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Biopsy is the removal of cells or tissues for examination by a pathologist. The pathologist may study the tissue under a microscope or perform other tests on the cells or tissue. There are many different types of biopsy procedures. The most common types include: (1) incisional biopsy, in which only a sample of tissue is removed; (2) excisional biopsy, in which an entire lump or suspicious area is removed; and (3) needle biopsy, in which a sample of tissue or fluid is removed with a needle. When a wide needle is used, the procedure is called a core biopsy. When a thin needle is used, the procedure is called a fine-needle aspiration biopsy.
Single biopsy site may reveal all lung adenocarcinoma genetic mutations

Single biopsy site may reveal all lung adenocarcinoma genetic mutations

Genetic sequencing of a single tumour site sample may be adequate for identifying cancer gene mutations in patients with lung andenocarcinoma, research published in Science suggests. [More]
U-M researchers devise reliable way to grow tumor cells

U-M researchers devise reliable way to grow tumor cells

In a development that could lead to a deeper understanding of cancer and better early-stage treatment of the disease, University of Michigan researchers have devised a reliable way to grow a certain type of cancer cells from patients outside the body for study. [More]
Photoacoustic imaging has potential to be used as noninvasive method to detect cervical cancer

Photoacoustic imaging has potential to be used as noninvasive method to detect cervical cancer

Cervical cancer is, in many ways, a shining example of how successful the war on cancer can be. Thanks largely to the advent of Pap smear screening, U.S. cervical cancer deaths decreased dramatically, by more than 60 percent, between 1955 and 1992. In the last two decades, better treatment outcomes and more powerful imaging techniques have steadily pushed 5-year survival rates ever higher. [More]
Genomic Health reports positive results from Oncotype DX clinical study in women with DCIS

Genomic Health reports positive results from Oncotype DX clinical study in women with DCIS

Genomic Health, Inc. today announced positive results from the second large clinical validation study of Oncotype DX in patients with a pre-invasive form of breast cancer known as DCIS (ductal carcinoma in situ). [More]
New statistical model enables better identification of different cell types in solid tumors

New statistical model enables better identification of different cell types in solid tumors

A new statistical model developed by a research team at Worcester Polytechnic Institute may enable physicians to create personalized cancer treatments for patients based on the specific genetic mutations found in their tumors. [More]
Cianna Medical's SAVI SCOUT surgical guidance system gets FDA clearance

Cianna Medical's SAVI SCOUT surgical guidance system gets FDA clearance

Cianna Medical Inc. announced today U.S. Food and Drug Administration clearance for the SAVI SCOUT surgical guidance system, a novel technology that uses real-time audible and visual indicators to give surgeons a precise way to target tissue during lumpectomy and excisional biopsy procedures. [More]
New therapeutic approach for women with estrogen-receptor-positive breast cancer

New therapeutic approach for women with estrogen-receptor-positive breast cancer

Loyola researchers and collaborators have reported promising results from a novel therapeutic approach for women with estrogen-receptor-positive breast cancer. [More]
Stem cells from healthy eye could one day be used to repair scarred cornea

Stem cells from healthy eye could one day be used to repair scarred cornea

Treating the potentially blinding haze of a scar on the cornea might be as straightforward as growing stem cells from a tiny biopsy of the patient's undamaged eye and then placing them on the injury site, according to mouse model experiments conducted by researchers at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. [More]
Simple rectal swab cultures can thwart drug-resistant E. coli in patients undergoing TRUSBx procedures

Simple rectal swab cultures can thwart drug-resistant E. coli in patients undergoing TRUSBx procedures

Some infections after prostate biopsy due to drug-resistant Escherichia coli can be thwarted by simple rectal swab cultures prior to the procedure. The cultures test for antibiotic-resistant E. coli, and the findings are used to direct the selection of antimicrobial prophylaxis used for the procedure, according to Rhode Island Hospital researchers. [More]
Leica Biosystems completes acquisition of Devicor Medical Products

