Bone Marrow News and Research RSS Feed - Bone Marrow News and Research

Bone Marrow is the soft, sponge-like tissue in the center of most bones. It produces white blood cells, red blood cells, and platelets.
New study shows microRNAs play important role in inducing asthma

New study shows microRNAs play important role in inducing asthma

A new study shows that microRNAs, which are small, noncoding RNA molecules that can silence genes, have an important role in inducing asthma. [More]
Scientists elucidate why acute leukemias with same genetic abnormality vary in aggressiveness

Scientists elucidate why acute leukemias with same genetic abnormality vary in aggressiveness

Scientists at the Friedrich Miescher Institute for Biomedical Research and the University of Basel have discovered why acute leukemias with the same genetic abnormality vary in their aggressiveness based on their cellular origin. [More]
Metal ions released by implant wear can damage progenitors of bone-forming cells

Metal ions released by implant wear can damage progenitors of bone-forming cells

In metal-on-metal pairings, both the shell and head of an implant consist of a cobalt-chromium-molybdenum alloy. The release of metal ions into the body has been reported as a result of implant wear. Bone loss (osteolysis) was observed in many cases. [More]
Potential therapeutic approaches to combat chronic myeloid leukemia

Potential therapeutic approaches to combat chronic myeloid leukemia

Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) develops through chromosomal alterations in blood-forming cells of the bone marrow and usually occurs in older persons. Around 20 percent of adults diagnosed with leukemia suffer from this type of blood cancer. [More]
Legions of immune cells play complex role to destroy Legionella bacteria

Legions of immune cells play complex role to destroy Legionella bacteria

Immunologists and microbiologists from the University of Melbourne's Bio21 Molecular Science and Biotechnology Institute and the Peter Doherty Institute for Infection and Immunity - a joint venture between the University of Melbourne and Royal Melbourne Hospital - have led a study that defined a new cell type responsible for turning the attack back on the bacteria. [More]
Elevated levels of CXCL10 protein could help diagnose cGvHD in blood, bone marrow transplant patients

Elevated levels of CXCL10 protein could help diagnose cGvHD in blood, bone marrow transplant patients

A new study published today in the journal Blood has identified a protein that could diagnose chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGvHD), a serious, long-term complication that affects some patients after a blood and bone marrow transplant. [More]
Adaptive Biotechnologies demonstrates use of high-throughput sequencing platform for MRD

Adaptive Biotechnologies demonstrates use of high-throughput sequencing platform for MRD

Adaptive Biotechnologies, the leader in combining next-generation sequencing (NGS) and expert bioinformatics to profile T- and B-cell receptors of the adaptive immune system, and collaborators will be presenting five studies demonstrating how Adaptive’s high-throughput sequencing platform enables diagnosis, detection and assessment of prognosis in hematological malignances and has increased sensitivity over flow cytometry. [More]
Salvage alloSCT remains option for progressing CML patients

Salvage alloSCT remains option for progressing CML patients

Research demonstrates the continuing role of allogeneic stem cell transplantation as a salvage option for patients with chronic myeloid leukaemia who progress to accelerated phase or blast crisis after tyrosine kinase inhibitor failure. [More]
Long-term dasatinib findings support first-line use in CML

Long-term dasatinib findings support first-line use in CML

Final DASISION study findings confirm dasatinib to be an effective, long-term treatment for patients with a new diagnosis of chronic phase-chronic myeloid leukaemia. [More]
Already-approved drugs can fight apoptosis evasion in cancer

Already-approved drugs can fight apoptosis evasion in cancer

Cancer cells don't die when they're supposed to. Animal and human bodies follow an orderly process of birthing new cells and killing old ones. But cancer cells escape programmed cell death, called apoptosis, and multiply uncontrollably. [More]
New technique may help replace brain cells, restore memory

New technique may help replace brain cells, restore memory

Although brains—even adult brains—are far more malleable than we used to think, they are eventually subject to age-related illnesses, like dementia, and loss of cognitive function. [More]
Autologous stem cell transplant safe, effective for HIV-associated lymphoma patients

Autologous stem cell transplant safe, effective for HIV-associated lymphoma patients

New research published online today in Blood Journal of the American Society of Hematology (ASH), challenges the generally held belief that individuals with HIV and aggressive lymphoma are not candidates for standard treatment. [More]
New stem cell treatment may halt clinical relapses, development of new brain lesions in patients MS

New stem cell treatment may halt clinical relapses, development of new brain lesions in patients MS

A new use of chemotherapy followed by autologous haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (aHSCT) has fully halted clinical relapses and development of new brain lesions in 23 of 24 patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) for a prolonged period without the need for ongoing medication, according to a new phase 2 clinical trial, published in The Lancet. [More]
Researchers discover AF1q protein linked to multiple myeloma, EMD

Researchers discover AF1q protein linked to multiple myeloma, EMD

A group of researchers from the University of Louisville, Japan and Austria is the first to identify a protein, AF1q, associated with multiple myeloma and a condition that occurs in approximately one-fourth of very aggressive multiple myeloma, extramedullary disease or EMD. [More]
Scientists develop non-toxic transplantation procedure using antibodies to target blood stem cells in mice

Scientists develop non-toxic transplantation procedure using antibodies to target blood stem cells in mice

Harvard Stem Cell Institute scientists have taken the first steps toward developing a treatment that would make bone marrow - blood stem cell - transplantation safer and, as a result, more widely available to the millions of people living with blood disorders like sickle cell anemia, thalassemia, and AIDS. [More]
Human stem cells restore motor function in chronic stroke patients

Human stem cells restore motor function in chronic stroke patients

Injecting modified, human, adult stem cells directly into the brains of chronic stroke patients proved not only safe but effective in restoring motor function, according to the findings of a small clinical trial led by Stanford University School of Medicine investigators. [More]
Multiple cell and gene therapies can enhance cardiac function in mice modeled with MI

Multiple cell and gene therapies can enhance cardiac function in mice modeled with MI

Researchers at the University of Utah compared the therapeutic potential of umbilical cord-derived sub-epithelial cells (UC-SECs), bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) and induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (iPSC-CMs) -- all derived from human tissue -- along with genes (S100a1 and SDF-1a) and growth factor (VEGF165) to evaluate how injected biologics might enhance cardiac function in mice modeled with myocardial infarction (MI; commonly referred to as heart attack). [More]
CD34+ cell therapy improves angina frequency in no option patients with class III/IV angina refractory

CD34+ cell therapy improves angina frequency in no option patients with class III/IV angina refractory

A two-year, multi-center clinical study with 167 patients with class III-IV refractory angina randomized to low and high dose CD34+ cells or placebo has revealed that patients who received either a high or low dose of CD34 -- a member of a family of proteins that have an impact on vascular-associated tissue -- cells had a significant reduction in angina frequency over patients who received placebo. [More]
Researchers spot molecular key that breast cancer cells use to invade bone marrow

Researchers spot molecular key that breast cancer cells use to invade bone marrow

Scientists at the Duke Cancer Institute have identified a molecular key that breast cancer cells use to invade bone marrow in mice, where they may be protected from chemotherapy or hormonal therapies that could otherwise eradicate them. [More]
ART alone not sufficient to reduce arterial inflammation among HIV-infected patients, study finds

ART alone not sufficient to reduce arterial inflammation among HIV-infected patients, study finds

Initiating antiretroviral therapy (ART) soon after diagnosis of an HIV infection did not prevent the progression of significant arterial inflammation in a small group of previously untreated patients. [More]
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