Blood Pressure News and Research RSS Feed - Blood Pressure News and Research

Blood Pressure is the force of circulating blood on the walls of the arteries. Blood pressure is taken using two measurements: systolic (measured when the heart beats, when blood pressure is at its highest) and diastolic (measured between heart beats, when blood pressure is at its lowest). Blood pressure is written with the systolic blood pressure first, followed by the diastolic blood pressure (for example 120/80).
Normoglycaemia key to improved neurological outcome after paediatric stroke

Normoglycaemia key to improved neurological outcome after paediatric stroke

Achieving normal blood glucose concentrations may be important in preventing poor neurological outcomes in children following acute arterial ischemic stroke, a retrospective review indicates. [More]
Self-care can help nurses manage compassion fatigue

Self-care can help nurses manage compassion fatigue

The heart of healthcare is stressed. With longer shifts, staffing shortages and healthcare changes taxing our nurses, it's no surprise that up to 80 percent report suffering compassion fatigue at some point in their careers, according to recent studies. [More]
Majority of young adults with abdominal obesity unaware of CKD risk

Majority of young adults with abdominal obesity unaware of CKD risk

Many young adults with abdominal obesity exhibit a readily detectable risk factor for chronic kidney disease (CKD), yet the vast majority don't know they're at risk, according to a study of nationwide health data led by Albert Einstein College of Medicine researchers that was published online today in the journal PLOS ONE. [More]
Study finds gap in screening for lipid abnormalities among adults taking antipsychotic medications

Study finds gap in screening for lipid abnormalities among adults taking antipsychotic medications

Too few adults taking antipsychotic medications are being screened for abnormalities in lipids, which include cholesterol and triglycerides, new research from the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus finds. [More]
Study finds link between sodium intake and clinical CVD events in CKD patients

Study finds link between sodium intake and clinical CVD events in CKD patients

In a study appearing in the May 24/31 issue of JAMA, Jiang He, M.D., Ph.D., of the Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, New Orleans, and colleagues evaluated more than 3,500 participants with chronic kidney disease (CKD), examining the association between urinary sodium excretion and clinical cardiovascular disease (CVD) events. [More]
Raging with anger may increase risk of cardiovascular problems

Raging with anger may increase risk of cardiovascular problems

Those who rage with frustration during a marital spat have an increased risk of cardiovascular problems such as chest pain or high blood pressure later in life, according to new research from Northwestern University and the University of California, Berkeley. [More]
Microvascular disease burden tied to CVD outcomes in diabetic patients

Microvascular disease burden tied to CVD outcomes in diabetic patients

The risk of cardiovascular disease events in patients with Type 2 diabetes rises in line with their cumulative burden of microvascular disease, research shows. [More]
Urinary sodium excretion study attracts controversy

Urinary sodium excretion study attracts controversy

A pooled analysis in The Lancet showing a U-shaped association between urinary sodium excretion and cardiovascular disease has drawn criticism. [More]
Chloride switch controls critical step in basement membrane formation

Chloride switch controls critical step in basement membrane formation

Chloride plays a key role in the formation of the basement membrane, a suprastructure on the outside of cells that undergirds and guides the function of most of the tissues of the body. [More]
Heart failure patients who receive influenza vaccine less likely to develop dementia

Heart failure patients who receive influenza vaccine less likely to develop dementia

Influenza vaccination is associated with a lower risk of dementia in patients with heart failure, according to a study in more than 20 000 patients presented today at Heart Failure 2016 and the 3rd World Congress on Acute Heart Failure by Dr Ju-Chi Liu, director of the Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Department of Medicine, Taipei Medical University - Shuang Ho Hospital, in New Taipei City, Taiwan. [More]
Epigenetic modification of Igfbp2 gene may increase risk of obesity and fatty liver

Epigenetic modification of Igfbp2 gene may increase risk of obesity and fatty liver

Scientists of the German Center for Diabetes Research led by the German Institute of Human Nutrition have shown in a mouse model that the epigenetic modification of the Igfbp2 gene observed in the young animal precedes a fatty liver in the adult animal later in life. [More]
Researchers explore phenomenon that causes late mortality in sepsis patients

Researchers explore phenomenon that causes late mortality in sepsis patients

It's known that many patients die in the months and years after sepsis. But no one has known if this increased risk of death (in the 30 days to 2 years after sepsis) is because of sepsis itself, or because of the pre-existing health conditions the patient had before acquiring the complication. [More]
Tips for improving cardiovascular health

Tips for improving cardiovascular health

New research by UT Southwestern heart specialists shows that sedentary behavior such as sitting for long periods of time at a desk or on the couch is associated with increased amounts of calcium in the arteries, which in turn can lead to higher risk of heart attack. [More]
Aggressive blood pressure intervention can benefit frail adults aged 75 and older

Aggressive blood pressure intervention can benefit frail adults aged 75 and older

NIH-supported researchers are reporting additional details about a widely-publicized study that linked a systolic blood pressure target under 120 mm Hg (millimeters of mercury) with reduced cardiovascular disease and a lower risk of death. [More]
Low-salt diets may increase CVD risk and death compared to average salt consumption

Low-salt diets may increase CVD risk and death compared to average salt consumption

A large worldwide study has found that, contrary to popular thought, low-salt diets may not be beneficial and may actually increase the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and death compared to average salt consumption. [More]
Intensive blood pressure lowering therapies can cut heart disease risk in older adults

Intensive blood pressure lowering therapies can cut heart disease risk in older adults

Intensive therapies to reduce high blood pressure can cut the risk of heart disease in older adults without increasing the risk for falls, according to doctors at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center. [More]
SPRINT supports stringent BP goals for elderly

SPRINT supports stringent BP goals for elderly

Analysis of SPRINT participants older than 75 years shows that they too benefitted from an intensive blood pressure target of 120 mmHg. [More]
Older, frail hypertensive adults could benefit from intensive lowering of blood pressure

Older, frail hypertensive adults could benefit from intensive lowering of blood pressure

Adults with hypertension who are age 75 years and older, including those who are frail and with poor overall health, could benefit from lowering their blood pressure below current medical guidelines. [More]
Combined public health intervention could help manage CKD in developing countries

Combined public health intervention could help manage CKD in developing countries

A simple and inexpensive public health intervention helped prevent many cases of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in Pakistan. The intervention, which is described in a study in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology, will be especially helpful for protecting the kidney health of people living in developing countries. [More]
Study finds that ACS NSQIP Surgical Risk Calculator has excellent calibration

Study finds that ACS NSQIP Surgical Risk Calculator has excellent calibration

The American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program Surgical Risk Calculator accurately estimates the chance of a patient experiencing postoperative complications, and its performance can improve with recalibration of the tool according to research findings appearing online in the Journal of the American College of Surgeons in advance of print publication. [More]
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