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More than half the world’s population is host to newly described gut virus

More than half the world’s population is host to newly described gut virus

Odds are, there-s a virus living inside your gut that has gone undetected by scientists for decades. A new study led by researchers at San Diego State University has found that more than half the world-s population is host to a newly described virus, named crAssphage, which infects one of the most common types of gut bacteria, Bacteroidetes. [More]
Marmoset's unique rapid reproductive system sheds new light on evolution and primate biology

Marmoset's unique rapid reproductive system sheds new light on evolution and primate biology

A team of scientists from around the world led by Baylor College of Medicine and Washington University in St. Louis has completed the genome sequence of the common marmoset - the first sequence of a New World Monkey - providing new information about the marmoset's unique rapid reproductive system, physiology and growth, shedding new light on primate biology and evolution. [More]
Scientists make seminal breakthrough in understanding molecular basis of fibroadenoma

Scientists make seminal breakthrough in understanding molecular basis of fibroadenoma

A multi-disciplinary team of scientists from the National Cancer Centre Singapore, Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School Singapore, and Singapore General Hospital have made a seminal breakthrough in understanding the molecular basis of fibroadenoma, one of the most common breast tumours diagnosed in women. [More]
Scientists examine part of sample consisting of non-human DNA

Scientists examine part of sample consisting of non-human DNA

Much of what we know about Oetzi - for example what he looked like or that he suffered from lactose intolerance - stems from a tiny bone sample which allowed the decoding of his genetic make-up. [More]
New research opens up potential new therapeutic targets for hard-to-treat food allergy

New research opens up potential new therapeutic targets for hard-to-treat food allergy

New research in Nature Genetics identifies a novel genetic and molecular pathway in the esophagus that causes eosinophillic esophagitis (EoE), opening up potential new therapeutic strategies for an enigmatic and hard-to-treat food allergy. [More]
New diagnostic procedure helps differentiate psoriasis from eczema

New diagnostic procedure helps differentiate psoriasis from eczema

In some patients, the chronic inflammatory skin diseases psoriasis* and eczema** are similar in appearance. Up to now, dermatologists have therefore had to base their decision on which treatment should be selected on their own experience and an examination of tissue samples. [More]
NCGR, Simbiot join forces to create new solutions for handling genomic data

NCGR, Simbiot join forces to create new solutions for handling genomic data

On Tuesday, the National Center for Genome Resources and Simbiot announced a strategic partnership to create new solutions for handling 'big data' in the genomics space. [More]
Pseudogenes may play key role in the discovery of new biomarkers

Pseudogenes may play key role in the discovery of new biomarkers

Dysfunctional, unloved and seemingly of little use, these poor-cousin relatives of genes have lost their protein-coding abilities. They contain material not essential for an organism's survival and are the "last stop" for removal of genomic waste. [More]
OHSU professor recognized with AAAS Martin and Rose Wachtel Cancer Research Award

OHSU professor recognized with AAAS Martin and Rose Wachtel Cancer Research Award

Jeffrey Tyner, Ph.D., assistant professor of Cell, Developmental & Cancer Biology for Oregon Health & Science University (OHSU) and a researcher with OHSU's Knight Cancer Institute, has won a distinguished award from the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) for the development of a research program that more rapidly identifies the mutations driving a patient's cancer and accelerates development of precision treatments. [More]
CNIOA researchers update number of human genes to 19,000

CNIOA researchers update number of human genes to 19,000

How nutrients are metabolised and how neurons communicate in the brain are just some of the messages coded by the 3 billion letters that make up the human genome. [More]
DFG to establish five new Research Units to pursue current issues in research areas

DFG to establish five new Research Units to pursue current issues in research areas

The Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG, German Research Foundation) is establishing five new Research Units. [More]
Webinar outlines novel findings from RNA-Seq project performed by OGT

Webinar outlines novel findings from RNA-Seq project performed by OGT

Oxford Gene Technology (OGT), The Molecular Genetics Company, has made the latest in its series of educational webinars available to watch online at www.ogt.com/webinars. In the webinar entitled “Developing new insights into gene expression using RNA-Seq”, Dr Christopher Jones, Research Fellow at the Brighton and Sussex Medical School (BSMS), UK, presents novel findings from a recent RNA-Seq project performed by OGT. [More]
CNIO researchers identify over 40 genes that predict aggressiveness of melanoma

CNIO researchers identify over 40 genes that predict aggressiveness of melanoma

Researchers from the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre have discovered more than 40 genes that predict the level of aggressiveness of melanoma and that distinguish it from other cancers with a poor prognosis. The discovery, published in Cancer Cell, will help to identify unique aspects of melanoma that could contribute to determine the risk of developing metastasis in patients with this disease. [More]
Researchers apply infection-modeling to tackle mass incarceration rates

Researchers apply infection-modeling to tackle mass incarceration rates

The incarceration rate has nearly quadrupled since the U.S. declared a war on drugs, researchers say. Along with that, racial disparities abound. Incarceration rates for black Americans are more than six times higher than those for white Americans, according to the U.S. Bureau of Justice Statistics. [More]
Researchers discover analgesic mechanism that prevents pain in Buruli ulcer patients

Researchers discover analgesic mechanism that prevents pain in Buruli ulcer patients

When the body receives an injury to the skin, a signal is sent to the brain, which generates a sensation of pain. [More]
Weizmann Institute scientists 'fingerprint' a culprit in depression and anxiety disorders

Weizmann Institute scientists 'fingerprint' a culprit in depression and anxiety disorders

According the World Health Organization, such mood disorders as depression affect some 10% of the world's population and are associated with a heavy burden of disease. That is why numerous scientists around the world have invested a great deal of effort in understanding these diseases. Yet the molecular and cellular mechanisms that underlie these problems are still only partly understood. [More]
DNA sequencing does not reveal the pathogenicity of bacteria

DNA sequencing does not reveal the pathogenicity of bacteria

While more and more genomic information is becoming available at a drastically increasing pace, the knowledge we can gain about how microorganisms interact with their surrounding, infect hosts and alter their molecular programs in accordance to changing environmental conditions remains widely not deducible from genomic data alone, the researchers from University of Southern Denmark claim. [More]
Detective work maps special gene variant among Greenlanders which plays role in type 2 diabetes

Detective work maps special gene variant among Greenlanders which plays role in type 2 diabetes

A spectacular piece of detective work has mapped a special gene variant among Greenlanders which plays a particularly important role in the development of type 2 diabetes. [More]
Entomologists develop chromosome map to find ways to prevent dengue fever, yellow fever

Entomologists develop chromosome map to find ways to prevent dengue fever, yellow fever

Virginia Tech entomologists have developed a chromosome map for about half of the genome of the mosquito Aedes agypti, the major carrier of dengue fever and yellow fever. [More]
Genomic study reveals striking contrasts that may aid disease prevention

Genomic study reveals striking contrasts that may aid disease prevention

Virginia Tech entomologists have developed a chromosome map for about half of the genome of the mosquito Aedes agypti, the major carrier of dengue fever and yellow fever. [More]