Blood Pressure News and Research RSS Feed - Blood Pressure News and Research

Blood Pressure is the force of circulating blood on the walls of the arteries. Blood pressure is taken using two measurements: systolic (measured when the heart beats, when blood pressure is at its highest) and diastolic (measured between heart beats, when blood pressure is at its lowest). Blood pressure is written with the systolic blood pressure first, followed by the diastolic blood pressure (for example 120/80).

VHVI implants miniaturized HeartWare HVAD Pump through minimally invasive approach

Sometimes smaller is better. This is especially true of left ventricular assist devices, the mechanically operated heart pumps that are implanted in heart failure patients to bridge them to transplantation. [More]
Drug used to treat hypertension prevents post-traumatic epilepsy in rodent model

Drug used to treat hypertension prevents post-traumatic epilepsy in rodent model

Between 10 and 20 percent of all cases of epilepsy result from severe head injury, but a new drug promises to prevent post-traumatic seizures and may forestall further brain damage caused by seizures in those who already have epilepsy. [More]

FDA approves Cyramza to treat patients with advanced stomach cancer

Based on results of a clinical trial led by Dana-Farber Cancer Institute scientists, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved a molecularly targeted drug as second-line treatment in advanced stomach cancer that has progressed after standard chemotherapy has failed. [More]

Urine test separates nonadherent from treatment-resistant hypertensive patients

Researchers have used a urine test to show that about a quarter of patients with supposedly treatment-resistant hypertension are actually failing to take their medications as prescribed. [More]
Narrowing of carotid artery in neck without any symptoms may be linked to memory problems

Narrowing of carotid artery in neck without any symptoms may be linked to memory problems

For the first time, researchers have demonstrated that narrowing of the carotid artery in the neck without any symptoms may be linked to problems in learning, memory, thinking and decision-making, compared to people with similar risk factors but no narrowing in the neck artery, according to a study released today that will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology's 66th Annual Meeting in Philadelphia, April 26 to May 3, 2014. [More]
Penn study clarifies action of potential new class of pain relievers that may benefit and not hurt heart

Penn study clarifies action of potential new class of pain relievers that may benefit and not hurt heart

Nonsteroidal antinflamatory drugs (NSAIDs) that block an enzyme called COX-2 relieve pain and inflammation but can cause heart attacks, stroke, heart failure, and even sudden cardiac death. [More]

FDA approves molecularly targeted drug as second-line treatment for advanced stomach cancer

Based on results of a clinical trial led by Dana-Farber Cancer Institute scientists, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved a molecularly targeted drug as second-line treatment in advanced stomach cancer that has progressed after standard chemotherapy has failed. [More]
Researchers explore new standard of continuity of care for stroke patients

Researchers explore new standard of continuity of care for stroke patients

A new study from the Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry is looking at nurse- and pharmacist-led interventions to improve the standard of care for patients who have suffered minor stroke or transient ischemic attack, also known as "mini stoke." [More]

FDA approves GSK's Tanzeum as once-weekly treatment for type 2 diabetes

GlaxoSmithKline plc today announced that the US Food and Drug Administration has approved Tanzeum (albiglutide) for injection, for subcutaneous use, as a once-weekly treatment for type 2 diabetes. Tanzeum has been approved as an adjunct to diet and exercise to improve glycemic control in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus. [More]
NEPHRON+ project improves lives of kidney failure patients by developing wearable artificial kidney device

NEPHRON+ project improves lives of kidney failure patients by developing wearable artificial kidney device

End stage kidney disease is a global public health problem with an estimated 2.4 million patients on dialysis. The number of new cases is rising (7-8% annually) due to population ageing and increased diabetes prevalence. [More]

Study shows obstructive sleep apnea is associated with increased risk of stroke, cancer and death

​A new study shows that moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnea is independently associated with an increased risk of stroke, cancer and death. [More]
Variability in SBP portends cognitive decline

Variability in SBP portends cognitive decline

Findings from the Ohasama study reveal an association between variability in home systolic blood pressure and cognitive decline. [More]
RWJUH offers new alternative to open up blocked arteries

RWJUH offers new alternative to open up blocked arteries

Treatment options for high-risk heart patients with severely calcified coronary artery disease (CAD) have been limited for more than 20 years. Now, Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital offers a new alternative to open up blocked arteries. [More]

Loyola University Medical Center designated as Comprehensive Hypertension Center

Loyola University Medical Center has been approved as a Comprehensive Hypertension Center by the American Society of Hypertension. This designation recognizes centers that have demonstrated the highest level of expertise in treating patients with complex hypertension and co-existing medical conditions such as diabetes and chronic kidney disease. [More]
Mayo Clinic research shows RA patients more likely to develop chronic kidney disease

Mayo Clinic research shows RA patients more likely to develop chronic kidney disease

Rheumatoid arthritis patients are likelier than the average person to develop chronic kidney disease, and more severe inflammation in the first year of rheumatoid arthritis, corticosteroid use, high blood pressure and obesity are among the risk factors, new Mayo Clinic research shows. [More]

Siemens, NKF form new alliance to improve screening for kidney disease in high-risk individuals

Siemens Healthcare and the National Kidney Foundation (NKF) announced today a new strategic alliance focusing on education, awareness and screening for kidney disease in high-risk individuals. This important collaboration will leverage the latest testing recommendations from the NKF to improve detection among the 73 million Americans at risk for kidney disease. [More]
Research shows that rheumatoid arthritis patients are at higher risk of kidney disease

Research shows that rheumatoid arthritis patients are at higher risk of kidney disease

Rheumatoid arthritis patients are likelier than the average person to develop chronic kidney disease, and more severe inflammation in the first year of rheumatoid arthritis, corticosteroid use, high blood pressure and obesity are among the risk factors, new Mayo Clinic research shows. [More]
Childhood obesity rates stabilize in recent years, study finds

Childhood obesity rates stabilize in recent years, study finds

Childhood obesity rates leveled off during a 14-year period between 1999 and 2012, according to research published Monday in the Journal of the American Medical Association: Pediatrics. But the rate of severe obesity increased, especially in Hispanic girls and black boys, according to the study. [More]

Study shows spinal stimulation therapy may have potential to change prognosis of people with paralysis

Four people with paraplegia are able to voluntarily move previously paralyzed muscles as a result of a novel therapy that involves electrical stimulation of the spinal cord, according to a study funded in part by the National Institutes of Health and the Christopher & Dana Reeve Foundation. [More]

Children exposed to 'green exercise' more likely to experience health-enhancing effects after activity

​Children who are exposed to scenes of nature while exercising are more likely to experience health-enhancing effects after activity, according to a Coventry University study published this week in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. [More]