Biopsy News and Research RSS Feed - Biopsy News and Research

Biopsy is the removal of cells or tissues for examination by a pathologist. The pathologist may study the tissue under a microscope or perform other tests on the cells or tissue. There are many different types of biopsy procedures. The most common types include: (1) incisional biopsy, in which only a sample of tissue is removed; (2) excisional biopsy, in which an entire lump or suspicious area is removed; and (3) needle biopsy, in which a sample of tissue or fluid is removed with a needle. When a wide needle is used, the procedure is called a core biopsy. When a thin needle is used, the procedure is called a fine-needle aspiration biopsy.
Gene fusions in esophageal adenocarcinomas offer new molecular insights into lethal cancer

Gene fusions in esophageal adenocarcinomas offer new molecular insights into lethal cancer

Despite years of research, cellular mechanisms contributing to cancers like esophageal adenocarcinoma have remained elusive. [More]
New study uses evolutionary theory to predict cancer risk in patients with Barrett's esophagus

New study uses evolutionary theory to predict cancer risk in patients with Barrett's esophagus

A disorder known as Barrett's esophagus (BE) affects some 200,000 Americans each year. The condition, which is caused by stomach acid damaging the lining of the esophagus, can lead to the development of a serious, potentially fatal cancer of epithelial tissue, known as esophageal adenocarcinoma. [More]
New imaging technique may help detect amyloid-related heart failure

New imaging technique may help detect amyloid-related heart failure

A type of heart failure caused by a build-up of amyloid can be accurately diagnosed and prognosticated with an imaging technique, eliminating the need for a biopsy, according to a multicenter study led by researchers at Columbia University Medical Center. [More]
Preimplantation genetic screening using next generation sequencing: an interview with Dr Luis Alcaraz

Preimplantation genetic screening using next generation sequencing: an interview with Dr Luis Alcaraz

PGS, Preimplantation Genetic Screening, is a genetic test that analyses biopsied cells from embryos produced by in vitro fertilization (IVF) techniques. PGS determines whether the embryos are chromosomally normal (euploid) or not (aneuploid), thus giving the chance to transfer chromosomally normal embryos that are more apt to successfully implant and develop into a pregnancy. [More]
Breast cancer patients in the U.S. now have new surgical option that offers flexible alternative for cancer detection

Breast cancer patients in the U.S. now have new surgical option that offers flexible alternative for cancer detection

Breast cancer patients in the U.S. will have a new surgical option that eliminates exposure to radioactive materials and offers a less invasive, more flexible alternative for cancer detection. Receiving FDA approval in April and a distribution deal this month, the new device will be used to locate early stage tumors that cannot yet be felt. [More]
Study links Omega 6 fatty acid in adipose tissue to lower mortality among older men

Study links Omega 6 fatty acid in adipose tissue to lower mortality among older men

In a study from Uppsala University, published in the American journal JAMA Cardiology, the fatty acid linoleic acid (Omega 6) in subcutaneous adipose tissue was linked to lower mortality among older men followed over a 15-year period. [More]
Study demonstrates safety and effectiveness of new SLN radiotracer in breast cancer patients

Study demonstrates safety and effectiveness of new SLN radiotracer in breast cancer patients

Determining whether breast cancer has spread to sentinel lymph nodes (SLN) is key to prognosis and treatment, making SLN mapping critical. [More]
Scientists develop novel method to widen usage of blood in biomarker discovery and analysis

Scientists develop novel method to widen usage of blood in biomarker discovery and analysis

Scientists at Karolinska Institutet in collaboration with Estonian Competence Centre on Health Technologies have developed a new gene expression analysis method to widen the usage of blood in biomarker discovery and analysis. Their paper is published in the journal Scientific Reports. [More]
Analysis of biopsies during early treatment predicts patient’s response to melanoma immunotherapy

Analysis of biopsies during early treatment predicts patient’s response to melanoma immunotherapy

