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Researchers identify druggable target to potentially root out colon cancer, end relapse

Researchers identify druggable target to potentially root out colon cancer, end relapse

Researchers targeting colorectal cancer stem cells - the root cause of disease, resistance to treatment and relapse - have discovered a mechanism to mimic a virus and potentially trigger an immune response to fight the cancer like an infection. [More]
Researchers uncover important cellular functions that help regulate inflammation

Researchers uncover important cellular functions that help regulate inflammation

Researchers at the Virginia Bioinformatics Institute at Virginia Tech have uncovered key cellular functions that help regulate inflammation -- a discovery that could have important implications for the treatment of allergies, heart disease, and certain forms of cancer. [More]
Analysis of toilet waste from international aircraft may lead to global surveillance of infectious diseases

Analysis of toilet waste from international aircraft may lead to global surveillance of infectious diseases

Current international disease surveillance systems are mainly based on reports made by doctors after treatment of infected patients. As a consequence, disease-causing microorganisms and resistance bacteria have time to spread and make large population groups sick before they are detected. [More]
New study uses donor sample to evaluate how self-identification measures intersect with genetics

New study uses donor sample to evaluate how self-identification measures intersect with genetics

For years, medicine has relied on self-reported race/ethnicity as the basis of an array of decisions, from risk for disease to matching organ donors. Now, a study led by researchers at UC San Francisco has found that when that information matters most - in connecting bone marrow donors to patients - the format of the questions may determine how well the answers actually correspond to their genes. [More]
Penn State College of Medicine students to work with medical educators to design new curriculum

Penn State College of Medicine students to work with medical educators to design new curriculum

The medical school model that has existed for decades involves two years of study in the basic sciences followed by two years of clinical study. An initiative under way at Penn State College of Medicine will involve students in developing a new curriculum that integrates the two areas of study, with a goal of preparing physicians for the new realities of health care. [More]
Newly developed big data technique may have significant impact on health care

Newly developed big data technique may have significant impact on health care

Rice University scientists have developed a big data technique that could have a significant impact on health care. The Rice lab of bioengineer Amina Qutub designed an algorithm called "progeny clustering" that is being used in a hospital study to identify which treatments should be given to children with leukemia. [More]
Researchers develop user-friendly platform for analyzing transcriptomic and epigenomic big data

Researchers develop user-friendly platform for analyzing transcriptomic and epigenomic big data

Researchers at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center have developed a user-friendly, integrated platform for analyzing the transcriptomic and epigenomic "big data." [More]
Researchers create new cell screening method for immunotherapy cancer treatments

Researchers create new cell screening method for immunotherapy cancer treatments

Researchers have created a new method for screening cells used in immunotherapy cancer treatments, allowing high-performing immune system cells to be studied in isolation and potentially expanding the number of patients for whom the breakthrough treatment proves successful. [More]
Study may lead to effective antimicrobial treatment strategies for people with uncontrolled diabetes

Study may lead to effective antimicrobial treatment strategies for people with uncontrolled diabetes

Case Western Reserve scientists may have uncovered a molecular mechanism that sets into motion dangerous infection in the feet and hands often occurring with uncontrolled diabetes. It appears that high blood sugar unleashes destructive molecules that interfere with the body's natural infection-control defenses. [More]
Discovery may lead to new ways to diagnose, treat brain cancer

Discovery may lead to new ways to diagnose, treat brain cancer

Researchers at the Virginia Bioinformatics Institute have uncovered a link between the genomes of cells originating in the neural crest and development of tumors — a discovery that could lead to new ways to diagnose and treat cancer. [More]
Research: Critical aspects of human genome's regulatory program encoded by genomic sequence elements

Research: Critical aspects of human genome's regulatory program encoded by genomic sequence elements

Since the classical studies of Jacob and Monod in the early 1960s, it has been evident that genome sequences contain not only blueprints for genes and the proteins that they encode, but also the instructions for a coordinated regulatory program that governs when, where and to what extent these genes and proteins are expressed. [More]
SGI-DNA recognized by Frost & Sullivan for BioXp 3200 System

SGI-DNA recognized by Frost & Sullivan for BioXp 3200 System

SGI-DNA, a Synthetic Genomics, Inc. company, was recently recognized by Frost & Sullivan for its groundbreaking innovation in genomic technologies for the BioXp 3200 System, an instrument with the capacity to simultaneously build 32 unique, double-stranded DNA fragments to study gene function, pathways, and whole genomes. [More]
California Initiative to Advance Precision Medicine selects two demonstration projects

California Initiative to Advance Precision Medicine selects two demonstration projects

Two demonstration projects that aim to yield quick results for patients have been selected by the new California Initiative to Advance Precision Medicine, a public-private effort launched by Governor Edmund G. Brown Jr. [More]

New study on photoaging could minimize risk of skin cancer

While all human organs undergo normal, chronological aging, human skin undergoes an additional type of aging because of its direct contact with the environment. [More]
Researchers uncover master regulators that govern the fate of TFH cells

Researchers uncover master regulators that govern the fate of TFH cells

Follicular helper Tcells (TFH cells), a rare type of immune cell that is essential for inducing a strong and lasting antibody response to viruses and other microbes, have garnered intense interest in recent years but the molecular signals that drive their differentiation had remained unclear. [More]
DFG Senate Commission approves recommendations for developing clinical research at German universities

DFG Senate Commission approves recommendations for developing clinical research at German universities

At the annual meeting of the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG, German Research Foundation) on 30 June 2015, the Senate of the largest research funding organisation approved recommendations for "Developing Clinical Research at German Universities Between 2015 and 2025" (available in German). [More]
Bioenergetic analysis of pancreatic beta-cells shows impaired metabolic signature in type 2 diabetes patients

Bioenergetic analysis of pancreatic beta-cells shows impaired metabolic signature in type 2 diabetes patients

Impaired activation of mitochondrial energy metabolism in the presence of glucose has been demonstrated in pancreatic beta-cells from patients with type 2 diabetes. The cause of this dysfunction has been unknown. Publishing online in Endocrinology, Buck Institute assistant research professor Akos Gerencser, PhD, shows that in patients with type 2 diabetes the balance between supply and demand of the mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔψM) is altered causing a decrease in the signaling that turns on insulin secretion. [More]
Detailed molecular analyses reveal new treatment options for aggressive childhood leukemia

Detailed molecular analyses reveal new treatment options for aggressive childhood leukemia

Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) leukemia is the most common type of cancer in children. It can occur in various forms, differing not only by specific changes in the genetic material of the leukemia cells but also by their response to therapies. Now, an international team of scientists from Berlin, Düsseldorf, Hannover, Heidelberg, Kiel, and Zurich have succeeded in decoding the molecular characteristics of an as yet incurable subtype of leukemia, paving the way for new therapeutic approaches. [More]
Low blood level of 4 proteins can help diabetics protect against immune attack

Low blood level of 4 proteins can help diabetics protect against immune attack

Patients with type 1 diabetes have significantly lower blood levels of four proteins that help protect their tissue from attack by their immune system, scientists report. [More]
Discovery paves way for new therapeutic approaches to treat fatal leukemia in children

Discovery paves way for new therapeutic approaches to treat fatal leukemia in children

Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common type of cancer in children. It can occur in various forms, differing not only by specific changes in the genetic material of the leukemia cells but also by their response to therapies. [More]
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