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Tolero Pharmaceuticals' Alvocidib gets Orphan Drug Designation for acute myeloid leukemia treatment

Tolero Pharmaceuticals' Alvocidib gets Orphan Drug Designation for acute myeloid leukemia treatment

Tolero Pharmaceuticals, Inc., a clinical-stage company developing treatments for serious hematological diseases, today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has granted Orphan Drug designation for Alvocidib for the treatment of patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). [More]
NovaBay introduces new eye care product to help patients with eyelids irritation

NovaBay introduces new eye care product to help patients with eyelids irritation

NovaBay Pharmaceuticals, Inc., a clinical-stage biopharmaceutical company developing topical non-antibiotic antimicrobial products, today announced that it is introducing a new eye care product, i-Lid Cleanser. [More]
Alexion Pharmaceuticals obtains orphan drug designation from EC for Soliris

Alexion Pharmaceuticals obtains orphan drug designation from EC for Soliris

Alexion Pharmaceuticals, Inc. today announced that the European Commission has granted an orphan drug designation (ODD) to Soliris (eculizumab), a first-in-class terminal complement inhibitor, for the prevention of graft rejection following solid organ transplantation. Graft rejection can cause severe injury to the transplanted organ and is a significant barrier to successful transplantation. [More]
91% of Americans know genetic information has important utility in managing health

91% of Americans know genetic information has important utility in managing health

23andMe, the leading personal genetics company, is celebrating National DNA Day by taking an in-depth look at what Americans know about their DNA and how genetics play a role in our everyday lives. The survey found that 91 percent of Americans know that their genetic information has important utility in managing their health. [More]

New tool can help doctors identify patients at highest risk for respiratory failure after surgery

A new prediction tool can help doctors better identify patients who are at highest risk for respiratory failure after surgery and therefore prevent the often deadly condition, suggest data from a large multi-center study published in the May issue of Anesthesiology. [More]

Study suggests that variant of cell surface protein is ideal target to treat gastric cancer

New study by the Cancer Science Institute of Singapore and National University Hospital Singapore suggests that a variant of a cell surface protein is an ideal target for developing drugs to treat gastric cancer [More]

Diaverum acquires its seventh kidney centre in Chile

Diaverum, one of the world's leading renal care service providers, has acquired its seventh kidney centre Chile. The Diaseal clinic, located in Puente Alto, a highly populated and fast growing district in the south of capital Santiago, features 18 stations which are used to treat 100 patients with haemodialysis (HD). [More]

Investigators use computer-assisted approach to identify and rank new clock genes

Over the last few decades researchers have characterized a set of clock genes that drive daily rhythms of physiology and behavior in all types of species, from flies to humans. [More]

New data-based model accurately estimates hemoglobin A1c using SMBG readings

Hemoglobin A1c is the standard measurement for assessing glycemic control over time in people with diabetes. [More]

Study: Added benefit of turoctocog alfa is not proven

Turoctocog alfa (trade name: NovoEight) has been approved since November 2013 for the prevention and treatment of bleeding in patients with haemophilia A. [More]
Johns Hopkins scientists find a way to prevent atherosclerosis

Johns Hopkins scientists find a way to prevent atherosclerosis

Working with mice and rabbits, Johns Hopkins scientists have found a way to block abnormal cholesterol production, transport and breakdown, successfully preventing the development of atherosclerosis, the main cause of heart attacks and strokes and the number-one cause of death among humans. The condition develops when fat builds inside blood vessels over time and renders them stiff, narrowed and hardened, greatly reducing their ability to feed oxygen-rich blood to the heart muscle and the brain. [More]
Bile acids could be a new target for treating obesity and diabetes, say researchers

Bile acids could be a new target for treating obesity and diabetes, say researchers

Bariatric surgery has positive effects not only on weight loss but also on diabetes and heart disease. Researchers at the Sahlgrenska Academy and University of Cincinnati have shown that the health benefits are not caused by a reduction in the stomach size but by increased levels of bile acids in the blood. [More]

VHVI implants miniaturized HeartWare HVAD Pump through minimally invasive approach

Sometimes smaller is better. This is especially true of left ventricular assist devices, the mechanically operated heart pumps that are implanted in heart failure patients to bridge them to transplantation. [More]

Drug used to treat hypertension prevents post-traumatic epilepsy in rodent model

Between 10 and 20 percent of all cases of epilepsy result from severe head injury, but a new drug promises to prevent post-traumatic seizures and may forestall further brain damage caused by seizures in those who already have epilepsy. [More]
New computational tool identifies undiagnosed illnesses and unknown gene mutations

New computational tool identifies undiagnosed illnesses and unknown gene mutations

A computational tool developed at the University of Utah (U of U) has successfully identified diseases with unknown gene mutations in three separate cases, U of U researchers and their colleagues report in a new study in The American Journal of Human Genetics. [More]
Pfizer reports positive results from two tofacitinib Phase 3 trials for moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis

Pfizer reports positive results from two tofacitinib Phase 3 trials for moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis

Pfizer Inc. announced today top-line results from two pivotal Phase 3 trials from the Oral treatment Psoriasis Trials (OPT) Program, OPT Pivotal #1 (A3921078) and OPT Pivotal #2 (A3921079), evaluating the efficacy and safety of tofacitinib, an oral Janus kinase (JAK) inhibitor, the first in a new class of medicines being investigated for the treatment of moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis. [More]

FDA approves Cyramza to treat patients with advanced stomach cancer

Based on results of a clinical trial led by Dana-Farber Cancer Institute scientists, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved a molecularly targeted drug as second-line treatment in advanced stomach cancer that has progressed after standard chemotherapy has failed. [More]

Cedars-Sinai researchers to receive $8M grant to fund Phase II clinical trial of experimental drug for stroke

​Cedars-Sinai stroke intervention researchers have been informed that the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, part of the National Institutes of Health, will award an $8 million grant to fund a multicenter Phase II clinical trial of an experimental drug for stroke. [More]
University of Utah software successfully identifies diseases with unknown gene mutations in three separate cases

University of Utah software successfully identifies diseases with unknown gene mutations in three separate cases

A computational tool developed at the University of Utah (U of U) has successfully identified diseases with unknown gene mutations in three separate cases, U of U researchers and their colleagues report in a new study in The American Journal of Human Genetics. The software, Phevor (Phenotype Driven Variant Ontological Re-ranking tool), identifies undiagnosed illnesses and unknown gene mutations by analyzing the exomes, or areas of DNA where proteins that code for genes are made, in individual patients and small families. [More]

Urine test separates nonadherent from treatment-resistant hypertensive patients

Researchers have used a urine test to show that about a quarter of patients with supposedly treatment-resistant hypertension are actually failing to take their medications as prescribed. [More]