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New device uses space-tested concept of capillary flow to diagnose infectious diseases

New device uses space-tested concept of capillary flow to diagnose infectious diseases

A new medical-testing device is being prepped to enter the battle against infectious disease. This instrument could improve diagnosis of certain diseases in remote areas, thanks in part to knowledge gained from a series of investigations aboard the International Space Station on the behavior of liquids. The device uses the space-tested concept of capillary flow to diagnose infectious diseases such as HIV/AIDS and tuberculosis. [More]
Three Johns Hopkins researchers awarded grants for work on potential treatments for diabetes

Three Johns Hopkins researchers awarded grants for work on potential treatments for diabetes

Three Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine researchers have been awarded two-year grants for their work on potential treatments for diabetes, Novo Nordisk announced this month. Of the 110 initial submissions to the new Novo Nordisk Diabetes and Obesity Biologics Science Forum Program, only four projects were funded, three of which are led by Johns Hopkins researchers. They are Jonathan Powell, M.D., Ph.D.; G. William Wong, Ph.D.; and Elias Zambidis, M.D., Ph.D. [More]
Researchers discover new marker derived from human umbilical cord blood

Researchers discover new marker derived from human umbilical cord blood

The development of stem cell therapies to cure a variety of diseases depends on the ability to characterize stem cell populations based on cell surface markers. [More]
LSTM researchers to conduct extensive research on HIV and schistosomiasis coinfection in African children

LSTM researchers to conduct extensive research on HIV and schistosomiasis coinfection in African children

​Researchers from LSTM have called for more research to be carried out into HIV and schistosomiasis coinfection in children in sub-Saharan Africa. [More]
Research by UCI, Salk Institute points to novel therapies for minimizing stroke-induced brain damage

Research by UCI, Salk Institute points to novel therapies for minimizing stroke-induced brain damage

​By discovering a new mechanism that allows blood to enter the brain immediately after a stroke, researchers at UC Irvine and the Salk Institute have opened the door to new therapies that may limit or prevent stroke-induced brain damage. [More]

Le Bonheur Children's takes aggressive steps to minimize blood loss during heart surgery

More than 20 percent of Le Bonheur Children's Hospital's open heart surgeries are now bloodless, meaning no blood or blood products given during surgery. The Memphis, Tenn., hospital's Heart Institute has been taking aggressive steps to minimize blood loss during surgery and reduce perioperative blood transfusions over the last 18 months. [More]

Study shows massage therapy improves blood flow, alleviates muscle soreness after exercise

Massage therapy improves general blood flow and alleviates muscle soreness after exercise, according to a study by researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago. [More]
B1/Cdk1 protein which plays key role in cell division also boosts power of mitochondrial activity

B1/Cdk1 protein which plays key role in cell division also boosts power of mitochondrial activity

​An international team led by researchers at UC Davis has shown that the cyclin B1/Cdk1 protein complex, which plays a key role in cell division, also boosts the mitochondrial activity to power that process. [More]

ARCA biopharma announces genetic screening of first patient in GENETIC-AF Phase 2B/3 clinical trial

ARCA biopharma, Inc., a biopharmaceutical company developing genetically targeted therapies for cardiovascular diseases, today announced that the first patient has been genetically screened in GENETIC-AF, its Phase 2B/3 adaptive design clinical trial. [More]
Adrenaline does not boost long-term survival rates in heart attack patients, says study

Adrenaline does not boost long-term survival rates in heart attack patients, says study

Giving patients adrenaline after they suffer a cardiac arrest outside of a hospital does not increase their prospects of surviving long-term, according to new research conducted at St. Michael's Hospital. [More]

Agios begins AG-348 Phase 1 study for treatment of PK deficiency

Agios Pharmaceuticals, Inc., a leader in the fields of cancer metabolism and inborn errors of metabolism (IEM), today announced dose administration of AG-348 in a Phase 1 study in healthy volunteers. [More]
New research may help scientists develop treatments or vaccines for Dengue fever

New research may help scientists develop treatments or vaccines for Dengue fever

Two recent papers by a University of Colorado School of Medicine researcher and colleagues may help scientists develop treatments or vaccines for Dengue fever, West Nile virus, Yellow fever, Japanese encephalitis and other disease-causing flaviviruses. [More]
Researchers identify novel vancomycin-resistant MRSA superbug in Brazil

Researchers identify novel vancomycin-resistant MRSA superbug in Brazil

An international research team led by Cesar A. Arias, M.D., Ph.D., at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston has identified a new superbug that caused a bloodstream infection in a Brazilian patient. The report appeared in the April 17 issue of The New England Journal of Medicine. [More]
Discovery could have far-reaching implications for diagnosis and treatment of diabetic retinopathy

Discovery could have far-reaching implications for diagnosis and treatment of diabetic retinopathy

Indiana University researchers have detected new early-warning signs of the potential loss of sight associated with diabetes. This discovery could have far-reaching implications for the diagnosis and treatment of diabetic retinopathy, potentially impacting the care of over 25 million Americans. [More]

Researchers examine effects of introducing rapid diagnostic tests for malaria in Africa

Researchers from the Cochrane Infectious Diseases Group conducted a review of the effects of introducing rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) for diagnosing malaria in primary healthcare settings in Africa where laboratory services are unavailable. [More]
Targeted Medical Pharma signs agreement with Lebanon based company, ATL

Targeted Medical Pharma signs agreement with Lebanon based company, ATL

Targeted Medical Pharma, today announced the completion of an agreement between Analytical Testing Laboratories (ATL), a Lebanon based company that specializes in drug testing services and inborn errors of metabolism, for the exclusive distribution of the company's amino acid based products to physicians and pharmacies throughout the Middle East. [More]

Research on HIV and schistosomiasis coinfection in sub-Saharan Africa children

Paper shows that more work is needed to fully understand the consequences of coinfection. Researchers from LSTM have called for more research to be carried out into HIV and schistosomiasis coinfection in children in sub-Saharan Africa. [More]
Boehringer grants volasertib 'orphan drug designation' for treatment of patients with AML

Boehringer grants volasertib 'orphan drug designation' for treatment of patients with AML

Boehringer Ingelheim announced today that the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the European Commission have granted volasertib* 'orphan drug designation' for the treatment of patients with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). [More]
Researchers uncover mechanism that may help explain severe forms of schistosomiasis

Researchers uncover mechanism that may help explain severe forms of schistosomiasis

​Researchers at the Sackler School of Graduate Biomedical Sciences at Tufts and Tufts University School of Medicine (TUSM) have uncovered a mechanism that may help explain the severe forms of schistosomiasis, or snail fever, which is caused by schistosome worms and is one of the most prevalent parasitic diseases in the world. The study in mice, published online in The Journal of Immunology, may also offer targets for intervention and amelioration of the disease. [More]
Scientists discover protein structure that helps common fungal pathogen to infect humans

Scientists discover protein structure that helps common fungal pathogen to infect humans

A team that includes scientists from the School of Medicine at The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, Johns Hopkins University and St. Mary's University reported the structure of a protein that helps a common fungus to infect the body. [More]