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Biopsy is the removal of cells or tissues for examination by a pathologist. The pathologist may study the tissue under a microscope or perform other tests on the cells or tissue. There are many different types of biopsy procedures. The most common types include: (1) incisional biopsy, in which only a sample of tissue is removed; (2) excisional biopsy, in which an entire lump or suspicious area is removed; and (3) needle biopsy, in which a sample of tissue or fluid is removed with a needle. When a wide needle is used, the procedure is called a core biopsy. When a thin needle is used, the procedure is called a fine-needle aspiration biopsy.
Researchers crack genetic code of lung tissues to identify novel targets for treating IPF

Researchers crack genetic code of lung tissues to identify novel targets for treating IPF

Researchers cracked the complete genetic code of individual cells in healthy and diseased human lung tissues to find potential new molecular targets for diagnosing and treating the lethal lung disease Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis (IPF). [More]
PITX2 methylation biomarker shows promise for predicting prostate cancer recurrence risk

PITX2 methylation biomarker shows promise for predicting prostate cancer recurrence risk

Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and other biomarkers are essential tools for diagnosing and monitoring prostate cancer. [More]
NASPGHAN clinical practice guidelines recommend screening test for NAFLD in obese children

NASPGHAN clinical practice guidelines recommend screening test for NAFLD in obese children

A screening test for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD)--a serious condition that may have lifelong health consequences--is recommended for all obese children aged nine to eleven years, according to clinical practice guidelines developed by the North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition and published in the Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition. [More]
Study finds 1 in 5 pediatric celiac disease patients on gluten-free diet sustain persistent intestinal damage

Study finds 1 in 5 pediatric celiac disease patients on gluten-free diet sustain persistent intestinal damage

In surprising findings, researchers from MassGeneral Hospital for Children and Boston Children's Hospital have discovered that nearly one in five children with celiac disease sustained persistent intestinal damage, despite strict adherence to a gluten-free diet. [More]
Zilico to pilot pioneering cervical cancer diagnostic system across India as part of TechEmerge's programme

Zilico to pilot pioneering cervical cancer diagnostic system across India as part of TechEmerge's programme

Zilico Ltd – a developer of a pioneering cervical cancer diagnostic system - has been selected by the IFC, a member of the World Bank Group, to be part of a unique program across India. [More]
Dilon and GE receive FDA approval for Discovery NM750b breast imaging system

Dilon and GE receive FDA approval for Discovery NM750b breast imaging system

DILON Diagnostics and GE Healthcare are pleased to announce the FDA clearance of the Molecular Breast Imaging (MBI) localization accessory for breast biopsy. [More]
Research may lead to improved system for early diagnosis and treatment of prostate cancer

Research may lead to improved system for early diagnosis and treatment of prostate cancer

New research coauthored by Brigham Young University researchers may lead to a more accurate system for early detection, diagnosis, and treatment of prostate cancer. [More]
Low-calorie diet and exercise could improve kidney function in patients with NASH

Low-calorie diet and exercise could improve kidney function in patients with NASH

Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is a potentially serious liver condition characterized by excess fat in the liver associated with inflammation and scarring. [More]
Results of high-impact clinical trials could improve kidney-related medical care

Results of high-impact clinical trials could improve kidney-related medical care

The results of numerous high-impact clinical trials that could affect kidney-related medical care will be presented at ASN Kidney Week 2016, November 15-20 at McCormick Place in Chicago, IL. [More]
Johns Hopkins researchers develop new, highly accurate urine test to predict risk for cervical cancer

Johns Hopkins researchers develop new, highly accurate urine test to predict risk for cervical cancer

Johns Hopkins Medicine specialists report they have developed a urine test for the likely emergence of cervical cancer that is highly accurate compared to other tests based on genetic markers derived directly from cervical tissue. [More]
Experimental cancer imaging tool shows promise in illuminating brain tumors during surgery

Experimental cancer imaging tool shows promise in illuminating brain tumors during surgery

An experimental cancer imaging tool that makes tumors glow brightly during surgery has shown promise again in a new Penn Medicine clinical study, this time in patients with brain cancer. [More]
How toxic is your stress?

How toxic is your stress?

The term “stress” originates not in our minds or bodies, but from physics. It is the internal forces generated in an object in response to an external load. In the 1950s, Hans Selye adopted the term to characterize how living organisms change... [More]
BUSM researchers show how MRI can effectively identify bone marrow cancer in experimental model

BUSM researchers show how MRI can effectively identify bone marrow cancer in experimental model

For the first time, researchers have shown that using Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) can effectively identify bone marrow cancer (myelofibrosis) in an experimental model. [More]
Stem-cell-derived gap junction cells could be important therapeutic target for treatment of hereditary deafness

Stem-cell-derived gap junction cells could be important therapeutic target for treatment of hereditary deafness

A collaboration, including researchers from Juntendo University, demonstrate differentiation from stem cells into specialised cells thought to be the most important therapeutic target for the treatment of hereditary deafness. [More]
Technion researchers develop new diagnostic technology for improving personalized cancer treatment

Technion researchers develop new diagnostic technology for improving personalized cancer treatment

Using synthetic DNA sequences as the tiniest of barcodes, Technion researchers have developed a new diagnostic technology for determining the suitability of specific anticancer drugs to a specific patient - before treatment even begins. [More]
Agendia partners with Cryogene and Mist to distribute breast cancer recurrence assay in the Middle East

Agendia partners with Cryogene and Mist to distribute breast cancer recurrence assay in the Middle East

Agendia, Inc., a world leader in personalized medicine and molecular cancer diagnostics, announced today a partnership agreement to distribute the company’s breast cancer recurrence assay, MammaPrint, in the Middle East. [More]
Nearly 20% of children with celiac disease have persistent enteropathy despite gluten-free diet

Nearly 20% of children with celiac disease have persistent enteropathy despite gluten-free diet

Even after a year on a gluten-free diet, nearly 20 percent of children with celiac disease continue to have intestinal abnormalities (enteropathy) on repeat biopsies, reports a study in the Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, official journal of the European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition and the North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition. The journal is published by Wolters Kluwer. [More]
Group of circulating tumour cells in the blood linked to prostate cancer spread

Group of circulating tumour cells in the blood linked to prostate cancer spread

Researchers have found a group of circulating tumour cells in prostate cancer patient blood samples which are linked to the spread of the disease, according to new research presented at the National Cancer Research Institute Cancer Conference in Liverpool. [More]
New treatment with therapeutic short interfering RNA could help thwart cancer

New treatment with therapeutic short interfering RNA could help thwart cancer

In the fight against cancer, doctors dish out combination-blows of surgery, chemotherapy and other drugs to beat back a merciless foe. Now, scientists have taken early steps toward adding a stinging punch to clinicians' repertoire. [More]
Immune checkpoint cancer therapies may cause rare cardiac side effects linked to unexpected immune response

Immune checkpoint cancer therapies may cause rare cardiac side effects linked to unexpected immune response

Combination therapy utilizing two approved immunotherapy drugs for cancer treatment may cause rare and sometimes fatal cardiac side effects linked to an unexpected immune response. [More]
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