Blood Pressure News and Research RSS Feed - Blood Pressure News and Research

Blood Pressure is the force of circulating blood on the walls of the arteries. Blood pressure is taken using two measurements: systolic (measured when the heart beats, when blood pressure is at its highest) and diastolic (measured between heart beats, when blood pressure is at its lowest). Blood pressure is written with the systolic blood pressure first, followed by the diastolic blood pressure (for example 120/80).
Findings could help design tailor-made drugs to treat blood pressure

Findings could help design tailor-made drugs to treat blood pressure

One in three Americans has high blood pressure, a long-term constriction of arteries that can lead to coronary heart disease, heart failure and stroke. [More]
Lilly receives fourth FDA approval for CYRAMZA (ramucirumab)

Lilly receives fourth FDA approval for CYRAMZA (ramucirumab)

Eli Lilly and Company has received its fourth U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval for CYRAMZA (ramucirumab). CYRAMZA (ramucirumab injection 10 mg/mL solution) is now also indicated in combination with FOLFIRI (irinotecan, folinic acid, and 5-fluorouracil) chemotherapy for the treatment of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) with disease progression on or after prior therapy with bevacizumab, oxaliplatin, and a fluoropyrimidine. [More]
New research shows how fat controls energy levels in the brain

New research shows how fat controls energy levels in the brain

An enzyme secreted by the body's fat tissue controls energy levels in the brain, according to new research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. The findings, in mice, underscore a role for the body's fat tissue in controlling the brain's response to food scarcity, and suggest there is an optimal amount of body fat for maximizing health and longevity. [More]
IUPUI researcher awarded NIH grant to study neuroscience underlying obstructive sleep apnea

IUPUI researcher awarded NIH grant to study neuroscience underlying obstructive sleep apnea

Sleep apnea affects an estimated 25 million adults in the United States and is associated with increased risk of hypertension, stroke, health attack and heart failure. [More]
EuroPRevent congress to focus on cardiovascular disease

EuroPRevent congress to focus on cardiovascular disease

While death rates from heart disease in Europe have more than halved in many countries and in most population groups since the early 1980s, heart disease remains by far the leading cause of death. [More]
New study shows regular consumption of yogurt not linked to health-related quality of life

New study shows regular consumption of yogurt not linked to health-related quality of life

Dietary recommendations support the consumption of dairy products as part of a healthy diet. However, after a Spanish study involving more than 4,000 people analysed the relationship between the regular intake of yogurt and health-related quality of life, it declared that there was no link with the improvement of the physical and mental parameters analysed. [More]
New CUMC study finds DNA anomalies in kids with chronic kidney disease

New CUMC study finds DNA anomalies in kids with chronic kidney disease

A significant proportion of children with chronic kidney disease (CKD) have unsuspected chromosomal imbalances, including DNA anomalies that have been linked to neurocognitive disorders, according to a new Columbia University Medical Center study. [More]
CPAP use reduces atrial fibrillation recurrence in patients with obstructive sleep apnea

CPAP use reduces atrial fibrillation recurrence in patients with obstructive sleep apnea

The use of continuous positive airway pressure was associated with a significant reduction in the recurrence of atrial fibrillation in patients with obstructive sleep apnea, according to an analysis of data from past research published today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology: Clinical Electrophysiology. [More]
MSU researchers receive $7 million NIH grant to study link between belly fat and high blood pressure

MSU researchers receive $7 million NIH grant to study link between belly fat and high blood pressure

Michigan State University researchers, who were the first to suggest that high blood pressure could be caused by belly fat hormones "talking" with blood vessels in the abdomen, have received a nearly $7 million National Institutes of Health grant to further their work. [More]
Vascular cells of vertebrates can fuse with themselves

Vascular cells of vertebrates can fuse with themselves

Cells of the vascular system of vertebrates can fuse with themselves. This process, which occurs when a blood vessel is no longer necessary and pruned, has now been described on the cellular level by Prof. Markus Affolter from the Biozentrum of the University of Basel. [More]
New UM SOM study reveals why thiazide drugs not effective in some patients

New UM SOM study reveals why thiazide drugs not effective in some patients

Every year, more than 120 million prescriptions are written worldwide for thiazide drugs, a group of salt-lowering medicines used to treat high blood pressure. These drugs are often work very well, and over decades have saved hundreds of thousands of lives. [More]
AHA selects UAB to take part in $15 million study on high blood pressure

AHA selects UAB to take part in $15 million study on high blood pressure

The University of Alabama at Birmingham is one of four institutions selected to study high blood pressure as part of the American Heart Association's new Strategically Focused Research Network on hypertension. [More]
Study: Cardiorespiratory fitness associated with reduced metabolic syndrome risk among smokers

Study: Cardiorespiratory fitness associated with reduced metabolic syndrome risk among smokers

Cardiorespiratory fitness is associated with reduced metabolic syndrome risk among smokers, according to researchers from The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) School of Public Health. [More]
Majority of patients who survive cardiac arrest experience cognitive problems

Majority of patients who survive cardiac arrest experience cognitive problems

Half of all patients who survive a cardiac arrest experience problems with cognitive functions such as memory and attention. [More]
Genetic study may help identify novel targets for treatment of high blood pressure

Genetic study may help identify novel targets for treatment of high blood pressure

A genetic investigation of individuals in the Framingham Heart Study may prove useful to identify novel targets for the prevention or treatment of high blood pressure. The study, which takes a close look at networks of blood pressure-related genes, is published in the journal Molecular Systems Biology. [More]
Aspirin use continues to surge among older adults in US

Aspirin use continues to surge among older adults in US

A national survey suggests that slightly more than half of the older adults in the United States are now taking a daily dose of aspirin, even though its use is not recommended by the Food and Drug Administration for most people who have not yet had a heart attack or stroke. [More]
Children who experience multiple traumatic events face risk of being hypertensive adults

Children who experience multiple traumatic events face risk of being hypertensive adults

Children who experience multiple traumatic events, from emotional and sexual abuse to neglect, have higher blood pressures as young adults than their peers, researchers report. [More]
HeartWare Ventricular Assist System meets primary endpoint in ENDURANCE clinical trial

HeartWare Ventricular Assist System meets primary endpoint in ENDURANCE clinical trial

HeartWare International, Inc., a leading innovator of less invasive, miniaturized circulatory support technologies that are revolutionizing the treatment of advanced heart failure, today announced that data from its first destination therapy clinical trial cohort, ENDURANCE, successfully demonstrated that the trial achieved the primary endpoint. [More]
Studies examine positive and negative outcomes of using health apps

Studies examine positive and negative outcomes of using health apps

Health apps have the potential to make a broad impact on the health of the general population, argues one expert in The BMJ this week. But another explains that there is not enough evidence to support such claims and suggests that health apps may even be harmful. [More]
NIH-supported clinical trial to test statin use in patients with HIV-related cardiovascular disease

NIH-supported clinical trial to test statin use in patients with HIV-related cardiovascular disease

Researchers have begun enrolling participants in a multicenter international clinical trial to test whether statin administration can reduce the risk for major adverse cardiovascular events, such as heart attacks, strokes, and heart disease, in people with HIV infection. The trial is supported by the National Institutes of Health's National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute and National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. [More]
Advertisement