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Researchers one step closer to understanding disease origin

Researchers one step closer to understanding disease origin

Researchers are one step closer to understanding the genetic and biological basis of diseases like cancer, diabetes, Alzheimer's and rheumatoid arthritis - and identifying new drug targets and therapies - thanks to work by three computational biology research teams from the University of Arizona Health Sciences, University of Pennsylvania and Vanderbilt University. [More]
TJP1 protein could help determine multiple myeloma patients who may best benefit from proteasome inhibitors

TJP1 protein could help determine multiple myeloma patients who may best benefit from proteasome inhibitors

A gene known as TJP1 (tight junction protein 1) could help determine which multiple myeloma patients would best benefit from proteasome inhibitors such as bortezomib, as well as combination approaches to enhance proteasome inhibitor sensitivity, according to a study led by The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. [More]
New gene testing method can identify mutations, prioritize variants in breast and ovarian cancer genes

New gene testing method can identify mutations, prioritize variants in breast and ovarian cancer genes

A research team led by an award-winning genomicist at Western University has developed a new method for identifying mutations and prioritizing variants in breast and ovarian cancer genes, which will not only reduce the number of possible variants for doctors to investigate, but also increase the number of patients that are properly diagnosed. [More]
Study links age-related changes in human pancreas to diabetes development

Study links age-related changes in human pancreas to diabetes development

A Stanford-led national collaboration to procure and analyze human pancreatic tissue from deceased donors illustrates how the organ's function changes as we age, and could point the way toward new diabetes treatments. [More]
Researchers outline strategy to address vital measurement challenges in allergen analysis

Researchers outline strategy to address vital measurement challenges in allergen analysis

A Manchester scientist has contributed to a review of allergen analysis that aims to improve the situation for those living with food allergies - preventing food fraud and protecting consumers. [More]
Differences in timing of stem cells turning into cartilage play major role in shaping the face

Differences in timing of stem cells turning into cartilage play major role in shaping the face

Timing is everything when it comes to the development of the vertebrate face. In a new study published in PLoS Genetics, USC Stem Cell researcher Lindsey Barske from the laboratory of Gage Crump and her colleagues identify the roles of key molecular signals that control this critical timing. [More]
Using proteomics to understand Alzheimer’s: an interview with Dr Renã Robinson

Using proteomics to understand Alzheimer’s: an interview with Dr Renã Robinson

In our bioanalytical mass spectrometry lab we use proteomics techniques to try to understand more about Alzheimer's disease. The primary thrust of our research is that we're interested in understanding the changes that take place outside of the brain and how those correlate with what's taking place inside the brain [More]
New computer algorithm can better characterize functional context of genomic variations in cancer

New computer algorithm can better characterize functional context of genomic variations in cancer

Cancer is rarely the result of a single mutation in a single gene. Rather, tumors arise from the complex interplay between any number of mutually exclusive abnormal changes in the genome, the combinations of which can be unique to each individual patient. [More]
Inhibiting adrenaline receptors reduces breast cancer brain metastases

Inhibiting adrenaline receptors reduces breast cancer brain metastases

While we look to invent new medicines to treat cancer, a parallel approach to repurpose existing medicines may be highly effective. Stress, mediated by adrenaline, has been suspected to promote cancer growth and this research study shows that by blocking adrenaline receptors in breast cancers, they are less successful in spreading to and growing in the brain. [More]
Researchers develop new method for identifying DNA mutations in single cancer cell

Researchers develop new method for identifying DNA mutations in single cancer cell

Researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center have announced a new method for detecting DNA mutations in a single cancer cell versus current technology that analyzes millions of cells which they believe could have important applications for cancer diagnosis and treatment. The results are published in the April 18 online issue of Nature Methods. [More]
MicroRNAs circulating in blood could lead to first diagnostic test for asthma

MicroRNAs circulating in blood could lead to first diagnostic test for asthma

People with asthma have telltale molecules circulating in their blood, say researchers at Penn State College of Medicine. The discovery could lead to the first diagnostic blood test for asthma, as well as more targeted treatments for the condition. [More]
Slow-wave sleep may promote consolidation of recent memories

Slow-wave sleep may promote consolidation of recent memories

Research strongly suggests that sleep, which constitutes about a third of our lives, is crucial for learning and forming long-term memories. But exactly how such memory is formed is not well understood and remains, despite considerable research, a central question of inquiry in neuroscience. [More]
Complete genetic map of scleroderma opens door for diagnosis and targeted treatment

Complete genetic map of scleroderma opens door for diagnosis and targeted treatment

Scleroderma is an autoimmune disease that affects one out of every 10,000 people in Europe and North America, mostly middle-aged women, and causes death in a high percentage of cases. [More]
Vanderbilt, Celgene collaborate to accelerate development of personalized therapies

Vanderbilt, Celgene collaborate to accelerate development of personalized therapies

Vanderbilt University Medical Center has entered into a strategic research agreement with Celgene Corporation, a biopharmaceutical company based in Summit, New Jersey. [More]
New CWRU study identifies three glycosyltransferases as major mutational targets in colorectal cancer

New CWRU study identifies three glycosyltransferases as major mutational targets in colorectal cancer

Little is known about the molecular basis of aberrant protein glycosylation, a complex enzymatic process that is a hallmark of many human cancers including colorectal cancers (CRC), and how it may contribute to tumor progression. In a new study published in Scientific Reports, an online journal of the Nature Publishing Group, scientists at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine have successfully characterized the mutational landscapes of glycosylation-associated genes in colon cancer, identifying three glycosyltransferases as significant mutational targets in CRC. [More]
New tool interprets whole-exome tumor sequencing data for better cancer therapies

New tool interprets whole-exome tumor sequencing data for better cancer therapies

A University of Colorado Cancer study published today in the Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association describes a new tool that interprets the raw data of whole exome tumor sequencing and then matches the cancer's unique genetics to FDA-approved targeted treatments. [More]
Researchers use novel technology to sequence Y chromosome in malaria spreading mosquitoes

Researchers use novel technology to sequence Y chromosome in malaria spreading mosquitoes

A team of researchers with the Fralin Life Science Institute at Virginia Tech, working with a large international consortium, has sequenced the Y chromosome--the genetic driver of sex-determination and male fertility-- in a family of malaria spreading mosquitoes. [More]
BIDMC investigators identify precise 5-gene classifier for discriminating early pancreatic cancer

BIDMC investigators identify precise 5-gene classifier for discriminating early pancreatic cancer

Pancreatic cancer, the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the United States, is often diagnosed at a late stage, when curative treatment is no longer possible. A team led by investigators at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center has now identified and validated an accurate 5-gene classifier for discriminating early pancreatic cancer from non-malignant tissue. [More]
New project aims to prevent complications from drug usage

New project aims to prevent complications from drug usage

If a patient is ill and takes drugs for that illness, these drugs often lead to further illnesses and complications. This affects millions of people throughout the world. [More]
Scientists provide overview of most promising compounds to combat prostate cancer

Scientists provide overview of most promising compounds to combat prostate cancer

Scientists from MIPT (Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology), MSU (Moscow State University), and National University of Science and Technology “MISIS” provided an overview of the most promising compounds which can be used as medications for prostate cancer. [More]
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