Leica Biosystems completes acquisition of Devicor Medical Products

Leica Biosystems, a global leader in anatomic pathology laboratory solutions and instruments, announced today that it has successfully completed its previously announced acquisition of Devicor Medical Products, Inc. [More]
Human stem cells made from adult donor cells remember their origin, say McMaster scientists

Human stem cells made from adult donor cells remember their origin, say McMaster scientists

Scientists at McMaster University have discovered that human stem cells made from adult donor cells "remember" where they came from and that's what they prefer to become again. [More]
Researchers remake brain and gut stem cells to study potential therapies for fatal diseases

Researchers remake brain and gut stem cells to study potential therapies for fatal diseases

Research scientists have developed a novel method to re-create brain and intestinal stem cells from patients who died decades ago, using DNA from stored blood samples to study the potential causes of debilitating illnesses such as inflammatory bowel disease. [More]
Researchers find way to prevent noise-induced hearing loss

Researchers find way to prevent noise-induced hearing loss

Researchers from Weill Cornell Medical College and the Gladstone Institutes have found a way to prevent noise-induced hearing loss in a mouse using a simple chemical compound that is a precursor to vitamin B3. This discovery has important implications not only for preventing hearing loss, but also potentially for treating some aging-related conditions that are linked to the same protein. [More]
Alport syndrome: an interview with Dr Paul Grint, CMO, Regulus

Alport syndrome: an interview with Dr Paul Grint, CMO, Regulus

Alport Syndrome was first described by a physician called Cecil Alport, back in the late 1920s. It's a genetic disease that affects a certain type of collagen involved in the functioning of the kidney, the ear, and the eye. [More]
Endomagnetics gets FDA's IDE approval to begin clinical trial of SentiMag and Sienna+ system

Endomagnetics gets FDA's IDE approval to begin clinical trial of SentiMag and Sienna+ system

Cancer healthcare company Endomagnetics announced today that it has received Investigational Device Exemption (IDE) approval from the United States Food and Drug Administration to initiate a pivotal clinical trial to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of the SentiMag and Sienna+ magnetic sentinel lymph node biopsy system in the management of breast cancer. [More]
Researchers discover why advanced melanoma patients respond to pembrolizumab drug

Researchers discover why advanced melanoma patients respond to pembrolizumab drug

Work supported by the Stand Up To Cance - Cancer Research Institute - Immunology Translational Research Dream Team, launched in 2012 to focus on how the patient's own immune system can be harnessed to treat some cancers have pioneered an approach to predict why advanced melanoma patients respond to a new life-saving melanoma drug. [More]
Research findings could lead to better tests for predicting breast cancer spread

Research findings could lead to better tests for predicting breast cancer spread

A study combining tumor cells from patients with breast cancer with a laboratory model of blood vessel lining provides the most compelling evidence so far that a specific trio of cells is required for the spread of breast cancer. The findings could lead to better tests for predicting whether a woman's breast cancer will spread and to new anti-cancer therapies. [More]
Gamma Medica to offer Philips MicroDose SI as complement to LumaGEM MBI system

Gamma Medica to offer Philips MicroDose SI as complement to LumaGEM MBI system

Gamma Medica today announces the company will now offer Philips MicroDose SI, the first full-field digital mammography (FFDM) system that supports single-shot, non-invasive spectral imaging, as a complement to its market leading LumaGEM Molecular Breast Imaging (MBI) system. [More]
Children with NAFLD at substantial risk for high blood pressure

Children with NAFLD at substantial risk for high blood pressure

High blood pressure and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) are two emerging health problems related to the epidemic of childhood obesity. In a recent study, researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine sought to determine the prevalence of high blood pressure in children with NAFLD, which places them at risk for premature cardiovascular disease. [More]
New drug shows promise against treatment-resistant non-small cell lung cancer

New drug shows promise against treatment-resistant non-small cell lung cancer

A new drug that targets not only common cancer-causing genetic mutations in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), but also a form of the mutation that causes resistance to treatment, has shown promising results in patients in a phase I/II clinical trial. [More]