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Early and late menopause linked to increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes

Early and late menopause linked to increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes

Women who begin menopause before age 46 or after 55 have an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes, according to a study of more than 124,000 women enrolled in the Women's Health Initiative, a large national trial aimed at preventing disease in postmenopausal women. [More]
New study reports gymnastics equipment contains toxic flame-retardants linked to ADHD, cancer risks

New study reports gymnastics equipment contains toxic flame-retardants linked to ADHD, cancer risks

As the summer Olympics get underway, a new study co-authored by Boston University School of Public Health researchers reports that popular gymnastics training equipment contains mixtures of flame-retardant chemicals that have been linked to increased risks of ADHD, cancer and brain development delays. [More]
Male hormones can reverse biological drivers of aging, study shows

Male hormones can reverse biological drivers of aging, study shows

Telomerase, an enzyme naturally found in the human organism, is the closest of all known substances to a "cellular elixir of youth." In a recent study, Brazilian and US researchers show that sex hormones can stimulate production of this enzyme. [More]
VCU Health radiologist uses MRI technology to detect difficult prostate cancers

VCU Health radiologist uses MRI technology to detect difficult prostate cancers

For three years, Andrew Harder wondered if he had prostate cancer. In 2009, he had routine blood work that revealed an elevated prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level. [More]
Researchers identify specific pathways involved in development of mucormycosis

Researchers identify specific pathways involved in development of mucormycosis

Research published today in the journal, Nature Communications, provides new insights into the evolution of Mucorales fungi, which cause a fatal infection in ever-increasing segments of patient population, and several molecular pathways that might be exploited as potential therapeutic or diagnostic targets. [More]
Blood cancer is associated with considerably higher healthcare costs than other cancers

Blood cancer is associated with considerably higher healthcare costs than other cancers

Health economics studies, published today in The Lancet Haematology, report that the cost of treating blood cancers is twice that for treating other cancers. This is largely because they require more complex treatment regimens that necessitate longer hospital stays. [More]
Study finds older adults who sustain wrist fractures more likely to have poor balance

Study finds older adults who sustain wrist fractures more likely to have poor balance

Elderly patients suffering a low energy wrist (distal radius) fracture are more likely to have difficulties with balance, placing them at risk for future injuries, according to a new study appearing in the July 20, 2016 issue of the Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery. [More]
HSS researchers launch new study to find if stem cell treatment could help people with knee arthritis

HSS researchers launch new study to find if stem cell treatment could help people with knee arthritis

Researchers at Hospital for Special Surgery have launched a study to determine if a treatment using stem cells could help people with painful knee arthritis. [More]
GSK and University of Leicester team up to develop novel drugs to treat blood cancer

GSK and University of Leicester team up to develop novel drugs to treat blood cancer

A collaboration between the University of Leicester and global pharmaceutical company GlaxoSmithKline has been established to discover and develop novel medicines to treat aggressive forms of blood cancer. [More]
New SACN guidelines recommend daily 10 micrograms intake of Vitamin D

New SACN guidelines recommend daily 10 micrograms intake of Vitamin D

The Scientific Advisory Committee on Nutrition (SACN) has published a report advising that anybody aged over one year should have a vitamin D intake of 10 micrograms a day throughout the year. [More]
New study offers hypothesis why obese patients fare worse during cancer treatment

New study offers hypothesis why obese patients fare worse during cancer treatment

Across many cancer types, obese patients fare worse than leaner patients. Now a University of Colorado Cancer Center study published in the journal Cell Stem Cell offers a compelling hypothesis why: researchers found that leukemia stem cells "hide" in fatty tissue, even transforming this tissue in ways that support their survival when challenged with chemotherapy. It is as if leukemia stem cells not only use fatty tissue as a robbers' cave to hide from therapy, but actively adapt this cave to their liking. [More]
Study reports BV therapy may be curative in some Hodgkin lymphoma patients

Study reports BV therapy may be curative in some Hodgkin lymphoma patients

Five-year survival data published online today in Blood, the Journal of the American Society of Hematology, suggest that the targeted therapy brentuximab vedotin may have cured some Hodgkin lymphoma patients whose disease has persisted despite receiving previous therapies. [More]
Anthropologists find new record of vitamin D deficiency in people who lived hundreds of years ago

Anthropologists find new record of vitamin D deficiency in people who lived hundreds of years ago

Researchers at McMaster University have found a rich new record of vitamin D deficiency, one that resides in the teeth of every person and remains viable for hundreds of years or more. [More]
New TSRI study may bring doctors closer to using gene therapies to grow, repair tendons

New TSRI study may bring doctors closer to using gene therapies to grow, repair tendons

With the Rio Olympics just weeks away, many are wondering how Jamaican sprinter Usain Bolt will perform. [More]

New system uses 3D acoustic stimuli to guide visually impaired users

The visually impaired will be able to use a new system of sensorial guidance that uses 3D sounds. [More]
Scientists develop new way to resurface arthritic hip joint

Scientists develop new way to resurface arthritic hip joint

With a goal of treating worn, arthritic hips without extensive surgery to replace them, scientists have programmed stem cells to grow new cartilage on a 3-D template shaped like the ball of a hip joint. [More]
Mutations in STN1 gene cause Coats plus syndrome

Mutations in STN1 gene cause Coats plus syndrome

A team of Israeli researchers has discovered that mutations in STN1, a gene that helps maintain the ends of chromosomes, cause the rare, inherited disorder Coats plus syndrome. [More]
Bone marrow transplantation may one day be beneficial to subset of ALS, say researchers

Bone marrow transplantation may one day be beneficial to subset of ALS, say researchers

Harvard Stem Cell Institute researchers at Harvard University and the Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT have found evidence that bone marrow transplantation may one day be beneficial to a subset of patients suffering from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a fatal neurodegenerative disorder more commonly known as Lou Gehrig's disease. [More]
Researchers propose new approach to target chemotherapy medications specifically to sarcomas

Researchers propose new approach to target chemotherapy medications specifically to sarcomas

Sarcoma is an aggressive form of cancer responsible for up to 20 percent of childhood cancers. Tumors often first appear in the extremities and the abdomen. Surgery is a primary treatment, but it often is combined with chemotherapy. [More]
TUM scientists discover molecular signaling pathway for self-destruction in leukemia cells

TUM scientists discover molecular signaling pathway for self-destruction in leukemia cells

When adults develop blood cancer, they are frequently diagnosed with what is referred to as acute myeloid leukemia. [More]
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