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Blood Vessels are tubes through which the blood circulates in the body. Blood vessels include a network of arteries, arterioles, capillaries, venules, and veins.
Zika virus infection may cause ocular problems in Brazilian infants with microcephaly

Zika virus infection may cause ocular problems in Brazilian infants with microcephaly

Researchers studying babies with a Zika virus-related birth defect say they have found previously unreported eye problems possibly linked to the virus that could result in severe visual impairment. [More]
New technique to grow blood vessels could accelerate growth of regenerative medicine

New technique to grow blood vessels could accelerate growth of regenerative medicine

In addition the technique to grow the blood vessels in a 3D scaffold cuts down on the risk of transplant rejection because it uses cells from the patient. It was developed by researchers from the University of Bath's Department of Pharmacy and Pharmacology, working with colleagues at Bristol Heart Institute. [More]
Aggressive blood pressure intervention can benefit frail adults aged 75 and older

Aggressive blood pressure intervention can benefit frail adults aged 75 and older

NIH-supported researchers are reporting additional details about a widely-publicized study that linked a systolic blood pressure target under 120 mm Hg (millimeters of mercury) with reduced cardiovascular disease and a lower risk of death. [More]
High blood pressure could increase vascular dementia risk

High blood pressure could increase vascular dementia risk

High blood pressure could significantly raise the risk of developing the second most common form of dementia, according to a new study from The George Institute for Global Health. [More]
New Research: High blood pressure raises risk of dementia

New Research: High blood pressure raises risk of dementia

High blood pressure could significantly raise the risk of developing the second most common form of dementia, according to a new study from The George Institute for Global Health. [More]
First-ever clinical trial of bioabsorbable cardiovascular device in children shows promise

First-ever clinical trial of bioabsorbable cardiovascular device in children shows promise

Current cardiovascular valve or blood vessel implants are generally associated with a number of complications, have limited efficacy over time, and may necessitate repeated interventions over a patient's lifetime, especially when implanted in a young child. [More]
PCI with polymer-free BA9 drug-coated stent better than bare metal stent in ACS patients

PCI with polymer-free BA9 drug-coated stent better than bare metal stent in ACS patients

Patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS) who are at high risk for bleeding have significantly lower rates of target lesion revascularisation and fewer adverse events after undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) with a polymer-free biolimus-A (BA9) drug-coated stent than with those receiving a bare metal stent (BMS) in results from a sub-study of the LEADERS FREE trial reported for the first time in a late-breaker session at EuroPCR 2016. [More]
Combination of two compounds found in red grapes, oranges could treat diseases

Combination of two compounds found in red grapes, oranges could treat diseases

A combination of two compounds found in red grapes and oranges could be used to improve the health of people with diabetes, and reduce cases of obesity and heart disease. [More]
New NICE guidance recommends use of Roche Diagnostics’ new pre-eclampsia test

New NICE guidance recommends use of Roche Diagnostics’ new pre-eclampsia test

Obstetricians and midwives are today welcoming the publication of new NICE guidance recommending the use of a new test from Roche Diagnostics that can rule-out the development of the life threatening condition, pre-eclampsia, within one week in pregnant women. [More]
Modified dosage of clot-busting drug can reduce intracerebral haemorrhage

Modified dosage of clot-busting drug can reduce intracerebral haemorrhage

The safety of a controversial clot-busting drug has been investigated by researchers, who have shown a modified dosage can reduce serious bleeding in the brain and improve survival rates. [More]
Non-invasive 3-D virtual heart assessment tool can help predict arrhythmia risk in patients

Non-invasive 3-D virtual heart assessment tool can help predict arrhythmia risk in patients

When electrical waves in the heart run amok in a condition called arrhythmia, sudden death can occur. To save the life of a patient at risk, doctors currently implant a small defibrillator to sense the onset of arrhythmia and jolt the heart back to a normal rhythm. [More]
New technology allows for safer, more precise removal of plaque during atherectomy procedure

New technology allows for safer, more precise removal of plaque during atherectomy procedure

Rush Oak Park Hospital is the first hospital in the surrounding area to acquire and use a newly approved technology that allows vascular surgeons to see in real-time the plaque they are removing during an atherectomy, a minimally invasive procedure that helps treat peripheral artery disease (PAD). [More]
Leica Microsystems launches IOLcompass Pro intraocular lens positioning system

Leica Microsystems launches IOLcompass Pro intraocular lens positioning system

Leica Microsystems in partnership with TrueVision Systems Inc. launches the IOLcompass Pro. IOLcompass Pro is a software-based guidance system for pre-operative planning and intra-operative positioning of premium intraocular lenses (IOLs). It supports ophthalmic surgeons to achieve minimal residual astigmatism for their patients by providing stable and accurate guidance throughout the cataract surgical workflow. [More]
Enzyme previously thought beneficial could pose threat to developing embryos

Enzyme previously thought beneficial could pose threat to developing embryos

A pair of Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation scientists have discovered that an enzyme previously thought only to be beneficial could, in fact, pose significant danger to developing embryos. The new research could have implications not only for prenatal development but also for treating lymphedema and liver damage resulting from acetaminophen overdose. [More]
Fish oil supplements combined with anti-cancer therapy can reduce renal cell carcinoma

Fish oil supplements combined with anti-cancer therapy can reduce renal cell carcinoma

Researchers at UC Davis have shown that docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), a fatty acid commonly found in fish and fish oil supplements, reduces renal cell carcinoma invasiveness, growth rate, and blood vessel growth when combined with the anti-cancer therapy regorafenib. The study was published in the journal Molecular Cancer Therapeutics. [More]
Southern Society bestows 2016 Clinical Science Young Investigator Award to Stansfield

Southern Society bestows 2016 Clinical Science Young Investigator Award to Stansfield

Dr. Brian K. Stansfield, neonatologist at Children's Hospital of Georgia and a 2004 graduate of the Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University, has received the 2016 Clinical Science Young Investigator Award from the Southern Society for Pediatric Research. [More]
DIEP flap breast reconstruction improves long-term quality of life for breast cancer patients

DIEP flap breast reconstruction improves long-term quality of life for breast cancer patients

For women who have undergone mastectomy for breast cancer, breast reconstruction using the abdominal "DIEP flap" provides good long-term quality of life (QOL)—similar to that of women without breast cancer, reports a study in the May issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, the official medical journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS). [More]
Scientists find way to reduce need for secondary cataract surgery

Scientists find way to reduce need for secondary cataract surgery

Scientists at the University of East Anglia may have found a way to prevent complications from surgery to treat cataract - the world's leading cause of blindness. [More]
New research reveals sliding ability of cancer cells that helps in tumor spread

New research reveals sliding ability of cancer cells that helps in tumor spread

Metas­tasis. The very word evokes fear. Defined as the spread of cancer cells from one part of the body to another, metastasis is the cause of approximately 90 percent of deaths among cancer patients. How does metastasis come about? And can we stop it?
New research from a team led by Northeastern's Anand Asthagiri, associate professor of bioengineering and chemical engineering, helps to answer those questions. It provides an astonishing look at the biophysical properties that permit breast cancer cells to "slide" by obsta­les and travel out of their primary tumor toward a blood vessel that will carry them to a new site. [More]
New research on EdnrB, Wnt signaling pathways could lead to therapies for skin pigment disorders

New research on EdnrB, Wnt signaling pathways could lead to therapies for skin pigment disorders

A pair of molecular signals controls skin and hair color in mice and humans — and could be targeted by new drugs to treat skin pigment disorders like vitiligo, according to a report by scientists at NYU Langone Medical Center. [More]
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