Blood Pressure News and Research RSS Feed - Blood Pressure News and Research

Blood Pressure is the force of circulating blood on the walls of the arteries. Blood pressure is taken using two measurements: systolic (measured when the heart beats, when blood pressure is at its highest) and diastolic (measured between heart beats, when blood pressure is at its lowest). Blood pressure is written with the systolic blood pressure first, followed by the diastolic blood pressure (for example 120/80).
Revised blood pressure targets for diabetes patients may increase number of stroke patients

Revised blood pressure targets for diabetes patients may increase number of stroke patients

The Swedish National Board of Health and Welfare recently raised the recommended target blood pressure for patients with diabetes. [More]
Morbidly obese individuals more likely to experience heart failure, say researchers

Morbidly obese individuals more likely to experience heart failure, say researchers

A study by Johns Hopkins researchers of more than 13,000 people has found that even after accounting for such risk factors as high blood pressure, high cholesterol and diabetes, so-called morbid obesity appears to stand alone as a standout risk for heart failure, but not for other major types of heart disease. [More]
Neuropsychologist pinpoints risk factors for dementia

Neuropsychologist pinpoints risk factors for dementia

Dementia strikes one in 14 people in the UK over 65, and 47 million people worldwide.Yet scientists are still urgently trying to find why the disease affects some but not others. [More]
Next generation wearables for health monitoring: an interview with Dr Steven LeBoeuf

Next generation wearables for health monitoring: an interview with Dr Steven LeBoeuf

Wearables have proliferated in the marketplace, but there's still a lot of opportunity for growth. One of the ways in which wearables are limited is that people expect their wearables to really measure what they feel is important to be measured [More]
Music interventions help improve quality of life in cancer patients

Music interventions help improve quality of life in cancer patients

We've all heard of laughter being the best medicine, but what about music? A systematic review published by the Cochrane Library found that there is significant evidence that music interventions help alleviate symptoms of anxiety, pain and fatigue in cancer patients, while also boosting their quality of life. [More]
Study finds alarming rates of obesity, high blood pressure readings among adolescent student-athletes

Study finds alarming rates of obesity, high blood pressure readings among adolescent student-athletes

Researchers at Thomas Jefferson University found similar rates of obesity and high blood pressure readings in student-athletes as would be expected in the general adolescent population, which may suggest that participation in athletics does not protect against these conditions. [More]
Replacing one sugar-sweetened beverage with water may help reduce body weight

Replacing one sugar-sweetened beverage with water may help reduce body weight

Think one little sugary soda won't make a difference on your waistline? Think again. If people replace just one calorie-laden drink with water, they can reduce body weight and improve overall health, according to a Virginia Tech researcher. [More]
Increased parental longevity linked to lower risk of cardiovascular conditions in offspring

Increased parental longevity linked to lower risk of cardiovascular conditions in offspring

In middle aged populations, the risks of cardiovascular conditions are progressively lower the longer a person's parents lived past 69 years old, according to a study of 186,000 participants using a voluntary database published today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. [More]
DASH diet could be effective, non-pharmacologic approach to prevent gout flares

DASH diet could be effective, non-pharmacologic approach to prevent gout flares

New research indicates that a healthy diet can effectively lower blood levels of uric acid, a known trigger of gout. The findings are published in Arthritis & Rheumatology, a journal of the American College of Rheumatology . [More]
Six tips to incorporate movement into everyday life

Six tips to incorporate movement into everyday life

Commuters and desk sitters have probably heard the news that sitting is not good for our health. [More]
Strict blood pressure control may help protect against early death in CKD patients

Strict blood pressure control may help protect against early death in CKD patients

For individuals with chronic kidney disease, strict blood pressure control may help protect against premature death. That's the conclusion of a recent analysis of clinical trial data. The findings appear in an upcoming issue of the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology. [More]
New study shows frozen embryo transfer safer, more successful in women with PCOS

New study shows frozen embryo transfer safer, more successful in women with PCOS

Women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) who receive frozen embryos during in vitro fertilization have safer and more successful pregnancies than those who get fresh embryos, according to the results of a recent collaboration between Penn State College of Medicine and Chinese researchers. [More]
Study shows 1 in 5 hospitalized adults discharged with vital sign instabilities

Study shows 1 in 5 hospitalized adults discharged with vital sign instabilities

Twenty percent of people hospitalized are released before all vital signs are stable, a pattern that is associated with an increased risk of death and hospital readmission, a new study by UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers shows [More]
Study shows overall prevalence of diabetic kidney disease remains unchanged among U.S. adults

Study shows overall prevalence of diabetic kidney disease remains unchanged among U.S. adults

Among U.S. adults with diabetes from 1988 to 2014, the overall prevalence of diabetic kidney disease did not change significantly, while the prevalence of albuminuria declined and the prevalence of reduced estimated glomerular filtration rate increased, according to a study appearing in the August 9 issue of JAMA. [More]
DASH-style diet could help lower risk of developing chronic kidney disease

DASH-style diet could help lower risk of developing chronic kidney disease

People who ate a diet high in nuts and legumes, low-fat dairy, whole grains, fruits, and vegetables and low in red and processed meat, sugar-sweetened beverages and sodium were at a significantly lower risk of developing chronic kidney disease over the course of more than two decades, new Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health research suggests. [More]
Penn study shows synchronized refill program enhances medication adherence

Penn study shows synchronized refill program enhances medication adherence

Programs aimed at helping patients adhere to prescription medication regimens have become an area of interest for researchers as nearly half of patients do not take medications as prescribed. [More]
Working or volunteering could decrease chances of physical disability in elders

Working or volunteering could decrease chances of physical disability in elders

Working or volunteering can reduce the chances of chronic health conditions leading to physical disability in older Americans, according to researchers at Georgia State University and Florida State University. [More]
Researcher receives grant to study how changes in gut bacteria could lead to obesity-related disorders

Researcher receives grant to study how changes in gut bacteria could lead to obesity-related disorders

Andrew Gewirtz, a professor in the Institute for Biomedical Sciences at Georgia State University, has received a four-year, $1.8-million federal grant to study how changes in intestinal bacteria could lead to obesity and metabolic syndrome. [More]
Watching cartoons during dental treatment could help reduce anxiety and distress in children

Watching cartoons during dental treatment could help reduce anxiety and distress in children

Watching cartoons through video glasses during dental treatment could help lessen children's anxiety and distress as well as reducing disruptive behaviour, according to a randomized controlled trial published in Acta Odontologia Scandinavica. [More]
Gasotransmitters in the body could potentially be used to develop new drugs

Gasotransmitters in the body could potentially be used to develop new drugs

Gases once thought of only as environmental pollutants are now known to be produced by the body. They could potentially be used to develop drugs to treat diseases including heart failure and cancer. [More]
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