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Blood Pressure is the force of circulating blood on the walls of the arteries. Blood pressure is taken using two measurements: systolic (measured when the heart beats, when blood pressure is at its highest) and diastolic (measured between heart beats, when blood pressure is at its lowest). Blood pressure is written with the systolic blood pressure first, followed by the diastolic blood pressure (for example 120/80).
Novel gene therapy can treat pulmonary hypertension linked with heart failure

Novel gene therapy can treat pulmonary hypertension linked with heart failure

Scientists have used a novel gene therapy to halt the progression of pulmonary hypertension, a form of high blood pressure in the lung blood vessels that is linked to heart failure, according to a study led by Roger J. Hajjar, MD, Professor of Medicine and Director of the Cardiovascular Research Center at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. [More]
Researchers explore effects of adolescent obesity on cognitive performance in adulthood

Researchers explore effects of adolescent obesity on cognitive performance in adulthood

The Franco-Mexican research explores the cognitive performance in adulthood when the subjects have been exposed to an obesogenic environment during adolescence. [More]
Older women with chronic health problems more likely to have lower quality of life

Older women with chronic health problems more likely to have lower quality of life

Researchers writing in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society recently learned that older women who are frail, and who have six or more chronic health conditions, are twice as likely to have a lower quality of life compared to women with less than three risk factors. [More]
Black raspberry intake can lower key measure of arterial stiffness in patients with metabolic syndrome

Black raspberry intake can lower key measure of arterial stiffness in patients with metabolic syndrome

A new study shows that black raspberry extract can significantly lower a key measure of arterial stiffness-an indicator of cardiovascular disease. Black raspberry intake was also associated with increased levels of circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), which help repair and regenerate damaged arteries, according to the study published in Journal of Medicinal Food, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. The article is available free on the Journal of Medicinal Food website until May 28, 2016. [More]
Nurse scientist asks health-care systems to set patients up for mortality cliff

Nurse scientist asks health-care systems to set patients up for mortality cliff

Longer lifespans, due to advances in medicine and public health, mean people are living longer with multiple chronic conditions. [More]
Endocrine Society urges physicians to increase screening for primary aldosteronism

Endocrine Society urges physicians to increase screening for primary aldosteronism

The Endocrine Society today issued a Clinical Practice Guideline calling on physicians to ramp up screening for primary aldosteronism, a common cause of high blood pressure. [More]
Mediterranean diet reduces risk of recurrent heart attacks or strokes

Mediterranean diet reduces risk of recurrent heart attacks or strokes

A "Mediterranean" diet, high in fruit, vegetables, fish and unrefined foods, is linked to a lower risk of heart attack and stroke in people who already have heart disease, according to a study of over 15,000 people in 39 countries around the world. The research also showed that eating greater amounts of healthy food was more important for these people than avoiding unhealthy foods, such as refined grains, sweets, desserts, sugared drinks and deep-fried food - a "Western" diet. [More]
Cancer survivors at risk of death after organ transplant

Cancer survivors at risk of death after organ transplant

People who had cancer before receiving an organ transplant were more likely to die of any cause, die of cancer or develop a new cancer than organ recipients who did not previously have cancer, a new paper has found. However, the increased risk is less than that reported in some previous studies. [More]
Researchers observe worrisome increase in anaphylaxis rate

Researchers observe worrisome increase in anaphylaxis rate

Anaphylaxis, known to be a sudden and potentially life-threatening allergic reaction, seems to be increasing among children, according to a new study led by a team at the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre. [More]
Pediatric researchers develop minimally invasive techniques to treat plastic bronchitis

Pediatric researchers develop minimally invasive techniques to treat plastic bronchitis

Pediatric researchers have devised an innovative, safe and minimally invasive procedure that helps relieve rare but potentially life-threatening airway blockages occurring in children who had surgery for congenital heart defects. [More]
More cautious blood pressure-lowering strategy may be reasonable for elderly CKD patients

More cautious blood pressure-lowering strategy may be reasonable for elderly CKD patients

New research indicates that higher systolic blood pressure is linked with poor outcomes in patients with kidney disease, although the association diminishes with advanced age. The findings, which come from a study appearing in an upcoming issue of the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology (CJASN), provide valuable information concerning patients who are often excluded from blood pressure-lowering clinical trials. [More]
New study explores mechanisms that control size, shape of tubular organ systems

New study explores mechanisms that control size, shape of tubular organ systems

A new study from the group of Holger Gerhardt in collaboration with Katie Bentley's Lab addresses a long standing question in the wider field of developmental biology and tissue patterning in general, and in the vascular biology field in particular: 'What are the fundamental mechanisms controlling size and shape of tubular organ systems'. [More]
High fructose consumption during pregnancy may increase risk factors for heart disease in children

High fructose consumption during pregnancy may increase risk factors for heart disease in children

The negative health effects of consuming large amounts of fructose could impact several generations, according to researchers at The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston. [More]
Scientists discover CD2AP protein that plays key role in nervous system

Scientists discover CD2AP protein that plays key role in nervous system

University of Louisville researchers have discovered that a protein previously known for its role in kidney function also plays a significant role in the nervous system. In an article featured in the April 13 issue of the Journal of Neuroscience, they show that the adaptor protein CD2AP is a key player in a type of neural growth known as collateral sprouting. [More]
Scientists identify underlying cause of immune suppression in people with high level spinal cord injuries

Scientists identify underlying cause of immune suppression in people with high level spinal cord injuries

Scientists report in Nature Neuroscience they have identified an underlying cause of dangerous immune suppression in people with high level spinal cord injuries and they propose a possible treatment. [More]
Inhibiting adrenaline receptors reduces breast cancer brain metastases

Inhibiting adrenaline receptors reduces breast cancer brain metastases

While we look to invent new medicines to treat cancer, a parallel approach to repurpose existing medicines may be highly effective. Stress, mediated by adrenaline, has been suspected to promote cancer growth and this research study shows that by blocking adrenaline receptors in breast cancers, they are less successful in spreading to and growing in the brain. [More]
Specific intake levels of xanthohumol reduces obesity, cholesterol and elevated glucose

Specific intake levels of xanthohumol reduces obesity, cholesterol and elevated glucose

A recent study at Oregon State University has identified specific intake levels of xanthohumol, a natural flavonoid found in hops, that significantly improved some of the underlying markers of metabolic syndrome in laboratory animals and also reduced weight gain. [More]
Fujitsu develops portable breath sensor that can quickly measure concentration of gas components in people's breath

Fujitsu develops portable breath sensor that can quickly measure concentration of gas components in people's breath

Fujitsu Laboratories Ltd. today announced that it has developed a portable breath sensor that can extract and quickly measure the concentration of only specified gas components, such as ammonia, that are included at low concentrations in people's breath and are suggested to be correlated with lifestyle diseases. [More]
Cancer causing genetic condition risk in children lower than previously thought

Cancer causing genetic condition risk in children lower than previously thought

The odds of children having a genetic condition which causes learning difficulties and tumours have been dramatically cut, thanks to genetic analysis led by The University of Manchester and Central Manchester University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust [More]
Existing cancer drugs may be able to help people with enlarged heart cells

Existing cancer drugs may be able to help people with enlarged heart cells

UT Southwestern Medical Center cardiology researchers have identified molecular ties between the growth of cancer cells and heart cells that suggest existing cancer drugs may be able to help those with enlarged heart cells -- a condition that can lead to heart attacks and stroke. [More]
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