Blood Pressure News and Research RSS Feed - Blood Pressure News and Research

Blood Pressure is the force of circulating blood on the walls of the arteries. Blood pressure is taken using two measurements: systolic (measured when the heart beats, when blood pressure is at its highest) and diastolic (measured between heart beats, when blood pressure is at its lowest). Blood pressure is written with the systolic blood pressure first, followed by the diastolic blood pressure (for example 120/80).
Fixed-dose combinations could help patients stick to taking anti-hypertensive medicines

Fixed-dose combinations could help patients stick to taking anti-hypertensive medicines

There is value in starting off patients with high blood pressure on an all-in-one pill. In the long run, it may help them stick to taking the potentially life-saving medicines prescribed to them. [More]
Study compares effects of two types of sugar on metabolic and vascular function

Study compares effects of two types of sugar on metabolic and vascular function

The type of sugar you eat—and not just calorie count—may determine your risk for chronic disease. [More]
Chronic kidney disease patients have high out-of-pocket healthcare expenditures, study finds

Chronic kidney disease patients have high out-of-pocket healthcare expenditures, study finds

Patients who have chronic kidney disease but are not on dialysis have higher out-of-pocket healthcare expenses than even stroke and cancer patients, according to a study by researchers at Loyola University Chicago and Loyola Medicine. [More]
People with metabolic syndrome may need more vitamin E, new research shows

People with metabolic syndrome may need more vitamin E, new research shows

New research has shown that people with metabolic syndrome need significantly more vitamin E - which could be a serious public health concern, in light of the millions of people who have this condition that's often related to obesity. [More]
Heart CT scans can help personalize treatment for patients with mild high blood pressure

Heart CT scans can help personalize treatment for patients with mild high blood pressure

Using data from a national study, Johns Hopkins researchers determined that using heart CT scans can help personalize treatment in patients whose blood pressure falls in the gray zone of just above normal or mild high blood pressure. [More]
Common drug for high blood pressure repurposed to treat soft tissue sarcoma in Europe

Common drug for high blood pressure repurposed to treat soft tissue sarcoma in Europe

A drug that's commonly used to treat high blood pressure is being repurposed for a rare tissue cancer in Europe. The medication, named propranolol, was recently granted Orphan Drug Designation by the European Commission. [More]
New study reports link between truck driver’s poor health and crash risk

New study reports link between truck driver’s poor health and crash risk

As commuters shimmy past large, lumbering trucks on the road, they may glance over and wonder, "How safe is that driver next to me?" If the truck driver is in poor health, the answer could be: Not very. [More]
Onset of hypertension later in life linked to lower dementia risk, study finds

Onset of hypertension later in life linked to lower dementia risk, study finds

New study results published online today in Alzheimer's & Dementia: The Journal of the Alzheimer's Association suggest that onset of high blood pressure later in life is associated with lower dementia risk after age 90, especially if hypertension is developed at age 80 or older. [More]
Spectroscopy and computer help RUB scientists gain new insights into workings of protein switches

Spectroscopy and computer help RUB scientists gain new insights into workings of protein switches

Using a combination of infrared spectroscopy and computer simulation, researchers at Ruhr-Universität Bochum have gained new insights into the workings of protein switches. [More]
Woman's blood pressure before pregnancy may be linked to babies' sex

Woman's blood pressure before pregnancy may be linked to babies' sex

A new paper published in the American Journal of Hypertension suggests that a woman's blood pressure before pregnancy is related to her likelihood of giving birth to a boy or girl. [More]
Clean-burning ethanol stoves may reduce hypertension, cardiovascular risk in pregnant women, study shows

Clean-burning ethanol stoves may reduce hypertension, cardiovascular risk in pregnant women, study shows

Replacing biomass and kerosene cookstoves used throughout the developing world with clean-burning ethanol stoves may reduce hypertension and cardiovascular risk in pregnant women, according to new research published online, ahead of print in the American Thoracic Society’s American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine. [More]
Experts suggest new five-stage system of classifying patients at risk for heart attack

Experts suggest new five-stage system of classifying patients at risk for heart attack

Experts at Johns Hopkins and New York's Mount Sinai Health System have published a suggested new plan for a five-stage system of classifying the risk of heart attack in those with heart disease, one they say puts much-needed and long-absent focus on the risks faced by millions of Americans who pass so-called stress tests or have less obvious or earlier-stage danger signs. [More]
Blue maize may help protect against metabolic syndrome, rat study shows

Blue maize may help protect against metabolic syndrome, rat study shows

A new study shows that a rat model of metabolic syndrome fed a high-sugar and high-cholesterol diet and given blue maize extract showed significant improvement in systolic blood pressure, high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, and triglyceride levels compared to those not given the extract. [More]
Childhood obesity starts in the womb?

Childhood obesity starts in the womb?

There is incontrovertible evidence that some harmful drugs and toxins can affect lifelong health. For example, if women take certain drugs in pregnancy, such as thalidomide, there are well documented effects on lifelong health. These have obvious and dramatic effects on the child... [More]
SLU expert suggests viewing exercise as daily contribution that offers cumulative health benefits

SLU expert suggests viewing exercise as daily contribution that offers cumulative health benefits

Have you already faltered on your New Year's resolution to exercise regularly in 2017? Joined a gym, but only worked out two days so far? New workout gear still neatly folded with tags attached? Don't give up your admirable ambition just yet. Instead, consider a new attitude to refocus your approach toward your exercise goal. [More]
Epigenetic changes favor development of fatty liver in humans and mice

Epigenetic changes favor development of fatty liver in humans and mice

Mice with a strong tendency to obesity already exhibit epigenetic changes at six weeks of age, inducing the liver to amplify its production of the enzyme DPP4 and release it into the circulation. Over the long term, this favors the development of a fatty liver. [More]
Study finds new link between short sleep during pregnancy and gestational diabetes mellitus

Study finds new link between short sleep during pregnancy and gestational diabetes mellitus

A Singapore-based study has found a new health link between short sleep during pregnancy and gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). [More]
Drug that improves blood flow in damaged heart may be possible treatment option for TNBC

Drug that improves blood flow in damaged heart may be possible treatment option for TNBC

Researchers are looking at a drug once used to improve blood flow in damaged hearts in thousands of patients as a possible treatment option for triple negative breast cancer (TNBC). [More]
New US guidelines developed for the prevention of peanut allergy

New US guidelines developed for the prevention of peanut allergy

Recommendations for introducing peanut-containing foods to infants, compiled by an expert panel sponsored by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health, were published this week. The guidelines are intended to help prevent the development of peanut allergy. They provide specific recommendations for infants with differing risk levels for developing peanut allergy. [More]
Studies reveal long-term effects of gastric bypass surgery in severely obese teenagers

Studies reveal long-term effects of gastric bypass surgery in severely obese teenagers

Gastric bypass surgery helps severely obese teenagers lose weight and keep it off, according to the first long-term follow-up studies of teenagers who had undergone the procedure 5-12 years earlier. [More]
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