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New therapy may reduce stroke risk in severe sickle cell disease patients

New therapy may reduce stroke risk in severe sickle cell disease patients

Eleven-year-old Martin Mwita, of Omaha, has made more than 300 visits to health care facilities since he was a baby. Because of sickle cell disease, he's suffered three strokes and countless other health episodes. [More]
Study explores history of penumbra in untreated acute stroke patients

Study explores history of penumbra in untreated acute stroke patients

Radiological imaging is being used more often to evaluate stroke diagnosis and outcomes, with penumbra, or tissue that is at risk of progressing to dead tissue but is still salvageable if blood flow is returned, as a potential target for therapy. [More]
Self-care can help nurses manage compassion fatigue

Self-care can help nurses manage compassion fatigue

The heart of healthcare is stressed. With longer shifts, staffing shortages and healthcare changes taxing our nurses, it's no surprise that up to 80 percent report suffering compassion fatigue at some point in their careers, according to recent studies. [More]
Researchers find new clue to understanding 'chemo brain' in cancer patients

Researchers find new clue to understanding 'chemo brain' in cancer patients

During and after chemotherapy, many cancer patients describe feeling a mental fog, a condition that has been dubbed "chemo brain." Why this happens is unclear, but researchers have found a new clue to understanding this syndrome. [More]
Malaria parasites use complement system to evade human immune response, study finds

Malaria parasites use complement system to evade human immune response, study finds

The malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum hijacks an immune system process to invade red blood cells, according to a study led by researchers at Penn State College of Medicine. Understanding how malaria invades the cells could lead to a more effective vaccine. [More]
Research sheds new light on biological processes underlying neurodegeneration in AD

Research sheds new light on biological processes underlying neurodegeneration in AD

Progranulin is a central protein in both neuronal survival and neurodegenerative diseases. It is thus not surprising that altered progranulin levels represent a universal theme shared across several common neurodegenerative diseases. [More]
Shoulder, arm pain could stem from thoracic outlet syndrome

Shoulder, arm pain could stem from thoracic outlet syndrome

Shoulder and arm pain come with the territory for some athletes and certain occupations like hair stylists, mechanics, even office workers. [More]
ART trial: Adacolumn shows clinical benefit in refractory ulcerative colitis patients

ART trial: Adacolumn shows clinical benefit in refractory ulcerative colitis patients

Data from the 48-week ART trial, presented today at the Digestive Disease Week meeting, showed that remission and response rates were 37.2% and 53.2% respectively at week 12, in patients with moderate-to-severe, steroid-dependent active ulcerative colitis (UC) with insufficient response or intolerance to immunosuppressants and / or biologics when treated with between five and eight sessions with Adacolumn. [More]
Clinical study supports safety, efficacy of GI Windows’ IAS as treatment option for Type 2 diabetes

Clinical study supports safety, efficacy of GI Windows’ IAS as treatment option for Type 2 diabetes

GI Windows, Inc., a clinical-stage medical device company, today announced the presentation of six-month results of the first-ever clinical study evaluating the endoscopic creation of a dual-path enteral diversion using the company’s Incision-less Anastomosis System (IAS) at Digestive Disease Week® 2016 (DDW), in San Diego, Calif. [More]
Researchers spot molecular key that breast cancer cells use to invade bone marrow

Researchers spot molecular key that breast cancer cells use to invade bone marrow

Scientists at the Duke Cancer Institute have identified a molecular key that breast cancer cells use to invade bone marrow in mice, where they may be protected from chemotherapy or hormonal therapies that could otherwise eradicate them. [More]
Health of 1 million over 65s at risk from low awareness of heart valve disease

Health of 1 million over 65s at risk from low awareness of heart valve disease

New research has revealed that the UK’s over 60s could seriously be jeopardising their health due to a lack of awareness of heart valve disease. [More]
Majority of young adults with abdominal obesity unaware of CKD risk

Majority of young adults with abdominal obesity unaware of CKD risk

Many young adults with abdominal obesity exhibit a readily detectable risk factor for chronic kidney disease (CKD), yet the vast majority don't know they're at risk, according to a study of nationwide health data led by Albert Einstein College of Medicine researchers that was published online today in the journal PLOS ONE. [More]
ART alone not sufficient to reduce arterial inflammation among HIV-infected patients, study finds

ART alone not sufficient to reduce arterial inflammation among HIV-infected patients, study finds

Initiating antiretroviral therapy (ART) soon after diagnosis of an HIV infection did not prevent the progression of significant arterial inflammation in a small group of previously untreated patients. [More]
Combining sonoporation with chemotherapy drug may help improve pancreatic cancer treatment

Combining sonoporation with chemotherapy drug may help improve pancreatic cancer treatment

Researchers at Haukeland University Hospital in Bergen, Norway have combined a laboratory ultrasound technique called "sonoporation" with the commercially-available chemotherapy compound Gemcitabine to increase the porosity of pancreatic cells with microbubbles and to help get the drug into cancer cells where it is needed. [More]
Bone marrow transplantation dose may have lasting effects on HSC behavior

Bone marrow transplantation dose may have lasting effects on HSC behavior

Unlike aspirin, bone marrow doesn't come with a neatly printed label with dosage instructions. However, a new study published in Cell Reports provides clues about how the dose of transplanted bone marrow might affect patients undergoing this risky procedure, frequently used to treat cancer and blood diseases. [More]
The National MDS Study aims to identify causes, genetic makeup of fatal blood diseases

The National MDS Study aims to identify causes, genetic makeup of fatal blood diseases

The National Myelodysplastic Syndromes Natural History Study is underway, the ECOG-ACRIN Cancer Research Group and its collaborators announced today. [More]
Mice study shows heart medication helps reduce build-up of plaque in brain's blood vessels

Mice study shows heart medication helps reduce build-up of plaque in brain's blood vessels

A new study from örebro University, published in Science Signaling today, shows that heart medication reduces the build-up of plaque in the brain's blood vessels in mice. The question is if this is true also in humans? If the answer is yes, it might bring scientists a step closer to developing a medicine against Alzheimer's disease. [More]
Zika virus infection may cause ocular problems in Brazilian infants with microcephaly

Zika virus infection may cause ocular problems in Brazilian infants with microcephaly

Researchers studying babies with a Zika virus-related birth defect say they have found previously unreported eye problems possibly linked to the virus that could result in severe visual impairment. [More]
Study provides better understanding of sequence of genetic events in colorectal cancer premalignancy

Study provides better understanding of sequence of genetic events in colorectal cancer premalignancy

Whole-exome sequencing of both colorectal adenomas (precancers often called polyps) and intestinal mucosa at risk for developing into adenomas from patients with familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) has generated a comprehensive picture of the genomic alterations that characterize the evolution of normal mucosa to precancer. [More]
Obese individuals who consume aspartame may have worse glucose management

Obese individuals who consume aspartame may have worse glucose management

Artificial sweeteners help individuals with obesity to cut calories and lose weight but may have negative health effects, according to researchers at York University's Faculty of Health. [More]
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