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Biopsy is the removal of cells or tissues for examination by a pathologist. The pathologist may study the tissue under a microscope or perform other tests on the cells or tissue. There are many different types of biopsy procedures. The most common types include: (1) incisional biopsy, in which only a sample of tissue is removed; (2) excisional biopsy, in which an entire lump or suspicious area is removed; and (3) needle biopsy, in which a sample of tissue or fluid is removed with a needle. When a wide needle is used, the procedure is called a core biopsy. When a thin needle is used, the procedure is called a fine-needle aspiration biopsy.
Urologists offer new tool for visualizing, monitoring prostate in men with greater accuracy

Urologists offer new tool for visualizing, monitoring prostate in men with greater accuracy

Urologists at Rush University Medical Center are the first in Chicago to offer a powerful new tool for visualizing and monitoring the prostate in men who have high prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels and in detecting prostate cancer more accurately. [More]

Tissue reconstruction using autologous engineered implants has been successfully achieved in humans

Reconstruction of damaged/absent tissue using engineered autologous (from the patients’ own cells) implants has been successfully achieved in humans for the first time. [More]

Scientists report first human recipients of laboratory-grown vaginal organs

Scientists reported today the first human recipients of laboratory-grown vaginal organs. A research team led by Anthony Atala, M.D., director of Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center's Institute for Regenerative Medicine, describes in the Lancet long-term success in four teenage girls who received vaginal organs that were engineered with their own cells. [More]

Scientists report successful nose reconstruction surgery using cartilage grown in laboratory

Scientists at the University of Basel report first ever successful nose reconstruction surgery using cartilage grown in the laboratory. Cartilage cells were extracted from the patient's nasal septum, multiplied and expanded onto a collagen membrane. [More]

Millennium Medical Devices inks another network selling agreement

Millennium HealthCare Inc. today announced that its subsidiary, Millennium Medical Devices LLC, has signed yet another network selling agreement. This agreement was signed with a US based healthcare organization for the use of Millennium's medical devices in 400 of the organization's locations. This agreement includes an average monthly minimum use of 350 units per device, per location. [More]

Patient-friendly examination method reduces need for prostate cancer biopsies

Each year prostate tissue samples are taken from over a million men around the world - in most cases using 12 large biopsy needles - to check whether they have prostate cancer. [More]

6 months of hormonal treatment in addition to radiotherapy improves outcome for prostate cancer

Vienna, Austria: Men with prostate cancer that is small and confined to the prostate gland but that is at risk of growing and spreading, do better if they are treated with radiotherapy combined with androgen deprivation therapy, which lowers their levels of the male hormone, testosterone, according to new research. [More]
Scientists battle against cancer with nanoballoons and lasers

Scientists battle against cancer with nanoballoons and lasers

Chemotherapeutic drugs excel at fighting cancer, but they're not so efficient at getting where they need to go. [More]
Cedars-Sinai earns grant to conduct clinical trial of gene therapy product for patients with Lou Gehrig's disease

Cedars-Sinai earns grant to conduct clinical trial of gene therapy product for patients with Lou Gehrig's disease

The Cedars-Sinai Regenerative Medicine Institute has received a $2.5 million grant from the Department of Defense to conduct animal studies that, if successful, could provide the basis for a clinical trial of a gene therapy product for patients with Lou Gehrig's disease, also called amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or ALS. [More]
Full-field digital mammography associated with lower recall and biopsy rates, says study

Full-field digital mammography associated with lower recall and biopsy rates, says study

Population-based screening with full-field digital mammography (FFDM) is associated with lower recall and biopsy rates than screen film mammography (SFM), suggesting that FFDM may reduce the number of diagnostic workups and biopsies that do not lead to diagnosis of breast cancer, according to a new study published online in the journal Radiology. [More]
Discovery could lead to major breakthrough in breast and ovarian cancer

Discovery could lead to major breakthrough in breast and ovarian cancer

Cancer researchers at Queen's University Belfast have made a breakthrough which could signal new treatments for women at high risk of breast and ovarian cancer. [More]
Scientists move a step closer to preserving fertility in young boys with cancer

Scientists move a step closer to preserving fertility in young boys with cancer

Scientists have moved a step closer to being able to preserve fertility in young boys who undergo chemotherapy and radiation treatments for cancer. The new research, published in Fertility and Sterility, the journal of the American Society for Reproductive Medicine, addresses the safety of an option scientists are developing for boys who aren't sexually mature and cannot bank sperm. [More]
Treatment option for women with squamous cell carcinoma of the vulva

Treatment option for women with squamous cell carcinoma of the vulva

A team of researchers from Women & Infants Hospital of Rhode Island commanded a national stage to present the results of a study evaluating the use of sentinel lymph node dissection in women with vulvar malignancies, and then follow the patients for complications and recurrence. [More]
Johns Hopkins researchers identify protein that regulates the body's immune response to CMV

Johns Hopkins researchers identify protein that regulates the body's immune response to CMV

Infectious disease specialists at the Johns Hopkins Children's Center have identified a protein that regulates the body's immune response to cytomegalovirus (CMV), a common pathogen that causes lifelong infections and can lead to devastating illness in newborns and those with weakened immune systems. [More]
SLU researchers receive $1.4M grant to study alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency in adults

SLU researchers receive $1.4M grant to study alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency in adults

Researchers at Saint Louis University will study alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency in adults, an inherited disease that can cause liver damage, to answer various questions that could lead to effective methods of treatment. [More]

EKF Molecular to exhibit PointMan DNA-enrichment technology at AACR 2014

EKF Diagnostics, the global in vitro diagnostics business, will be present on Booth #438 at AACR 2014, 5-9th April, San Diego. [More]
XBP1 gene plays pivotal role in the growth and progression of triple negative breast cancer

XBP1 gene plays pivotal role in the growth and progression of triple negative breast cancer

Scientists from Weill Cornell Medical College and Houston Methodist have found that a gene previously unassociated with breast cancer plays a pivotal role in the growth and progression of the triple negative form of the disease, a particularly deadly strain that often has few treatment options. Their research, published in this week's Nature, suggests that targeting the gene may be a new approach to treating the disease. [More]

Renal mass biopsy rates increasing in kidney cancer

Rates of renal mass biopsy have been historically low in patients with kidney cancer, but are steadily rising, shows an analysis of Medicare data. [More]
Genomic analysis to study cancer in dogs can help develop new therapies for human cancers

Genomic analysis to study cancer in dogs can help develop new therapies for human cancers

Using genomic analysis to study cancer in dogs can help develop new therapies for humans with cancer, according to a proof-of-concept study led by the National Cancer Institute (NCI) and the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen). [More]

Researchers use "big data" analytics to predict triple-negative breast cancer and other cancers with 95% accuracy

Researchers at Case Western Reserve University and colleagues used "big data" analytics to predict if a patient is suffering from aggressive triple-negative breast cancer, slower-moving cancers or non-cancerous lesions with 95 percent accuracy. [More]