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Preimplantation genetic screening using next generation sequencing: an interview with Dr Luis Alcaraz

Preimplantation genetic screening using next generation sequencing: an interview with Dr Luis Alcaraz

PGS, Preimplantation Genetic Screening, is a genetic test that analyses biopsied cells from embryos produced by in vitro fertilization (IVF) techniques. PGS determines whether the embryos are chromosomally normal (euploid) or not (aneuploid), thus giving the chance to transfer chromosomally normal embryos that are more apt to successfully implant and develop into a pregnancy. [More]
Tulane professor receives three-year grant to improve survival of mesenchymal stem cells

Tulane professor receives three-year grant to improve survival of mesenchymal stem cells

Kim O'Connor, a professor in Tulane University's Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, received a three-year $599,638 grant from the National Science Foundation to study ways to improve the survival of mesenchymal stem cells once they are implanted in patients. [More]
Study uses computer-based approaches to characterize Zika virus genome

Study uses computer-based approaches to characterize Zika virus genome

The sudden emergence of the Zika virus epidemic in Latin America in 2015-16 has caught the scientific world unawares. [More]
Brazilian study discovers promising therapeutic and diagnostic target for treatment of melanoma

Brazilian study discovers promising therapeutic and diagnostic target for treatment of melanoma

A Brazilian study shows that inhibition of an RNA named RMEL3, which is encoded by a previously uncharacterized gene (also named RMEL3), can reduce the viability of cultured melanoma cells by up to 95%. [More]
Scientists develop interactive model to fast-track research and treatment of schizophrenia

Scientists develop interactive model to fast-track research and treatment of schizophrenia

It's called mental imbalance for a reason. Sanity hangs, in part, in the gentle balance of chemicals strung together within regions of the brain in an intricate matrix. [More]
New tool helps researchers make connections between proteins, genes, drugs and diseases

New tool helps researchers make connections between proteins, genes, drugs and diseases

Every day, more than 3,000 new abstracts are uploaded to PubMed, the main biomedical literature reference database. Even in a researcher's narrowly-defined field, it is impossible to stay on top of the ever-evolving webs of interconnections between these papers. [More]
UTMB researchers unlock clues to understand signals that trigger labor and delivery process

UTMB researchers unlock clues to understand signals that trigger labor and delivery process

In a normal full-term pregnancy, signals from the mature organs of the fetus and the aging placental membranes and placenta prompt the uterus' muscular walls to begin the labor and delivery process. It's still unclear how these signals accomplish this goal or how they reach from the fetal side to the maternal side. [More]
Penn's ADCC receives $8.8 million grant to continue research on treatment for AD and related dementias

Penn's ADCC receives $8.8 million grant to continue research on treatment for AD and related dementias

The University of Pennsylvania's Alzheimer's Disease Core Center has been awarded an estimated $8.8 million over five years from the National Institute on Aging to continue its mission of investigating mechanisms, diagnostics, treatments and strategies for Alzheimer's Disease (AD) and related dementias including Parkinson's disease (PD), Parkinson's disease dementia (PDD), Lewy Body dementia (LBD) and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). [More]
Study finds how differences in vegetation in urban areas influence airborne microbial communities

Study finds how differences in vegetation in urban areas influence airborne microbial communities

New research finds that airborne bacterial communities differ from one urban park to the next but those of parking lots are alike -- and differ from those of parks in subtle but potentially important ways. [More]
Scientists use Regeneration Intelligence to assess perturbation status of many signaling pathways

Scientists use Regeneration Intelligence to assess perturbation status of many signaling pathways

Insilico Medicine, Inc in collaboration with scientists from Atlas Regeneration, Inc, Vision Genomics, Inc and Howard University published two research papers on fibrosis in the lung and liver and fibrotic signatures in glaucoma. [More]
University of Warwick develops cloud-computing platform for UK's medical microbiology community

University of Warwick develops cloud-computing platform for UK's medical microbiology community

The University of Warwick has led the development of a cloud-based microbial bioinformatics resource, which is believed to be the largest of its kind in the world. [More]
Embryonic stem cell gene Nanog holds potential for reversing effects of aging

Embryonic stem cell gene Nanog holds potential for reversing effects of aging

The fountain of youth may reside in an embryonic stem cell gene named Nanog. [More]
Key gene controls ability of adult stem cells to regenerate muscle after injury, study finds

Key gene controls ability of adult stem cells to regenerate muscle after injury, study finds

A key gene enables the repair of injured muscle throughout life. This is the finding of a study in mice led by researchers at NYU Langone Medical Center and the University of Colorado at Boulder, and published online July 21 in Cell Reports. [More]
New study sheds light on pathogenesis of DNA lesions present in leukemia

New study sheds light on pathogenesis of DNA lesions present in leukemia

Researchers have succeeded in shedding light on the pathogenesis of DNA breakpoints that are associated with leukemia. [More]
Researchers receive $9 million grant to develop novel platform to quickly identify new antibiotics

Researchers receive $9 million grant to develop novel platform to quickly identify new antibiotics

In September 2014, President Obama issued an executive order for "Combating Antibiotic- Resistant Bacteria." Why the urgency? The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the order noted, "estimates that annually at least 2 million illnesses and 23,000 deaths are caused by antibiotic- resistant bacteria in the United States alone." [More]
NIH selects VUMC to play foundational role in PMI Cohort Program

NIH selects VUMC to play foundational role in PMI Cohort Program

Vanderbilt University Medical Center has been chosen by the National Institutes of Health to be the Data and Research Support Center for the Precision Medicine Initiative Cohort Program, a landmark study of genetic, environmental and lifestyle factors affecting the health of a million or more people, federal officials have announced. [More]
Microbes detected in Boston subway system have low pathogenic potential, study shows

Microbes detected in Boston subway system have low pathogenic potential, study shows

Boston's subway system, known as the T, might be just as bacteria-laden as you'd expect but organisms found there are largely from normal human skin and incapable of causing disease, according to a study published June 28 in mSystems, an open access journal of the American Society for Microbiology. [More]
Buck researchers find new way for possible treatment of AMD

Buck researchers find new way for possible treatment of AMD

Buck researchers boosted the potency of a broccoli-related compound by ten times and identified it as a possible treatment for age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the leading cause of vision loss affecting more than 10 million older Americans. [More]
Diabetes drug metformin could help reduce toxic acid levels linked to MSUD

Diabetes drug metformin could help reduce toxic acid levels linked to MSUD

Maple Syrup Urine Disease (MSUD) is a rare inherited metabolic disorder involving the dysfunction of an enzyme which breaks down three essential amino acids: leucine, isoleucine and valine. [More]
Researchers uncover sensing mechanism of food poisoning bacteria found in shellfish

Researchers uncover sensing mechanism of food poisoning bacteria found in shellfish

UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers have uncovered a mechanism that a type of pathogenic bacteria found in shellfish use to sense when they are in the human gut, where they release toxins that cause food poisoning. [More]
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