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FDA approves Allergan's sNDA to update label for TEFLARO (ceftaroline fosamil)

FDA approves Allergan's sNDA to update label for TEFLARO (ceftaroline fosamil)

Allergan plc today announced the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved the company's supplemental new drug application (sNDA) to update the label for TEFLARO (ceftaroline fosamil) for the treatment of adult patients with acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSI) and community-acquired bacterial pneumonia (CABP). [More]
Smoking prevalence remains same but proportion of smokers with no intention of quitting increases

Smoking prevalence remains same but proportion of smokers with no intention of quitting increases

Smoking prevalence has stayed the same but the proportion with no intention of quitting has risen in the last seven years, according to results from the latest EUROASPIRE surveys presented for the first time today at ESC Congress 2015 by Professor Kornelia Kotseva, chair of the EUROASPIRE Steering Committee and senior clinical research fellow at Imperial College London, UK. [More]
UC Santa Barbara neuroscientists uncover mechanism of Alzheimer's progression

UC Santa Barbara neuroscientists uncover mechanism of Alzheimer's progression

Medical research has yet to discover an Alzheimer's treatment that effectively slows the disease's progression, but neuroscientists at UC Santa Barbara may have uncovered a mechanism by which onset can be delayed by as much as 10 years. [More]
Volatile anesthetics may combat viral and bacterial infections in the lung

Volatile anesthetics may combat viral and bacterial infections in the lung

In use for more than a century, inhaled anesthetics like nitrous oxide and halothane have made modern surgery possible. Now, in experiments in mice, researchers at Johns Hopkins and elsewhere have added to evidence that certain so-called "volatile" anesthetics -- commonly used during surgeries -- may also possess powerful effects on the immune system that can combat viral and bacterial infections in the lung, including influenza and pneumonia. [More]
Annual diabetic retinopathy screening for children with type 1 diabetes should begin at later age, study says

Annual diabetic retinopathy screening for children with type 1 diabetes should begin at later age, study says

A new study has found that the occurrence of advanced forms of a diabetic eye disease remains low among children living with diabetes, regardless of how long they have had the disease or their ability to keep blood sugar levels controlled. Researchers are therefore recommending that most children with type 1 diabetes delay annual diabetic retinopathy screenings until age 15, or 5 years after their diabetes diagnosis, whichever occurs later. [More]
Elevated blood pressure associated with increased risk of ICH recurrence

Elevated blood pressure associated with increased risk of ICH recurrence

Survivors of an intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH; a type of hemorrhagic stroke in which bleeding occurs directly into the brain) who had inadequate blood pressure (BP) control during follow-up had a higher risk of ICH recurrence, with this association appearing stronger with worsening severity of hypertension, according to a study in the September 1 issue of JAMA. [More]
Common antidepressant can help stroke patients improve movement and coordination

Common antidepressant can help stroke patients improve movement and coordination

Working with mice, researchers at Johns Hopkins have added to evidence that a commonly prescribed antidepressant called fluoxetine helps stroke victims improve movement and coordination, and possibly why. [More]
Altering protein recycling complexes in human cells may help overcome chemotherapy resistance

Altering protein recycling complexes in human cells may help overcome chemotherapy resistance

Altering the protein recycling complexes in human cells, including cancer cells, allows the cells to resist treatment with a class of drugs known as proteasome inhibitors, according to Whitehead Institute scientists. [More]
A unique perspective on health and exercise

A unique perspective on health and exercise

For over 30 years, Terrie Williams has been studying exercise physiology in wild animals: African lions and wild dogs, dolphins and whales, coyotes and mountain lions, as well as a few human athletes. [More]
Report: 3 out of 4 U.S. adults have hearts older than their actual age

Report: 3 out of 4 U.S. adults have hearts older than their actual age

Your heart may be older than you are – and that's not good. According to a new CDC Vital Signs report, 3 out of 4 U.S. adults have a predicted heart age that is older than their actual age. This means they are at higher risk for heart attacks and stroke. [More]
Researchers perform first focused ultrasound treatments in the U.S. for dyskinesia

