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Biting into whole foods can make children rowdy

There's a new secret to get your child to behave at the dinner table-cut up their food and they'll relax. A new Cornell study published in Eating Behaviors, found that when 6-10 year old children ate foods they had to bite with their front teeth- such as drumsticks, whole apples, or corn on the cob- they were rowdier than when these foods had been cut. [More]
Interleukin receives conditional approval to offer results of PerioPredict genetic risk test

Interleukin receives conditional approval to offer results of PerioPredict genetic risk test

Interleukin Genetics, Inc. today announced it has received conditional approval from the New York State Department of Health to offer, process and report the results of the PerioPredict™ Genetic Risk Test for periodontal disease. [More]
DePuy Synthes CMF announces launch of Patient Specific Plates for Mandible

DePuy Synthes CMF announces launch of Patient Specific Plates for Mandible

DePuy Synthes CMF, a leader in skeletal and soft tissue repair and reconstruction and part of the DePuy Synthes Companies of Johnson & Johnson, announced the launch of Patient Specific Plates for Mandible (PSPM), new plates that are customized based on surgeon specifications and individual patient anatomy. [More]

FDA and EC grant Orphan Drug Designation to Boehringer’s volasertib for acute myeloid leukemia

Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc. announced today that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and European Commission (EC) have granted Orphan Drug Designation to volasertib for acute myeloid leukemia (AML). [More]

Scientist receives $1.8M defense grant from Kessler Foundation for spinal cord injury research

Kessler Foundation has been named awardee of a three-year grant for $1.8 million from the Department of Defense Spinal Cord Injury Research Program. Gail Forrest, PT, PhD, is principal investigator for the randomized, double-blinded, controlled, multi-site clinical trial, which will test strategies to improve bone and muscle strength after spinal cord injury. Dr. Forrest is assistant director of Human Performance & Engineering Research at Kessler Foundation. [More]
Hydrogen sulfide regulates bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells, shows study

Hydrogen sulfide regulates bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells, shows study

Stem cells in bone marrow need to produce hydrogen sulfide in order to properly multiply and form bone tissue, according to a new study from the Center for Craniofacial Molecular Biology at the Herman Ostrow School of Dentistry of USC. [More]

Boehringer grants volasertib 'orphan drug designation' for treatment of patients with AML

Boehringer Ingelheim announced today that the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the European Commission have granted volasertib* 'orphan drug designation' for the treatment of patients with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). [More]
TSRI scientist receives $2.1M grant to study therapeutic potential of alternatives to current crop of anti-diabetic drugs

TSRI scientist receives $2.1M grant to study therapeutic potential of alternatives to current crop of anti-diabetic drugs

Scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have been awarded $2.1 million from the National Institutes of Health to study the therapeutic potential of safer and more effective alternatives to the current crop of anti-diabetic drugs, which have been limited in their use due to side effects including bone loss and congestive heart failure. [More]

New syndrome osteosarcopenic obesity links deterioration of bone density and muscle mass with obesity

Florida State University researchers have identified a new syndrome called "osteosarcopenic obesity" that links the deterioration of bone density and muscle mass with obesity. [More]
Researchers coax human embryonic stem cells to turn into working spinal cord cells

Researchers coax human embryonic stem cells to turn into working spinal cord cells

The sponginess of the environment where human embryonic stem cells are growing affects the type of specialized cells they eventually become, a University of Michigan study shows. [More]

Study investigates tested applicability of Google Glass in daily pediatric surgical practice

Recent study published in the International Journal of Surgery investigates tested applicability of Google Glass in daily pediatric surgical practice [More]

Harvard successfully transplants regenerated esophagus into rat using bioreactor

Harvard Apparatus Regenerative Technology, Inc., a clinical stage biotechnology company developing regenerated organs for transplant, initially focused on the trachea, announces that a research team led by Paolo Macchiarini, MD, PhD at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden has successfully transplanted a regenerated esophagus into a rat using a bioreactor developed by HART. [More]
Viewpoints: Obamacare dilemma -- some people dislike the law but embrace its provisions; are health costs falling?

Viewpoints: Obamacare dilemma -- some people dislike the law but embrace its provisions; are health costs falling?

Polls have consistently shown that even though the public opposes Obamacare, people like some of its most significant provisions. That's particularly true of the requirement that insurers ignore preexisting conditions when signing up customers for coverage. [More]

ulrich medical USA announces release of tezo spine implants in the U.S. market

ulrich medical USA, Inc., today announced the U.S. market release of the tezo spine implants for multiple surgical approaches to lumbosacral interbody fusion. [More]
New blood test accurately detects presence of breast cancer and monitors response to treatment

New blood test accurately detects presence of breast cancer and monitors response to treatment

Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center investigators report they have designed a blood test that accurately detects the presence of advanced breast cancer and also holds promise for precisely monitoring response to cancer treatment. [More]
Drugs used to treat osteoporosis appear to prevent cell membrane repair

Drugs used to treat osteoporosis appear to prevent cell membrane repair

A class of drugs widely used to treat osteoporosis appears to impede a cell's ability to repair a protective outer membrane that helps determine what enters and exits, researchers report. [More]
Johns Hopkins designs blood test that accurately detects presence of advanced breast cancer

Johns Hopkins designs blood test that accurately detects presence of advanced breast cancer

Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center investigators report they have designed a blood test that accurately detects the presence of advanced breast cancer and also holds promise for precisely monitoring response to cancer treatment. [More]
New guidelines on management and return to play of Female Athlete Triad discussed at AMSSM

New guidelines on management and return to play of Female Athlete Triad discussed at AMSSM

The Female Athlete Triad is a medical condition often observed in physically active girls and women, and involves three components: low energy availability with or without disordered eating, menstrual dysfunction and low bone mineral density. [More]
Nanotechnology unlocks new pathways for targeted drug delivery

Nanotechnology unlocks new pathways for targeted drug delivery

​Significant advances have been made in chemotherapy over the past decade, but targeting drugs to cancer cells while avoiding healthy tissues continues to be a major challenge. [More]

Study shows link between overuse injury rates in young athletes and their socioeconomic status

A Loyola University Medical Center study is reporting for the first time a link between overuse injury rates in young athletes and their socioeconomic status. [More]