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Blood Vessels are tubes through which the blood circulates in the body. Blood vessels include a network of arteries, arterioles, capillaries, venules, and veins.
New AHA/ASA guidelines recommend stent retrievers to treat strokes in selected patients

New AHA/ASA guidelines recommend stent retrievers to treat strokes in selected patients

New devices called stent retrievers are enabling physicians to benefit selected patients who suffer strokes caused by blood clots. The devices effectively stop strokes in their tracks. [More]
NDSU's Stephen O'Rourke awarded NIH grant to conduct cardiovascular research

NDSU's Stephen O'Rourke awarded NIH grant to conduct cardiovascular research

Stephen O'Rourke, professor of pharmaceutical sciences at North Dakota State University, Fargo, has received a $435,000 grant from the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute of the National Institutes of Health to conduct cardiovascular research. [More]
Study of genetic mutations could lead to optimized treatment plans for aplastic anemia patients

Study of genetic mutations could lead to optimized treatment plans for aplastic anemia patients

Scientists have identified a group of genetic mutations in patients with aplastic anemia, which likely will help doctors optimize treatment for this rare and deadly blood condition. The study, appearing in the New England Journal of Medicine, could lead to tailor-made treatment plans for aplastic anemia patients as part of the emerging precision medicine movement. [More]
Scientists identify new protein that affects growth of secondary breast tumours in the brain

Scientists identify new protein that affects growth of secondary breast tumours in the brain

Scientists from the University of Leeds and The Institute of Cancer Research, London, have discovered a new protein which triggers the growth of blood vessels in breast cancer tumours which have spread to the brain, a common location which breast cancer can spread to. [More]
NIBIB-supported researchers create platelet-like particles to control excessive bleeding, augment clotting

NIBIB-supported researchers create platelet-like particles to control excessive bleeding, augment clotting

NIBIB-supported researchers have created tiny gel particles that can perform the same essential functions as platelets. The particles could one day be used to control excessive bleeding following traumatic injury or in individuals with impaired clotting due to an inherited condition or as a result of certain medications or chemotherapy. [More]
Human intervention trial results show that Comvita’s Olive Leaf Extract improves cardiovascular function

Human intervention trial results show that Comvita’s Olive Leaf Extract improves cardiovascular function

Comvita, the global natural health products company, today announces the results of a human intervention trial demonstrating for the first time a positive effect between the intake of Comvita’s fresh Olive Leaf Extract and positive short-term changes in measures associated with cardiovascular disease. [More]
Bayer Yakuhin receives MHLW approval in Japan for EYLEA (aflibercept) Injection to treat RVO patients

Bayer Yakuhin receives MHLW approval in Japan for EYLEA (aflibercept) Injection to treat RVO patients

Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Inc. today announced that Bayer HealthCare's Japanese subsidiary, Bayer Yakuhin, Ltd., received approval for EYLEA (aflibercept) Injection by the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare (MHLW) in Japan for the treatment of patients with macular edema secondary to retinal vein occlusion (RVO). [More]
Growth of lymph node metastases takes advantage of existing blood vessels

Growth of lymph node metastases takes advantage of existing blood vessels

While the use of antiangiogenesis drugs that block the growth of new blood vessels can improve the treatment of some cancers, clinical trials of their ability to prevent the development of new metastases have failed. Now a study from the Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center may have found at least one reason why. [More]
UIC researchers identify molecular mechanism that directs embryonic stem cells to turn into endothelial cells

UIC researchers identify molecular mechanism that directs embryonic stem cells to turn into endothelial cells

Researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago have identified a molecular mechanism that directs embryonic stem cells to mature into endothelial cells -- the specialized cells that form blood vessels. Understanding the processes initiated by this mechanism could help scientists more efficiently convert stem cells into endothelial cells for use in tissue repair, or for engineering blood vessels to bypass blockages in the heart. [More]
Noisy road traffic may reduce life expectancy, increase stroke risk

Noisy road traffic may reduce life expectancy, increase stroke risk

Living in an area with noisy road traffic may reduce life expectancy, according to new research published in the European Heart Journal. [More]
NIH awards $1.8 million grant for brain imaging technique

