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Biopsy is the removal of cells or tissues for examination by a pathologist. The pathologist may study the tissue under a microscope or perform other tests on the cells or tissue. There are many different types of biopsy procedures. The most common types include: (1) incisional biopsy, in which only a sample of tissue is removed; (2) excisional biopsy, in which an entire lump or suspicious area is removed; and (3) needle biopsy, in which a sample of tissue or fluid is removed with a needle. When a wide needle is used, the procedure is called a core biopsy. When a thin needle is used, the procedure is called a fine-needle aspiration biopsy.
Liquid biopsies hold potential for detecting NSCLC EGFR mutations, predicting cancer recurrence

Liquid biopsies hold potential for detecting NSCLC EGFR mutations, predicting cancer recurrence

Three manuscripts published in the recent issue of the Journal of Thoracic Oncology, the official journal of the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer, explored the versatility of liquid biopsies by identifying EGFR mutations using circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) in urine and plasma and examining circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in plasma to predict the risk of lung cancer recurrence after surgical resection. [More]
Active surveillance improves health related quality of life in low risk prostate cancer patients

Active surveillance improves health related quality of life in low risk prostate cancer patients

Active surveillance (AS) has become an increasingly important alternative to surgery, chemotherapy, or radiation treatment for men diagnosed with low risk prostate cancer. [More]
VCU Health radiologist uses MRI technology to detect difficult prostate cancers

VCU Health radiologist uses MRI technology to detect difficult prostate cancers

For three years, Andrew Harder wondered if he had prostate cancer. In 2009, he had routine blood work that revealed an elevated prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level. [More]
Scientists discover group of genes that can help predict damage in transplanted kidney

Scientists discover group of genes that can help predict damage in transplanted kidney

A multicenter team of researchers led by Barbara Murphy, MD, of the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai has identified a panel of genes which can help predict whether a transplanted kidney will later develop fibrosis, an injury which can cause the organ to fail. Their results were published in the July 21 edition of Lancet. [More]
Scientists find promising new method to detect and treat recurrence of ovarian cancer

Scientists find promising new method to detect and treat recurrence of ovarian cancer

Researchers at the Mayo Clinic Center for Individualized Medicine have found a promising new way to monitor and treat recurrence of ovarian cancer -- a hard-to-detect disease that claims many lives. [More]
Researcher aims to make early detection of melanoma faster, cheaper without need for biopsy

Researcher aims to make early detection of melanoma faster, cheaper without need for biopsy

Melanoma is a form of skin cancer that becomes dangerous when it spreads, but is treatable in its early stages. Doctors diagnose melanoma by cutting away a piece of a suspicious skin lesion -- a procedure known as a biopsy -- and testing it for malignant cells. [More]
New diagnostic model may become cheaper and easier alternative to screen for NAFLD

New diagnostic model may become cheaper and easier alternative to screen for NAFLD

Researchers have developed a diagnostic model that is highly predictive of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). [More]
IVF Spain, Bioarray to present clinical outcomes of preimplantation genetic screening using NGS

IVF Spain, Bioarray to present clinical outcomes of preimplantation genetic screening using NGS

Bioarray, S.L., IVF SPAIN S.L. and iGLS will present clinical outcomes of IVF treatments with PGS by NGS, after two years providing this genetic test as part of a cooperation supported in a framework agreement. [More]
Aelan's researchers develop novel epigenetic biomarker for diagnosis of AD

Aelan's researchers develop novel epigenetic biomarker for diagnosis of AD

Aelan Cell Technologies today announced the development of a novel epigenetic biomarker. An early human clinical feasibility study has indicated that serological tests using the biomarker alongside other proprietary components developed by Aelan's researchers could potentially help physicians diagnose Alzheimer's disease (AD). [More]
Women who undergo axillary node surgery for breast cancer more likely to develop chronic pain

Women who undergo axillary node surgery for breast cancer more likely to develop chronic pain

An analysis led by McMaster University researchers has found that women who undergo armpit lymph node surgery for breast cancer are much more likely to develop chronic pain. [More]
Researchers to develop new test to predict therapy for women with ER+ breast cancer

Researchers to develop new test to predict therapy for women with ER+ breast cancer

Researchers from Case Western Reserve University are teaming with industry and other academics to develop a quick and inexpensive test to predict which women with ER+ breast cancer need chemotherapy and which need only the more tolerable hormonal therapy. [More]
New diagnostic blood test may offer hope for transplant recipients through analysis of cfDNA

New diagnostic blood test may offer hope for transplant recipients through analysis of cfDNA

When cells die, whether through apoptosis or necrosis, the DNA and other molecules found in those cells don't just disappear. They wind up in the blood stream, where degraded bits and pieces can be extracted. [More]
Research opens up new ways to detect, inhibit cancer spread

Research opens up new ways to detect, inhibit cancer spread

Clusters of circulating cells commonly found in the blood of cancer patients have long been the subject of research on cancer. These clusters have been regarded for more than 50 years as malignant cells that have broken off from the primary tumor, spreading cancer to other parts of the body. [More]
HHV-6A human herpesvirus infects uterus lining of women with unexplained infertility

HHV-6A human herpesvirus infects uterus lining of women with unexplained infertility

A new study has found that the little-known member of the human herpesvirus family called HHV-6A infects the lining of the uterus in 43% of women with unexplained infertility but cannot be found in uterine lining of fertile women. The study was conducted by investigators at the University of Ferrara, Italy. [More]
Alnylam reports new results from investigational RNAi therapeutic programs

Alnylam reports new results from investigational RNAi therapeutic programs

Alnylam Pharmaceuticals, Inc. (Nasdaq: ALNY), the leading RNAi therapeutics company, announced today preliminary results from its ongoing Phase 2 open-label extension (OLE) studies with patisiran and revusiran, both investigational RNAi therapeutics targeting transthyretin (TTR) for the treatment of hereditary TTR-mediated amyloidosis (hATTR amyloidosis). [More]
Annual repeat CT scans can eliminate need for biopsy or surgery in NSNs

Annual repeat CT scans can eliminate need for biopsy or surgery in NSNs

Annual low-dose computed-tomography (CT) screening can eliminate the need for biopsy or surgery in nonsolid lung nodules, according to a new study published online in the journal Radiology. [More]
Endometrial scratching in women appears to increase chance of clinical pregnancy, live birth

Endometrial scratching in women appears to increase chance of clinical pregnancy, live birth

There is a much disputed claim that "injury" to the lining of the uterus - whether inadvertent or deliberate - increases the chance of embryo implantation and thus the chance of pregnancy in certain groups of women having IVF. [More]
Scientists reveal how new adult-born neurons evolve in olfactory bulb of mice

Scientists reveal how new adult-born neurons evolve in olfactory bulb of mice

Scientists from the Institut Pasteur and the CNRS were able to make real-time observations over a period of several months that reveal how new adult-born neurons are formed and evolve in the olfactory bulb of mice. [More]
New technique can help identify aggressive forms of DCIS

New technique can help identify aggressive forms of DCIS

When a woman is diagnosed with the earliest stage of breast cancer, how aggressive should her treatment be? Will the non-invasive cancer become invasive? Or is it a slow-growing variety that will likely never be harmful? [More]
Study shows low incidence of cancer in patients with large colorectal polyps

Study shows low incidence of cancer in patients with large colorectal polyps

For the majority of patients with large or difficult to remove colorectal polyps (growths in the colon), the incidence of cancer is actually lower than previously thought, and using more advanced endoscopic techniques that spare the colon may be a better, safer alternative to a traditional operation in certain cases, according to study results published online in the Journal of the American College of Surgeons in advance of print publication. [More]
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