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Regeneron announces EU approval of EYLEA (aflibercept) Injection for retinal vascular disease treatment

Regeneron announces EU approval of EYLEA (aflibercept) Injection for retinal vascular disease treatment

Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Inc. today announced that EYLEA (aflibercept) Injection has been approved by the European Commission for the treatment of visual impairment due to Macular Edema secondary to Retinal Vein Occlusion (RVO). [More]
Predicting the development of type 1 diabetes is possible, shows TEDDY study

Predicting the development of type 1 diabetes is possible, shows TEDDY study

New research shows that it is possible to predict the development of type 1 diabetes. By measuring the presence of autoantibodies in the blood, it is possible to detect whether the immune system has begun to break down the body's own insulin cells. [More]
Sleeping more than eight hours a night could increase risk of stroke

Sleeping more than eight hours a night could increase risk of stroke

People who sleep more than eight hours a night may have an increased risk of stroke, according to a new study published in the February 25, 2015, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Study points respiratory viruses as the most common cause of childhood pneumonia

Study points respiratory viruses as the most common cause of childhood pneumonia

Respiratory viruses, not bacterial infections, are the most commonly detected causes of community-acquired pneumonia in children, according to new research released Feb. 26 in the New England Journal of Medicine. [More]
Fat cell transplantation benefits systemic sclerosis patients with non-healing digital ulcers

Fat cell transplantation benefits systemic sclerosis patients with non-healing digital ulcers

Digital ulcers (DUs) are a frequent, painful, and quality of life altering complication for patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc), a connective tissue disease causing a progressive loss of small blood vessels and resulting changes in organs and tissues. DUs on the fingertips of SSc patients are slow to heal, if they heal at all, as many are unresponsive to any therapies. [More]
Frailty assessment test can accurately predict complications after major operation

Frailty assessment test can accurately predict complications after major operation

Frailty has been used to predict how well a patient may recover from a major operation. Because frailty assessments are not routinely utilized in busy surgical practices, surgeons at Emory University School of Medicine in Atlanta have discovered that a short, approximately one-minute assessment can accurately determine how likely a patient is to have complications after an operation. [More]
Novel technology could improve diagnosis of peripheral arterial disease

Novel technology could improve diagnosis of peripheral arterial disease

Approximately 8 to 12 million people in the United States alone are suffering from peripheral arterial disease (PAD), a common vascular problem that is caused by narrowing of the arteries as a result of plaque buildup. The plaque accumulation leads to an insufficient blood flow to the body's extremities and increases a person's risk for heart attack and stroke by up to six times. PAD is also one of the most serious complications of diabetes. [More]
Tolero's alvocidib receives EMA orphan drug designation for treatment of AML patients

Tolero's alvocidib receives EMA orphan drug designation for treatment of AML patients

Tolero Pharmaceuticals, Inc., a clinical-stage company developing treatments for serious hematological diseases, today announced that the European Medicines Agency has granted orphan drug designation for alvocidib for the treatment of patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). [More]
Researchers reveal how malaria parasite deploys genetic trickery to escape immune system attack

Researchers reveal how malaria parasite deploys genetic trickery to escape immune system attack

Up to one million people -- mainly pregnant woman and young children -- are killed each year by the Plasmodium falciparum parasite, which causes the most devastating form of human malaria. [More]
Sanofi announces FDA approval of Toujeo insulin to improve glycemic control in people with diabetes

Sanofi announces FDA approval of Toujeo insulin to improve glycemic control in people with diabetes

Sanofi announced today that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved Toujeo (insulin glargine [rDNA origin] injection, 300 U/mL), a once-daily long-acting basal insulin, to improve glycemic control in adults living with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Toujeo is expected to be available in the U.S. at the beginning of Q2 2015. [More]
Researchers generate mature, functional skeletal muscles using new approach

Researchers generate mature, functional skeletal muscles using new approach

A team of researchers from Italy, Israel and the United Kingdom has succeeded in generating mature, functional skeletal muscles in mice using a new approach for tissue engineering. The scientists grew a leg muscle starting from engineered cells cultured in a dish to produce a graft. [More]
Researchers identify previously unknown effect of vitamin A in embryonic development

