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Bioethics Commission makes recommendations on preparedness for public health emergencies

Bioethics Commission makes recommendations on preparedness for public health emergencies

Today the Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues (Bioethics Commission) reported that the federal government has both a prudential and a moral responsibility to actively participate in coordinated global responses to public health emergencies wherever they arise. [More]
New article assesses 40 years of intensive effort to improve end-of-life care

New article assesses 40 years of intensive effort to improve end-of-life care

After four decades of work - first on patients' rights, then on family and caregiving relationships, and most recently on systemic reform -- we now know that it will take additional efforts in all three areas to improve care at the end of life, concludes an article in the New England Journal of Medicine. [More]
New report raises ethical questions surrounding the use of data

New report raises ethical questions surrounding the use of data

Public participation should be at the heart of big data projects in health care and biomedical research, according to the findings of a new report by the Nuffield Council on Bioethics. [More]
Hastings Center Report: Latest issues on health and medicine

Hastings Center Report: Latest issues on health and medicine

For two years, a debate has raged over the study known as the Surfactant, Positive Pressure, and Oxygenation Randomized Trial (SUPPORT), which sought to gauge the risks and benefits of different blood oxygen levels currently targeted in the care of premature infants. [More]
New initiative aims at reducing adverse effects of medications in individuals with mental illnesses

New initiative aims at reducing adverse effects of medications in individuals with mental illnesses

Geneticists at the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health will provide their scientific expertise to a new initiative aimed at preventing and reducing the adverse effects of medications in people with mental illnesses. [More]
Study shows changes in kidney function among sugarcane workers in northwestern Nicaragua

Study shows changes in kidney function among sugarcane workers in northwestern Nicaragua

Sugarcane workers in northwestern Nicaragua experienced a decline in kidney function during the harvest, with field workers at greatest risk, suggesting that heat stress or other occupational factors may be playing a role in the high rates of chronic kidney disease in the region, a new study led by Boston University School of Public Health researchers shows. [More]

Study documents concerns relating to tissue donation

When donating blood, plasma, human tissue or any other bodily sample for medical research, most people might not think about how it's being used. But if you were told, would you care? [More]
ACOs can ethically influence physician referrals, say medical ethicists

ACOs can ethically influence physician referrals, say medical ethicists

It's the health care holy grail: higher quality care at lower cost, and there are a growing number of accountable care organizations (ACOs) in the United States aiming to achieve it, in part by influencing where patients receive care. This carries risk to patient well-being and choice, but medical ethicists at Johns Hopkins and Brigham and Women's say ACOs can ethically influence referrals, under certain conditions. [More]
Seattle Children's starts patient enrollment for immunotherapy clinical trial for neuroblastoma

Seattle Children's starts patient enrollment for immunotherapy clinical trial for neuroblastoma

Seattle Children's today announced the opening of patient enrollment for its new cellular immunotherapy clinical research trial designed to induce remission in children suffering from neuroblastoma, one of the deadliest forms of childhood cancer. [More]
Addressing the evolution of diversity in medical education

Addressing the evolution of diversity in medical education

A perspective piece in this week's issue of the New England Journal of Medicine from a student at the University of Pennsylvania's Perelman School of Medicine addresses the evolution of diversity in medical education. [More]
SCD patients who experience discrimination are less likely to follow physician recommendations

SCD patients who experience discrimination are less likely to follow physician recommendations

Sickle Cell Disease (SCD) is the most common genetic condition detected by newborn screening in the United States - a physically devastating and painful illness affecting an estimated 100,000 individuals currently nationwide. [More]

Study looks at reasons why sickle cell patients do not adhere to available treatment

Experiencing discrimination because of their race or health condition can influence just how much trust people put into the health profession. [More]
Scientists discover area of brain that could control person's motivation to exercise

Scientists discover area of brain that could control person's motivation to exercise

Scientists at Seattle Children's Research Institute have discovered an area of the brain that could control a person's motivation to exercise and participate in other rewarding activities - potentially leading to improved treatments for depression. [More]
Communications about the benefits of vaccination influence parents' intentions to immunize children

Communications about the benefits of vaccination influence parents' intentions to immunize children

How do parents decide whether to vaccinate their child? In a study designed to formally look at the content of parent-targeted communications about the benefits of vaccination for measles, mumps and rubella, Indiana University School of Medicine investigators report that the framing of these messages influences parents' intentions to immunize their children. [More]
Women seek hormonal treatments for menopausal symptoms from anti-aging clinicians

Women seek hormonal treatments for menopausal symptoms from anti-aging clinicians

Feeling that conventional doctors did not take their suffering seriously, women instead sought out hormonal treatments for menopausal symptoms from anti-aging clinicians, according to a Case Western Reserve University study that investigated the appeal of anti-aging medicine. [More]
Researcher finds genetic identifier that may allow clinicians to determine babies at risk for autism

Researcher finds genetic identifier that may allow clinicians to determine babies at risk for autism

A researcher at Seattle Children's Hospital and Research Institute has found a genetic identifier for autism that includes physical features that may eventually allow clinicians to identify babies who are at risk for autism before they are born. [More]
Research reveals why HIV remains a long-lasting infection

Research reveals why HIV remains a long-lasting infection

HIV, the virus that causes AIDS, has the ability to integrate into the human genome, making it extremely difficult to cure the infection. A new study by scientists at Seattle Children's Research Institute, University of Washington and Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center found that when HIV integrates into genes involved with cancer, these cells tend to reproduce to a greater extent than others HIV-infected cells. [More]
New research collaboration aims to develop better therapies for autoimmune diseases

New research collaboration aims to develop better therapies for autoimmune diseases

Seattle Children's Research Institute and biotechnology company Kineta, Inc. today launched the Alliance for Children's Therapeutics (ACT), a first-of-its-kind pediatric research and funding collaboration designed to speed development of new medications for children and teens with lupus nephritis and other autoimmune diseases like multiple sclerosis, Type 1 diabetes and rheumatoid arthritis. [More]
New report raises important questions about transcranial direct current stimulation

New report raises important questions about transcranial direct current stimulation

Over the past several decades, neurostimulation techniques such as transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) have gradually gained favour in the public eye. In a new report, published yesterday in the prestigious scientific journal Neuron, IRCM ethics experts raise important questions about the rising tide of tDCS coverage in the media, while regulatory action is lacking and ethical issues need to be addressed. [More]

Medical schools need to guide students on use of social media, say Penn researchers

Medical students use social media extensively, but medical schools may need to offer more guidance in potential pitfalls, according to Penn State College of Medicine researchers. [More]