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Roche announces acquisition of Bina Technologies

Roche announces acquisition of Bina Technologies

Roche announced today the acquisition of Bina Technologies, Inc., a privately held company based in Redwood City, California, USA. Bina provides a big data platform for centralized management and processing of next generation sequencing (NGS) data. [More]
Penn, UGA scientists awarded new contract to develop genome database for microbial pathogens

Penn, UGA scientists awarded new contract to develop genome database for microbial pathogens

At the turn of the millennium, the cost to sequence a single human genome exceeded $50 million, and the process took a decade to complete. Microbes have genomes, too, and the first reference genome for a malaria parasite was completed in 2002 at a cost of roughly $15 million. But today researchers can sequence a genome in a single afternoon for just a few thousand dollars. Related technologies make it possible to capture information about all genes in the genome, in all tissues, from multiple individuals. [More]
Researchers use novel technique to identify microlesions in brain tissue from epileptic patients

Researchers use novel technique to identify microlesions in brain tissue from epileptic patients

Using an innovative technique combining genetic analysis and mathematical modeling with some basic sleuthing, researchers have identified previously undescribed microlesions in brain tissue from epileptic patients. The millimeter-sized abnormalities may explain why areas of the brain that appear normal can produce severe seizures in many children and adults with epilepsy. [More]
UTSA receives NIH grant to develop bioinformatics tools to find cause of breast cancer

UTSA receives NIH grant to develop bioinformatics tools to find cause of breast cancer

According to the American Cancer Society, breast cancer is the most common cancer among American women, except for skin cancers, and about one in eight women in the United States will develop invasive breast cancer during their lifetime. The National Institutes of Health recently awarded a $1.08 million grant to The University of Texas at San Antonio to combine computational modeling with biological information to advance our understanding of what may cause breast cells to become cancerous. [More]
TGen uncovers way to track cause of neurological disorder in a young girl

TGen uncovers way to track cause of neurological disorder in a young girl

Using a basic genetic difference between men and women, the Translational Genomics Research Institute has uncovered a way to track down the source of a neurological disorder in a young girl. [More]
New study investigates use of DNA barcoding to test authenticity of popular herbal supplements

New study investigates use of DNA barcoding to test authenticity of popular herbal supplements

Dr. Damon Little, Associate Curator of Bioinformatics in the Cullman Program for Molecular Systematics at The New York Botanical Garden, has just published a new study in the journal Genome investigating the use of DNA barcoding to test the authenticity of Ginkgo biloba (G. biloba), an herbal dietary supplement sold to consumers that is supposed to boost cognitive capacity. [More]
New statistical model enables better identification of different cell types in solid tumors

New statistical model enables better identification of different cell types in solid tumors

A new statistical model developed by a research team at Worcester Polytechnic Institute may enable physicians to create personalized cancer treatments for patients based on the specific genetic mutations found in their tumors. [More]
Plymouth University receives £1.2M in funding to support capital investment for teaching facilities

Plymouth University receives £1.2M in funding to support capital investment for teaching facilities

Plymouth University has received funding in excess of £1.2M from the Higher Education Funding Council for England to support capital investment for teaching facilities in existing and proposed laboratories, at the headquarters of Plymouth University Peninsula Schools of Medicine and Dentistry (PUPSMD), Plymouth Science Park. [More]
UT Southwestern biophysicist named recipient of 2015 Edith and Peter O'Donnell Award in Science

UT Southwestern biophysicist named recipient of 2015 Edith and Peter O'Donnell Award in Science

The Academy of Medicine, Engineering and Science of Texas has selected Dr. Yuh Min Chook, Professor of Pharmacology and of Biophysics at UT Southwestern Medical Center, as the recipient of the 2015 Edith and Peter O'Donnell Award in Science. [More]
MD Anderson study sheds light on miR569 gene

MD Anderson study sheds light on miR569 gene

A genetic misfire called the 3q26.2 amplicon can cause real havoc. In fact, it is among the most frequent chromosomal aberrations seen in many cancers, including ovarian and breast cancers. [More]
Scientists suspect role of mini-chromosomes in cancers, diseases caused by gene mutations

Scientists suspect role of mini-chromosomes in cancers, diseases caused by gene mutations

Cancers are due to genetic aberrations in certain cells that gain the ability to divide indefinitely. This proliferation of sick cells generates tumors, which gradually invade healthy tissue. Therefore, current therapies essentially seek to destroy cancer cells to stop their proliferation. Through high-throughput genetic sequencing of glioblastoma cells, one of the most deadly brain tumors, a team of geneticists from the University of Geneva's (UNIGE) Faculty of Medicine discovered that some of these mutations are caused by supplemental extrachromosomal DNA fragments, called double minutes, which enable cancer cells to better adapt to their environment and therefore better resist to treatments meant to destroy them. [More]
Protein that regulates the body's sleep cycle may offer cancer protection

Protein that regulates the body's sleep cycle may offer cancer protection

People who work around the clock could actually be setting themselves back, according to Virginia Tech biologists. [More]
Garmatex, Diagnomics partner to develop healthcare products to prevent hospital-acquired infections

Garmatex, Diagnomics partner to develop healthcare products to prevent hospital-acquired infections

Garmatex Technologies, Inc., a leading inventor of performance fabric and apparel solution-focused technologies, has signed a Letter of Intent ("LOI") for a five year term with Diagnomics Inc., a biotech company that provides next-generation healthcare solutions from personal genomics. [More]
Joint therapy to counter HIV and HCV increases chance of success

Joint therapy to counter HIV and HCV increases chance of success

A Spanish researcher has collaborated on a mathematical analysis, recently published in the journal 'Science Translational Medicine', which concludes that joint therapy to counter HIV in patients who also have hepatitis C increases the chance of success in the fight against both infections. Between eight and nine million people worldwide simultaneously suffer from AIDS and hepatitis C. [More]
University of Chicago collaborates with NCI to set up Genomic Data Commons

University of Chicago collaborates with NCI to set up Genomic Data Commons

The University of Chicago is collaborating with the National Cancer Institute to establish the nation's most comprehensive computational facility that stores and harmonizes cancer genomic data generated through NCI-funded research programs. [More]
UT Austin researchers identify network of genes that drives alcohol dependence

UT Austin researchers identify network of genes that drives alcohol dependence

Researchers at The University of Texas at Austin have identified a network of genes that appear to work together in determining alcohol dependence. The findings, which could lead to future treatments and therapies for alcoholics and possibly help doctors screen for alcoholism, are being published this week in the journal Molecular Psychiatry. [More]
Predictive model provides information for treating 20% of human diseases

Predictive model provides information for treating 20% of human diseases

The analysis of drugs, natural products, and chemical substances found in the environment allows the identification of the chemical fragments responsible for a therapeutic or deleterious effect on human health. [More]
Certain mosquito species genetically better at transmitting malaria

Certain mosquito species genetically better at transmitting malaria

Certain species of mosquitoes are genetically better at transmitting malaria than even some of their close cousins, according to a multi-institutional team of researchers including Virginia Tech scientists. [More]
Johns Hopkins researchers develop online tool to speed up creation of new drugs to prevent Ebola virus

Johns Hopkins researchers develop online tool to speed up creation of new drugs to prevent Ebola virus

Johns Hopkins biomedical engineers have developed a free, browser-based online tool that could speed up the creation of new drugs to treat or prevent Ebola virus infections. [More]
Two UH scientists named as fellows of AAAS

Two UH scientists named as fellows of AAAS

Two scientists from the University of Houston have been elected as fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. [More]