Researchers identify previously unknown effect of vitamin A in embryonic development

Researchers at Lund University in Sweden have identified a previously unknown effect of vitamin A in human embryonic development. Their findings show that vitamin A affects the formation of blood cells. [More]
Sotera Wireless announces acquisition of Reflectance Medical

Sotera Wireless announces acquisition of Reflectance Medical

Sotera Wireless, Inc. today announced its acquisition of Reflectance Medical Inc., a privately held company that has developed first-of-its kind technology aimed at detecting potentially life threatening conditions in critically ill patients, including those who have suffered trauma injuries. [More]
AR-V7 status does not affect response to taxane chemotherapy in patients with mCRPC

AR-V7 status does not affect response to taxane chemotherapy in patients with mCRPC

Findings from a small prospective study suggest that androgen receptor V7 (or AR-V7) status does not significantly affect response to taxane chemotherapy in men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). Treatment outcomes were largely similar for the 17 patients with AR-V7-positive prostate cancer and the 20 patients with AR-V7-negative disease included in this analysis. [More]
Sorafenib, sunitinib provide no benefit to patients with locally advanced kidney cancer

Sorafenib, sunitinib provide no benefit to patients with locally advanced kidney cancer

Findings from a federally funded study suggest that patients with locally advanced kidney cancer should not be treated with either adjuvant (post-surgery) sorafenib or sunitinib. The average period to disease recurrence was similar between those who received sorafenib or sunitinib after surgery (5.6 years) and those treated with placebo (5.7 years). [More]
Scientists detect new molecule that contributes to development of liver fibrosis

Scientists detect new molecule that contributes to development of liver fibrosis

Liver fibrosis, which is the progressive formation of scar tissue in the liver, is a massive medical problem. An estimated ten percent of the population is affected by liver fibrosis or its corresponding later stage, liver cirrhosis. A variety of causes can lead to liver fibrosis, the most widely recognized ones being alcohol consumption and virus-induced chronic liver inflammation. [More]
Study finds new approaches to manage anticoagulant-associated intracerebral hemorrhage

Study finds new approaches to manage anticoagulant-associated intracerebral hemorrhage

Among patients with oral anticoagulation-associated intracerebral hemorrhage (bleeding within the brain), reversal of international normalized ratio (INR; a measure used to determine the clotting tendency of blood while on medication) below a certain level within 4 hours and systolic blood pressure less than 160 mm Hg at 4 hours were associated with lower rates of hematoma (a localized swelling filled with blood) enlargement, and resumption of anticoagulant therapy was associated with a lower risk of ischemic events without increased bleeding complications, according to a study in the February 24 issue of JAMA. [More]
Discovery demonstrates effect of exercise to prevent chronic health conditions

Discovery demonstrates effect of exercise to prevent chronic health conditions

A researcher at the University of Virginia School of Medicine has magnified a benefit of exercise in mice to provide a "profound" protection from diabetic cardiomyopathy, a potentially deadly heart condition that affects many people with diabetes. The discovery demonstrates the power of exercise to prevent chronic health conditions and suggests that one day some benefits of exercise may come in a pill or bottle. [More]
Investigators define prevalence, associated factors for vasospasm in children with brain injuries

Investigators define prevalence, associated factors for vasospasm in children with brain injuries

Vasospasm, or severe narrowing of blood vessels, is a dangerous complication observed in children with moderate to severe traumatic brain injury. In a paper recently published in Critical Care Medicine, investigators at Nationwide Children's Hospital have further defined the prevalence, associated factors and time course for vasospasm in children with these brain injuries. [More]
Reslizumab drug appears to reduce risk of severe asthma attacks

Reslizumab drug appears to reduce risk of severe asthma attacks

An investigational drug appears to cut the risk of severe asthma attacks in half for patients who have difficulty controlling the disorder with standard medications, according to results from two multicenter clinical trials. [More]