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Tenofovir stems treatment-induced kidney toxicity in HBV-related chronic hepatitis

Tenofovir stems treatment-induced kidney toxicity in HBV-related chronic hepatitis

Switching to tenofovir may stave further kidney and bone impairment in patients with hepatitis B virus-related chronic hepatitis taking adefovir-based therapy, retrospective study findings suggest. [More]
Long-term TDF therapy offers sustained HBV suppression without resistance

Long-term TDF therapy offers sustained HBV suppression without resistance

Patients with chronic hepatitis B virus infection can achieve sustained viral suppression with long-term tenofovir disoproxil fumarate treatment without developing resistance, shows a 7-year study. [More]
SCCA's Fred Hutch Bone Marrow Transplant Program achieves higher survival rates

SCCA's Fred Hutch Bone Marrow Transplant Program achieves higher survival rates

The Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center Bone Marrow Transplant Program at Seattle Cancer Care Alliance was recently recognized for outperforming its anticipated one-year survival rate for allogeneic transplant patients. [More]
New study shows mechanism behind tubulin transport in cilia

New study shows mechanism behind tubulin transport in cilia

Defective cilia can lead to a host of diseases and conditions in the human body--from rare, inherited bone malformations to blindness, male infertility, kidney disease and obesity. Scientists knew that somehow these tiny cell organelles become deformed and cause these diseases because of a problem related to their assembly, which requires the translocation of vast quantities of the vital cell protein tubulin. [More]
Investigators make medical breakthrough in repairing tracheal damage

Investigators make medical breakthrough in repairing tracheal damage

Investigators at The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research have made a medical breakthrough using 3D printing on a MakerBot Replicator 2X Experimental 3D Printer to create cartilage designed for tracheal repair or replacement. [More]
Study finds no evidence that testosterone replacement therapy increases cardiovascular risk

Study finds no evidence that testosterone replacement therapy increases cardiovascular risk

Fears of a link between testosterone replacement therapy and cardiovascular risk are misplaced, according to a review published in this month's Mayo Clinic Proceedings. The therapy has come under widespread scrutiny in recent months, including by a federal Food and Drug Administration panel convened last fall. [More]
Ethicon launches new ECHELON FLEX Powered Vascular Stapler for lung cancer treatment

Ethicon launches new ECHELON FLEX Powered Vascular Stapler for lung cancer treatment

Ethicon has developed a new powered vascular stapler designed to provide greater precision and stability than currently available staplers for critical vessel transections. The new ECHELON FLEX Powered Vascular Stapler has the narrowest anvil of any stapler on the market, an articulating shaft and advanced placement tip that may allow for better visibility, navigation and precise placement during thoracic and other procedures, including VATS lobectomy (Video-Assisted Thoracoscopic Surgery) for lung cancer. [More]
Study finds relationship between menopausal symptoms, bone health in postmenopausal women

Study finds relationship between menopausal symptoms, bone health in postmenopausal women

The first large prospective cohort study to examine the relationship between menopausal symptoms and bone health in postmenopausal women has found that those who experience moderate to severe hot flashes and night sweats during menopause tend to have lower bone mineral density and higher rates of hip fracture than peers with no menopausal symptoms. [More]
UAB Research Probes Molecular Basis Of Rare Genetic Disorder

UAB Research Probes Molecular Basis Of Rare Genetic Disorder

An international group co-led by University of Alabama at Birmingham researcher Mary MacDougall, Ph.D., has unraveled the molecular basis for the rare, inherited genetic disorder, Singleton-Merten Syndrome (SMS). Individuals with SMS develop extreme, life-threatening calcification of the aorta and heart valves, early-onset periodontitis and root resorption of the teeth, decreases in bone density, and loss of bone tissue at the tips of fingers and toes. [More]

DePuy Synthes announces launch of new CMF MatrixWAVE MMF System

The DePuy Synthes Companies of Johnson & Johnson today announced the launch of the DePuy Synthes CMF MatrixWAVE MMF System, an adaptable wave-patterned bone borne plate and screw system designed for use in the temporary stabilization of mandibular and maxillary fractures and osteotomies. [More]
Mount Sinai study measures ability of artificial pancreas in preventing hypoglycemia in T1D patients

