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Blood Vessels are tubes through which the blood circulates in the body. Blood vessels include a network of arteries, arterioles, capillaries, venules, and veins.
Scientists use novel theranostics technique for early thromboembolism diagnosis and treatment

Scientists use novel theranostics technique for early thromboembolism diagnosis and treatment

Researchers from the University of Arkansas for Medical Science (USA), in collaboration with University Hospital Frankfurt and University Hospital Dresden, under the supervision of Prof. Vladimir Zharov and with the participation of Alexander Melerzanov, the dean of Department of Biological and Medical Physics (MIPT), conducted experiments on mice to detect blood clotting using photoacoustic flow-cytometry. [More]
Real-time MRI guidance could help target and deliver stem cell therapies

Real-time MRI guidance could help target and deliver stem cell therapies

Working with animals, a team of scientists reports it has delivered stem cells to the brain with unprecedented precision by threading a catheter through an artery and infusing the cells under real-time MRI guidance. [More]
Fraunhofer researchers plan to use electron beams to remove germs from tissue transplants

Fraunhofer researchers plan to use electron beams to remove germs from tissue transplants

Medical products, packaging and food can be safely and efficiently sterilized with electron beams. [More]
New software that simulates interventions could spare young heart patients from surgery

New software that simulates interventions could spare young heart patients from surgery

Children with congenital heart defects often undergo a battery of strenuous examinations and interventions. In the EU CARDIOPROOF project, Fraunhofer researchers have developed software to simulate certain interventions in advance. [More]
Good blood microcirculation linked to longevity

Good blood microcirculation linked to longevity

Human longevity has been previously linked by researchers to genetic factors, calorie restriction, and certain life-style factors such as physical activity or the Mediterranean diet. [More]
Foul smelling gas could help people with diabetes recover from heart complications

Foul smelling gas could help people with diabetes recover from heart complications

A gas that was formerly known for its noxious qualities could help people with diabetes recover from common heart and blood vessel complications, concludes research led by the University of Exeter Medical School. [More]
LJI researchers reveal unanticipated way by which neutrophils defend against invading pathogens

LJI researchers reveal unanticipated way by which neutrophils defend against invading pathogens

As an arm of the innate immune system, white blood cells called neutrophils form the first line of defense against invading pathogens. [More]
Simple steps can improve survival of sepsis patients

Simple steps can improve survival of sepsis patients

Sepsis, commonly called blood poisoning, is a common affliction that can affect people of all ages. A series of simple measures tested at a Norwegian hospital can make a difference in successfully treating sepsis. [More]
Transplantation of placenta-derived MSCs can prevent diabetes-related CLI in rats

Transplantation of placenta-derived MSCs can prevent diabetes-related CLI in rats

In an effort to determine if stem cell therapy can prevent or improve a condition called "diabetic foot" caused by poor blood flow in patients with diabetes, a team of researchers in China has found that transplanting human placenta-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) into rats modeled with diabetes can affect blood vessel growth, potentially improving blood flow and preventing critical limb ischemia (CLI), a condition that results in diabetic foot and frequently leads to amputation. [More]
Study suggests autologous EPC transfusion may prevent miscarriage in high-risk pregnancies

Study suggests autologous EPC transfusion may prevent miscarriage in high-risk pregnancies

In a study focusing on the role of self-donated (autologous) bone marrow-derived endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) in placental vascular development, researchers in Japan have discovered that when transplanted into pregnant mice, EPCs can contribute to better blood vessel growth that helps in forming "normalized" placental vascularization, leading, in turn, to reduced recurrent miscarriages by providing a healthier fetal environment during gestation. [More]
Atomic level analysis reveals how two classes of calcium channel blockers produce different effects

Atomic level analysis reveals how two classes of calcium channel blockers produce different effects

An atomic level analysis has revealed how two classes of calcium channel blockers, widely prescribed for heart disease patients, produce separate therapeutic effects through their actions at different sites on the calcium channel molecule. [More]
Drinking green tea could prevent abdominal aortic aneurysm

Drinking green tea could prevent abdominal aortic aneurysm

Japan's favorite beverage might be offering more than just a relaxing tea break. [More]
NIH researchers discover rare, lethal inflammatory disease that affects young children

NIH researchers discover rare, lethal inflammatory disease that affects young children

National Institutes of Health researchers have discovered a rare and sometimes lethal inflammatory disease - otulipenia - that primarily affects young children. They have also identified anti-inflammatory treatments that ease some of the patients' symptoms: fever, skin rashes, diarrhea, joint pain and overall failure to grow or thrive. [More]
Morbidly obese individuals more likely to experience heart failure, say researchers

Morbidly obese individuals more likely to experience heart failure, say researchers

A study by Johns Hopkins researchers of more than 13,000 people has found that even after accounting for such risk factors as high blood pressure, high cholesterol and diabetes, so-called morbid obesity appears to stand alone as a standout risk for heart failure, but not for other major types of heart disease. [More]
Swimming can be effective option for treating patients with fibromyalgia pain

Swimming can be effective option for treating patients with fibromyalgia pain

A study performed by researchers at the Federal University of São Paulo shows swimming is as effective as walking to relieve pain and improve quality of life for patients with fibromyalgia. [More]
Popular pain and fever reliever does not worsen asthma in children, study shows

Popular pain and fever reliever does not worsen asthma in children, study shows

WIn a study of children with mild, persistent asthma, scientists found that acetaminophen was tolerated without the worsening of asthma, when compared with ibuprofen use. [More]
Maintaining proper oxygen supply in tumors could be key factor to stop progression of cancer

Maintaining proper oxygen supply in tumors could be key factor to stop progression of cancer

The lack of oxygen in tumor cells changes the cells' gene expression, thereby contributing to the growth of cancer. [More]
Migraine patients differ from healthy people by increased vascular reactivity

Migraine patients differ from healthy people by increased vascular reactivity

A group of scientists from several Russian universities and medical centers made progress in explaining the nature of one of the most ancient neurologic diseases – migraine. The study was conducted within a larger project to develop a device capable of remotely and effectively diagnosing this disease. [More]
Could nanotechnology turn the cancer cell suicide switch back on? An interview with Professor Dipanjan Pan

Could nanotechnology turn the cancer cell suicide switch back on? An interview with Professor Dipanjan Pan

Before I explain the discovery, I would take a step back and explain an interesting event that takes place in the cancer cells. Normal cells follow a rapid and irreversible process to efficiently eradicate dysfunctional cells. This is a natural process by which damaged cells commit ‘suicide’. This process is known as apoptosis or programmed cell death. [More]
Cerebral protection device reduces brain lesions after TAVI in patients with severe aortic stenosis

Cerebral protection device reduces brain lesions after TAVI in patients with severe aortic stenosis

Among patients with severe aortic stenosis (narrowing of the aortic valve) undergoing transcatheter aortic valve implantation, the use of a cerebral protection device (a filter that captures debris [tissue and plaque] dislodged during the procedure) reduced the number and volume of brain lesions, according to a study appearing in the August 9 issue of JAMA. [More]
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