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Survey: 52% of acute coronary syndrome patients don't take their prescribed OAP therapy

Survey: 52% of acute coronary syndrome patients don't take their prescribed OAP therapy

People with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) who undergo an angioplasty procedure and receive a heart stent are prescribed an oral antiplatelet (OAP) therapy and aspirin to help prevent a heart attack, a blood clot in their heart stent (stent thrombosis), or even death. [More]
First patient enrolled in CryoLife's PerClot IDE clinical trial

First patient enrolled in CryoLife's PerClot IDE clinical trial

CryoLife, Inc., a leading medical device and tissue processing company focused on cardiac and vascular surgery, announced today the enrollment of the first patient in its PerClot Investigational Device Exemption (IDE) clinical trial, the Company's pivotal clinical trial to gain approval to commercialize PerClot in the U.S. [More]
PAML signs collaborative agreement with Axela

PAML signs collaborative agreement with Axela

PAML announced today that the laboratory has entered into a collaborative agreement with Axela, Inc. to develop multiplex assays focused on immune status for vaccine preventable diseases. PAML is one of the nation's leading medical reference laboratories, and Axela focuses on multiplexed nucleic acid and protein analysis for clinical diagnostics. [More]
Stempeutics Research granted process patent in China for novel stem-cell based drug Stempeucel

Stempeutics Research granted process patent in China for novel stem-cell based drug Stempeucel

Stempeutics Research, a group company of Manipal Education and Medical Group and a Joint Venture with Cipla Group, announced today that the State Intellectual Property Office of China granted a process patent for its novel stem-cell based drug Stempeucel. [More]
Scientific study confirms harmful effect of submicroscopic malarial infections during pregnancy

Scientific study confirms harmful effect of submicroscopic malarial infections during pregnancy

A scientific study conducted in Benin by researchers from IRD and the Centre for study and research on pregnancy associated malaria and infancy (CERPAGE, Benin) confirms the harmful impact of submicroscopic malarial infections during pregnancy. These complications include maternal anaemia, premature births and low birthweights in children. [More]
TUW, Medical University of Vienna jointly develop artificial blood vessels from elastomer material

TUW, Medical University of Vienna jointly develop artificial blood vessels from elastomer material

Blocked blood vessels can quickly become dangerous. It is often necessary to replace a blood vessel - either by another vessel taken from the body or even by artificial vascular prostheses. Together, Vienna University of Technology and Vienna Medical University have developed artificial blood vessels made from a special elastomer material, which has excellent mechanical properties. [More]
National survey shows that most women don't know risks or symptoms of stroke

National survey shows that most women don't know risks or symptoms of stroke

A national survey released today by The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center shows that most women don't know the risks or symptoms females face when it comes to having a stroke. [More]
TSRI study provides new insight into preventing diseases that cause vision loss in adults

TSRI study provides new insight into preventing diseases that cause vision loss in adults

A new study from scientists at The Scripps Research Institute shows that nerve cells and blood vessels in the eye constantly "talk" to each other to maintain healthy blood flow and prevent disease. [More]
Atrial fibrillation linked to only one type of heart attack

Atrial fibrillation linked to only one type of heart attack

Refining the results of a 2013 study, researchers have found that atrial fibrillation, or irregular heartbeat, is associated with only one type of heart attack - the more common of the two types. [More]
Specific altered function in heart's left atrium may signal stroke risk in people with a-fib

Specific altered function in heart's left atrium may signal stroke risk in people with a-fib

Stroke is a frequent and dreaded complication of atrial fibrillation. But predicting which of the estimated six million Americans with a-fib are at highest risk has long challenged physicians weighing stroke risk against the serious side effects posed by lifelong therapy with warfarin and other blood thinners. [More]
Researchers pinpoint new mechanism responsible for malaria progression

Researchers pinpoint new mechanism responsible for malaria progression

A team of researchers from four universities has pinpointed one of the mechanisms responsible for the progression of malaria, providing a new target for possible treatments. [More]
Simple device to treat sleep apnea may reduce diabetes risk

Simple device to treat sleep apnea may reduce diabetes risk

Using a simple device for eight hours a night to treat sleep apnea can help people with prediabetes improve their blood sugar levels and may reduce the risk of progressing to diabetes, according to a new study published online in the April 21, 2015, issue of the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine. [More]
UW develops new app to wirelessly test sleep apnea events using smartphone

UW develops new app to wirelessly test sleep apnea events using smartphone

Determining whether your snoring is merely annoying, or crosses the threshold into a life-threatening problem, isn't convenient or cheap. [More]
New T1D Prevention Initiative launched to identify pathways to prevent type 1 diabetes

New T1D Prevention Initiative launched to identify pathways to prevent type 1 diabetes

As the incidence of type 1 diabetes (T1D) rises worldwide, The Leona M. and Harry B. Helmsley Charitable Trust today announced the launch of an ambitious new T1D Prevention Initiative to investigate the early stages of development of the disease and identify new pathways to prevent it. [More]
Study suggests that inhibiting FOXO1 protein could speed diabetic wound healing

Study suggests that inhibiting FOXO1 protein could speed diabetic wound healing

A protein that normally fosters tissue repair instead acts to inhibit healing when sugar levels are high, according to a study in The Journal of Cell Biology. The role reversal helps explain why wounds heal slowly in people with diabetes. [More]
Vermillion reports expanded medical policy coverage of OVA1 test

Vermillion reports expanded medical policy coverage of OVA1 test

Vermillion, Inc., a bio-analytical solutions company focused on gynecologic disease, today announced expanded medical policy coverage of its OVA1 test, following Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan's recent decision to include OVA1 in its medical policy guidelines. [More]
Molecular Health granted European patent for novel Erythropoietin receptor

Molecular Health granted European patent for novel Erythropoietin receptor

Molecular Health announced today it has been granted a patent in Europe entitled "Tissue Protective Erythropoietin Receptor". This latest patent supports Molecular Health's discovery that EPHB4 is a novel receptor for Erythropoietin (EPO), where EPHB4 binds to EPO and promotes tumor growth. [More]
Preclinical data from Synthetic Biologics' SYN-005 for Pertussis treatment presented at ECCMID 2015

Preclinical data from Synthetic Biologics' SYN-005 for Pertussis treatment presented at ECCMID 2015

Synthetic Biologics, Inc., a developer of pathogen-specific therapies for serious infections and diseases, with a focus on protecting the microbiome, announced that preclinical data from its novel SYN-005 program for the treatment of Pertussis were presented in two posters at ECCMID 2015 (European Congress of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases), on April 25, 2015, in Copenhagen, Denmark. [More]
Can-Fite announces favorable data from further analysis of CF101 Phase II/III study in patients with psoriasis

Can-Fite announces favorable data from further analysis of CF101 Phase II/III study in patients with psoriasis

Can-Fite BioPharma Ltd. (NYSE MKT: CANF) (TASE: CFBI), a biotechnology company with a pipeline of proprietary small molecule drugs that address inflammatory and cancer diseases, announced today favorable data from further analysis of its Phase II/III double-blind, placebo-controlled study designed to test the efficacy of CF101 in patients with moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis. [More]
Haemonetics' revenue for fourth quarter fiscal 2015 down 6%

Haemonetics' revenue for fourth quarter fiscal 2015 down 6%

Haemonetics Corporation today reported revenue for the fourth quarter fiscal 2015 of $226.5 million, down 6%. Excluding currency impact, revenue was down 4% in the quarter. The Company reported a fourth quarter GAAP net loss of $2.9 million or $0.06 per share. [More]
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