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Breastfeeding mothers taking monthly high-dose vitamin D supplements could benefit infants

Breastfeeding mothers taking monthly high-dose vitamin D supplements could benefit infants

New research from New Zealand's University of Otago has found that giving breastfeeding mothers monthly high-dose vitamin D supplements may be a possible way to improve their babies' vitamin D status. [More]
Transplantation of placenta-derived MSCs can prevent diabetes-related CLI in rats

Transplantation of placenta-derived MSCs can prevent diabetes-related CLI in rats

In an effort to determine if stem cell therapy can prevent or improve a condition called "diabetic foot" caused by poor blood flow in patients with diabetes, a team of researchers in China has found that transplanting human placenta-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) into rats modeled with diabetes can affect blood vessel growth, potentially improving blood flow and preventing critical limb ischemia (CLI), a condition that results in diabetic foot and frequently leads to amputation. [More]
Study suggests autologous EPC transfusion may prevent miscarriage in high-risk pregnancies

Study suggests autologous EPC transfusion may prevent miscarriage in high-risk pregnancies

In a study focusing on the role of self-donated (autologous) bone marrow-derived endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) in placental vascular development, researchers in Japan have discovered that when transplanted into pregnant mice, EPCs can contribute to better blood vessel growth that helps in forming "normalized" placental vascularization, leading, in turn, to reduced recurrent miscarriages by providing a healthier fetal environment during gestation. [More]
Study urges caution when using BP-lowering treatment in patients with coronary artery disease

Study urges caution when using BP-lowering treatment in patients with coronary artery disease

Caution has been urged in the use of blood pressure lowering treatment for heart disease patients after a study in more than 22 000 patients with coronary artery disease found that too low blood pressure was associated with worse outcomes. The analysis from the CLARIFY registry is presented today at ESC Congress and published in The Lancet. [More]
Multi-purpose protein may offer clues for successful treatment of Alzheimer's disease

Multi-purpose protein may offer clues for successful treatment of Alzheimer's disease

The tidal wave approaches. In the coming decades, Alzheimer's disease is projected to exact a devastating economic and emotional toll on society, with patient numbers in the US alone expected to reach 13.5 million by mid-century at a projected cost of over a trillion dollars. [More]
MedUni Vienna scientists aim to identify prognostic markers for cutaneous lymphomas

MedUni Vienna scientists aim to identify prognostic markers for cutaneous lymphomas

Primary cutaneous lymphomas, cancers of the lymphatic system, occur in the skin and originate either from T-lymphocytes (T-cell lymphomas, incidence 75%) or in B-cell lymphocytes (B-cell lymphomas, 25%). [More]
KU Leuven researchers use microbubbles to evaluate effectiveness of cancer radiation treatment

KU Leuven researchers use microbubbles to evaluate effectiveness of cancer radiation treatment

An interdisciplinary team of researchers at KU Leuven (University of Leuven), Belgium, have developed a new way to evaluate whether a cancer radiation treatment is effective. [More]
Novel drug delivery system may offer new hope for patients with rare fatal genetic disorder

Novel drug delivery system may offer new hope for patients with rare fatal genetic disorder

Researchers at Oregon State University and other institutions have discovered a type of drug delivery system that may offer new hope for patients with a rare, ultimately fatal genetic disorder - and make what might become a terrible choice a little easier. [More]
OPTICARE study shows year-long CR program makes heart patients happier, healthier and active

OPTICARE study shows year-long CR program makes heart patients happier, healthier and active

Enhanced cardiac rehabilitation (CR) programs that include a year of group or personal lifestyle and fitness coaching did not improve cardiovascular risk scores more than a standard 3-month program in patients recovering from a heart attack. [More]
Physicians vary greatly in their responses to patients about e-cigarettes, study reveals

Physicians vary greatly in their responses to patients about e-cigarettes, study reveals

If you ask two different doctors about e-cigarettes, you might get two different answers. [More]
Researchers find better way to purify liver cells made from induced pluripotent stem cells

Researchers find better way to purify liver cells made from induced pluripotent stem cells

A research team including developmental biologist Stephen A. Duncan, D. Phil., SmartState Chair of Regenerative Medicine at the Medical University of South Carolina, has found a better way to purify liver cells made from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). [More]
New study examines potential weight management benefits of sit-stand desks

New study examines potential weight management benefits of sit-stand desks

Alternating positions between standing and sitting while performing deskwork could make the difference in whether the thin red needle in your bathroom scale tilts to the left or the right of your goal weight. [More]
Could a light-listening photonics device detect skin disease? An interview with Prof. Vasilis Ntziachristos

Could a light-listening photonics device detect skin disease? An interview with Prof. Vasilis Ntziachristos

Detection of malignant skin alterations is currently aided by optical microscopes such as dermoscopes or optical microscopes. While the latter offers high resolution, it comes with a major disadvantage, just like any other purely microscopic method: it only provides a partial view of the skin due to the low penetration depth. [More]
CFS possesses objectively identifiable chemical signature in men and women, study reveals

CFS possesses objectively identifiable chemical signature in men and women, study reveals

Dauer is the German word for persistence or long-lived. It is a type of stasis in the development in some invertebrates that is prompted by harsh environmental conditions. The findings are published online in the August 29 issue of PNAS. [More]
Scripps collaborates with MD Anderson for clinically integrated cancer care program

Scripps collaborates with MD Anderson for clinically integrated cancer care program

Scripps Health and The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center have reached a partnership agreement to create Scripps MD Anderson Cancer Center, a comprehensive and clinically integrated cancer care program in San Diego that will provide adult cancer patients greater access to the most advanced oncology care available throughout Southern California. [More]
Integrating mental and physical healthcare leads to better clinical outcomes, lower costs

Integrating mental and physical healthcare leads to better clinical outcomes, lower costs

A major new study shows that delivering integrated mental and physical healthcare in team-based primary care settings at Intermountain Healthcare results in better clinical outcomes for patients, lower rates of healthcare utilization, and lower costs. [More]
Study finds tight glycemic control provides no impact on patient-important microvascular outcomes

Study finds tight glycemic control provides no impact on patient-important microvascular outcomes

The glucocentric focus on lowering blood sugar in Type 2 diabetes may have short-circuited development of new diabetes therapies, according to a new paper published by Mayo Clinic researchers in the journal Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes. [More]
New research finds decrease in brain blood flow after stopping exercise in healthy older adults

New research finds decrease in brain blood flow after stopping exercise in healthy older adults

We all know that we can quickly lose cardiovascular endurance if we stop exercising for a few weeks, but what impact does the cessation of exercise have on our brains? New research led by University of Maryland School of Public Health researchers examined cerebral blood flow in healthy, physically fit older adults (ages 50-80 years) before and after a 10-day period during which they stopped all exercise. [More]
Outpatient CLABSIs costly for pediatric stem cell transplant and oncology patient population

Outpatient CLABSIs costly for pediatric stem cell transplant and oncology patient population

Pediatric stem cell transplant and cancer patients often are discharged from the hospital with an external central venous line for medications that parents or other caregivers must clean and flush daily to avoid potentially life-threatening infections. [More]
Researcher receives NIH grant to detect increasing Mtb activity in people with HIV

Researcher receives NIH grant to detect increasing Mtb activity in people with HIV

Tuberculosis (TB) is the leading cause of death worldwide among people infected with HIV. [More]
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