Bone News and Research RSS Feed - Bone News and Research

Sixty-ninth World Health Assembly comes to end after approving many new resolutions

Sixty-ninth World Health Assembly comes to end after approving many new resolutions

The Sixty-ninth World Health Assembly closed today after approving new resolutions on WHO's Framework for Engagement with Non-State Actors; the Sustainable Development Goals; the International Health Regulations; tobacco control; road traffic deaths and injuries; nutrition; HIV, hepatitis and STIs; mycetoma; research and development; access to medicines and integrated health services. [More]
Premature babies have lower peak bone mass as adults

Premature babies have lower peak bone mass as adults

Among the many important processes that happen during a woman's last few weeks of pregnancy is the transfer of calcium to the growing foetus to boost bone development. [More]
Initiatives to improve adolescent, young adult cancer outcomes justified

Initiatives to improve adolescent, young adult cancer outcomes justified

Analysis of the EUROCARE-5 data shows that although survival for adolescents and young adults with cancer has improved overall, the survival rates for certain malignancies still lag behind those for children. [More]
Combining VCA with organ transplants improves patient outcomes

Combining VCA with organ transplants improves patient outcomes

Simultaneous transplantation of a "composite" skull and scalp flap plus a kidney and pancreas—all from the same donor—provided excellent outcomes for a patient with a non-healing scalp defect and declining organ kidney and pancreas function, according to a report in the June issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, the official medical journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons. [More]
Adolescents and young adults have lower cancer survival rates compared to children

Adolescents and young adults have lower cancer survival rates compared to children

More young people of all ages are surviving cancer than ever before, but new research published today in The Lancet Oncology journal shows that adolescents and young adults have a lower chance of surviving eight relatively common types of cancer than children, according to the latest data from a long-running study of cancer survival across Europe. [More]
New imaging methods could help identify early stages of arthrosis

New imaging methods could help identify early stages of arthrosis

Arthrosis, a degenerative disease that affects the joints, becomes more common as people become older. The disease is becoming increasingly common among older people in Finland as well. Arthrosis is currently the subject of research in a number of projects funded by the Academy of Finland. [More]
Researchers spot molecular key that breast cancer cells use to invade bone marrow

Researchers spot molecular key that breast cancer cells use to invade bone marrow

Scientists at the Duke Cancer Institute have identified a molecular key that breast cancer cells use to invade bone marrow in mice, where they may be protected from chemotherapy or hormonal therapies that could otherwise eradicate them. [More]
ART alone not sufficient to reduce arterial inflammation among HIV-infected patients, study finds

ART alone not sufficient to reduce arterial inflammation among HIV-infected patients, study finds

Initiating antiretroviral therapy (ART) soon after diagnosis of an HIV infection did not prevent the progression of significant arterial inflammation in a small group of previously untreated patients. [More]
Bone marrow transplantation dose may have lasting effects on HSC behavior

Bone marrow transplantation dose may have lasting effects on HSC behavior

Unlike aspirin, bone marrow doesn't come with a neatly printed label with dosage instructions. However, a new study published in Cell Reports provides clues about how the dose of transplanted bone marrow might affect patients undergoing this risky procedure, frequently used to treat cancer and blood diseases. [More]
The National MDS Study aims to identify causes, genetic makeup of fatal blood diseases

The National MDS Study aims to identify causes, genetic makeup of fatal blood diseases

The National Myelodysplastic Syndromes Natural History Study is underway, the ECOG-ACRIN Cancer Research Group and its collaborators announced today. [More]
Nutrition, safety tips for grilling season

Nutrition, safety tips for grilling season

Cooking meat, including beef, pork, fish, or poultry, with high-temperature methods such as pan frying or grilling directly over an open flame can increase exposure to chemicals that can cause changes in DNA that may increase the risk of cancer, according to the National Cancer Institute. [More]
Obese teenagers may have lower levels of spexin harmone

Obese teenagers may have lower levels of spexin harmone

Obese teenagers already show signs of hormonal differences from normal-weight peers that may make them prone to weight gain, according to a new study published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. [More]
Telephone-based intervention helps reduce menopause-related insomnia, hot flashes

Telephone-based intervention helps reduce menopause-related insomnia, hot flashes

Chatting on the phone with a "sleep coach" and keeping a nightly sleep diary significantly improve sleep quality and reduce insomnia in women through all stages of menopause, according to a new study published today in JAMA Internal Medicine. [More]
Administering TXA through IV and IA can reduce blood loss following total knee replacement

Administering TXA through IV and IA can reduce blood loss following total knee replacement

A new study appearing in the Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery found that administering tranexamic acid (TXA) both intravenously (IV) and injected at the surgical site (intra-articular administration, or IA) reduced blood loss by 37 percent, compared to IV alone, following total knee replacement (TKR). [More]
Phase I study of triple drug combination shows promise in multiple myeloma patients

Phase I study of triple drug combination shows promise in multiple myeloma patients

PharmaMar announces the positive results from a Phase I study of plitidepsin in combination with bortezomib and dexamethasone in patients with relapsed and/or refractory multiple myeloma. [More]
Radiation-immunotherapy combination can help treat melanoma

Radiation-immunotherapy combination can help treat melanoma

Combining radiation treatments with a new generation of immunotherapies is showing promise as a one-two-punch against melanoma, Loyola Medicine researchers report in a review article. [More]
UCL researchers identify four genes that drive shape of human noses

UCL researchers identify four genes that drive shape of human noses

Genes that drive the shape of human noses have been identified by a UCL-led study. The four genes mainly affect the width and 'pointiness' of noses which vary greatly between different populations. The new information adds to our understanding of how the human face evolved and may help contribute to forensic DNA technologies that build visual profiles based on an individual's genetic makeup. [More]
More than 7 in 10 older hip fracture patients not aware of having osteoporosis

More than 7 in 10 older hip fracture patients not aware of having osteoporosis

More than 7 in 10 older adults who suffer hip fractures aren't told they have the bone-weakening disease osteoporosis - despite the fact that hip fractures nearly always signify the presence of this potentially debilitating condition, according to revealing new research by Northwell Health physicians. [More]
AKR1C3 enzyme could be promising therapeutic target for managing CRPC, AML

AKR1C3 enzyme could be promising therapeutic target for managing CRPC, AML

Prostate cancer is the second leading cause of mortality among American men with the highest incidence rate of all cancers reported in the U.S. Male sex hormones testosterone (T) and 5α-dihydrotestosterone (5α-DHT) promote prostate cancer progression. [More]
New mice study unveils mystery of why chronic stress, depression can lead to bone loss

New mice study unveils mystery of why chronic stress, depression can lead to bone loss

A new study has helped to unveil the mystery of why chronic stress and depression can lead to bone loss and increase the risk of fractures. [More]
Advertisement
Advertisement