Immune response measured in tumor biopsies during the course of early treatment predicts which melanoma patients will benefit from specific immune checkpoint blockade drugs, researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center report in the journal Cancer Discovery. [More]
Integration of multiple types of protein biomarkers improves ability to detect breast cancer

Integration of multiple types of protein biomarkers improves ability to detect breast cancer

A first-time study published in PLOS ONE shows that a combined assessment of multiple types of protein biomarkers in the blood offers an important advancement for detecting early breast cancer. [More]
Experts develop new genomic testing method for pulmonary hypertension caused by genetic mutation

Experts develop new genomic testing method for pulmonary hypertension caused by genetic mutation

Pulmonology and genetics experts from two Utah healthcare organizations have collaboratively developed a new diagnostic genomic testing method for a rare form of pulmonary hypertension caused by a genetic mutation they discovered three years ago. [More]
Study reveals needle biopsy hormone receptor testing for DCIS wastes millions

Study reveals needle biopsy hormone receptor testing for DCIS wastes millions

For patients with the most common type of noninvasive breast cancer, routine testing for estrogen and progesterone receptors in tissue taken at the first "needle" biopsy is both unnecessary and wasteful, according to results of a study led by Johns Hopkins pathologists. [More]
Sleep-disordered breathing promotes progression of pediatric NAFLD to NASH

Sleep-disordered breathing promotes progression of pediatric NAFLD to NASH

Studies have shown that obstructive sleep apnea and low nighttime oxygen, which result in oxidative stress, are associated with the progression of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in adults. [More]
Cell-free DNA test could help identify liver transplant patients with acute rejection

Cell-free DNA test could help identify liver transplant patients with acute rejection

Today, researchers presented findings at the 68th AACC Annual Scientific Meeting that DNA found circulating in the bloodstream—known as cell-free DNA—can be used to identify liver transplant patients with acute rejection with greater accuracy than conventional liver function tests. [More]
Management of prostate cancer varies by race

Management of prostate cancer varies by race

A study published in The Journal of Urology® indicates that treatment for low-risk prostate cancer, rather than watchful waiting, is most likely to be sought by black men. [More]
Scientists identify new group of molecules that could slow tumour growth in prostate cancer patients

Scientists identify new group of molecules that could slow tumour growth in prostate cancer patients

Prostate cancer patients have been offered hope after scientists at Newcastle University, UK, have identified a new group of molecules that could be targeted to slow tumour growth. [More]
Liquid biopsies hold potential for detecting NSCLC EGFR mutations, predicting cancer recurrence

Liquid biopsies hold potential for detecting NSCLC EGFR mutations, predicting cancer recurrence

Three manuscripts published in the recent issue of the Journal of Thoracic Oncology, the official journal of the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer, explored the versatility of liquid biopsies by identifying EGFR mutations using circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) in urine and plasma and examining circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in plasma to predict the risk of lung cancer recurrence after surgical resection. [More]
Active surveillance improves health related quality of life in low risk prostate cancer patients

Active surveillance improves health related quality of life in low risk prostate cancer patients

Active surveillance (AS) has become an increasingly important alternative to surgery, chemotherapy, or radiation treatment for men diagnosed with low risk prostate cancer. [More]
VCU Health radiologist uses MRI technology to detect difficult prostate cancers

VCU Health radiologist uses MRI technology to detect difficult prostate cancers

For three years, Andrew Harder wondered if he had prostate cancer. In 2009, he had routine blood work that revealed an elevated prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level. [More]
Scientists discover group of genes that can help predict damage in transplanted kidney

Scientists discover group of genes that can help predict damage in transplanted kidney

A multicenter team of researchers led by Barbara Murphy, MD, of the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai has identified a panel of genes which can help predict whether a transplanted kidney will later develop fibrosis, an injury which can cause the organ to fail. Their results were published in the July 21 edition of Lancet. [More]
Advertisement
Advertisement