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TJP1 protein could help determine multiple myeloma patients who may best benefit from proteasome inhibitors

TJP1 protein could help determine multiple myeloma patients who may best benefit from proteasome inhibitors

A gene known as TJP1 (tight junction protein 1) could help determine which multiple myeloma patients would best benefit from proteasome inhibitors such as bortezomib, as well as combination approaches to enhance proteasome inhibitor sensitivity, according to a study led by The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. [More]
Penn researchers report results of CAR therapy trial in brain cancer patients

Penn researchers report results of CAR therapy trial in brain cancer patients

Immune cells engineered to seek out and attack a type of deadly brain cancer known as glioblastoma (GBM) were found to have an acceptable safety profile and successfully migrate to and infiltrate tumors, researchers from Penn Medicine and Harvard University reported at the AACR Annual Meeting 2016. [More]
CHMP recommends conditional marketing authorisation for Janssen’s daratumumab

CHMP recommends conditional marketing authorisation for Janssen’s daratumumab

Janssen-Cilag announced today that the Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use of the European Medicines Agency has recommended the granting of a conditional marketing authorisation for first-in-class CD38 immunotherapy daratumumab in the European Union. [More]
Plitidepsin in combination with dexamethasone shows top-line results in Phase III multiple myeloma trial

Plitidepsin in combination with dexamethasone shows top-line results in Phase III multiple myeloma trial

PharmaMar today announced positive top-line results of its Phase III clinical trial -ADMYRE- with Aplidin (plitidepsin) in combination with dexamethasone versus dexamethasone alone in patients with relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma (MM). [More]
Four key genes govern growth, multiplication of blood stem cells

Four key genes govern growth, multiplication of blood stem cells

An important element in getting blood stem cells to multiply outside the body is to understand which of the approximately 20,000 genes in the human body control their growth. Now a research team at Lund University in Sweden has studied close to 15,000 of these genes alongside each other. [More]
Ibrutinib and idelalisib drugs for chronic lymphatic leukaemia can prolong survival time of high-risk patients

Ibrutinib and idelalisib drugs for chronic lymphatic leukaemia can prolong survival time of high-risk patients

Studies conducted at the Comprehensive Cancer Center at MedUni Vienna and Vienna General Hospital show that the drugs ibrutinib and idelalisib used in the targeted treatment of chronic lymphatic leukaemia can significantly prolong the survival time of high-risk patients. [More]
Scientists find surprising link between iPS cell reprogramming, blood cell formation and cancer

Scientists find surprising link between iPS cell reprogramming, blood cell formation and cancer

The ability to reprogram cells has revolutionized stem cell research with major implications for almost all fields of modern biology. A decade ago Shinya Yamanaka described a procedure that revolutionized stem cell biology. Using a genetic trick that introduces a cocktail of four genes into cultured cells from human biopsies, he was able to generate induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS) from mature skin or blood cells [More]
RUVICA (ibrutinib) capsules approved for treatment-naïve CLL patients

RUVICA (ibrutinib) capsules approved for treatment-naïve CLL patients

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved IMBRUVICA (ibrutinib) capsules for treatment-naïve patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). [More]
New combination treatment shows promise for treating acute myeloid leukaemia

New combination treatment shows promise for treating acute myeloid leukaemia

Walter and Eliza Hall Institute researchers have discovered that the treatment of the most deadly form of blood cancer may be improved by combining two recently developed drugs. [More]
IMP's Johannes Zuber receives German Cancer Prize 2016

IMP's Johannes Zuber receives German Cancer Prize 2016

Johannes Zuber, group leader at the Research Institute of Molecular Pathology (IMP) in Vienna, receives the German Cancer Prize 2016 in the category of experimental cancer research. [More]
Researchers launch clinical trials to test novel cellular-immunotherapy to treat three types of blood cancer

Researchers launch clinical trials to test novel cellular-immunotherapy to treat three types of blood cancer

Cancer immunology is based upon boosting the body's own immune system to vanquish malignancies. It is among the fastest growing areas of oncology research. Researchers at UC San Diego Moores Cancer Center have launched three clinical trials to test the safety and efficacy of a novel cellular-immunotherapy that uses modified T cells - one of the immune system's primary weapons - to treat three different types of blood cancer that often defy existing therapies. [More]
Australian researchers reveal how nutlins pave way for improving future of cancer treatment

Australian researchers reveal how nutlins pave way for improving future of cancer treatment

Australian researchers have resolved a mystery about how a promising new class of anti-cancer drugs, called nutlins, work - paving the way for improving the future of cancer treatment. [More]
Amgen announces availability of Kyprolis (carfilzomib) in the UK for treatment of relapsed multiple myeloma

Amgen announces availability of Kyprolis (carfilzomib) in the UK for treatment of relapsed multiple myeloma

Amgen today announced that Kyprolis in combination with lenalidomide and dexamethasone is now available in the UK for the treatment of adult patients with multiple myeloma who have received at least one prior therapy. [More]
Cell Therapy Catapult becomes Cell and Gene Therapy Catapult

Cell Therapy Catapult becomes Cell and Gene Therapy Catapult

The Cell Therapy Catapult, the UK organisation dedicated to the growth of the UK cell and gene therapy industry by bridging the gap between scientific research and commercialisation, today announces the official change of its name to the Cell and Gene Therapy Catapult. [More]
ST Asia signs licensing deal with PharmaMar to distribute new multiple myeloma drug in South East Asia

ST Asia signs licensing deal with PharmaMar to distribute new multiple myeloma drug in South East Asia

International biopharmaceutical company Specialised Therapeutics Asia will supply and distribute a novel oncology drug candidate throughout South East Asia, following an exclusive licensing deal with European pharmaceutical company PharmaMar. [More]
Simple blood test could predict relapse in AML patients

Simple blood test could predict relapse in AML patients

A simple blood test capable of detecting trace levels of leukaemia cells remaining after intensive chemotherapy has been developed by scientists at the National Institute for Health Research Biomedical Research Centre at Guy’s and St Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust and King’s College London. [More]
Hhex protein could be key target for new therapies to cure leukaemia

Hhex protein could be key target for new therapies to cure leukaemia

Melbourne researchers have showed that they can stop leukaemia in its tracks by targeting a protein that puts the handbrake on cancer cell growth. [More]
Researchers identify origins of aggressive childhood lymphoma

Researchers identify origins of aggressive childhood lymphoma

The origins of a type of aggressive childhood lymphoma have been found, giving hope that new drugs could be designed to prevent the disease coming back after treatment. [More]
Drugs that block KDM4C and PRMT1 genes could be effective in treating AML

Drugs that block KDM4C and PRMT1 genes could be effective in treating AML

Two genes have been identified that are critical to the development of the biggest leukaemia killer, acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). Researchers at King’s College London found that drugs that selectively block these genes could be highly effective in treating this type of leukaemia. [More]
McMaster University researchers take a giant leap in detecting early stages of leukemia

McMaster University researchers take a giant leap in detecting early stages of leukemia

McMaster University researchers have taken a giant leap in identifying the early stages of a deadly cancer and predicting how it will develop in individuals. [More]
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