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Study looks at natural history of cervical spondylolisthesis

Follow-up data on patients with degenerative disease of the upper (cervical) spinal vertebrae show little or no evidence of worsening degeneration over time, according to a study in the February 15 issue of Spine. [More]
Osteoporosis screening: an interview with Professor Cyrus Cooper

Osteoporosis screening: an interview with Professor Cyrus Cooper

Osteoporosis is defined as a reduction in bone mass coupled with micro-architectural deterioration of bone tissue which predisposes to fractures. Osteoporosis manifests through an increased risk of fracture, and age-related fractures are a major public health problem. [More]

K2M expands biologics portfolio

K2M, Inc., a spinal device company developing innovative solutions for the treatment of complex spinal pathologies and minimally invasive procedures, today announced a major expansion of the company’s U.S. biologics offering with the launch of its VESUVIUS™ Osteobiologic Systems and new additions to its VIKOS® Allograft Systems. K2M is working with LifeNet Health®, a leading allograft bio-implant and regenerative medicine company, to bring to market quality implants to enhance bone regeneration and osteoconductivity. [More]
Study investigates how breast cancer cells migrate to bone

Study investigates how breast cancer cells migrate to bone

Breast cancer cells frequently move from their primary site and invade bone, decreasing a patient's chance of survival. This process of metastasis is complex, and factors both within the breast cancer cells and within the new bone environment play a role. In next week's Journal of Biological Chemistry "Paper of the Week," Roger Gomis and colleagues at the Institute for Research in Biomedicine in Spain investigated how breast cancer cells migrate to bone. [More]
SANUWAVE’s ESWT stimulates proliferation of cambium cells for bone generation

SANUWAVE’s ESWT stimulates proliferation of cambium cells for bone generation

SANUWAVE Health, Inc., today announced the publication of peer-reviewed, preclinical research that demonstrates the ability of the Company's Extracorporeal Shock Wave Technology (ESWT) to stimulate proliferation of periosteal adult stem cells (cambium cells) within the body and subsequently form bone. [More]
32 genetic variations could play a role in osteoporosis risk

32 genetic variations could play a role in osteoporosis risk

A team of international researchers have found 32 new genetic regions linked to fractures and osteoporosis. According to the new study published in the April 15 online edition of Nature Genetics, changes in these regions could offer protection from, or greater risk for, bone-weakening disease. [More]
Vitamin E may lead to thinning and weakening of bones: Study

Vitamin E may lead to thinning and weakening of bones: Study

From studies in laboratory animals it was found that the most common form of vitamin E stimulates the generation of bone-degrading cells. Scientists who carried out the research in Japan are now calling for their results to be followed up in humans. [More]
Testing for osteoporosis – how often?

Testing for osteoporosis – how often?

A new study shows that many women who get screened for osteoporosis may not need it. It suggests that the current guidelines result in too many unnecessary tests, increasing costs and sometimes spurring unnecessary treatment. [More]

FDA advisory panel suggests warning for bisphosphonates but does not specify wording

Two independent advisory panels to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) on Friday recommended increasing the cautionary language on the product labels of bone-building drugs taken by more than five million women in the United States. They did not however mention the exact words of the safety warnings and did not recommend limiting use of the drugs to a proposed five years. About 11 percent of women 55 and older take the drugs to prevent bone fractures. [More]
Common culinary spice derivative could treat tendinitis

Common culinary spice derivative could treat tendinitis

A derivative of a common culinary spice found in Indian curries could offer a new treatment hope for sufferers of the painful condition tendinitis, an international team of researchers has shown. [More]

Soy useless for menopause

In their two year study they found that there were no differences in changes in bone density or menopausal symptoms between women taking soy and those taking a placebo, although women taking isoflavones did have more hot flashes, Dr. Silvina Levis of the University of Miami and colleagues reported in the August 8/22 issue of Archives of Internal Medicine. [More]
Being health wards off dementia and Alzheimer's: Study

Being health wards off dementia and Alzheimer's: Study

According to a new study even relatively minor health problems seemingly unrelated to the mind may affect a person's risk of dementia, including Alzheimer's disease. This is apart from the other known risk factors like heart disease, strokes and other serious health conditions that affect the circulatory system or brain. The study was published this week in the journal Neurology. [More]

Bone fusion drug comes under scrutiny due to researchers’ vested interests

The Spine Journal has dedicated its June issue to a series of papers that carefully reject previous research supporting the use of Infuse, a controversial, but popular bone growth product commonly used in spinal fusion surgeries. [More]
New technique makes artificial bones more natural

New technique makes artificial bones more natural

A new technique for producing artificial bone implants has been developed by Korean researchers. Published in the journal Science and Technology of Advanced Material (STAM), the technique combines two methods to approximate both types of bone tissue. By mimicking natural bone, it is hoped the implant material will better complement the natural regeneration process. [More]

Bone building drugs bisphosphonates lead to only a marginally higher risk of fractures: Study

According to a new study, nearly 78% of all Swedish women aged 55 years and older who sustained a thigh bone or femur fracture in 2008 had taken bisphosphonates for their osteoporosis. However the authors of the study published in the May 5 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM) write that the absolute risk for such breaks is small enough to justify prescribing the drugs. [More]
Study: Surgeon enthusiasm linked to high spinal procedure rates

Study: Surgeon enthusiasm linked to high spinal procedure rates

Surgeons in some areas are more likely to recommend surgery for low back problems—and those differences in "surgeon enthusiasm" are a major factor driving regional variations in spinal surgery rates, suggests a study in the March 14 issue of Spine. The journal is published by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, a part of Wolters Kluwer Health. [More]
HIV infection and increased fracture risk: Study

HIV infection and increased fracture risk: Study

According to a latest study, adults between ages 25 and 54 infected with HIV, are at increased risk for bone fractures compared to the general population. Until now it was known that low bone mineral density was common in people with HIV, but no concrete proof existed. [More]
Beta blockers for high blood pressure also reduce fracture risk: Study

Beta blockers for high blood pressure also reduce fracture risk: Study

Beta blockers, one of the most commonly used types of cardiovascular drugs, taken by about 20 per cent of the population, have been found to cut a person's incidence of bone fracture by half. This new and welcome side effect was reported by Professor Tuan Nguyen from Sydney's Garvan Institute of Medical Research and his Australian-based colleagues. “Indeed, we found that men and women who used beta-blockers had a 50 per cent lower risk of fracture than those not using beta blockers… We were very excited about the finding because, as you know, a lot of elderly people use beta blockers ... it’s a very significant public health issue,” he said. [More]

Bismuth for bone cement

Organic–inorganic hybrid materials, uniting the advantages of their organic and inorganic parts, are used for a wide variety of applications. However, making a homogeneous composite material is only possible if a solvent can be found in which both components are soluble. [More]

Osteoporosis common but underestimated in old men: Study

According to the latest research osteoporosis a diseases common in women that makes bones brittle and easily breakable with age also affects men. The study suggests that this debilitating condition is often overlooked in elderly Australian men. [More]