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Biopsy is the removal of cells or tissues for examination by a pathologist. The pathologist may study the tissue under a microscope or perform other tests on the cells or tissue. There are many different types of biopsy procedures. The most common types include: (1) incisional biopsy, in which only a sample of tissue is removed; (2) excisional biopsy, in which an entire lump or suspicious area is removed; and (3) needle biopsy, in which a sample of tissue or fluid is removed with a needle. When a wide needle is used, the procedure is called a core biopsy. When a thin needle is used, the procedure is called a fine-needle aspiration biopsy.
Pathologists help determine prostate cancer patient’s eligibility for active surveillance

Pathologists help determine prostate cancer patient’s eligibility for active surveillance

Prostate cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death in men in the United States. Active surveillance offers low-risk prostate cancer patients a means to avoid the potentially harmful side effects from treatment. [More]
Statistical genetic analysis can detect aggressiveness of lymphoma

Statistical genetic analysis can detect aggressiveness of lymphoma

Each year, more than one thousand Norwegians develop lymphoma. A statistical genetic analysis can detect when the disease will be aggressive. Thereby, treatment can be initiated in time. [More]
Risk of urinary tract infections after prostate biopsy highest in men with prior infections

Risk of urinary tract infections after prostate biopsy highest in men with prior infections

Risk of Urinary Tract Infections after Prostate Biopsy Highest in Men with Prior Infections or Significant Comorbidities, Report Swedish Researchers in The Journal Of Urology® [More]
BRCA2 mutations herald poor prognosis in screen-detected prostate cancer

BRCA2 mutations herald poor prognosis in screen-detected prostate cancer

Among men with prostate cancer detected on screening, survival among those with a mutation in the BRCA2 gene is much poorer than in those without such a mutation, researchers report. [More]
Study reveals treatment trends for prostate cancer in Japan

Study reveals treatment trends for prostate cancer in Japan

There has been a recent increase in use of radiotherapy in Japanese men newly diagnosed with prostate cancer and a concomitant decrease in use of androgen deprivation therapy, study findings indicate. [More]
Clinical trial tests COXEN model in bladder cancer to find promising treatment

Clinical trial tests COXEN model in bladder cancer to find promising treatment

Imagine being able to match a cancer's genes to the best treatment. That's the promise of COXEN (CO eXpression ExtrapolatioN) - a computer program that looks at a panel of cancer genes in a patient's tumor to predict whether it will respond to chemotherapy. [More]
Healthy men participating in Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial are most likely to undergo biopsy

Healthy men participating in Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial are most likely to undergo biopsy

Healthy men participating in the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial who actively participate in all steps of the clinical trial are most likely to undergo a biopsy, according to a study published in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers and Prevention - a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research. [More]
MRI technology improves prostate cancer diagnosis

MRI technology improves prostate cancer diagnosis

Oncologists at UC San Diego Moores Cancer Center are the first in San Diego to meld magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technology with a traditional ultrasound prostate exam to create a three-dimensional map of the prostate that allows physicians to view growths that were previously undetectable. [More]
Identifying epigenetic markers in cancer cells could improve patient treatment

Identifying epigenetic markers in cancer cells could improve patient treatment

Scientists have known for decades that cancer can be caused by genetic mutations, but more recently they have discovered that chemical modifications of a gene can also contribute to cancer. [More]
Researchers develop new way of using electricity to open blood-brain-barrier

Researchers develop new way of using electricity to open blood-brain-barrier

A team of researchers from the Virginia Tech-Wake Forest University School of Biomedical Engineering and Sciences have developed a new way of using electricity to open the blood-brain-barrier (BBB). [More]
Scientists aim to understand and treat painful bladder condition

Scientists aim to understand and treat painful bladder condition

Taking advantage of technology that can analyze tissue samples and measure the activity of thousands of genes at once, scientists at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center are on a mission to better understand and treat interstitial cystitis (IC), a painful and difficult-to-diagnose bladder condition. [More]
New market research report on Canadian endoscopic and surgical devices market

New market research report on Canadian endoscopic and surgical devices market

Reportlinker.com announces that a new market research report is available in its catalogue: Canadian Endoscopic and Surgical Devices Market. [More]
Patient with mechanical heart pump receives new gene therapy for heart failure

Patient with mechanical heart pump receives new gene therapy for heart failure

For the first time in the world, a patient with a mechanical heart pump has received a new gene therapy for heart failure at Harefield Hospital, London. [More]
Prostate cancer screening could cut deaths by one fifth

Prostate cancer screening could cut deaths by one fifth

Routine screening for prostate cancer could reduce the number of people who die from the illness by around a fifth, according to findings from a major European trial. [More]
Hand-held photoacoustic microscopy may change the way doctors treat, diagnose melanoma

Hand-held photoacoustic microscopy may change the way doctors treat, diagnose melanoma

A new hand-held device that uses lasers and sound waves may change the way doctors treat and diagnose melanoma, according to a team of researchers from Washington University in St. Louis. [More]
New probe can be used in 3 unique ways to detect cancer

New probe can be used in 3 unique ways to detect cancer

As thousands of vacationers hit the beach this summer, many of them will expose their unprotected bare limbs to direct UV sunlight, potentially putting them at risk of skin cancer later in life. [More]
New techniques offer insight into cell-by-cell makeup of organisms

New techniques offer insight into cell-by-cell makeup of organisms

In general, our knowledge of biology-and much of science in general-is limited by our ability to actually see things. Researchers who study developmental problems and disease, in particular, are often limited by their inability to look inside an organism to figure out exactly what went wrong and when. [More]
New guideline recommends genetic testing of tumors for colorectal cancer patients

New guideline recommends genetic testing of tumors for colorectal cancer patients

Of the 143,000 patients diagnosed with colorectal cancer annually in the U.S., up to 25 percent have a familial risk of colorectal cancer. A new guideline from the U.S. Multi-Society Task Force on Colorectal Cancer recommends genetic testing of tumors for all newly diagnosed colorectal cancer patients. [More]
New calculator helps men assess risk of prostate cancer

New calculator helps men assess risk of prostate cancer

A calculator to help men and their doctors assess their risk of prostate cancer, developed at the UT Health Science Center, has had a major upgrade to enhance how men and their physicians better understand a man's risk of prostate cancer. [More]
UK researcher working to develop online tool to help patients navigate lung cancer screening decision

UK researcher working to develop online tool to help patients navigate lung cancer screening decision

The phrase "we caught it early" is possibly the best news a patient can hear in the midst of a cancer diagnosis. Combating cancer in its earliest stages, when the disease is localized to a certain part of the body, gives patients the best chances of survival. [More]