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A biomarker is a biological molecule found in blood, other body fluids, or tissues that is a sign of a normal or abnormal process, or of a condition or disease. A biomarker may be used to see how well the body responds to a treatment for a disease or condition. Also called molecular marker and signature molecule.
Men with relatively unaggressive prostate tumors unlikely to develop metastatic prostate cancer

Men with relatively unaggressive prostate tumors unlikely to develop metastatic prostate cancer

Men with relatively unaggressive prostate tumors and whose disease is carefully monitored by urologists are unlikely to develop metastatic prostate cancer or die of their cancers, according to results of a study by researchers at the Brady Urological Institute at Johns Hopkins, who analyzed survival statistics up to 15 years. [More]
Finerenone effective in heart failure patients with diabetes and/or chronic kidney disease

Finerenone effective in heart failure patients with diabetes and/or chronic kidney disease

In heart failure patients with diabetes and/or chronic kidney disease, a new, non-steroidal mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist (MRA) called finerenone was no more effective than the currently approved MRA eplerenone in reducing the heart failure biomarker N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide [NT-proBNP]. [More]
Researchers discover that vitamin D may play significant role in preventing AMD among women

Researchers discover that vitamin D may play significant role in preventing AMD among women

Vitamin D has been studied extensively in relation to bone health as well as cancer. Now, a team led by a researcher at the University at Buffalo has discovered that vitamin D may play a significant role in eye health, specifically in the possible prevention of age-related macular degeneration, or AMD, among women who are more genetically prone to developing the sight-damaging disease. [More]
MACC1 gene can help predict better treatment options for patients with Klatskin carcinoma

MACC1 gene can help predict better treatment options for patients with Klatskin carcinoma

Bile duct cancer is rare and is usually detected too late. Often only extensive liver surgery can help or, in rare cases, liver transplantation. But which patients will benefit from surgery and which will not, because their risk of cancer recurrence is too high? With the oncogene MACC1 as a biomarker, physicians for the first time have a tool to decide which treatment option is best for patients with Klatskin carcinoma, one type of bile duct cancer. [More]
Study shows food craving may be hard-wired into the brain of overweight patients

Study shows food craving may be hard-wired into the brain of overweight patients

An international group of researchers have found that food craving activates different brain networks between obese and normal weight patients. [More]
Cornell study reveals how obesity changes consistency of breast tissue

Cornell study reveals how obesity changes consistency of breast tissue

Women who are obese have a higher risk and a worse prognosis for breast cancer, but the reasons why remain unclear. A Cornell study published this month in Science Translational Medicine explains how obesity changes the consistency of breast tissue in ways that are similar to tumors, thereby promoting disease. [More]
ASTRO awards $675,000 to seven physician-researchers to advance radiation oncology research

ASTRO awards $675,000 to seven physician-researchers to advance radiation oncology research

The American Society for Radiation Oncology has selected seven leading physician-researchers to receive a total of $675,000 in awards and grants to advance radiation oncology research. Together, the seven funding grants, including ASTRO Junior Faculty Career Research Training Award, the ASTRO Residents/Fellows in Radiation Oncology Research Seed Award and the ASTRO/Radiation Oncology Institute Comparative Effectiveness Research Award, will support studies in radiation and cancer biology, radiation physics, translational research, outcomes/health services research and comparative effectiveness research within radiation oncology. [More]
Research reveals why older adults who undergo general anesthesia experience postoperative delirium

Research reveals why older adults who undergo general anesthesia experience postoperative delirium

Newly published research from the Department of Geriatrics and Gerontology at the Rowan University School of Osteopathic Medicine explains why up to half of older adults who undergo general anesthesia develop postoperative delirium - the sudden onset of confusion, aggression or agitated behavior that could progress to dementia. The findings indicate that older patients who are undergoing surgery may benefit from a less-potent, slower-acting anesthetic. [More]
Study shows significant link between macular pigment levels in the eye and cognitive function

Study shows significant link between macular pigment levels in the eye and cognitive function

Ongoing European Research Council-funded research at Waterford Institute of Technology's Macular Pigment Research Group is investigating the potential link between cognitive function and levels of a vital eye pigment linked to diet. The study suggests that measuring macular pigment offers potential as a biomarker of cognitive health [More]
Dr. Sharma receives research award from ASCO to continue study on triple-negative breast cancer

