Blood Pressure News and Research RSS Feed - Blood Pressure News and Research

Blood Pressure is the force of circulating blood on the walls of the arteries. Blood pressure is taken using two measurements: systolic (measured when the heart beats, when blood pressure is at its highest) and diastolic (measured between heart beats, when blood pressure is at its lowest). Blood pressure is written with the systolic blood pressure first, followed by the diastolic blood pressure (for example 120/80).
Lifestyle tips to lower heart disease risks

Lifestyle tips to lower heart disease risks

With the arrival of American Heart Month in February, it's that time of the year to remind ourselves to take good care of our hearts. [More]
Shire announces FDA approval of Vyvanse Capsules for binge eating disorder

Shire announces FDA approval of Vyvanse Capsules for binge eating disorder

Shire plc announced today that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved Vyvanse (lisdexamfetamine dimesylate) Capsules (CII), the first and only medication for the treatment of moderate to severe binge eating disorder (B.E.D.) in adults, shown to significantly reduce the mean number of binge days per week. [More]
OSTAR introduces Cellular TeleHealth Blood Pressure Monitoring System in North America

OSTAR introduces Cellular TeleHealth Blood Pressure Monitoring System in North America

OSTAR Healthcare Technology, a Washington State Based TeleHealth Solutions company, announced the North American launch of yet another first in their Cellular TeleHealth Blood Pressure Monitoring System. [More]
Cardiologist promotes the importance of controlling high blood pressure

Cardiologist promotes the importance of controlling high blood pressure

During Heart Month, the Cardiovascular Institute of New Jersey at Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School is promoting the importance of controlling high blood pressure, also called hypertension, in order to reduce the risk of coronary heart disease and other related chronic disorders in adults. [More]
FDA clears AliveCor's automated detectors that record and display ECG rhythm

FDA clears AliveCor's automated detectors that record and display ECG rhythm

AliveCor, Inc. announced today that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has granted the company clearance for two new algorithms giving users instant feedback on their electrocardiogram (ECG) recordings and expanding its automated interpretation service offerings. [More]
Researchers receive $2.2M grant to study links between depression and cardiovascular disease in HIV patients

Researchers receive $2.2M grant to study links between depression and cardiovascular disease in HIV patients

Jesse Stewart, Ph.D., associate professor of psychology in the School of Science at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, and two colleagues have received a $2.2 million National Institutes of Health grant to investigate the links between depression, depression treatment and cardiovascular disease in adults with HIV. [More]
AP39 compound could help lower heart rate, blood pressure, and blood vessel stiffness

AP39 compound could help lower heart rate, blood pressure, and blood vessel stiffness

A gas that gives rotten eggs their distinctive odour could one day form the basis of new cardiovascular therapies. [More]
CUMC evaluates impact, cost-effectiveness of implementing new hypertension guidelines

CUMC evaluates impact, cost-effectiveness of implementing new hypertension guidelines

Full implementation of new hypertension guidelines could prevent 56,000 cardiovascular disease events (mostly heart attacks and strokes) and 13,000 deaths each year, without increasing overall health care costs, an analysis conducted by researchers at Columbia University Medical Center found. [More]
Preventing obesity-related inflammation may reverse type 2 diabetes

Preventing obesity-related inflammation may reverse type 2 diabetes

Preventing inflammation in obese fat tissue may hold the key to preventing or even reversing type 2 diabetes, new research has found. [More]
Howard Hughes Medical Institute scientists identify the brain's on-off thirst switch

Howard Hughes Medical Institute scientists identify the brain's on-off thirst switch

Howard Hughes Medical Institute scientists have identified a circuit in the brains of mice that regulates thirst. When a subset of cells in the circuit is switched on, mice immediately begin drinking water, even if they are fully hydrated. A second set of cells suppresses the urge to drink. [More]
Medco Health develops online monitoring system for people with sleep apnoea-hypopnoea syndrome

Medco Health develops online monitoring system for people with sleep apnoea-hypopnoea syndrome

The company Medco Health at the Business, Scientific and Technological Park, Espaitec, of the Universitat Jaume I of Castellón, has developed an assistance system based on telemedicine using information and communication technologies, which allows an online daily monitoring of people with sleep apnoea-hypopnoea syndrome. [More]
Kaleo, CHMI partner to reduce prescription drug-related deaths

Kaleo, CHMI partner to reduce prescription drug-related deaths

Kaleo, a privately-held pharmaceutical company, today announced a national strategic partnership with the Clinton Health Matters Initiative, an initiative of the Clinton Foundation, that will help support its goal of cutting prescription drug-related deaths in half, saving approximately 10,000 lives over five years. [More]
High cholesterol in mid-life can impact heart health later

High cholesterol in mid-life can impact heart health later

Most young adults might assume they have years before needing to worry about their cholesterol. [More]
Study: Poor psychosocial work environment linked to cardiovascular problems

Study: Poor psychosocial work environment linked to cardiovascular problems

A psychosocially poor work environment means that employees experience highly demanding requirements but have little ability to control their work or not feel sufficiently appreciated for the contributions they make. [More]
Pitt researchers receive NIH grant to improve health of sedentary, overweight people

Pitt researchers receive NIH grant to improve health of sedentary, overweight people

University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health researchers are flipping conventional thought on its head regarding how to improve the health of sedentary people at risk for diabetes and heart disease in a new study designed to combat a condition popularly called "sitting disease." [More]
Study examines effects of beetroot juice on physical function of COPD patients

Study examines effects of beetroot juice on physical function of COPD patients

A Wake Forest University study to investigate the effects of acute beetroot juice ingestion on the exercise capacity of COPD patients shows some promise, but a larger clinical trial is needed to verify results. [More]
Excessive salt intake 'reprograms' the brain, leads to hypertension

Excessive salt intake 'reprograms' the brain, leads to hypertension

An international research team led by scientists at McGill University has found that excessive salt intake "reprograms" the brain, interfering with a natural safety mechanism that normally prevents the body's arterial blood pressure from rising. [More]
UH Case Medical Center offers new test for coronary artery disease

UH Case Medical Center offers new test for coronary artery disease

Medical tests are stressful. Invasive tests, stress tests and unnecessary surgeries are too, not to mention the costs associated with all of them, but the alternative of undiagnosed heart problems are not. They can be fatal. [More]
Study: Mutated ATRX gene may serve as much-needed biomarker for rare neuroendocrine tumors

Study: Mutated ATRX gene may serve as much-needed biomarker for rare neuroendocrine tumors

A somatic mutation in the ATRX gene has recently been shown as a potential molecular marker for aggressive brain tumors, such as gliomas, neuroblastomas and pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. Now, for the first time, researchers at Penn's Abramson Cancer Center have found that the same mutated gene may serve as a much-needed biomarker for the pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas (PCC/PGL) that become malignant. [More]
New research on safest way to position women during labor

New research on safest way to position women during labor

New research is challenging what many obstetricians and physician anesthesiologists believe is the best way to position women during labor. According to a study published in the February issue of Anesthesiology, the official medical journal of the American Society of Anesthesiologists, the traditional practice of positioning women on their side, with hips tilted at 15 degrees, during labor does not effectively reduce compression of the inferior vena cava, a large vein located near the abdominal area that returns blood to the heart, as previously thought. [More]