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Penn scientists explore potential therapeutic target for cerebral cavernous malformations

Penn scientists explore potential therapeutic target for cerebral cavernous malformations

Tens of millions of people around the world have abnormal, leak-prone sproutings of blood vessels in the brain called cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs). These abnormal growths can lead to seizures, strokes, hemorrhages, and other serious conditions, yet their precise molecular cause has never been determined. [More]
High cholesterol in mid-life can impact heart health later

High cholesterol in mid-life can impact heart health later

Most young adults might assume they have years before needing to worry about their cholesterol. [More]
CHLA researchers develop new protein-based therapy against drug-resistant leukemia cells

CHLA researchers develop new protein-based therapy against drug-resistant leukemia cells

Resistance of leukemia cells to contemporary chemotherapy is one of the most formidable obstacles to treating acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), the most common form of childhood cancer. Now researchers at Children's Hospital Los Angeles have designed and developed a new protein-based therapy they believe will prove highly effective against drug-resistant leukemia cells. [More]
Study: Poor psychosocial work environment linked to cardiovascular problems

Study: Poor psychosocial work environment linked to cardiovascular problems

A psychosocially poor work environment means that employees experience highly demanding requirements but have little ability to control their work or not feel sufficiently appreciated for the contributions they make. [More]
Pitt researchers receive NIH grant to improve health of sedentary, overweight people

Pitt researchers receive NIH grant to improve health of sedentary, overweight people

University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health researchers are flipping conventional thought on its head regarding how to improve the health of sedentary people at risk for diabetes and heart disease in a new study designed to combat a condition popularly called "sitting disease." [More]
Researchers decode how cancer uses cell-cell interaction mechanism to promote metastasis

Researchers decode how cancer uses cell-cell interaction mechanism to promote metastasis

Cancer uses a little-understood element of cell signaling to hijack the communication process and spread, according to Rice University researchers. [More]
Study explores economic outcomes of hospital-based violence intervention

Study explores economic outcomes of hospital-based violence intervention

At more than 25 hospitals across the U.S., health care professionals have embraced a public health approach to their work--taking action to prevent violent injuries, not just treat them. In programs known as hospital-based violence intervention programs (HVIPs), teams of medical professionals, social workers and researchers step in at a critical moment in a patient's life--the period following a violent injury such as a gunshot or stab wound--with case management, counseling and other services that help these victims break free from the cycle of violence. [More]
Morphine after tonsillectomy may be life threatening for children

Morphine after tonsillectomy may be life threatening for children

Treating post-operative pain with morphine can cause life-threatening respiratory problems in some children who have had their tonsils and/or adenoids removed, new research has found. [More]

Large numbers of boys suffer from cognitive disabilities linked to lead than girls

A study recently published in the Journal of Environmental Health provides evidence the female hormones estrogen and estradiol may help ward off the effects of lead exposure for young girls, explaining why boys, in greater numbers than girls, are shown to suffer from the cognitive disabilities linked to lead. [More]
Research findings may accelerate work to safely control diabetes

Research findings may accelerate work to safely control diabetes

For those with diabetes, managing blood sugar is a balancing act -- if blood sugar is too high it raises the risk for nerve damage, blindness, kidney failure, and heart trouble, and if too low it can lead to a seizure or unconsciousness. [More]
Study examines effects of beetroot juice on physical function of COPD patients

Study examines effects of beetroot juice on physical function of COPD patients

A Wake Forest University study to investigate the effects of acute beetroot juice ingestion on the exercise capacity of COPD patients shows some promise, but a larger clinical trial is needed to verify results. [More]
New study focuses on improving Iowa healthcare exchange

New study focuses on improving Iowa healthcare exchange

The Partnership to Fight Chronic Disease released a public opinion poll of Iowa health care leaders and a new study analyzing the impact of increased cost sharing on patient adherence to prescription medications. The PFCD is a nationwide coalition working to educate policy makers and the public on the costs of chronic diseases. [More]
New research could help pave way to new cancer therapies

New research could help pave way to new cancer therapies

New research from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem shows that the most common form of white blood cells, called neutrophils, contain many different subtypes, of which some fight the development of cancer and others promote its progression. The research could help pave the way to new therapies that fight cancer by increasing anti-tumor neutrophils while limiting pro-tumor neutrophils. [More]
Cardiac regeneration strategies need to be based on severity of heart injury

Cardiac regeneration strategies need to be based on severity of heart injury

A new study by researchers at Children's Hospital Los Angeles has shown that neonatal mouse hearts have varying regenerative capacities depending upon the severity of injury. Using cryoinjury - damaging the heart through exposure to extreme cold in order to mimic cellular injury caused by myocardial infarction - investigators found that neonatal mouse hearts can fully recover normal function following a mild injury, though fail to regenerate after a severe injury. [More]
Voices of loved ones telling familiar stories can help awaken unconscious brain, speed coma recovery

Voices of loved ones telling familiar stories can help awaken unconscious brain, speed coma recovery

"Can he hear me?" family members are desperate to know when a loved one with a traumatic brain injury is in a coma. [More]
Excessive salt intake 'reprograms' the brain, leads to hypertension

Excessive salt intake 'reprograms' the brain, leads to hypertension

An international research team led by scientists at McGill University has found that excessive salt intake "reprograms" the brain, interfering with a natural safety mechanism that normally prevents the body's arterial blood pressure from rising. [More]
UAB Research Probes Molecular Basis Of Rare Genetic Disorder

UAB Research Probes Molecular Basis Of Rare Genetic Disorder

An international group co-led by University of Alabama at Birmingham researcher Mary MacDougall, Ph.D., has unraveled the molecular basis for the rare, inherited genetic disorder, Singleton-Merten Syndrome (SMS). Individuals with SMS develop extreme, life-threatening calcification of the aorta and heart valves, early-onset periodontitis and root resorption of the teeth, decreases in bone density, and loss of bone tissue at the tips of fingers and toes. [More]
Cypher Genomics, Sequenom sign development agreement for noninvasive prenatal tests

Cypher Genomics, Sequenom sign development agreement for noninvasive prenatal tests

Cypher Genomics, Inc., the leading genome informatics company, and Sequenom, Inc., the leading molecular diagnostics company, today announced a development agreement for next generation noninvasive prenatal tests (NIPT). [More]
Gensignia's research in CT lung cancer screening recognized by ASCO

Gensignia's research in CT lung cancer screening recognized by ASCO

Gensignia scientific co-founders' research has been recognized in Clinical Cancer Advances 2015: Annual Report on Progress Against Cancer From the American Society of Clinical Oncology published online in the Journal of Clinical Oncology (JCO) on January 20, 2015. [More]
USC neuroscientists find potential prevention for Alzheimer's disease

USC neuroscientists find potential prevention for Alzheimer's disease

University of Southern California neuroscientists may have unlocked another puzzle to preventing risks that can lead to Alzheimer's disease. Researchers at Keck Medicine of USC used high-resolution imaging of the living human brain to show for the first time that the brain's protective blood barrier becomes leaky with age, starting at the hippocampus, a critical learning and memory center that is damaged by Alzheimer's disease. [More]