Dr. Sharma receives research award from ASCO to continue study on triple-negative breast cancer

Dr. Sharma was awarded the 2015 Advanced Clinical Research Award in Breast Cancer from the American Society of Clinical Oncology to continue her research on triple-negative breast cancer. [More]
Berg and University of Miami extend partnership to battle cardiac dysfunction, heart failure

Berg and University of Miami extend partnership to battle cardiac dysfunction, heart failure

Berg, a Boston-based biopharmaceutical company, and the University of Miami Leonard M. Miller School of Medicine are extending its collaboration to battle cardiac dysfunction and heart failure. According to the American Heart Association, cardiovascular disease is the leading global cause of death, accounting for 17.3 million deaths per year, a number that is expected to grow to more than 23.6 million by 2030. [More]
Potential biomarker could help prevent pre-diabetic individuals from developing Type II diabetes

Potential biomarker could help prevent pre-diabetic individuals from developing Type II diabetes

Virginia Tech researchers have identified a biomarker in pre-diabetic individuals that could help prevent them from developing Type II diabetes. [More]
PSMA PET imaging more precise than MR imaging for detection of high-grade prostate cancer lesions

PSMA PET imaging more precise than MR imaging for detection of high-grade prostate cancer lesions

A molecular imaging biomarker is able to detect fast-growing primary prostate cancer and distinguish it from benign prostate lesions, addressing an unmet clinical need. The new research, published in the July 2015 issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine, is significant for patients with suspected prostate cancer that has not been confirmed by standard biopsy. [More]
Landmark 'basket study' shows efficacy of vemurafenib in multiple nonmelanoma BRAFV600-mutated cancers

Landmark 'basket study' shows efficacy of vemurafenib in multiple nonmelanoma BRAFV600-mutated cancers

Researchers from Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center have announced results from the first published basket study, a new form of clinical trial design that explores responses to drugs based on the specific mutations in patients' tumors rather than where their cancer originated. [More]
CSF biomarkers predict dementia risk in PD patients

CSF biomarkers predict dementia risk in PD patients

Early analysis of cerebrospinal fluid could help diagnose parkinsonian disorders and enhance the prediction of dementia in Parkinson’s disease patients, study results indicate. [More]
UC Davis researchers set out to identify biomarkers for early diagnosis of lung cancer

UC Davis researchers set out to identify biomarkers for early diagnosis of lung cancer

Despite decades of warnings about smoking, lung cancer is still the second-most common cancer and the leading cause of death from cancer in the U.S. Patients are often diagnosed only when their disease is already at an advanced stage and hard to treat. Researchers at the West Coast Metabolomics Center at UC Davis are trying to change that, by identifying biomarkers that could be the basis of early tests for lung cancer. [More]
NIH grants Clinical and Translational Science Award to UC San Diego

NIH grants Clinical and Translational Science Award to UC San Diego

The Clinical and Translational Research Institute (CTRI) at University of California, San Diego has received a five-year Clinical and Translational Science Award (CTSA) for approximately $52 million from the National Center for Advancing Translational Science, part of the National Institutes of Health. [More]

Researchers at Forsyth Institute enhance pipetting efficiency using VIAFLO Assist

INTEGRA reports on how researchers at the renowned Forsyth Institute (Cambridge, MA) are using a VIAFLO Assist to enhance the efficiency while maintaining the accuracy of pipetting protocols related to the discovery, measurement, and validation of new biomarkers of disease that can be found in saliva. [More]
NCI-MATCH phase II precision medicine trial opens through ECOG-ACRIN

NCI-MATCH phase II precision medicine trial opens through ECOG-ACRIN

The National Cancer Institute-Molecular Analysis for Therapy Choice (NCI-MATCH) phase II precision medicine trial, known to doctors as trial EAY131, is open through the ECOG-ACRIN Cancer Research Group. [More]
Vitamin D supplements may help reduce risk of falls in homebound elderly

Vitamin D supplements may help reduce risk of falls in homebound elderly

Every year falls affect approximately one in three older adults living at home, with approximately one in 10 falls resulting in serious injury. Even if an injury does not occur, the fear of falling can lead to reduced activity and a loss of independence. [More]
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