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Johns Hopkins researchers develop online tool to speed up creation of new drugs to prevent Ebola virus

Johns Hopkins researchers develop online tool to speed up creation of new drugs to prevent Ebola virus

Johns Hopkins biomedical engineers have developed a free, browser-based online tool that could speed up the creation of new drugs to treat or prevent Ebola virus infections. [More]
Two UH scientists named as fellows of AAAS

Two UH scientists named as fellows of AAAS

Two scientists from the University of Houston have been elected as fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. [More]
Researchers examine genomic landscapes of humans and mice

Researchers examine genomic landscapes of humans and mice

Looking across evolutionary time and the genomic landscapes of humans and mice, an international group of researchers has found powerful clues to why certain processes and systems in the mouse - such as the immune system, metabolism and stress response - are so different from those in people. Building on years of mouse and gene regulation studies, they have developed a resource that can help scientists better understand how similarities and differences between mice and humans are written in their genomes. [More]
Promising molecular diagnostic approach to endometriosis

Promising molecular diagnostic approach to endometriosis

Researchers at UC San Francisco have identified patterns of genetic activity that can be used to diagnose endometriosis and its severity, a finding that may offer millions of women an alternative to surgery through a simple noninvasive procedure. [More]
BIDMC informatrician receives Morris F. Collen Award for achievements in medical informatics

BIDMC informatrician receives Morris F. Collen Award for achievements in medical informatics

Charles Safran, MD, FACMI, Chief of the Division of Clinical Informatics at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC), has received the American College of Medical Informatics' 2014 Morris F. Collen Award in recognition of his commitment to and achievements in medical informatics. [More]
New method could make Ebola surveillance quicker, cheaper for West African nations

New method could make Ebola surveillance quicker, cheaper for West African nations

A new method for examining the Ebola virus genome could make surveillance quicker and cheaper for West African nations, and help detect new forms of the virus. The detailed procedure is being shared with the research community along with the study paper, which is freely available in the open access journal Genome Biology. [More]
UMMS scientists awarded $9.5 million grant to study Fragile X syndrome

UMMS scientists awarded $9.5 million grant to study Fragile X syndrome

The National Institutes of Health has awarded a $9.5 million grant to investigators at the University of Massachusetts Medical School to establish a Center for Collaborative Research in Fragile X, one of three centers designated by the NIH. [More]
New wearable technology could send personalized health alerts to troops, civilians

New wearable technology could send personalized health alerts to troops, civilians

Wearable devices can count the steps you take and the calories you burn. But can they help soldiers in the field? Or prevent someone from having a heart attack? [More]
Scientists identify new therapeutic targets, screening test to uncover compounds for memory disorders

Scientists identify new therapeutic targets, screening test to uncover compounds for memory disorders

In a pair of related studies, scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute have identified a number of new therapeutic targets for memory disorders and have developed a new screening test to uncover compounds that may one day work against those disorders. [More]
RPCI researchers identify two novel candidate prognostic markers for ovarian cancer

RPCI researchers identify two novel candidate prognostic markers for ovarian cancer

Cancer researchers at Roswell Park Cancer Institute have identified two independent classes of novel candidate prognostic markers for ovarian cancer, advancing efforts to develop targeted therapies for the disease. The findings resulted from two separate studies published in the peer-reviewed journal PLoS ONE and based on data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA), the world's largest public database on gene expression in different tumor types. [More]
Study identifies multiple risk behaviors associated with gun possession, violence among youths

Study identifies multiple risk behaviors associated with gun possession, violence among youths

A fatal high school shooting in October near Seattle reignited a long-running national debate about gun safety, mental illness and minors. An important major study, to be published on Nov. 5 by researchers at NYU Langone Medical Center and Teachers College, Columbia University, contributes new insights to the discussion, including the finding that "multiple risk behaviors, beyond more commonly discussed indicators of poor mental health…are associated with gun possession among youth." [More]
PORT can improve survival for non-small cell lung cancer patients

PORT can improve survival for non-small cell lung cancer patients

Patients who received post-operative radiation therapy (PORT), radiation therapy after surgery, lived an average of four months longer when compared to the patients who had the same disease site, tumor histology and treatment criteria and who did not receive PORT, according to research presented today at the 2014 Chicago Multidisciplinary Symposium in Thoracic Oncology. [More]
UCLA research could lead to simple saliva test for early diagnosis of deadly diseases

UCLA research could lead to simple saliva test for early diagnosis of deadly diseases

UCLA research could lead to a simple saliva test capable of diagnosing — at an early stage — diabetes and cancer, and perhaps neurological disorders and autoimmune diseases. [More]
New study reveals link between aristolochic acid and kidney cancer

New study reveals link between aristolochic acid and kidney cancer

A new study on a large cohort of kidney cancer patients in Europe sheds light on the genetic architecture of the disease -- and reveals an apparent link between exposure to aristolochic acid and incidence of kidney cancer, particularly in Romania. [More]
Understanding of genomic landscape of thyroid cancer

Understanding of genomic landscape of thyroid cancer

A new comprehensive analysis of thyroid cancer from The Cancer Genome Atlas Research Network has identified markers of aggressive tumors, which could allow for better targeting of appropriate treatments to individual patients. [More]
New study reveals how cancer becomes drug resistant over time

New study reveals how cancer becomes drug resistant over time

Like a colony of bacteria or species of animals, cancer cells within a tumor must evolve to survive. A dose of chemotherapy may kill hundreds of thousands of cancer cells, for example, but a single cell with a unique mutation can survive and quickly generate a new batch of drug-resistant cells, making cancer hard to combat. [More]
Researchers identify novel method to develop personalized vaccines for ovarian cancer

Researchers identify novel method to develop personalized vaccines for ovarian cancer

Researchers at the University of Connecticut have found a new way to identify protein mutations in cancer cells. The novel method is being used to develop personalized vaccines to treat patients with ovarian cancer. [More]
New oral biologic medication successfully treats precancerous intestinal inflammation

New oral biologic medication successfully treats precancerous intestinal inflammation

An oral biologic medication has successfully treated chronic, precancerous inflammation in the intestine, according to results of an animal study authored by an MD/PhD student in the University at Buffalo School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences. [More]
New mutations in cat genome identified as causes of human eye diseases

New mutations in cat genome identified as causes of human eye diseases

Researchers from the University of Missouri and the 99 Lives Cat Genome Sequencing Initiative today announced groundbreaking discoveries of novel mutations in the cat genome found to correlate to two human eye diseases, retinitis pigmentosa and Leber's Congenital Amaurosis. [More]
Researchers reveal gene variants that delay fracture healing

Researchers reveal gene variants that delay fracture healing

Slow-healing or non-healing bone fractures in otherwise healthy people may be caused by gene variants that are common in the population, according to Penn State College of Medicine researchers. [More]