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Sex-determining gene in mosquitoes may help reduce disease transmission

Sex-determining gene in mosquitoes may help reduce disease transmission

Researchers with the Fralin Life Science Institute at Virginia Tech have identified a gene responsible for sex determination in mosquitoes that can transmit yellow fever, dengue, and chikungunya viruses. [More]
TGen and Baylor partnership set to increase treatment options for cancer patients

TGen and Baylor partnership set to increase treatment options for cancer patients

The Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen) and Baylor Research Institute (BRI) at Dallas today announce an agreement that will focus on accelerating early detection and treatments for patients with a broad range of cancers. [More]
New findings could help better understand neurodegenerative diseases

New findings could help better understand neurodegenerative diseases

Researchers at the Luxembourg Centre for Systems Biomedicine (LCSB), of the University of Luxembourg, have, under Dr. Manuel Buttini, successfully measured metabolic profiles, or the metabolomes, of different brain regions, and their findings could help better understand neurodegenerative diseases. [More]
CCFA announces $17.5 million grant to establish Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis research platform

CCFA announces $17.5 million grant to establish Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis research platform

The Crohn's & Colitis Foundation of America announces a three-year, $17.5 million grant from The Leona M. and Harry B. Helmsley Charitable Trust to establish an integrated knowledge platform designed to centralize and aggregate patient information - with linked biosamples - across multiple research efforts. [More]
Profiling normal DNA provides opportunity to identify inherited mutations

Profiling normal DNA provides opportunity to identify inherited mutations

As the practice of genetically profiling patient tumors for clinical treatment decision making becomes more commonplace, a recent study from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center suggests that profiling normal DNA also provides an important opportunity to identify inherited mutations that could be critical for patients and their families. [More]
Human microbiome contains unique fingerprints, shows study

Human microbiome contains unique fingerprints, shows study

A new study shows that the microbial communities we carry in and on our bodies—known as the human microbiome—have the potential to uniquely identify individuals, much like a fingerprint. [More]
TGen-led study associates 'X-linked' syndromes to genetic origins

TGen-led study associates 'X-linked' syndromes to genetic origins

A study led by the Translational Genomics Research Institute has for the first time matched dozens of infantile diseases and syndromes involving muscle weakness and stiff joints to their likely genetic origins. [More]
MD Anderson researchers discover link between telomere degeneration and MDS

MD Anderson researchers discover link between telomere degeneration and MDS

A study revealing fresh insight about chromosome "tails" called telomeres may provide scientists with a new way to look at developing treatments or even preventing a group of blood cell disorders known as myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). [More]
Southern Indiana to be oasis free from Lyme disease, finds Indiana University researcher

Southern Indiana to be oasis free from Lyme disease, finds Indiana University researcher

Over nearly 15 years spent studying ticks, Indiana University's Keith Clay has found southern Indiana to be an oasis free from Lyme disease, the condition most associated with these arachnids that are the second most common parasitic disease vector on Earth. [More]
UM cell biologist advances research about behavior of cell proteins in neuroblastoma

UM cell biologist advances research about behavior of cell proteins in neuroblastoma

Patience and persistence are beginning to pay off for University of Montana Professor Mark Grimes, whose research about the behavior of cell proteins in childhood cancer recently was published by the Public Library of Science Computational Biology. [More]
GTEx findings reveal how genomic variants can affect gene activity and disease susceptibility

GTEx findings reveal how genomic variants can affect gene activity and disease susceptibility

Researchers funded by the National Institutes of Health Genotype-Tissue Expression (GTEx) project have created a new and much-anticipated data resource to help establish how differences in an individual's genomic make-up can affect gene activity and contribute to disease. [More]
Researchers compile new genomic interactions catalogue

Researchers compile new genomic interactions catalogue

New clues about diseases like inflammatory bowel disorder may be found thanks to a new genomic interactions catalogue by a group of researchers in Japan and the United Kingdom. This research will be published on May 4, 2015 in Nature Genetics. [More]
Relaxation response has significant impact on patients with gastrointestinal disorders

Relaxation response has significant impact on patients with gastrointestinal disorders

A pilot study has found that participating in a nine-week training program including elicitation of the relaxation response had a significant impact on clinical symptoms of the gastrointestinal disorders irritable bowel syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease and on the expression of genes related to inflammation and the body's response to stress. [More]
Proteomics helps identify previously unrecognized proteins and pathways in nerve regeneration

Proteomics helps identify previously unrecognized proteins and pathways in nerve regeneration

Using proteomics techniques to study injured optic nerves, researchers at Boston Children's Hospital have identified previously unrecognized proteins and pathways involved in nerve regeneration. Adding back one of these proteins--the oncogene c-myc--they achieved unprecedented optic nerve regeneration in mice when combined with two other known strategies. [More]
Metanome changes name to Diversigen

Metanome changes name to Diversigen

Metanome, Inc., an industry leader in comprehensive microbiome services, today announced the company has changed its name to Diversigen, Inc. The name was changed to reflect Diversigen's positioning as the single commercial source for the myriad of services and expertise customers need to capitalize on the diverse opportunities of the microbiome. [More]
Researchers report advancement in development of Ebola vaccine trials

Researchers report advancement in development of Ebola vaccine trials

As the current Ebola outbreak wanes, scientists have to make the most of every opportunity to prepare for future outbreaks. One such opportunity involves the identification of a safe and effective Ebola vaccine. Texas supercomputers have aided researchers in modelling which types of clinical trials will provide the best information. That's according to University of Texas at Austin researchers Steve Bellan and Lauren Meyers, who are studying Ebola vaccine trials with the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. [More]
SQream Technologies releases GenomeStack platform for genome research

SQream Technologies releases GenomeStack platform for genome research

SQream Technologies, provider of the world's fastest big data analytics database, today announced the release of GenomeStack, its latest innovative platform developed specifically for genome research. [More]
Study explores artemisinin resistance in Plasmodium falciparum malaria

Study explores artemisinin resistance in Plasmodium falciparum malaria

According to the World Health Organization's 2014 World Malaria Report, there are an estimated 198 million cases of malaria worldwide with 3.3 billion people at risk for contracting the infection. Although the impact of malaria is still significant, the statistics reflect a considerable reduction in the global malaria burden. Since 2010, disease transmission has been reduced by 30 percent and mortality due to malaria has decreased by almost half. [More]
Two existing drugs may reverse damage caused by multiple sclerosis

Two existing drugs may reverse damage caused by multiple sclerosis

A pair of topical medicines already alleviating skin conditions each may prove to have another, even more compelling use: instructing stem cells in the brain to reverse damage caused by multiple sclerosis. [More]
PCF announces Stupski Prize in Prostate Cancer Computational Oncology

PCF announces Stupski Prize in Prostate Cancer Computational Oncology

The Prostate Cancer Foundation is pleased to announce the Stupski Prize in Prostate Cancer Computational Oncology, a first-in-field initiative designed to attract novel ideas to the rapidly changing field of large-scale cancer bioinformatics. [More]
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