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Bone Marrow is the soft, sponge-like tissue in the center of most bones. It produces white blood cells, red blood cells, and platelets.
Findings reveal variations between countries and regions in use of HSCT procedure

Findings reveal variations between countries and regions in use of HSCT procedure

Since the first experimental bone marrow transplant over 50 years ago, more than one million hematopoietic stem cell transplantations (HSCT) have been performed in 75 countries, according to new research charting the remarkable growth in the worldwide use of HSCT, published in The Lancet Haematology journal. [More]
Life-saving bone marrow transplants are not available to all who need them

Life-saving bone marrow transplants are not available to all who need them

Bone marrow (hematopoietic stem cell) transplant is a life saving treatment for patients with blood cancer that replaces blood stem cells lost to disease or chemotherapy. However, for each patient to benefit a matching donor must be found to provide the stem cells for transplant. [More]
Study may give health workers vital new evidence in fight against Ebola

Study may give health workers vital new evidence in fight against Ebola

One year after the first Ebola cases started to surface in Guinea, the latest findings from a Cochrane review show new ways of hydrating patients in critical care environments across the world. [More]
Fat cell transplantation benefits systemic sclerosis patients with non-healing digital ulcers

Fat cell transplantation benefits systemic sclerosis patients with non-healing digital ulcers

Digital ulcers (DUs) are a frequent, painful, and quality of life altering complication for patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc), a connective tissue disease causing a progressive loss of small blood vessels and resulting changes in organs and tissues. DUs on the fingertips of SSc patients are slow to heal, if they heal at all, as many are unresponsive to any therapies. [More]
Scientists discover DNA vaccine that alleviates chronic inflammation in the body

Scientists discover DNA vaccine that alleviates chronic inflammation in the body

An international team of scientists including CureLab Oncology, Inc. (Boston), University of Camerino (Italy), and Boston University have serendipitously discovered a DNA vaccine, which systemically alleviates chronic inflammation in the body. Since osteoporosis is an inflammatory disease, preventive and therapeutic effects of the new vaccine were demonstrated on mouse models with osteoporosis. [More]
Researchers report development of first 3D tissue-engineered system

Researchers report development of first 3D tissue-engineered system

A team led by researchers at Tufts University School of Engineering and the University of Pavia has reported development of the first three-dimensional tissue system that reproduces the complex structure and physiology of human bone marrow and successfully generates functional human platelets. [More]
Advances in stem cell therapy can improve outcomes for patients with chronic diabetic foot ulcers

Advances in stem cell therapy can improve outcomes for patients with chronic diabetic foot ulcers

According to data presented at the 73rd Annual Scientific Conference of the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons, advances in stem cell therapy can significantly improve outcomes for patients with chronic diabetic foot ulcers. Use of stem cells to treat foot problems like diabetic ulcers may speed up the healing process, preventing infection and hospitalization during recovery. [More]
TKI introduction improves French CML patient survival

TKI introduction improves French CML patient survival

Real-world study findings from France show the significant impact tyrosine kinase inhibitor treatment has had on the survival of patients with Philadelphia chromosome-positive chronic myeloid leukaemia. [More]
Jazz Pharmaceuticals to present defibrotide results for hepatic VOD at BMT Tandem meetings

Jazz Pharmaceuticals to present defibrotide results for hepatic VOD at BMT Tandem meetings

Jazz Pharmaceuticals plc announced today that researchers will present data on the use of defibrotide, an investigational medicine being studied in the United States (U.S.) for the treatment of hepatic veno-occlusive disease (VOD), a rare, potentially life-threatening, early complication in patients undergoing hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (HSCT) therapy. [More]
Stem cell transplants more effective than mitoxantrone drug for people with severe multiple sclerosis

Stem cell transplants more effective than mitoxantrone drug for people with severe multiple sclerosis

