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New research could pave way for improving retinal implants

New research could pave way for improving retinal implants

Engineers and neuroscientists at the University of Sheffield have demonstrated for the first time that the cells in the retina carry out key processing tasks. This could pave the way for improving retinal implants and therefore the sight of thousands of people suffering from retinal disorders. [More]
Tiny doses of anti-HIV drug may be effective for treating Alzheimer's disease

Tiny doses of anti-HIV drug may be effective for treating Alzheimer's disease

For a promising pathway to treating Alzheimer's patients, "aim here." That's what National Institute of Standards of Technology researchers advised collaborators hunting for molecules that, by linking to a normally occurring enzyme, rev up the brain's capacity for clearing cholesterol--a boost associated with improvements in memory and other benefits in animal studies. [More]
Researchers devise method to identify functional contribution of SIRT6

Researchers devise method to identify functional contribution of SIRT6

The enzyme sirtuin 6, or SIRT6, serves many key biological functions in regulating genome stability, DNA repair, metabolism and longevity, but how its multiple enzyme activities relate to its various functions is poorly understood. [More]
Researchers develop new technology to capture images of the brain

Researchers develop new technology to capture images of the brain

In a partnership melding neuroscience and electrical engineering, researchers from UNC-Chapel Hill and NC State University have developed a new technology that will allow neuroscientists to capture images of the brain almost 10 times larger than previously possible - helping them better understand the behavior of neurons in the brain. [More]
Rare inherited gene mutations may contribute to severe forms of bipolar disorder

Rare inherited gene mutations may contribute to severe forms of bipolar disorder

Using so-called next-generation genome sequencing, researchers at Johns Hopkins have identified 84 potential inherited gene mutations that may contribute to the most severe forms of bipolar disorder. About 5.6 million Americans are estimated to have bipolar disorder. [More]
NYU dentists receive grant to test whether non-viral gene delivery can effectively treat oral cancer pain

NYU dentists receive grant to test whether non-viral gene delivery can effectively treat oral cancer pain

The National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, part of the National Institutes of Health, has awarded Drs. Brian Schmidt and Seiichi Yamano a $1.2M (3-year) grant to test whether their non-viral gene delivery method can effectively and safely treat oral cancer pain. [More]
ISU researchers design nanomachine capable of detecting mock version of Ebola virus

ISU researchers design nanomachine capable of detecting mock version of Ebola virus

Imagine you want to build an intricate work of architecture, like a castle. Now imagine that, once all its individual components are brought together, the castle builds itself automatically. Finally, imagine this castle is so small that it's measured on the same scale as DNA, viruses and small molecules. [More]
Advances in epigenome sequencing technologies can allow comprehensive analysis of cancers

Advances in epigenome sequencing technologies can allow comprehensive analysis of cancers

An international research collaboration led by UCL scientists has developed ways to improve the quality and accuracy of information harvested from epigenome sequencing datasets in two new research papers published jointly in Nature Biotechnology and Nature Communications today. According to the studies, epigenome sequencing technologies can allow for more comprehensive analysis of cancers - a key component in the development of targeted approaches to combat cancer. [More]
ESCMID-ASM conference aims to speed up drug development processes for drug-resistant infections

ESCMID-ASM conference aims to speed up drug development processes for drug-resistant infections

The European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases and the American Society for Microbiology (ASM) are jointly organizing a conference in Vienna from 21 – 23 September 2016 to help researchers accelerate the development of new antimicrobials for drug-resistant infections. [More]
Vice President Biden to host Cancer Moonshot Summit in Washington, D.C.

Vice President Biden to host Cancer Moonshot Summit in Washington, D.C.

