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Biopsy is the removal of cells or tissues for examination by a pathologist. The pathologist may study the tissue under a microscope or perform other tests on the cells or tissue. There are many different types of biopsy procedures. The most common types include: (1) incisional biopsy, in which only a sample of tissue is removed; (2) excisional biopsy, in which an entire lump or suspicious area is removed; and (3) needle biopsy, in which a sample of tissue or fluid is removed with a needle. When a wide needle is used, the procedure is called a core biopsy. When a thin needle is used, the procedure is called a fine-needle aspiration biopsy.
Study: Targeted biopsy technique better than standard biopsy at detecting high-risk prostate cancer

Study: Targeted biopsy technique better than standard biopsy at detecting high-risk prostate cancer

Among men undergoing biopsy for suspected prostate cancer, targeted magnetic resonance/ultrasound fusion biopsy, compared with a standard biopsy technique, was associated with increased detection of high-risk prostate cancer and decreased detection of low-risk prostate cancer, according to a study in the January 27 issue of JAMA. [More]
Mayo Clinic study compares new breast cancer risk prediction model with current model

Mayo Clinic study compares new breast cancer risk prediction model with current model

A new breast cancer risk prediction model combining histologic features of biopsied breast tissue from women with benign breast disease and individual patient demographic information more accurately classified breast cancer risk than the current screening standard. [More]
New imaging technique increases detection rates of invasive breast cancers

New imaging technique increases detection rates of invasive breast cancers

A new breast imaging technique pioneered at Mayo Clinic nearly quadruples detection rates of invasive breast cancers in women with dense breast tissue, according to the results of a major study published this week in the American Journal of Roentgenology. [More]
Researchers develop new treatment that extends telomeres

Researchers develop new treatment that extends telomeres

Will extending telomeres lead to longer, healthier lives? Researchers have taken an important step toward answering this question by developing a new treatment used in the laboratory that extends telomeres. [More]
Gensignia's research in CT lung cancer screening recognized by ASCO

Gensignia's research in CT lung cancer screening recognized by ASCO

Gensignia scientific co-founders' research has been recognized in Clinical Cancer Advances 2015: Annual Report on Progress Against Cancer From the American Society of Clinical Oncology published online in the Journal of Clinical Oncology (JCO) on January 20, 2015. [More]
Patients who receive lungs from heavy drinkers more likely to develop severe primary graft dysfunction

Patients who receive lungs from heavy drinkers more likely to develop severe primary graft dysfunction

Lung transplant patients who receive lungs from heavy drinkers are nearly nine times more likely to experience a life-threatening complication called primary graft dysfunction, a Loyola University Medical Center study has found. [More]
Using breath tests to diagnose liver diseases: an interview with Larry Cohen

Using breath tests to diagnose liver diseases: an interview with Larry Cohen

It was back in the 1960s that scientists first started to understand that breath could be used to find out different things about diseases and other factors. I’m sure you’re familiar with alcohol breath testing, which was patented back in the ‘50s and has been used since the ‘60s. [More]
ArborMetrix's RegistryMetrix analytics platform selected for UNC's urology department

ArborMetrix's RegistryMetrix analytics platform selected for UNC's urology department

ArborMetrix, Inc., a leading provider of cloud-based healthcare analytics solutions, today announced that the Urology Department of the University of North Carolina School of Medicine is using its cloud-based RegistryMetrix analytics platform. [More]
Duke researchers grow contracting human skeletal muscle in lab

Duke researchers grow contracting human skeletal muscle in lab

In a laboratory first, Duke researchers have grown human skeletal muscle that contracts and responds just like native tissue to external stimuli such as electrical pulses, biochemical signals and pharmaceuticals. [More]
QIAGEN's circulating tumor DNA test CE-IVD marked to assess genomic mutation NSCLC patients

QIAGEN's circulating tumor DNA test CE-IVD marked to assess genomic mutation NSCLC patients

QIAGEN announced today the CE-IVD marking of its novel liquid biopsy-based companion diagnostic that analyzes circulating nucleic acids obtained from blood samples to assess an important genomic mutation in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), the most common form of this cancer. [More]
Pathologists use ProExC antibody cocktail to determine tumor recurrence

