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Research suggests humans occupied the Americas earlier than previously thought

Ancient artifacts found at an archeological site in Argentina suggest that humans occupied South America earlier than previously thought. [More]
New 3-D printed biomaterial could be effective in treating children with bone defects

New 3-D printed biomaterial could be effective in treating children with bone defects

A Northwestern University research team has developed a 3-D printable ink that produces a synthetic bone implant that rapidly induces bone regeneration and growth. This hyperelastic "bone" material, whose shape can be easily customized, one day could be especially useful for the treatment of bone defects in children. [More]
Researchers uncover key factor for promoting wound healing after corneal injuries

Researchers uncover key factor for promoting wound healing after corneal injuries

In cases of severe ocular trauma involving the cornea, wound healing occurs following intervention, but at the cost of opaque scar tissue formation and damaged vision. Recent research has shown that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) — which can differentiate into a variety of cells, including bone, cartilage, muscle and fat cells — are capable of returning clarity to scarred corneas; however, the mechanisms by which this happens remained a mystery — until now. [More]
UVA researchers begin first clinical trial using focused ultrasound to treat patients with epilepsy

UVA researchers begin first clinical trial using focused ultrasound to treat patients with epilepsy

Researchers at the University of Virginia are starting the first clinical trial in the world using focused ultrasound to treat patients with epilepsy. [More]
Researchers discover how signals from infectious bacteria get to inflammasome sensors

Researchers discover how signals from infectious bacteria get to inflammasome sensors

Researchers at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital have discovered the way signals from infectious bacteria gain entry into the cytoplasm of host cells to activate disease-fighting inflammasomes. [More]
Frequent nighttime hot flashes may trigger mild depression symptoms during menopause

Frequent nighttime hot flashes may trigger mild depression symptoms during menopause

A woman's perception that she is experiencing a high number of nighttime hot flashes can trigger mild symptoms of depression during menopause, according to a new study published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. [More]
Researchers identify new immune cell that protects mice from lung infections during chemotherapy

Researchers identify new immune cell that protects mice from lung infections during chemotherapy

St. Jude Children's Research Hospital investigators have identified a new form of an immune cell that protected mice from life-threatening lung infections under conditions that mimic cancer chemotherapy. [More]
Endocrine Society Clinical Practice Guideline recommends CGMs for Type 1 diabetes patients

Endocrine Society Clinical Practice Guideline recommends CGMs for Type 1 diabetes patients

The Endocrine Society today issued a Clinical Practice Guideline recommending continuous glucose monitors (CGMs) as the gold standard of care for adults with Type 1 diabetes. [More]
AlloSource to share early results of ProChondrix Cartilage Restoration Matrix at ICRS Congress

AlloSource to share early results of ProChondrix Cartilage Restoration Matrix at ICRS Congress

AlloSource, one of the nation's largest providers of cartilage, cellular, bone, skin and soft-tissue allografts for use in surgical procedures and wound care to advance patient healing, will share early results of its fresh cartilage allograft, ProChondrix Cartilage Restoration Matrix during the International Cartilage Repair Society's 13th World Congress in Sorrento-Naples, Italy. [More]
JAK inhibitors may be first effective treatment for people with alopecia areata

JAK inhibitors may be first effective treatment for people with alopecia areata

Seventy-five percent of patients with moderate to severe alopecia areata—an autoimmune disease that causes patchy, and less frequently, total hair loss—had significant hair regrowth after treatment with ruxolitinib, reported researchers from Columbia University Medical Center. By the end of their treatment, average hair regrowth was 92 percent. [More]
Novel immunotherapy shows promise against AML in clinical trial

Novel immunotherapy shows promise against AML in clinical trial

A new type of immunotherapy shows promise against cases of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) that recur after treatment or that never respond to therapy in the first place. [More]
New mobile health app may help manage hydroxyurea treatments in sickle cell patients

New mobile health app may help manage hydroxyurea treatments in sickle cell patients

The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, part of the National Institutes of Health, has awarded a 6-year, $4.4 million grant to St. Jude Children's Research Hospital and collaborators to improve the use of prescribed medication by sickle cell patients. [More]
Sanger Institute partners with St. Jude to support discovery, understanding of genetic mutations in paediatric cancers

Sanger Institute partners with St. Jude to support discovery, understanding of genetic mutations in paediatric cancers

The Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute is combining the power of COSMIC, its large-scale cancer genetics database, with ProteinPaint data mining and visualization system at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital in Memphis TN, to support the discovery and understanding of genetic mutations in paediatric cancers. [More]
Study finds link between gut flora and fat distribution in children and teenagers

Study finds link between gut flora and fat distribution in children and teenagers

Children and teenagers who are obese have different microorganisms living in the digestive tract than their lean counterparts, according to a new study published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. [More]
Predominance of testosterone in males may explain disparate ACL injury rate between men and women

Predominance of testosterone in males may explain disparate ACL injury rate between men and women

In studies on rats, Johns Hopkins Medicine scientists report new evidence that the predominance of the hormone testosterone in males may explain why women are up to 10 times more likely than men to injure the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) in their knees. [More]
Exposure to EDCs may reduce vitamin D levels in the bloodstream

Exposure to EDCs may reduce vitamin D levels in the bloodstream

Exposure to bisphenol A (BPA) and other endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) may reduce levels of vitamin D in the bloodstream, according to a new study published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. [More]
New therapy for osteoporosis provides protection against bone fractures in postmenopausal women

New therapy for osteoporosis provides protection against bone fractures in postmenopausal women

A recent analysis of results from a randomized controlled clinical trial indicates that abaloparatide-SC, a novel therapy for osteoporosis, provides consistent protection against bone fractures in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis regardless of their baseline bone density, age, and previous history of fracture. [More]
FDA authorizes marketing of new Aera system to treat patients with chronic ETD symptoms

FDA authorizes marketing of new Aera system to treat patients with chronic ETD symptoms

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today permitted marketing of a device that uses a small balloon to treat persistent Eustachian tube dysfunction (ETD), a condition in which pressure, pain or clogged or muffled sensations occur in the ear. [More]
New research seeks to find most effective medication for preventing life-threatening clots

New research seeks to find most effective medication for preventing life-threatening clots

Every year in the United States, thousands of high-risk fracture patients who have been admitted to trauma centers will suffer life-threatening blood clots related to the fracture. In rare cases these clots can even travel to the lungs, where they can cause sudden death. [More]
UTSW surgeons remove acoustic neuromas through small incisions in the ear canals

UTSW surgeons remove acoustic neuromas through small incisions in the ear canals

A surgical team at UT Southwestern Medical Center is helping to pioneer a new minimally invasive procedure that extracts vertigo-inducing tumors from the inner ear without having to remove a large piece of skull, as is usually required. [More]
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