Stem cell transplants may be more effective than the drug mitoxantrone for people with severe cases of multiple sclerosis (MS), according to a new study published in the February 11, 2015, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Longer donor leukocyte telomere length linked to improved survival following HCT

Longer donor leukocyte telomere length linked to improved survival following HCT

Among patients with severe aplastic anemia who received stem cell transplant from an unrelated donor, longer leukocyte (white blood cells) telomere length (a structure at the end of a chromosome) was associated with increased overall survival at 5 years, according to a study in the February 10 issue of JAMA. [More]
Japanese researchers explore use of bone marrow transplants to treat hypophosphatasia

Japanese researchers explore use of bone marrow transplants to treat hypophosphatasia

Recent research carried out by a team of researchers in Japan has investigated the use of bone marrow transplants (BMTs) to treat hypophosphatasia (HPP). In this study, the researchers carried out BMT for two infants with HPP in combination with allogenic (other-donated) mesenchymal stem cell transplants (MSCTs). The allogenic MSC donors were a parent of the infant. [More]
DNA strands predict life expectancy

DNA strands predict life expectancy

BYU biologist Jonathan Alder has a startling secret he doesn't freely share: he knows when most of us are going to die. [More]
CLL aggressiveness linked to genetic variability

CLL aggressiveness linked to genetic variability

The genetic variability of a tumour could be a predictor for its aggressiveness: the greater the variability in gene expression, the more aggressive the tumour is likely to be. This is the hypothesis that the CNIO Structural Biology and Biocomputing Programme, led by Alfonso Valencia, is testing, after their findings on chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL), now published in the journal Genome Medicine. [More]
Breakthrough therapies for blood cancers may provide reasonable value for money spent

Breakthrough therapies for blood cancers may provide reasonable value for money spent

Amid the growing debate about the high price of powerful new drugs in the United States, a recent analysis suggests that breakthrough therapies for blood cancers may, in many cases and with some important caveats, provide reasonable value for money spent. [More]
Breakthrough blood cancer therapies may provide reasonable value for money spent

Breakthrough blood cancer therapies may provide reasonable value for money spent

Amid the growing debate about the high price of powerful new drugs in the United States, a recent analysis suggests that breakthrough therapies for blood cancers may, in many cases and with some important caveats, provide reasonable value for money spent. [More]
G1 Therapeutics receives $33 million in Series B funding to develop effective treatments for cancer

G1 Therapeutics receives $33 million in Series B funding to develop effective treatments for cancer

An RTP-based pharmaceutical company with roots at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill has received $33 million in Series B venture capital funding to develop more effective and less toxic methods to treat patients with cancer. [More]
Scientists investigate how T cells in colorectal tumors actively fight cancer

Scientists investigate how T cells in colorectal tumors actively fight cancer

In recent years, a standard follow-up to colorectal cancer surgery has been to analyze the tumor tissue for the presence of immune cells. Finding high quantities of cytotoxic T cells, or "killer cells", means that there is a good chance that the disease will take a favorable course and that the risk of metastasis is comparatively low. [More]
Three Keck Medicine scientists of USC receive $4.3 million from CIRM for stem cell research

Three Keck Medicine scientists of USC receive $4.3 million from CIRM for stem cell research

Three scientists from Keck Medicine of the University of Southern California have won grants exceeding $4.3 million from the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine for research that includes creating a temporary liver for transplant patients, finding novel ways to treat immune disorders and blood diseases and developing a new animal model for exploring diseases like heart failure, diabetes and neurodegenerative diseases. [More]
FDA accepts Sangamo BioSciences' IND for SB-BCLmR-HSPC genome editing approach

FDA accepts Sangamo BioSciences' IND for SB-BCLmR-HSPC genome editing approach

Sangamo BioSciences, Inc. announced today that an Investigational New Drug (IND) application for the company's SB-BCLmR-HSPC genome editing approach, which is designed to provide a one-time lasting therapy for beta-thalassemia, has been accepted by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and is now active. [More]