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Study: Prior surgical abortion appears to increase risk of later preterm birth

Study: Prior surgical abortion appears to increase risk of later preterm birth

Surgical methods used in a common form of abortion or to clear the womb after a spontaneous miscarriage appears to significantly increase the risk of a later preterm birth, say researchers at Thomas Jefferson University who analyzed 36 studies that enrolled more than 1 million women. [More]
Prenatal stress affects babies' health in war-torn areas

Prenatal stress affects babies' health in war-torn areas

Children from war-torn areas of the globe are affected by trauma even before they are born, according to a new University of Florida study. [More]

Four factors help predict later cognitive function, motor performance for children with low birth weight

Four factors - medical complications at birth, maternal education, early motor assessments, and early cognitive assessments - help predict later cognitive function and motor performance for children born early and at a very low birth weight, finds a new study by NYU's Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development. [More]
Metabolic profile derived from routine newborn screenings could determine infant's gestational age

Metabolic profile derived from routine newborn screenings could determine infant's gestational age

Knowing if an infant was born on time or prematurely can make all the difference in deciding what medical care the baby needs. [More]
Depression in expectant parents during pregnancy increases risk of premature birth

Depression in expectant parents during pregnancy increases risk of premature birth

Depression in both expectant mothers and fathers increases the risk of premature birth, finds a study published in BJOG: an International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology (BJOG). [More]
FDA-approved, once-daily 24-hour aspirin now available for prevention of stroke and acute cardiac events

FDA-approved, once-daily 24-hour aspirin now available for prevention of stroke and acute cardiac events

New Haven Pharmaceuticals, Inc. today announced the availability by prescription of DURLAZA, the first and only 24-hour, extended-release aspirin capsules (162.5mg) approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the secondary prevention of stroke and acute cardiac events, including myocardial infarction (heart attack) in high-risk cardiovascular patients. [More]
Premature triplets released from Loyola University Medical Center in time for first Christmas

Premature triplets released from Loyola University Medical Center in time for first Christmas

Triplets Finn, Kyle and Ava Santiago, who were born six weeks premature and underweight, went home from Loyola University Medical Center Dec. 24, just in time to celebrate their first Christmas. [More]
Premature babies at higher risk of developing autism in later childhood

Premature babies at higher risk of developing autism in later childhood

Extremely premature babies run a much higher risk of developing autism in later childhood, and even during the neonate period differences are seen in the brains of those who do. This according to a new study by researchers from Karolinska Institutet and Karolinska University Hospital in Sweden. [More]
Vibration-based technology reduces apneic events, improves critical clinical parameters in premature infants

Vibration-based technology reduces apneic events, improves critical clinical parameters in premature infants

Scientists and clinicians at the University of Massachusetts Medical School, Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering, and the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center have shown in a clinical trial that a new, vibration-based prevention technology tested in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) reduces apneic events and improves critical clinical parameters in prematurely born infants. [More]
FEC recognizes Rachel S. Weinerman for receiving 2015 Scientific Program Prize Paper Award

FEC recognizes Rachel S. Weinerman for receiving 2015 Scientific Program Prize Paper Award

The Foundation for Embryonic Competence is pleased to recognize Dr. Rachel S. Weinerman, a clinical assistant professor, reproductive endocrinology and infertility at University Hospitals Case Medical in Cleveland, for receiving the 2015 Scientific Program Prize Paper Award at the 71st Annual American Society for Reproductive Medicine conference in Baltimore, Maryland on October 21, 2015. [More]
New Haven Pharmaceuticals' DURLAZA drug delivers sustained antiplatelet control for full 24 hours

New Haven Pharmaceuticals' DURLAZA drug delivers sustained antiplatelet control for full 24 hours

New Haven Pharmaceuticals, Inc. today announced new study data that shows the company's FDA-approved drug DURLAZA delivers sustained antiplatelet control for a full 24-hour period in high-risk patients. [More]
Obese women who lose weight during pregnancy have healthier babies, save health care costs

Obese women who lose weight during pregnancy have healthier babies, save health care costs

A recent study conducted by The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston shows that severely obese women who maintained or lost weight during pregnancy had healthier babies and lower health care costs. [More]
Web-based app helps women to maintain good health long before pregnancy

Web-based app helps women to maintain good health long before pregnancy

Women need to maintain good health years before they become pregnant. After all, healthy women are most likely to give birth to healthy babies. [More]
Expectant mothers encouraged to eat balanced diet to reduce obesity risk in unborn child

Expectant mothers encouraged to eat balanced diet to reduce obesity risk in unborn child

Overweight and obese women who gain excessive weight during pregnancy may be putting their babies at risk of a lifetime of obesity. [More]
Praziquantel treatment safe for pregnant women after first trimester

Praziquantel treatment safe for pregnant women after first trimester

A study by Rhode Island Hospital researchers confirmed that a drug used to treat a disease afflicting millions of people in developing countries is safe to give pregnant women following their first trimester. The finding could prove critical to the care of pregnant women and lactating women with schistosomiasis, a disease caused by a parasitic worm, who were denied the drug out of concern for their health and the health of their fetuses. [More]
Henry Ford Hospital pulmonologist advocates for raising the smoking age to 21

Henry Ford Hospital pulmonologist advocates for raising the smoking age to 21

Henry Ford Hospital pulmonologist Daniel Ouellette, M.D., who during his 31-year career in medicine has seen the harmful effects of smoking on his patients, advocates for raising the smoking age to 21. [More]
Researchers successfully convert skin cells into fully functional placenta-generating cells

Researchers successfully convert skin cells into fully functional placenta-generating cells

Regenerative medicine is a new and expanding area that aims to replace lost or damaged cells, tissues or organs in the human body through cellular transplantation. Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) are pluripotent cells that are capable of long-term growth, self-renewal, and can give rise to every cell, tissue and organ in the fetus's body. [More]
Women born in summer months are more likely to be healthy adults, suggests new research

Women born in summer months are more likely to be healthy adults, suggests new research

Women who were born in the summer are more likely to be healthy adults, suggests new research published in the journal Heliyon. [More]
Suspicion of fetal size influences patient-provider decisions to perform certain perinatal interventions

Suspicion of fetal size influences patient-provider decisions to perform certain perinatal interventions

Nearly one-third of women, without a prior cesarean, reported that they were told by their maternity care providers that their babies might be ''quite large," leading to higher rates of medically-induced labor or planned cesarean deliveries that may not be warranted, a new study co-authored by Boston University School of Public Health and Medicine researchers shows. [More]
Birth weight associated with poor hearing, vision and cognition in middle age

Birth weight associated with poor hearing, vision and cognition in middle age

A study of up to 433,390 UK adults, led by The University of Manchester, has linked being under and overweight at birth with poorer hearing, vision and cognition in middle age. [More]
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