Blood News and Research RSS Feed - Blood News and Research

Discovery reveals possibility of using water for finer analysis of the brain's functioning

Discovery reveals possibility of using water for finer analysis of the brain's functioning

To observe the brain in action, scientists and physicians use imaging techniques, among which functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is the best known. These techniques are not based on direct observations of electric impulses from activated neurons, but on one of their consequences. Indeed, this stimulation triggers physiological modifications in the activated cerebral region, changes that become visible by imaging. [More]
FMNCA's disaster response program makes difference in patients' lives during Super Storm Sandy

FMNCA's disaster response program makes difference in patients' lives during Super Storm Sandy

Fresenius Medical Care North America, a division of Fresenius Medical Care and North America's largest provider of kidney care, hospitalist services and renal products, today hailed a new study by the Department of Health and Human Services this week showing that dialysis patients who received treatments immediately before Super Storm Sandy experienced a much better survival rate and less frequent visits to the hospital. [More]
Study: New test may help predict effectiveness of biologic drugs in RA patients

Study: New test may help predict effectiveness of biologic drugs in RA patients

A study of 311 patients by The University of Manchester has found that it may be possible to predict early which rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients will fail to respond to the biologic drugs given to treat them. [More]
New AHA/ASA guidelines recommend stent retrievers to treat strokes in selected patients

New AHA/ASA guidelines recommend stent retrievers to treat strokes in selected patients

New devices called stent retrievers are enabling physicians to benefit selected patients who suffer strokes caused by blood clots. The devices effectively stop strokes in their tracks. [More]
WATCHMAN Device helps reduce stroke risk, stop use of blood thinners in patients with atrial fibrillation

WATCHMAN Device helps reduce stroke risk, stop use of blood thinners in patients with atrial fibrillation

MedStar Heart & Vascular Institute now offers patients with irregular heart rhythm a minimally invasive option to reduce the risk of stroke, as well as enable stopping long-term use of blood thinning medication. Physicians at MedStar Heart at MedStar Washington Hospital Center were the first in the Washington metropolitan region to successfully implant the WATCHMAN Device on June 16 in two patients with atrial fibrillation (A-fib). [More]
Creating more effective vaccines against flu virus

Creating more effective vaccines against flu virus

Flu vaccines can be something of a shot in the dark. Not only must they be given yearly, there's no guarantee the strains against which they protect will be the ones circulating once the season arrives. New research by Rockefeller University scientists and their colleagues suggests it may be possible to harness a previously unknown mechanism within the immune system to create more effective and efficient vaccines against this ever-mutating virus. [More]
Testosterone, cortisol hormones may destabilise financial markets by making traders take more risks

Testosterone, cortisol hormones may destabilise financial markets by making traders take more risks

The hormones testosterone and cortisol may destabilise financial markets by making traders take more risks, according to a study. Researchers simulated the trading floor in the lab by having volunteers buy and sell assets among themselves. They measured the volunteers' natural hormone levels in one experiment and artificially raised them in another. [More]
SkylineDx’s MMprofiler test helps predict prognosis of patients with multiple myeloma

SkylineDx’s MMprofiler test helps predict prognosis of patients with multiple myeloma

SkylineDx, an innovative biotechnology company specialising in the development and commercialization of genetic tests, is today launching its MMprofiler assay. This test enables clinicians to more accurately predict the prognosis of patients with multiple myeloma (bone marrow cancer) than traditional methods. [More]
Penn study suggests future precision medicine approach to treating diabetes, other metabolic disorders

Penn study suggests future precision medicine approach to treating diabetes, other metabolic disorders

In the first study of its kind, Penn researchers have shown how an anti-diabetic drug can have variable effects depending on small natural differences in DNA sequence between individuals. Mitchell Lazar, MD, PhD, Raymond Soccio, MD, PhD, and colleagues at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, aim to apply this knowledge to develop personalized approaches to treating diabetes and other metabolic disorders. [More]
NDSU's Stephen O'Rourke awarded NIH grant to conduct cardiovascular research

