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Functional deficits caused by mini-strokes can last longer than previously thought

Functional deficits caused by mini-strokes can last longer than previously thought

Evidence overwhelmingly supports a link between cognitive decline and cerebrovascular diseases such as atherosclerosis, arteriolosclerosis, and cerebral amyloid angiopathy. Not only do individuals with cerebrovascular diseases have a much higher incidence of cortical microinfarcts (mini-strokes), but post-mortem histological and in vivo radiological studies also find that the burden of microinfarcts is significantly greater among people with vascular cognitive impairment and dementia (VCID) than in age-matched, non-demented individuals. [More]
Spectroscopy and computer help RUB scientists gain new insights into workings of protein switches

Spectroscopy and computer help RUB scientists gain new insights into workings of protein switches

Using a combination of infrared spectroscopy and computer simulation, researchers at Ruhr-Universität Bochum have gained new insights into the workings of protein switches. [More]
New antibody design may pave way for treating diseases affecting the brain

New antibody design may pave way for treating diseases affecting the brain

Immunotherapy has proven to be effective against many serious diseases. But to treat diseases in the brain, the antibodies must first get past the obstacle of the blood-brain barrier. [More]
Biomarker linked to depression during pregnancy and low birth weight in baby

Biomarker linked to depression during pregnancy and low birth weight in baby

Depression is very common during pregnancy, with as many as one in seven women suffering from the illness and more than a half million women impacted by postpartum depression in the U.S. alone. [More]
People with schizophrenia more likely to have diabetes than general population

People with schizophrenia more likely to have diabetes than general population

People with early schizophrenia are at an increased risk of developing diabetes, even when the effects of antipsychotic drugs, diet and exercise are taken out of the equation, according to an analysis by researchers from King's College London. [More]
Study finds that T cells play important role in control of Zika infections

Study finds that T cells play important role in control of Zika infections

The worst of the global Zika virus outbreak may be over but many key questions remain, such as why the virus persists in certain tissues after the systemic infection has cleared; how does the immune system counteract the virus and protect against reinfection; what determines the likelihood of long-term complications? [More]
Pasta consumption in adults linked to overall better diet quality

Pasta consumption in adults linked to overall better diet quality

New research analyzing the diets of people who eat pasta has revealed more good news about one of America's favorite foods. [More]
Diet and exercise can help lessen damage caused by malaria, UTA study suggests

Diet and exercise can help lessen damage caused by malaria, UTA study suggests

The right amount of diet and exercise can help lessen damage to the heart and skeletal muscles brought on by malaria, according to a new UTA study. [More]
Workplace-based sleep health program can reduce injuries and disability in firefighters

Workplace-based sleep health program can reduce injuries and disability in firefighters

Many firefighters suffer acute and chronic sleep deficiency and misalignment of their circadian rhythm (body clock) due to extended shifts and long work weeks. [More]
Woman's blood pressure before pregnancy may be linked to babies' sex

Woman's blood pressure before pregnancy may be linked to babies' sex

A new paper published in the American Journal of Hypertension suggests that a woman's blood pressure before pregnancy is related to her likelihood of giving birth to a boy or girl. [More]
Skidmore College scientist discovers health benefits of balanced, protein-pacing, low-calorie diet

Skidmore College scientist discovers health benefits of balanced, protein-pacing, low-calorie diet

Research by Skidmore College exercise scientist Paul Arciero has found that a balanced, protein-pacing, low-calorie diet that includes intermittent fasting not only achieves long-term weight loss, but also helps release toxins in the form of PCBs from the body fat stores, in addition to enhancing heart health and reducing oxidative stress. [More]
New augmented-reality technology designed by Philips for spine surgery

New augmented-reality technology designed by Philips for spine surgery

Royal Philips, a leader in integrated image-guided therapy solutions, today announced the development of an industry-first augmented-reality surgical navigation technology that is designed to help surgeons perform image-guided open and minimally-invasive spine surgery. Philips is a pioneer in hybrid operating room (hybrid OR) solutions to facilitate both surgical and minimally-invasive endovascular procedures, with over 750 hybrid ORs installed globally. The addition of this new augmented reality technology will further widen the scope of Philips hybrid OR solutions to other fast-growing areas of image-guided surgery including spine, cranial and trauma procedures. [More]
Study reveals brain activity may be key to link between stress and heart disease

Study reveals brain activity may be key to link between stress and heart disease

Increased activity in a deep-lying region of the brain called the amygdala is associated with a higher risk of heart attack and stroke, according to a study published in The Lancet.

The amygdala is known to process emotions such as fear and anger and the finding sheds light on the possible mechanism by which stress can lead to cardiovascular disease (CVD), say the study authors. [More]
NTNU researchers testing use of new removable stent in the lungs

NTNU researchers testing use of new removable stent in the lungs

A knitted rag sock inspired this professor and MD to develop a stent that can easily be removed after it has done its job. [More]
Scientists identify Smurf1 protein that plays role in autophagy of TB bacteria

Scientists identify Smurf1 protein that plays role in autophagy of TB bacteria

UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers have identified a protein that is central to the immune system's ability to recognize and destroy the bacterium responsible for the global tuberculosis (TB) epidemic. [More]
New drug delivery system by Renishaw hopes to aid Parkinson’s treatment

New drug delivery system by Renishaw hopes to aid Parkinson’s treatment

Renishaw’s novel drug delivery system, to be used in partnership with Herantis Pharma Plc’s drug candidate CDNF for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease, is about to enter phase 1-2 clinical trials. The study will be supported by a €6 million grant from Horizon 2020, the European Union’s Framework Programme for Research and Innovation. [More]
Could pathogen infection really lead to Alzheimer’s?

Could pathogen infection really lead to Alzheimer’s?

New concepts of infectious disease are evolving with the realization that pathogens are key players in the development of progressive chronic diseases that originally were not thought to be infectious. Infection is well-known to be associated with numerous neurological diseases for which... [More]
AAN issues new guideline on mapping the brain before epilepsy surgery

AAN issues new guideline on mapping the brain before epilepsy surgery

Before epilepsy surgery, doctors may consider using brain imaging to locate language and memory functions in the brain instead of the more invasive procedure that is commonly used, according to a guideline published by the American Academy of Neurology in the January 11, 2017, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Inhibition of EZH2 protein could be new strategy to treat multiple myeloma

Inhibition of EZH2 protein could be new strategy to treat multiple myeloma

In a study published in the scientific journal Oncotarget, researchers from Uppsala University show how the protein EZH2 affects the development of multiple myeloma, and that inhibition of EZH2 could be used as a new strategy to treat the disease. [More]
Clean-burning ethanol stoves may reduce hypertension, cardiovascular risk in pregnant women, study shows

Clean-burning ethanol stoves may reduce hypertension, cardiovascular risk in pregnant women, study shows

Replacing biomass and kerosene cookstoves used throughout the developing world with clean-burning ethanol stoves may reduce hypertension and cardiovascular risk in pregnant women, according to new research published online, ahead of print in the American Thoracic Society’s American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine. [More]
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