Vice President Biden and Dr. Jill Biden will host a Cancer Moonshot Summit in Washington, D.C. at the White House. Cheryl Willman, MD, Director and CEO of The University of New Mexico Comprehensive Cancer Center, will attend. [More]
Gamma-ray irradiation improves safety of stem cell transplantation in Parkinson’s disease patients

Gamma-ray irradiation improves safety of stem cell transplantation in Parkinson’s disease patients

Replacing dopamine-producing cells in the brain represents a promising therapeutic approach in Parkinson's disease, and a new study shows how post-transplantation gamma-ray irradiation can reduce the risk of tumor formation. [More]
Insilico Medicine collaborates with Asia Genomics to develop advanced personalized longevity suite

Insilico Medicine collaborates with Asia Genomics to develop advanced personalized longevity suite

Insilico Medicine Inc, a big data analytics company located at the Emerging Technology Centers at the Johns Hopkins University at Eastern, announced an agreement with Asia Genomics, a Singapore-based rapidly growing molecular diagnostics company specializing in clinical genomics & genetic testing operating in major Asian countries including Vietnam, Malaysia and China. [More]
New study reveals conversion of oral cannabidiol to THC by acidic fluids in the stomach

New study reveals conversion of oral cannabidiol to THC by acidic fluids in the stomach

A new study demonstrating the conversion of oral cannabidiol (CBD) to the psychoactive component tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) in the presence of gastric fluids could explain why children given CBD to treat epilepsy had an unexpectedly high rate of adverse effects such as sleepiness and fatigue. [More]
Telephone counseling can help make cancer genetic services more accessible to rural women

Telephone counseling can help make cancer genetic services more accessible to rural women

Ever since Angelina Jolie used cancer genetic counseling and testing to learn about her risk for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer, many other women have chosen to do the same. [More]
Molecular diagnostics of the future: an interview with Elaine Warburton, OBE

Molecular diagnostics of the future: an interview with Elaine Warburton, OBE

Firstly, a sample must be transported from the clinic to the laboratory. Simple tests may be undertaken in a small lab within the hospital or clinic, whilst complex testing such as drug susceptibility testing is often done in a large centralized laboratory many miles from the clinic [More]
Legions of immune cells play complex role to destroy Legionella bacteria

Legions of immune cells play complex role to destroy Legionella bacteria

Immunologists and microbiologists from the University of Melbourne's Bio21 Molecular Science and Biotechnology Institute and the Peter Doherty Institute for Infection and Immunity - a joint venture between the University of Melbourne and Royal Melbourne Hospital - have led a study that defined a new cell type responsible for turning the attack back on the bacteria. [More]
Researcher aims to develop easy-to-use, inexpensive sperm sorting devices to help infertile couples

Researcher aims to develop easy-to-use, inexpensive sperm sorting devices to help infertile couples

The competition is fierce and only the strongest survive the obstacle course within the female reproductive tract. Of the millions of sperm that enter the vagina, only about 10 or so make it to the oocyte or egg, demonstrating how rigorous the natural sperm selection process really is. [More]
Already-approved drugs can fight apoptosis evasion in cancer

Already-approved drugs can fight apoptosis evasion in cancer

Cancer cells don't die when they're supposed to. Animal and human bodies follow an orderly process of birthing new cells and killing old ones. But cancer cells escape programmed cell death, called apoptosis, and multiply uncontrollably. [More]
Researchers find new method to replicate one of earliest changes in Alzheimer’s disease

Researchers find new method to replicate one of earliest changes in Alzheimer’s disease

Researchers at the Babraham Institute have found a way to replicate one of the earliest changes in Alzheimer's disease in a dish. This means that it should now be possible to find out a lot more about why it happens - and how to stop it. The new findings are published in the journal Molecular Neurodegeneration and supported by the charity Alzheimer's Research UK. [More]
New and inexpensive technique could help meet global demands for malaria drug

New and inexpensive technique could help meet global demands for malaria drug

A new and inexpensive technique for mass-producing the main ingredient in the most effective treatment for malaria, artemisinin, could help meet global demands for the drug, according to a study to be published in the journal eLife. [More]
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