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Vanderbilt participates in national study to evaluate effectiveness of group prenatal care

Vanderbilt University hopes to enroll about 400 women in a national study to evaluate the effectiveness of a new model of group prenatal care designed to improve the health and well-being of mothers and babies during pregnancy, birth and infancy. [More]
Prenatal risk factors linked with development of chronic kidney disease in children

Prenatal risk factors linked with development of chronic kidney disease in children

Certain prenatal risk factors are associated with the development of chronic kidney disease in children, according to a study appearing in an upcoming issue of the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology (JASN). Future studies should investigate whether modifying these factors could help protect children's kidney health. [More]
Researchers figure out role of birth weight and breastfeeding in long run health outcomes

Researchers figure out role of birth weight and breastfeeding in long run health outcomes

Lower weight babies and babies who aren't breastfed or not breastfed for long are at greater risk of developing chronic inflammation and related health problems later in life, according to a new study. [More]

Study suggests that non-communicable diseases can be programmed before birth

A new study in mothers and children of Pakistani origin suggests non-communicable diseases such as cardiovascular disease and Type 2 Diabetes could be programmed prior to birth. [More]
Racial differences in health outcomes between blacks and whites associated with synthesize of Vitamin D

Racial differences in health outcomes between blacks and whites associated with synthesize of Vitamin D

​A new study investigating racial disparities in birth outcomes shows that contrary to some theories Vitamin D is unlikely to play a role in differences in preterm birth and low birth weight between African-Americans and whites. [More]
Another concern related to low birth weight identified

Another concern related to low birth weight identified

Researchers have identified another concern related to low birth weight - a difference in how the body reacts to drugs, which may last a person's entire life and further complicate treatment of illnesses or diseases that are managed with medications. [More]

Winnie Palmer Hospital for Women & Babies opens neonatal intensive care unit

Winnie Palmer Hospital for Women & Babies is opening the doors to an expansion of its neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). The expansion, which adds 30 beds to the hospital's existing 112-bed NICU, will make it the largest NICU in the world under one roof. [More]

Researchers identify marker to find infants at risk for life-threatening bowel infection

Many premature infants suffer a life-threatening bowel infection called necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC). [More]

Research findings may lead to better care for premature infants at risk of necrotizing enterocolitis

Many premature infants suffer a life-threatening bowel infection called necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC). [More]

Research focuses on health effects from wood burning

With the winter weather still going strong, lots of people will be restocking the wood pile next to their fireplaces and wood burning stoves. Can using a wood burning stove or fireplace pose a threat to my health? [More]
Bubble CPAP device increases survival rate of newborns with severe respiratory illness

Bubble CPAP device increases survival rate of newborns with severe respiratory illness

The first clinical study of a low-cost neonatal breathing system created by Rice University bioengineering students demonstrated that the device increased the survival rate of newborns with severe respiratory illness from 44 percent to 71 percent. [More]
Maternal smoking during late pregnancy may affect baby's birth weight

Maternal smoking during late pregnancy may affect baby's birth weight

A doctoral dissertation by a Professor at the Catholic University of Valencia "San Vicente Mártir" finds that every cigarette a mother smokes a day during the third quarter of pregnancy reduces the baby's birth weight in 20 grams. Professor Rafael Vila, Faculty of Nursing, received his PhD with the distinction Cum Laude for his dissertation entitled "Anthropometric, haematological, obstetric and toxic variables that influence birth weight: a predictive model". [More]
Researchers receive $4M grant to study effect of fertility treatments and pregnancy complications

Researchers receive $4M grant to study effect of fertility treatments and pregnancy complications

Two Cedars-Sinai physician-researchers have been awarded grants totaling $4 million from the National Institutes of Health to study how the environment - both in the womb and in the hospital where the baby is born - can affect the newborn and the mother. [More]
Researchers receive $8M grant to expand research in arsenic toxicity in children, pregnant women

Researchers receive $8M grant to expand research in arsenic toxicity in children, pregnant women

​The Children's Environmental Health and Disease Prevention Research Center at Dartmouth and its partner universities have received an $8 million grant to expand their research into arsenic toxicity in children and pregnant women. [More]

Risk factor for life-threatening bowel infection in premature infants identified

Many premature infants suffer a life-threatening bowel infection called necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC). [More]
Prenatal exposure to maternal stress hormones predicts nicotine dependence for daughters

Prenatal exposure to maternal stress hormones predicts nicotine dependence for daughters

Tobacco smoking by pregnant women has long been viewed as a public health risk because of smoking's adverse effects on the development of a fetus. [More]

Risk of serious complications higher for babies conceived by assisted reproductive therapies

A University of Adelaide study has shown that the risk of serious complications such as stillbirth, preterm birth, low birth weight and neonatal death is around twice as high for babies conceived by assisted reproductive therapies compared with naturally conceived babies. [More]
Poverty, not smoking, linked to COPD mortality

Poverty, not smoking, linked to COPD mortality

An international study shows that national mortality rates for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease do not correlate well with the prevalence of smoking in low-income countries but do show a strong inverse correlation with wealth. [More]
New American Journal of Public Health issue explores methods, practices to enhance birth outcomes

New American Journal of Public Health issue explores methods, practices to enhance birth outcomes

In a new issue of the American Journal of Public Health, researchers and experts investigate the latest methods and practices in improving birth outcomes. The special issue compiles a collection of commentaries, research studies and editorials to discuss maternal and child health topics ranging from disparities to breastfeeding. [More]
Cedars-Sinai physicians awarded grant to study pregnancy problems resulting from fertility treatments

Cedars-Sinai physicians awarded grant to study pregnancy problems resulting from fertility treatments

Two Cedars-Sinai physician-researchers have been awarded grants totaling $4 million from the National Institutes of Health to study how the environment - both in the womb and in the hospital where the baby is born - can affect the newborn and the mother. [More]