Pathologists use ProExC antibody cocktail to determine tumor recurrence

Partnering with head and neck surgeons, pathologists at Dartmouth Hitchcock Medical Center's Norris Cotton Cancer Center developed a new use for an old test to determine if a patient's cancer is recurring, or if the biopsy shows benign inflammation of mucosal tissues. In Pathology - Research and Practice, lead author Candice C. Black, DO explained how her team confirmed the utility of ProExC, an existing antibody cocktail commonly used for pathology tests of the uterine cervix. [More]
Mayo Clinic study dispels myth that cancer biopsies cause cancer to spread

Mayo Clinic study dispels myth that cancer biopsies cause cancer to spread

A study of more than 2,000 patients by researchers at Mayo Clinic's campus in Jacksonville, Florida, has dispelled the myth that cancer biopsies cause cancer to spread. In the Jan. 9 online issue of Gut, they show that patients who received a biopsy had a better outcome and longer survival than patients who did not have a biopsy. [More]
ProNAi enrolls first patient in PNT2258 Phase II study for treatment of refractory or relapsed DLBCL

ProNAi enrolls first patient in PNT2258 Phase II study for treatment of refractory or relapsed DLBCL

ProNAi Therapeutics Inc., a private hematology/oncology company dedicated to developing and commercializing a new class of therapeutics based on its proprietary DNAi platform, today reported that the first patient with relapsed or refractory diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) has enrolled in the "Wolverine" Phase II study and been treated with PNT2258. [More]
Breast cancer risk for women with atypical hyperplasia greater than previously thought, study finds

Breast cancer risk for women with atypical hyperplasia greater than previously thought, study finds

Women with atypical hyperplasia of the breast have a higher risk of developing breast cancer than previously thought, a Mayo Clinic study has found. Results of the study appear in a special report on breast cancer in the New England Journal of Medicine. [More]
Mayo Clinic researchers correctly evaluate polyps using high-definition optical lenses

Mayo Clinic researchers correctly evaluate polyps using high-definition optical lenses

It may not be necessary for experienced gastroenterologists to send polyps they remove from a patient's colon to a pathologist for examination, according to a large study conducted by physician researchers at the Jacksonville campus of Mayo Clinic. [More]
Single biopsy site may reveal all lung adenocarcinoma genetic mutations

Single biopsy site may reveal all lung adenocarcinoma genetic mutations

Genetic sequencing of a single tumour site sample may be adequate for identifying cancer gene mutations in patients with lung andenocarcinoma, research published in Science suggests. [More]
U-M researchers devise reliable way to grow tumor cells

U-M researchers devise reliable way to grow tumor cells

In a development that could lead to a deeper understanding of cancer and better early-stage treatment of the disease, University of Michigan researchers have devised a reliable way to grow a certain type of cancer cells from patients outside the body for study. [More]
Photoacoustic imaging has potential to be used as noninvasive method to detect cervical cancer

Photoacoustic imaging has potential to be used as noninvasive method to detect cervical cancer

Cervical cancer is, in many ways, a shining example of how successful the war on cancer can be. Thanks largely to the advent of Pap smear screening, U.S. cervical cancer deaths decreased dramatically, by more than 60 percent, between 1955 and 1992. In the last two decades, better treatment outcomes and more powerful imaging techniques have steadily pushed 5-year survival rates ever higher. [More]
Genomic Health reports positive results from Oncotype DX clinical study in women with DCIS

Genomic Health reports positive results from Oncotype DX clinical study in women with DCIS

Genomic Health, Inc. today announced positive results from the second large clinical validation study of Oncotype DX in patients with a pre-invasive form of breast cancer known as DCIS (ductal carcinoma in situ). [More]
New statistical model enables better identification of different cell types in solid tumors

New statistical model enables better identification of different cell types in solid tumors

A new statistical model developed by a research team at Worcester Polytechnic Institute may enable physicians to create personalized cancer treatments for patients based on the specific genetic mutations found in their tumors. [More]