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New treatment option available for CLL patients in Manitoba and Saskatchewan

New treatment option available for CLL patients in Manitoba and Saskatchewan

People in Manitoba and Saskatchewan living with Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL) will now be able to access a new treatment option through the prescription drug insurance plans in both provinces. Earlier this week, GAZYVA (obinutuzumab) in combination with chlorambucil chemotherapy was added to benefits formularies of the Provincial Oncology Drug Programs at CancerCare Manitoba and the Saskatchewan Cancer Agency. [More]
Researchers compare effectiveness of two stem cell types in treating retinal degeneration

Researchers compare effectiveness of two stem cell types in treating retinal degeneration

By growing two types of stem cells in a "3-D culture" and measuring their ability to produce retinal cells, a team lead by St. Jude Children's Research Hospital researchers has found one cell type to be better at producing retinal cells. [More]
SkylineDx’s MMprofiler test helps predict prognosis of patients with multiple myeloma

SkylineDx’s MMprofiler test helps predict prognosis of patients with multiple myeloma

SkylineDx, an innovative biotechnology company specialising in the development and commercialization of genetic tests, is today launching its MMprofiler assay. This test enables clinicians to more accurately predict the prognosis of patients with multiple myeloma (bone marrow cancer) than traditional methods. [More]
Penn study suggests future precision medicine approach to treating diabetes, other metabolic disorders

Penn study suggests future precision medicine approach to treating diabetes, other metabolic disorders

In the first study of its kind, Penn researchers have shown how an anti-diabetic drug can have variable effects depending on small natural differences in DNA sequence between individuals. Mitchell Lazar, MD, PhD, Raymond Soccio, MD, PhD, and colleagues at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, aim to apply this knowledge to develop personalized approaches to treating diabetes and other metabolic disorders. [More]
Combination of exercise and artificial gravity may reduce effects of extended weightlessness in space

Combination of exercise and artificial gravity may reduce effects of extended weightlessness in space

Astronauts on the International Space Station have a number of exercise options, including a mechanical bicycle bolted to the floor, a weightlifting machine strapped to the wall, and a strap-down treadmill. They spend a significant portion of each day working out to ward off the long-term effects of weightlessness, but many still suffer bone loss, muscle atrophy, and issues with balance and their cardiovascular systems. [More]
Special issue provides comprehensive overview of latest findings in the area of skeletal research

Special issue provides comprehensive overview of latest findings in the area of skeletal research

While there is good understanding of how bone mass, and more recently bone architecture, affects fracture risk, far less is known about the material properties of bone, or how these can impart resilience or fragility to the skeleton. [More]
Women with 'female athlete triad' at greater risk of bone stress injuries

Women with 'female athlete triad' at greater risk of bone stress injuries

Participation in sports by women and girls has increased from 310,000 individuals in 1971 to 3.37 million in 2010. At the same time, sports-related injuries among female athletes have skyrocketed. [More]
Majority of consumers recognize that supplements can help meet nutrient needs

Majority of consumers recognize that supplements can help meet nutrient needs

The vast majority of consumers recognize that multivitamins, calcium and/or vitamin D supplements can help fill nutrient gaps but should not be viewed as replacements for a healthy diet, according to a new survey conducted on behalf of the Council for Responsible Nutrition (CRN). [More]
Study of genetic mutations could lead to optimized treatment plans for aplastic anemia patients

Study of genetic mutations could lead to optimized treatment plans for aplastic anemia patients

Scientists have identified a group of genetic mutations in patients with aplastic anemia, which likely will help doctors optimize treatment for this rare and deadly blood condition. The study, appearing in the New England Journal of Medicine, could lead to tailor-made treatment plans for aplastic anemia patients as part of the emerging precision medicine movement. [More]
Scientists develop olfactory fingerprint test to identify individuals from sense of smell

Scientists develop olfactory fingerprint test to identify individuals from sense of smell

Each of us has, in our nose, about six million smell receptors of around four hundred different types. The distribution of these receptors varies from person to person - so much so that each person's sense of smell may be unique. [More]
New review may help women with stress urinary incontinence make more informed choices about treatment

New review may help women with stress urinary incontinence make more informed choices about treatment

A new Cochrane systematic review published today of surgery for stress urinary incontinence makes an important contribution to an ongoing debate and will help women to make more informed choices about treatment. [More]
Multiple courses of antibiotics may have significant impact on child development

Multiple courses of antibiotics may have significant impact on child development

A new animal study by NYU Langone Medical Center researchers adds to growing evidence that multiple courses of commonly used antibiotics may have a significant impact on children's development. [More]
FDA grants first cervical multilevel indication to Centinel Spine’s STALIF C integrated interbody device

FDA grants first cervical multilevel indication to Centinel Spine’s STALIF C integrated interbody device

Centinel Spine, Inc., the pioneer of Stand-Alone, No-Profile, Integrated Interbody fusion devices was granted the first cervical multilevel indication for a Stand-Alone interbody device by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). [More]
Researchers discover gene locations affecting wrist bones in children

Researchers discover gene locations affecting wrist bones in children

Pediatric researchers have discovered gene locations affecting bone strength in wrist bones, the most common site for fractures in children. Children who have those genetic variants may be at higher-than-average risk of wrist fractures, and could especially benefit from activities and diets that promote bone strength. [More]
Inhibikase Therapeutics receives Phase II SBIR grant to advance novel RAMP medicinal chemistry program

Inhibikase Therapeutics receives Phase II SBIR grant to advance novel RAMP medicinal chemistry program

Inhibikase Therapeutics, Inc. announces the receipt of a Phase II SBIR grant in the amount of $1.54 million dollars from the U.S. National Institutes of Health to advance its novel Re-engineering with Metabolism Preserved (RAMP) medicinal chemistry program. [More]
Scientists identify association between coronary heart disease and osteoporosis

Scientists identify association between coronary heart disease and osteoporosis

University of Southampton scientists have discovered a link between coronary heart disease and osteoporosis, suggesting both conditions could have similar causes. [More]
ProfNet network experts available to discuss timely issues in your coverage area

ProfNet network experts available to discuss timely issues in your coverage area

Below are experts from the ProfNet network that are available to discuss timely issues in your coverage area. You can also submit a query to the hundreds of thousands of experts in our network – it's easy and free! [More]
Penn Medicine scientists identify stem-like 'progenitor' cell that produces heart muscle cells

Penn Medicine scientists identify stem-like 'progenitor' cell that produces heart muscle cells

Future therapies for failing hearts are likely to include stem-like cells and associated growth factors that regenerate heart muscle. Scientists from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania have just taken an important step towards that future by identifying a stem-like "progenitor" cell that produces only heart muscle cells. [More]
Experimental new treatment approach can send deadly leukemia into remission

Experimental new treatment approach can send deadly leukemia into remission

An experimental new treatment approach for a rare, deadly leukemia can send the disease into remission even in patients for whom the standard therapy has failed, buying them more time to have the stem cell transplant that could save their lives, a small pilot study has found. [More]
Weight loss, combined with vitamin D supplements, reduces chronic inflammation

Weight loss, combined with vitamin D supplements, reduces chronic inflammation

For the first time, researchers at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center have found that weight loss, in combination with vitamin D supplementation, has a greater effect on reducing chronic inflammation than weight loss alone. Chronic inflammation is known to contribute to the development and progression of several diseases, including some cancers. [More]
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