NIH awards $1.8 million grant for brain imaging technique

A researcher at the Cockrell School of Engineering at The University of Texas at Austin has received a four-year, $1.8 million grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to develop a new technique for imaging blood flow across the surface of the brain that could help patients undergoing neurosurgery. [More]
Study reveals benefit of early screening for vascular disorder patent ductus arteriosus among preterm infants

Study reveals benefit of early screening for vascular disorder patent ductus arteriosus among preterm infants

Among extremely preterm infants, early screening for the vascular disorder patent ductus arteriosus before day 3 of life was associated with a lower risk of in-hospital death and pulmonary hemorrhage, but not with differences in other severe complications, according to a study in the June 23/30 issue of JAMA. [More]
The Lancet Oncology publishes results of CYRAMZA (ramucirumab) Phase III trial for HCC treatment

The Lancet Oncology publishes results of CYRAMZA (ramucirumab) Phase III trial for HCC treatment

Eli Lilly and Company announced that The Lancet Oncology has published results of the Phase III REACH trial that evaluated CYRAMZA (ramucirumab) as a second-line treatment for people with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), also known as liver cancer. While the REACH trial's primary endpoint of overall survival favored the CYRAMZA arm, it was not statistically significant. [More]
ALK1 protein determines the extent of breast tumour's spread in the body

ALK1 protein determines the extent of breast tumour's spread in the body

For breast cancer to be fatal, the tumour has to send out metastases to other parts of the body. The cancer cells are spread via the blood vessels, and a research team at Lund University in Sweden has now proven that the protein ALK1 determines the extent of the tumour's spread in the body. [More]
New study reports more practical approach to heal the heart after a heart attack

New study reports more practical approach to heal the heart after a heart attack

Stem cell have been the main focus of healing therapy research because they can morph into new cells, and using a patient's own stem cells will not induce an autoimmune response. For healing after a heart attack, the ideal time to administer these therapies is when reopening the clogged blood vessel because the heart is easily accessible. While stem cells show promise for heart attack treatment, the process of harvesting and reintroducing the cells—which can take days or weeks—is too slow for this window. [More]
Brain changes reflect higher risk of cerebrovascular disease in women who experience more hot flashes

Brain changes reflect higher risk of cerebrovascular disease in women who experience more hot flashes

Women who experience more hot flashes, particularly while sleeping, during the menopause transition are more likely to have brain changes reflecting a higher risk for cerebrovascular disease, such as stroke and other brain blood flow problems, according to a pilot study led by researchers at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine published online today in Menopause and funded by the National Institutes of Health. [More]
Men benefit from ultrasound screening for abdominal aortic aneurysms

Men benefit from ultrasound screening for abdominal aortic aneurysms

Men benefit from one-time screening for abdominal aortic aneurysms via ultrasound. Studies provide proof that their risk of dying is reduced, the abdominal aorta ruptures less often, and emergency surgery can be avoided more often. Far fewer data are available for women and they show no relevant differences between the groups investigated. [More]
Diagnosing brain lesions in children can be challenging, report Loyola physicians

Diagnosing brain lesions in children can be challenging, report Loyola physicians

Brain lesions in children can be especially challenging to diagnose, according to a report in the journal Frontiers in Neurology by a multidisciplinary team of Loyola University Medical Center physicians.' [More]

Study examines how improvised explosive devices can lead to traumatic brain injury

By accounting for a rush of blood to the head, University of Nebraska-Lincoln engineers have found that blast waves from concussive explosions may put far greater strain on the brain than previously thought. [More]
MGH researchers develop bioartificial replacement limbs suitable for transplantation

MGH researchers develop bioartificial replacement limbs suitable for transplantation

A team of Massachusetts General Hospital investigators has made the first steps towards development of bioartificial replacement limbs suitable for transplantation. In their report, which has been published online in the journal Biomaterials, the researchers describe using an experimental approach previously used to build bioartificial organs to engineer rat forelimbs with functioning vascular and muscle tissue. [More]
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