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Review of EAS cases among patients with psychiatric conditions in the Netherlands

Review of EAS cases among patients with psychiatric conditions in the Netherlands

A review of euthanasia or assisted suicide (EAS) cases among patients with psychiatric disorders in the Netherlands found that most had chronic, severe conditions, with histories of attempted suicides and hospitalizations, and were described as socially isolated or lonely, according to an article published online by JAMA Psychiatry. [More]
U.S. panel endorses “three-parent” IVF technique

U.S. panel endorses “three-parent” IVF technique

An expert committee have recommended that the U.S. government allows the clinical investigation of mitochondrial replacement techniques (MRT) to go ahead. [More]

Strong ethical culture needed within US military health system

The health professional community should urge the United States Secretary of Defense to adopt and implement the recent recommendations of the Defense Health Board, and in addition rescind directives authorizing participation of health professionals in interrogation and force-feeding because they are inconsistent with professional ethics according to Leonard Rubenstein, from Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, and Berman Institute of Bioethics, Baltimore, and colleagues in a new Essay published this week in PLOS Medicine. [More]

Nearly half of Muslim Americans face discrimination in health care workplace

While many studies have examined the impact of bias based on race, gender or sexual orientation, religious discrimination in the health care workplace has received little research attention. A new study funded by the John Templeton Foundation and conducted at the University of Chicago finds that for Muslim Americans, even those in one the nation's most highly regarded professions, encounter a less-than-inclusive and welcoming work environment during their career. [More]
Researchers discover drug target and genetic pathway for graft-versus-host disease

Researchers discover drug target and genetic pathway for graft-versus-host disease

A Seattle Children's Research Institute lab has discovered a genetic pathway that can be targeted with existing drugs to prevent graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), a common and deadly complication of bone marrow transplants. [More]
Loyola's Public Health Program receives accreditation from Council on Education for Public Health

Loyola's Public Health Program receives accreditation from Council on Education for Public Health

Loyola University Chicago's Public Health Program has received a five-year accreditation from the Council on Education for Public Health. [More]
Two Loyola professors explore ethical issues that arise with use of social media in health care

Two Loyola professors explore ethical issues that arise with use of social media in health care

In a recent AMA Journal of Ethics article titled "Why Can't We Be Friends? A Case-Based Analysis of Ethical Issues with Social Media in Health Care," two Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine professors analyze this issue. Kayhan Parsi, JD, PhD, and Nanette Elster, JD, MPH, who are part of Loyola's Neiswanger Institute for Bioethics, discuss the good, the bad, and the ugly of social media and health care. [More]
Public policy needed to reduce stem cell tourism, say experts

Public policy needed to reduce stem cell tourism, say experts

The continued marketing and use of experimental stem cell-based interventions inside and outside the United States is problematic and unsustainable, according to a new paper by science policy and bioethics experts at Rice University's Baker Institute for Public Policy and Wake Forest University. [More]
Stanford bioethicist wins 2015 MacLean Center Prize in Clinical Ethics and Health Outcomes

Stanford bioethicist wins 2015 MacLean Center Prize in Clinical Ethics and Health Outcomes

The 2015 MacLean Center Prize in Clinical Ethics and Health Outcomes, a $50,000 award, will be presented to Laura Roberts, MD, MA, a graduate of the University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine, who is chair of the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at the Stanford University School of Medicine and an internationally recognized scholar in bioethics, psychiatry, medicine and medical education. [More]
First consensus guidelines on sharing genomic research findings on adults, children with family members

First consensus guidelines on sharing genomic research findings on adults, children with family members

A blue-ribbon project group funded by the National Institutes of Health has published the first consensus guidelines on how researchers should share genomic findings in research on adults and children with other family members. The recommendations, published in the Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics, offer direction on sharing information before and after the death of an individual research participant. [More]
Articles sponsored by NIH Health Care Systems Research Collaboratory provide new standpoint on clinical research

Articles sponsored by NIH Health Care Systems Research Collaboratory provide new standpoint on clinical research

A special series of articles addressing the ethical and regulatory challenges to pragmatic clinical trials appears this week on the website of the journal Clinical Trials. [More]
Hastings Center receives NSF grant for ethical analysis of next-generation prenatal genetic tests

Hastings Center receives NSF grant for ethical analysis of next-generation prenatal genetic tests

Prenatal testing is changing dramatically. With greatly expanded low-cost genetic tests - some as simple as a maternal blood test - prospective parents will soon be able to learn far more, far earlier, than ever before about their fetuses' medical conditions and risks, and some nonmedical traits. [More]
Leading public health scholars argue that increasing national focus on precision medicine misguided

Leading public health scholars argue that increasing national focus on precision medicine misguided

The increasing national focus on personalized or 'precision' medicine is misguided, distracting from broader investments to reduce health inequities and address the social factors that affect population health, two leading public health scholars argue in the New England Journal of Medicine. [More]
California Initiative to Advance Precision Medicine selects two demonstration projects

California Initiative to Advance Precision Medicine selects two demonstration projects

Two demonstration projects that aim to yield quick results for patients have been selected by the new California Initiative to Advance Precision Medicine, a public-private effort launched by Governor Edmund G. Brown Jr. [More]
BGI to hold 10th International Conference on Genomics in October

BGI to hold 10th International Conference on Genomics in October

The 10th International Conference on Genomics (ICG-10) will be held by BGI from October 22-25, 2015, in Shenzhen, China. [More]
CU research suggests safe, lower-cost way to treat upper gastrointestinal tract problems in children

CU research suggests safe, lower-cost way to treat upper gastrointestinal tract problems in children

Physicians at the University of Colorado School of Medicine on the Anschutz Medical Campus have published research that suggests a safe and lower-cost way to diagnose and treat problems in the upper gastrointestinal tract of children. [More]
Seattle Children's opens enrollment for first clinical trial of Tumor Paint BLZ-100 for children with brain tumors

Seattle Children's opens enrollment for first clinical trial of Tumor Paint BLZ-100 for children with brain tumors

Seattle Children's today announced the opening of patient enrollment for the first clinical research trial of the drug Tumor Paint BLZ-100, which is designed to improve surgical outcomes in children with brain tumors – the most common solid tumor cancer in kids. [More]

Reflection in medical education is a fundamental tool to help prevent burnout

Drawing on its Jesuit Catholic heritage, Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine has long understood the importance of reflection in medical education as a key element in physician formation. [More]
U.S. states with stronger alcohol policies have lower rates of youth drinking

U.S. states with stronger alcohol policies have lower rates of youth drinking

A new study by Boston University and Boston Medical Center researchers reveals that U.S. states with stronger alcohol policies have lower rates of youth overall drinking and binge drinking. The study's results, published in the journal Pediatrics, further suggest that the link is largely a result of policies intended mostly for adults and their effects on reducing adult binge drinking. [More]
Group Health Research Institute conducts first randomized trial to tackle vaccine hesitancy

Group Health Research Institute conducts first randomized trial to tackle vaccine hesitancy

Group Health Research Institute conducted the first randomized trial to test an intervention aimed at improving hesitancy about early childhood vaccines by working directly with doctors. Vax Northwest, a Washington state public-private partnership, developed the intervention. [More]
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