Researchers perform first focused ultrasound treatments in the U.S. for dyskinesia

Researchers at the University of Maryland and the University of Virginia have performed the first focused ultrasound treatments in the United States for dyskinesia associated with Parkinson's disease. [More]
Finerenone drug improves albuminuria among patients with diabetes and kidney disease

Finerenone drug improves albuminuria among patients with diabetes and kidney disease

Among patients with diabetes and kidney disease, most receiving an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor or an angiotensin receptor blocker, the addition of the medication finerenone compared with placebo resulted in improvement in albuminuria (the presence of excessive protein [chiefly albumin] in the urine), according to a study in the September 1 issue of JAMA. [More]
HeartWare International signs definitive agreement to acquire Valtech

HeartWare International signs definitive agreement to acquire Valtech

HeartWare International, Inc., a leading innovator of less invasive, miniaturized circulatory support technologies that are revolutionizing the treatment of advanced heart failure, announced today that it has entered into a definitive agreement to acquire Valtech Cardio, Ltd. [More]
SKA2 gene may play a role in development of PTSD

SKA2 gene may play a role in development of PTSD

A gene linked in previous research, appears to predict more severe post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms as well as a thinner cortex in regions of the brain critical for regulating strong emotions and coping with stressful experiences. This study is believed to be the first to show that the spindle and kinetochore-associated complex subunit 2 (SKA2) gene may play a role in the development of PTSD. [More]
Bacterial litmus test provides low-cost method to measure blood micronutrients

Bacterial litmus test provides low-cost method to measure blood micronutrients

A bacterium engineered to produce different pigments in response to varying levels of a micronutrient in blood samples could give health officials an inexpensive way to detect nutritional deficiencies in resource-limited areas of the world. [More]
Diagnosing traumatic brain injury through a blood test: an interview with Dr Korley

Diagnosing traumatic brain injury through a blood test: an interview with Dr Korley

The severity of traumatic brain injury is currently crudely classified as mild, moderate or severe. However, often patients referred to as mild have debilitating symptoms that are not “mild”. Additionally, there are patients currently classified as moderate or severe who regain their pre-injury functional status whereas others don’t. [More]
North Shore-LIJ researcher compares safety benefits two blood-thinning medications

North Shore-LIJ researcher compares safety benefits two blood-thinning medications

A large, ambitious contrast of blood-thinning medications used during cardiac stent placement suggests that a very expensive drug offers no clear safety benefits over a much more affordable option, according to a prominent North Shore-LIJ researcher and cardiologist. [More]
Finerenone effective in heart failure patients with diabetes and/or chronic kidney disease

Finerenone effective in heart failure patients with diabetes and/or chronic kidney disease

In heart failure patients with diabetes and/or chronic kidney disease, a new, non-steroidal mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist (MRA) called finerenone was no more effective than the currently approved MRA eplerenone in reducing the heart failure biomarker N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide [NT-proBNP]. [More]
SLU scientist receives grant to solve blood-clotting mysteries

SLU scientist receives grant to solve blood-clotting mysteries

Last summer, SLU scientists made a breakthrough discovery about the way in which blood clots. Through X-ray crystallography, they solved the molecular structure of prothrombin, an important blood-clotting protein, revealing an unexpected, flexible role for a "linker" region that may be the key to developing better life-saving drugs. [More]
Study: Retrieval of larger thrombi during IAT linked to improved neurological recovery after acute ischaemic stroke

Study: Retrieval of larger thrombi during IAT linked to improved neurological recovery after acute ischaemic stroke

Retrieval of larger thrombi during intra arterial treatment (IAT) is associated with improved neurological recovery after acute ischaemic stroke, according to a sub study of the MR CLEAN trial presented at ESC Congress today by Dr Anouchska Autar, PhD candidate at the Erasmus Medical Centre in Rotterdam, the Netherlands. [More]
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