Blood Pressure News and Research RSS Feed - Blood Pressure News and Research

Blood Pressure is the force of circulating blood on the walls of the arteries. Blood pressure is taken using two measurements: systolic (measured when the heart beats, when blood pressure is at its highest) and diastolic (measured between heart beats, when blood pressure is at its lowest). Blood pressure is written with the systolic blood pressure first, followed by the diastolic blood pressure (for example 120/80).
Researchers explore new standard of continuity of care for stroke patients

Researchers explore new standard of continuity of care for stroke patients

A new study from the Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry is looking at nurse- and pharmacist-led interventions to improve the standard of care for patients who have suffered minor stroke or transient ischemic attack, also known as "mini stoke." [More]
FDA approves GSK's Tanzeum as once-weekly treatment for type 2 diabetes

FDA approves GSK's Tanzeum as once-weekly treatment for type 2 diabetes

GlaxoSmithKline plc today announced that the US Food and Drug Administration has approved Tanzeum (albiglutide) for injection, for subcutaneous use, as a once-weekly treatment for type 2 diabetes. Tanzeum has been approved as an adjunct to diet and exercise to improve glycemic control in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus. [More]
NEPHRON+ project improves lives of kidney failure patients by developing wearable artificial kidney device

NEPHRON+ project improves lives of kidney failure patients by developing wearable artificial kidney device

End stage kidney disease is a global public health problem with an estimated 2.4 million patients on dialysis. The number of new cases is rising (7-8% annually) due to population ageing and increased diabetes prevalence. [More]

Study shows obstructive sleep apnea is associated with increased risk of stroke, cancer and death

​A new study shows that moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnea is independently associated with an increased risk of stroke, cancer and death. [More]

Variability in SBP portends cognitive decline

Findings from the Ohasama study reveal an association between variability in home systolic blood pressure and cognitive decline. [More]
RWJUH offers new alternative to open up blocked arteries

RWJUH offers new alternative to open up blocked arteries

Treatment options for high-risk heart patients with severely calcified coronary artery disease (CAD) have been limited for more than 20 years. Now, Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital offers a new alternative to open up blocked arteries. [More]

Loyola University Medical Center designated as Comprehensive Hypertension Center

Loyola University Medical Center has been approved as a Comprehensive Hypertension Center by the American Society of Hypertension. This designation recognizes centers that have demonstrated the highest level of expertise in treating patients with complex hypertension and co-existing medical conditions such as diabetes and chronic kidney disease. [More]

Mayo Clinic research shows RA patients more likely to develop chronic kidney disease

Rheumatoid arthritis patients are likelier than the average person to develop chronic kidney disease, and more severe inflammation in the first year of rheumatoid arthritis, corticosteroid use, high blood pressure and obesity are among the risk factors, new Mayo Clinic research shows. [More]

Siemens, NKF form new alliance to improve screening for kidney disease in high-risk individuals

Siemens Healthcare and the National Kidney Foundation (NKF) announced today a new strategic alliance focusing on education, awareness and screening for kidney disease in high-risk individuals. This important collaboration will leverage the latest testing recommendations from the NKF to improve detection among the 73 million Americans at risk for kidney disease. [More]

Research shows that rheumatoid arthritis patients are at higher risk of kidney disease

Rheumatoid arthritis patients are likelier than the average person to develop chronic kidney disease, and more severe inflammation in the first year of rheumatoid arthritis, corticosteroid use, high blood pressure and obesity are among the risk factors, new Mayo Clinic research shows. [More]
Childhood obesity rates stabilize in recent years, study finds

Childhood obesity rates stabilize in recent years, study finds

Childhood obesity rates leveled off during a 14-year period between 1999 and 2012, according to research published Monday in the Journal of the American Medical Association: Pediatrics. But the rate of severe obesity increased, especially in Hispanic girls and black boys, according to the study. [More]

Study shows spinal stimulation therapy may have potential to change prognosis of people with paralysis

Four people with paraplegia are able to voluntarily move previously paralyzed muscles as a result of a novel therapy that involves electrical stimulation of the spinal cord, according to a study funded in part by the National Institutes of Health and the Christopher & Dana Reeve Foundation. [More]

Children exposed to 'green exercise' more likely to experience health-enhancing effects after activity

​Children who are exposed to scenes of nature while exercising are more likely to experience health-enhancing effects after activity, according to a Coventry University study published this week in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. [More]

Interarm blood pressure measurement advised for diabetic patients

Initial blood pressure measurements in patients with diabetes should be taken from both arms, say researchers. [More]
Study: Moderate to severe depression increases risk of heart failure by 40%

Study: Moderate to severe depression increases risk of heart failure by 40%

Moderate to severe depression increases the risk of heart failure by 40%, a study of nearly 63 000 Norwegians has shown. The findings were presented for the first time today at EuroHeartCare 2014. [More]
Eating watermelon reduces blood pressure in overweight individuals

Eating watermelon reduces blood pressure in overweight individuals

Be sure to pick up a watermelon - or two - at your neighborhood farmers' market. It could save your life. [More]
Patients who stay longer in ICU have substantial physical impairments 2 years later

Patients who stay longer in ICU have substantial physical impairments 2 years later

Patients have substantial physical impairments even two years after being discharged from the hospital after a stay in an intensive care unit (ICU), new Johns Hopkins research suggests. [More]

Scientists find that ingredients in chocolate may help prevent obesity

Improved thinking. Decreased appetite. Lowered blood pressure. The potential health benefits of dark chocolate keep piling up, and scientists are now homing in on what ingredients in chocolate might help prevent obesity, as well as type-2 diabetes. They found that one particular type of antioxidant in cocoa prevented laboratory mice from gaining excess weight and lowered their blood sugar levels. The report appears in ACS' Journal of Agricultural & Food Chemistry. [More]
FDA expands age indication of Adacel vaccine for immunization against tetanus, diphtheria, pertussis

FDA expands age indication of Adacel vaccine for immunization against tetanus, diphtheria, pertussis

Sanofi Pasteur, the vaccines division of Sanofi, announced today that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has expanded the approved age indication of Adacel® (Tetanus Toxoid, Reduced Diphtheria Toxoid and Acellular Pertussis Vaccine Adsorbed; Tdap) for active booster immunization for the prevention of tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis as a single dose in persons 10 through 64 years of age. [More]
Northwestern University awarded NIH grant to conduct phase III Parkinson's neuroprotective study

Northwestern University awarded NIH grant to conduct phase III Parkinson's neuroprotective study

Tanya Simuni, M.D., medical director of Northwestern University's Parkinson's Disease and Movement Disorders Center, was awarded a grant from the National Institutes of Health to conduct a $16 million phase III study of the safety and efficacy of the drug isradipine as a potential neuroprotective agent in Parkinson's disease. [More]