Mount Sinai study measures ability of artificial pancreas in preventing hypoglycemia in T1D patients

A newly launched clinical research study at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai is examining whether an artificial pancreas (AP) can prevent too low blood sugar levels or hypoglycemia in patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D) as they sleep. People fast as they sleep and nighttime hypoglycemia can cause seizures, and coma or death in rare cases, among the more than three million Americans with type 1 diabetes. [More]
Umbilical cord-derived stem cells from women with gestational diabetes show premature aging

Umbilical cord-derived stem cells from women with gestational diabetes show premature aging

Multipotent cells isolated from the human umbilical cord, called mesenchymal stromal cells (hUC-MSCs) have shown promise for use in cell therapy to treat a variety of human diseases. However, intriguing new evidence shows that hUC-MSCs isolated from women with gestational diabetes demonstrate premature aging, poorer cell growth, and altered metabolic function, as reported in an article in Stem Cells and Development, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. [More]
Microscopic spheres of calcium phosphate linked to AMD development

Microscopic spheres of calcium phosphate linked to AMD development

Microscopic spheres of calcium phosphate have been linked to the development of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a major cause of blindness, by UCL-led research. [More]
Cohera Medical, B. Braun sign sales and distribution agreement for TissuGlu Surgical Adhesive

Cohera Medical, B. Braun sign sales and distribution agreement for TissuGlu Surgical Adhesive

Cohera Medical, Inc., a leading innovator and developer of absorbable surgical adhesives and sealants, announced today that it has entered into an exclusive sales and marketing distribution agreement with B. Braun for its TissuGlu Surgical Adhesive in Germany, Spain and Portugal. [More]
AMBER unveils new bone repair technology

AMBER unveils new bone repair technology

AMBER, the Science Foundation Ireland funded materials science centre, hosted in Trinity College Dublin, has today unveiled a new bone repair technology, which has led to an injured racehorse returning to winning ways after successful jaw reconstruction. [More]
Researchers turn clinical experience in multiple myeloma treatment into instructive review for physicians

Researchers turn clinical experience in multiple myeloma treatment into instructive review for physicians

Multiple myeloma is a malignant disease characterised by proliferation of clonal plasma cells in the bone marrow and typically accompanied by the secretion of monoclonal immunoglobulins that are detectable in the serum or urine. Increased understanding of the microenvironmental interactions between malignant plasma cells and the bone marrow niche, and their role in disease progression and acquisition of therapy resistance, has helped the development of novel therapeutic drugs for use in combination with cytostatic therapy. [More]
Study: Stem cells derived from human female amnion have anti-inflammatory effects

Study: Stem cells derived from human female amnion have anti-inflammatory effects

Stem cells derived from human amnion have for some time been considered promising for cell therapies because of their ease of access, ability to differentiate, and absence of ethical issues. [More]
FDA grants orphan drug status to NBI-77860 for treatment of congenital adrenal hyperplasia

FDA grants orphan drug status to NBI-77860 for treatment of congenital adrenal hyperplasia

Neurocrine Biosciences, Inc. announced today that NBI-77860, a proprietary corticotropin releasing factor 1 (CRF) receptor antagonist, has been granted orphan drug status by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) a disease that affects approximately 20,000-30,000 people in the United States. [More]
CUMC researchers identify that OCR stem cells can regenerate bone and cartilage in mice

CUMC researchers identify that OCR stem cells can regenerate bone and cartilage in mice

A stem cell capable of regenerating both bone and cartilage has been identified in bone marrow of mice. The discovery by researchers at Columbia University Medical Center is reported today in the online issue of the journal Cell. [More]
New device holds promise for improving the delivery of stem cell therapy for non-healing fractures

New device holds promise for improving the delivery of stem cell therapy for non-healing fractures

A new device that can rapidly concentrate and extract young cells from irrigation fluid used during orthopaedic surgery holds promise for improving the delivery of stem cell therapy in cases of non-healing fractures. UC Davis surgeons plan to launch a "proof-of-concept" clinical trial to test the safety and efficacy of the device in the coming months. [More]