused on the development of ZFP Therapeutics will be presented at the 18th Annual Meeting of the American Society of Gene and Cell Therapy [More]
Scholars from leading U.S. medical schools issue updated recommendations on medical ethics training

Scholars from leading U.S. medical schools issue updated recommendations on medical ethics training

The American health care landscape has changed significantly in the three decades since the landmark "DeCamp Report" first argued that ethics training should be required for all medical students, yet the fundamental importance of professionalism and ethical practice has only solidified. [More]
New study explores parent satisfaction with research study on treating severe childhood aggression

New study explores parent satisfaction with research study on treating severe childhood aggression

A new study of families participating in a clinical trial to treat children with severe physical aggression explored the factors affecting parent satisfaction with the research study. [More]
Study explains why generic insulin remains out of reach for diabetes patients

Study explains why generic insulin remains out of reach for diabetes patients

A generic version of insulin, the lifesaving diabetes drug used by 6 million people in the United States, has never been available in this country because drug companies have made incremental improvements that kept insulin under patent from 1923 to 2014. [More]
BU study explores birth outcomes for women who receive fertility treatment

BU study explores birth outcomes for women who receive fertility treatment

Birth outcomes for babies whose mothers used assisted reproductive technology (ART) are better in some cases, and worse in others, than for subfertile women who did not use ART, according to a first-of-its-kind study led by Boston University School of Public Health researchers. [More]
Whole genome sequencing may help identify disease risks

Whole genome sequencing may help identify disease risks

Using a small amount of blood or saliva, a technology called whole genome sequencing makes that possible - and more than half of parents said they'd not only be interested in the technology for themselves but for their children too, a new nationally-representative University of Michigan study shows. [More]
Bioethics Commission makes recommendations on preparedness for public health emergencies

Bioethics Commission makes recommendations on preparedness for public health emergencies

Today the Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues (Bioethics Commission) reported that the federal government has both a prudential and a moral responsibility to actively participate in coordinated global responses to public health emergencies wherever they arise. [More]
New article assesses 40 years of intensive effort to improve end-of-life care

New article assesses 40 years of intensive effort to improve end-of-life care

After four decades of work - first on patients' rights, then on family and caregiving relationships, and most recently on systemic reform -- we now know that it will take additional efforts in all three areas to improve care at the end of life, concludes an article in the New England Journal of Medicine. [More]
New report raises ethical questions surrounding the use of data

New report raises ethical questions surrounding the use of data

Public participation should be at the heart of big data projects in health care and biomedical research, according to the findings of a new report by the Nuffield Council on Bioethics. [More]
Hastings Center Report: Latest issues on health and medicine

Hastings Center Report: Latest issues on health and medicine

For two years, a debate has raged over the study known as the Surfactant, Positive Pressure, and Oxygenation Randomized Trial (SUPPORT), which sought to gauge the risks and benefits of different blood oxygen levels currently targeted in the care of premature infants. [More]

New initiative aims at reducing adverse effects of medications in individuals with mental illnesses

Geneticists at the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health will provide their scientific expertise to a new initiative aimed at preventing and reducing the adverse effects of medications in people with mental illnesses. [More]
Study shows changes in kidney function among sugarcane workers in northwestern Nicaragua

Study shows changes in kidney function among sugarcane workers in northwestern Nicaragua

Sugarcane workers in northwestern Nicaragua experienced a decline in kidney function during the harvest, with field workers at greatest risk, suggesting that heat stress or other occupational factors may be playing a role in the high rates of chronic kidney disease in the region, a new study led by Boston University School of Public Health researchers shows. [More]

Study documents concerns relating to tissue donation

When donating blood, plasma, human tissue or any other bodily sample for medical research, most people might not think about how it's being used. But if you were told, would you care? [More]
ACOs can ethically influence physician referrals, say medical ethicists

ACOs can ethically influence physician referrals, say medical ethicists

It's the health care holy grail: higher quality care at lower cost, and there are a growing number of accountable care organizations (ACOs) in the United States aiming to achieve it, in part by influencing where patients receive care. This carries risk to patient well-being and choice, but medical ethicists at Johns Hopkins and Brigham and Women's say ACOs can ethically influence referrals, under certain conditions. [More]
Seattle Children's starts patient enrollment for immunotherapy clinical trial for neuroblastoma

Seattle Children's starts patient enrollment for immunotherapy clinical trial for neuroblastoma

Seattle Children's today announced the opening of patient enrollment for its new cellular immunotherapy clinical research trial designed to induce remission in children suffering from neuroblastoma, one of the deadliest forms of childhood cancer. [More]
Addressing the evolution of diversity in medical education

Addressing the evolution of diversity in medical education

A perspective piece in this week's issue of the New England Journal of Medicine from a student at the University of Pennsylvania's Perelman School of Medicine addresses the evolution of diversity in medical education. [More]
SCD patients who experience discrimination are less likely to follow physician recommendations

SCD patients who experience discrimination are less likely to follow physician recommendations

Sickle Cell Disease (SCD) is the most common genetic condition detected by newborn screening in the United States - a physically devastating and painful illness affecting an estimated 100,000 individuals currently nationwide. [More]

Study looks at reasons why sickle cell patients do not adhere to available treatment

Experiencing discrimination because of their race or health condition can influence just how much trust people put into the health profession. [More]
Scientists discover area of brain that could control person's motivation to exercise

Scientists discover area of brain that could control person's motivation to exercise

Scientists at Seattle Children's Research Institute have discovered an area of the brain that could control a person's motivation to exercise and participate in other rewarding activities - potentially leading to improved treatments for depression. [More]
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