NDSU's Stephen O'Rourke awarded NIH grant to conduct cardiovascular research

Stephen O'Rourke, professor of pharmaceutical sciences at North Dakota State University, Fargo, has received a $435,000 grant from the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute of the National Institutes of Health to conduct cardiovascular research. [More]
Combination of exercise and artificial gravity may reduce effects of extended weightlessness in space

Combination of exercise and artificial gravity may reduce effects of extended weightlessness in space

Astronauts on the International Space Station have a number of exercise options, including a mechanical bicycle bolted to the floor, a weightlifting machine strapped to the wall, and a strap-down treadmill. They spend a significant portion of each day working out to ward off the long-term effects of weightlessness, but many still suffer bone loss, muscle atrophy, and issues with balance and their cardiovascular systems. [More]
Biologically active molecules produced during gluten digestion can pass through gut lining

Biologically active molecules produced during gluten digestion can pass through gut lining

Biologically active molecules released by digesting bread and pasta can survive digestion and potentially pass through the gut lining, suggests new research. [More]
FDA accepts Adaptimmune’s IND application for MAGE-A10 T therapeutic candidate to combat NSCLC

FDA accepts Adaptimmune’s IND application for MAGE-A10 T therapeutic candidate to combat NSCLC

Adaptimmune Therapeutics plc, a clinical stage biopharmaceutical company focused on the use of T-cell therapy to treat cancer, today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has accepted the Company's investigational new drug (IND) application for autologous genetically modified T-cells expressing enhanced T cell receptors specific for MAGE A10 (MAGE-A10 T) in patients with locally advanced or metastatic non-small cell lung cancer, and that the IND is now active. [More]
Paclitaxel-fostamatinib combination therapy may reduce size of ovarian cancer cells

Paclitaxel-fostamatinib combination therapy may reduce size of ovarian cancer cells

Working in cell cultures and mice, researchers at Johns Hopkins have found that an experimental drug called fostamatinib combined with the chemotherapy drug paclitaxel may overcome ovarian cancer cells' resistance to paclitaxel. [More]
Galderma obtains FDA approval for Restylane Lyft to restore structure to the cheeks and midface area

Galderma obtains FDA approval for Restylane Lyft to restore structure to the cheeks and midface area

Galderma, a global healthcare company focused on skin health, announced today that it has received U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval to market Restylane Lyft for cheek augmentation and the correction of age-related midface contour deficiencies in patients over the age of 21. [More]
Leah Hollins recognized for outstanding contributions to health care in British Columbia

Leah Hollins recognized for outstanding contributions to health care in British Columbia

Leah Hollins, Canadian Blood Services Board Chair, has been named a Member of the Order of Canada by His Excellency Right Honourable David Johnston, Governor General of Canada. [More]
St John's Wort may cause same adverse reactions as antidepressants

St John's Wort may cause same adverse reactions as antidepressants

St John's Wort can produce the same adverse reactions as antidepressants, and serious side effects can occur when the two are taken together, according to new University of Adelaide research. [More]
UCLA patient successfully receives smaller Total Artificial Heart

UCLA patient successfully receives smaller Total Artificial Heart

A petite 44-year-old woman has received a successful heart transplant at Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center, thanks to an experimental Total Artificial Heart designed for smaller patients. [More]
UChicago Medicine, Little Company of Mary partner to boost community access to specialty care for children

UChicago Medicine, Little Company of Mary partner to boost community access to specialty care for children

The University of Chicago Medicine and Little Company of Mary Hospital and Health Care Centers are partnering to expand care for infants and children by developing a subspecialty center on the community hospital's Evergreen Park campus that will provide enhanced neonatology and pediatric services. [More]
Scientists develop implantable 'artificial pancreas' to help control blood sugar in diabetes patients

Scientists develop implantable 'artificial pancreas' to help control blood sugar in diabetes patients

Living with Type 1 diabetes requires constant monitoring of blood sugar levels and injecting insulin daily. Now scientists are reporting in the ACS journal Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research the development of an implantable "artificial pancreas" that continuously measures a person's blood sugar, or glucose, level and can automatically release insulin as needed. [More]
Advertisement
Advertisement