Blood Pressure News and Research RSS Feed - Blood Pressure News and Research

Blood Pressure is the force of circulating blood on the walls of the arteries. Blood pressure is taken using two measurements: systolic (measured when the heart beats, when blood pressure is at its highest) and diastolic (measured between heart beats, when blood pressure is at its lowest). Blood pressure is written with the systolic blood pressure first, followed by the diastolic blood pressure (for example 120/80).
FDA approves LILETTA (levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system) to prevent pregnancy

FDA approves LILETTA (levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system) to prevent pregnancy

Actavis plc, a leading global specialty pharmaceutical company, and Medicines360, a nonprofit women's health pharmaceutical company, today announced the approval of LILETTA (levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system) by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for use by women to prevent pregnancy for up to three years. [More]
Feast-or-famine diet may extend lifespan, improve age-related diseases

Feast-or-famine diet may extend lifespan, improve age-related diseases

University of Florida Health researchers have found that putting people on a feast-or-famine diet may mimic some of the benefits of fasting, and that adding antioxidant supplements may counteract those benefits. [More]
NIAID partners with Liberian government to test ZMapp drug for Ebola virus disease

NIAID partners with Liberian government to test ZMapp drug for Ebola virus disease

In partnership with the Liberian government, the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases today launched a clinical trial to obtain safety and efficacy data on the investigational drug ZMapp as a treatment for Ebola virus disease. The study, which will be conducted in Liberia and the United States, is a randomized controlled trial enrolling adults and children with known Ebola virus infection. [More]
LGTmedical issued U.S. patent for Kenek Core audio waveform technology

LGTmedical issued U.S. patent for Kenek Core audio waveform technology

LionsGate Technologies, Inc., a privately-held medical device company, announced today that the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office has issued a patent for its pulse oximetry technology based on the Kenek Core proprietary audio waveform platform. [More]
Scientists confirm relation between levels of certain pollutants in the body and levels of obesity

Scientists confirm relation between levels of certain pollutants in the body and levels of obesity

A team of Spanish scientists, which includes several researchers from the University of Granada, has confirmed that there is a relation between the levels of certain environmental pollutants that a person accumulates in his or her body and their level of obesity. Subjects with more pollutants in their organisms present besides higher levels of cholesterol and triglycerides, which are important risk factors for cardiovascular disease. [More]
Children watching TV for more than two hours a day at greater risk of blood pressure

Children watching TV for more than two hours a day at greater risk of blood pressure

A study on European children concludes that spending more than two hours a day in front of a screen increases the probability of high blood pressure by 30%. The article also points out that doing no daily physical activity or doing less than an hour a day increases this risk by 50%. [More]
Loyola physician reveals top five health concerns for men, offers tips to prevent them

Loyola physician reveals top five health concerns for men, offers tips to prevent them

Men lead women in the likelihood to die from nearly all the most common causes of death. Still, men are less likely to go to the doctor than women and often try to ignore symptoms of health problems. [More]
Sleeping more than eight hours a night could increase risk of stroke

Sleeping more than eight hours a night could increase risk of stroke

People who sleep more than eight hours a night may have an increased risk of stroke, according to a new study published in the February 25, 2015, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Study finds new approaches to manage anticoagulant-associated intracerebral hemorrhage

Study finds new approaches to manage anticoagulant-associated intracerebral hemorrhage

Among patients with oral anticoagulation-associated intracerebral hemorrhage (bleeding within the brain), reversal of international normalized ratio (INR; a measure used to determine the clotting tendency of blood while on medication) below a certain level within 4 hours and systolic blood pressure less than 160 mm Hg at 4 hours were associated with lower rates of hematoma (a localized swelling filled with blood) enlargement, and resumption of anticoagulant therapy was associated with a lower risk of ischemic events without increased bleeding complications, according to a study in the February 24 issue of JAMA. [More]
'Walking football' could have a multitude of health benefits, say researchers

'Walking football' could have a multitude of health benefits, say researchers

The new sporting craze of 'Walking Football' may enable people to continue playing football into their 60s and 70s while reaping a multitude of health benefits, according to Aston University researchers. [More]
Diets high in animal proteins can worsen progression of kidney disease

Diets high in animal proteins can worsen progression of kidney disease

An estimated 26 million people in the United States have chronic kidney disease, which can lead to complete kidney failure. Once the kidneys fail, patients either need to undergo dialysis treatments three times a week or have a kidney transplant to remain alive. [More]
Penn State researchers explore hydrogen sulfide's probable role in regulating blood pressure

Penn State researchers explore hydrogen sulfide's probable role in regulating blood pressure

Widely considered simply a malodorous toxic gas, hydrogen sulfide is now being studied for its probable role in regulating blood pressure, according to researchers. [More]
New research finds that synthetic flame retardants can cause metabolic and liver problems

New research finds that synthetic flame retardants can cause metabolic and liver problems

Chemicals used as synthetic flame retardants that are found in common household items such as couches, carpet padding, and electronics have been found to cause metabolic and liver problems that can lead to insulin resistance, which is a major cause of obesity, according to new research from the University of New Hampshire. [More]
Nicotine metabolite supports learning, memory by amplifying action of primary chemical messenger

Nicotine metabolite supports learning, memory by amplifying action of primary chemical messenger

Nicotine's primary metabolite supports learning and memory by amplifying the action of a primary chemical messenger involved in both, researchers report. [More]
Loyola researchers receive grant to improve health of low-income minorities

Loyola researchers receive grant to improve health of low-income minorities

Loyola University Chicago health sciences researchers have received a $500,000 grant from the George M. Eisenberg Foundation for Charities, based in Arlington Heights, Ill., for a 10-year study to improve the health of low-income minority residents in communities surrounding Loyola's Health Sciences Campus in Maywood. [More]
Corticosteroids decrease treatment failure among patients with community-acquired pneumonia

Corticosteroids decrease treatment failure among patients with community-acquired pneumonia

Among patients with severe community-acquired pneumonia and high initial inflammatory response, the use of the corticosteroid methylprednisolone decreased treatment failure, compared with placebo, according to a study in the February 17 issue of JAMA. [More]
Study: Most risk calculators used by clinicians overestimate risk of heart attack

Study: Most risk calculators used by clinicians overestimate risk of heart attack

Most "risk calculators" used by clinicians to gauge a patient's chances of suffering a heart attack and guide treatment decisions appear to significantly overestimate the likelihood of a heart attack, according to results of a study by investigators at Johns Hopkins and other institutions. [More]
Large majority of coronary patients fail to meet lifestyle, risk factor targets

Large majority of coronary patients fail to meet lifestyle, risk factor targets

The large majority of coronary patients in Europe are failing to achieve their lifestyle, risk factor and therapeutic targets as set out in the latest prevention guidelines. [More]
UBMD physician discusses the dangers of hypothermia

UBMD physician discusses the dangers of hypothermia

The arctic cold snap affecting the Midwest and the Northeast this weekend should not be taken lightly, says David Holmes, MD, clinical associate professor of family medicine in the University at Buffalo School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences. [More]
Harmless plant extract can help treat Cushing Disease

Harmless plant extract can help treat Cushing Disease

Cushing Disease, not to be confused with Cushing's Syndrome, is caused by a tumour in the pituitary gland in the brain. The tumour secrets increased amounts of the stress hormone adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) followed by cortisol release from the adrenal glands leading to rapid weight gain, elevated blood pressure and muscular weakness. [More]