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Blood Pressure is the force of circulating blood on the walls of the arteries. Blood pressure is taken using two measurements: systolic (measured when the heart beats, when blood pressure is at its highest) and diastolic (measured between heart beats, when blood pressure is at its lowest). Blood pressure is written with the systolic blood pressure first, followed by the diastolic blood pressure (for example 120/80).
RGS2 protein plays significant role in healthy egg-sperm union in mice

RGS2 protein plays significant role in healthy egg-sperm union in mice

Researchers at the National Institutes of Health have discovered a protein that plays a vital role in healthy egg-sperm union in mice. The protein RGS2 can delay an egg's development into an embryo in order to allow time for sperm to arrive and merge with the egg in a healthy fertilization process. The embryo cannot survive without the male chromosomes. [More]
Resistance training can help reduce liver fat levels in patients suffering from fatty liver disease

Resistance training can help reduce liver fat levels in patients suffering from fatty liver disease

Resistance training in the gym leads to a fall in liver fat levels. This is the finding of a new study held at the University of Haifa in cooperation with Tel Aviv Medical Center and Tel Aviv University. [More]
Brazilian cardiovascular researcher receives Georg Forster Research Award

Brazilian cardiovascular researcher receives Georg Forster Research Award

The cardiovascular researcher Professor Robson Augusto Souza dos Santos of the Federal University of Minas Gerais in Belo Horizonte, Brazil, has been awarded the Georg Forster Research Award of the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation. [More]
Static synapses that lie between cell body and AIS critical for decreasing neuronal excitability

Static synapses that lie between cell body and AIS critical for decreasing neuronal excitability

In biology, stability is important. From body temperature to blood pressure and sugar levels, our body ensures that these remain within reasonable limits and do not reach potentially damaging extremes. [More]
Extremes of stroke symptoms attract misdiagnoses

Extremes of stroke symptoms attract misdiagnoses

Patients with very mild or very severe stroke symptoms are at the greatest risk of being misdiagnosed in the emergency department, research suggests. [More]
Study looks at impact of amyloid imaging on diagnosis, management of patients with cognitive impairment

Study looks at impact of amyloid imaging on diagnosis, management of patients with cognitive impairment

Eli Lilly and Company and Avid Radiopharmaceuticals, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Lilly, today announced new data showing that knowledge of amyloid status as determined by Florbetapir F 18 Injection imaging altered diagnosis and management in the majority of patients being studied. [More]
Biomedical breakthrough reveals never-before-seen details of the body's cellular switchboard

Biomedical breakthrough reveals never-before-seen details of the body's cellular switchboard

A biomedical breakthrough, published today in the journal Nature, reveals never-before-seen details of the human body's cellular switchboard that regulates sensory and hormonal responses. The work is based on an X-ray laser experiment at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. [More]
Nebraska researchers receive $3.5 million NIH grant to study stents for peripheral artery disease

Nebraska researchers receive $3.5 million NIH grant to study stents for peripheral artery disease

Researchers at the University of Nebraska Medical Center have received a five-year, $3.5 million grant funded by the National Institutes of Health to find out why stents don't work well for treating peripheral artery disease (PAD). [More]
Study finds that serum biomarkers can predict pre-eclampsia risk in pregnant women

Study finds that serum biomarkers can predict pre-eclampsia risk in pregnant women

Levels of biomarkers in the blood of pregnant women can be used to predict which women are at risk of pre-eclampsia, finds a study published today (22 July) in BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology (BJOG). ADMA and Hcy, both known to be raised in women with pre-eclampsia, are present in the blood in higher than normal concentrations a month before the onset of the condition. [More]
MediCollector to commercialize Wyss Institute's bedside data-acquisition software

MediCollector to commercialize Wyss Institute's bedside data-acquisition software

The Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University today announced that its bedside data-acquisition software will be commercialized by a recently formed startup company, MediCollector LLC. The announcement follows a worldwide license agreement between Harvard's Office of Technology Development and MediCollector. [More]
Research suggests that only one in three older Americans have diabetes under control

Research suggests that only one in three older Americans have diabetes under control

Only one in three older Americans have their diabetes under control as measured by guidelines set by the American Diabetes Association, new Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health research suggests. [More]
Tips to prevent, treat black widow and brown recluse spider bites

Tips to prevent, treat black widow and brown recluse spider bites

Most spiders are non-venomous and most spider bites are harmless. They may cause some local redness and pain, but can usually be managed at home by washing, applying ice and keeping the area clean. [More]
Cellphone interventions improve health among poor, urban women at risk for diabetes during childbearing years

Cellphone interventions improve health among poor, urban women at risk for diabetes during childbearing years

In a survey of a diverse group of almost 250 young, low-income, inner-city pregnant and postpartum women, Johns Hopkins researchers have learned that more than 90 percent use smartphones or regular cellphones to give and get information. [More]
Aging may trigger adaptive response to offset effects of oxidative stress on blood vessels

Aging may trigger adaptive response to offset effects of oxidative stress on blood vessels

Although the causes of many age-related diseases remain unknown, oxidative stress is thought to be the main culprit. Oxidative stress has been linked to cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases including diabetes, hypertension and age-related cancers. However, researchers at the University of Missouri recently found that aging actually offered significant protection against oxidative stress. [More]
MU researcher receives $2.2 million grant to develop system to display clear blood pressure information

MU researcher receives $2.2 million grant to develop system to display clear blood pressure information

Physicians receive lots of information about patients in a short amount of time, and sometimes that information is scattered, disorganized or difficult to comprehend. Now, a researcher at the University of Missouri School of Medicine has received funding to develop a simpler and clearer system to display blood pressure information. [More]
Allergan announces U.S. availability of SAPHRIS 2.5 mg tablets for children with bipolar I disorder

Allergan announces U.S. availability of SAPHRIS 2.5 mg tablets for children with bipolar I disorder

Allergan plc today announced that SAPHRIS (asenapine) 2.5 mg sublingual (placed under the tongue) black-cherry flavored tablets are available in pharmacies throughout the U.S. In March 2015, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved SAPHRIS for the acute treatment of manic or mixed episodes associated with bipolar I disorder in pediatric patients (ages 10 – 17). [More]
Two dietary modeling studies examine potential impact of sodium reduction ingredient on sodium intake

Two dietary modeling studies examine potential impact of sodium reduction ingredient on sodium intake

Sodium intake in the U.S. exceeds dietary recommendations and has been identified as a nutrient of public health concern in the Scientific Report of the 2015 Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee due to its link to increased risk of hypertension, heart disease, and stroke. [More]
Many mHealth applications not fully accessible to blind customers

Many mHealth applications not fully accessible to blind customers

More Americans are using mobile devices and other technologies to track some aspect of their health at home, from diet and exercise to sleep patterns to bloodwork. [More]
Having high blood pressure in midlife can affect cognition many years later

Having high blood pressure in midlife can affect cognition many years later

Having high blood pressure in your 50's may impact your ability to keep track or plan ahead in your 80's. This study reports a connection between high blood pressure at a younger age can affect cognition many years later. It currently appears in the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease. [More]
New project aims to revolutionize application of optogenetics in neuroscience

New project aims to revolutionize application of optogenetics in neuroscience

The revolution that optogenetics technology has brought to biology -- neuroscience in particular -- could be transformed all over again if a new project getting underway at Brown University and Central Michigan University is successful. [More]
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