Bone Marrow News and Research RSS Feed - Bone Marrow News and Research

Bone Marrow is the soft, sponge-like tissue in the center of most bones. It produces white blood cells, red blood cells, and platelets.
Scientists reprogram mature blood cells from mice into blood-forming HSCs

Scientists reprogram mature blood cells from mice into blood-forming HSCs

Researchers at Boston Children's Hospital have reprogrammed mature blood cells from mice into blood-forming hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), using a cocktail of eight genetic switches called transcription factors. The reprogrammed cells, which the researchers have dubbed induced HSCs (iHSCs), have the functional hallmarks of HSCs, are able to self-renew like HSCs, and can give rise to all of the cellular components of the blood like HSCs. [More]
New article reviews ability of different stem cells to help restore function after spinal cord injuries

New article reviews ability of different stem cells to help restore function after spinal cord injuries

Stem cell therapy is a rapidly evolving and promising treatment for spinal-cord injuries. According to a new literature review, published in the April issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons, different types of stem cells vary in their ability to help restore function, and an ideal treatment protocol remains unclear pending further clinical research. [More]
TJP1 protein could help determine multiple myeloma patients who may best benefit from proteasome inhibitors

TJP1 protein could help determine multiple myeloma patients who may best benefit from proteasome inhibitors

A gene known as TJP1 (tight junction protein 1) could help determine which multiple myeloma patients would best benefit from proteasome inhibitors such as bortezomib, as well as combination approaches to enhance proteasome inhibitor sensitivity, according to a study led by The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. [More]
Residential radon exposure may lead to hematologic cancer risk in women

Residential radon exposure may lead to hematologic cancer risk in women

A new report finds a statistically-significant, positive association between high levels of residential radon and the risk of hematologic cancer (lymphoma, myeloma, and leukemia) in women. The study is the first prospective, population-based study of residential radon exposure and hematologic cancer risk, leading the authors to caution that it requires replication to better understand the association and whether it truly differs by sex. It appears early online in Environmental Research. [More]
Gut bacteria linked to risk of bloodstream infections after chemotherapy

Gut bacteria linked to risk of bloodstream infections after chemotherapy

A new study led by researchers at the University of Minnesota and Nantes University Hospital in France shows that the bacteria in people's gut may predict their risk of life-threatening blood infections following high-dose chemotherapy. [More]
Experimental therapy has over 90% remission rate for advanced leukemia patients

Experimental therapy has over 90% remission rate for advanced leukemia patients

Twenty-seven of 29 patients with an advanced type of leukemia that had proved resistant to multiple other forms of therapy went into remission after their T cells (disease-fighting immune cells) were genetically engineered to fight their cancers. [More]
Study reveals surprising results that may impair future therapeutic approaches in TGF-beta pathway

Study reveals surprising results that may impair future therapeutic approaches in TGF-beta pathway

Researchers at Helmholtz Zentrum M√ľnchen describe how breast cancer cells challenged with a small-molecule inhibitor targeting specific invasive properties switch to an alternative mode-of-action, rendering them even more aggressive. The results may impair future therapeutic approaches in the TGF-beta pathway and are published in the journal 'Oncotarget'. [More]
First-ever vaccine to combat Leishmaniasis under development

First-ever vaccine to combat Leishmaniasis under development

As scientists scramble to get a Zika virus vaccine into human trials by the end of the summer, a team of researchers is working on the first-ever vaccine to prevent another insect-borne disease - Leishmaniasis - from gaining a similar foothold in the Americas. [More]
Series of routine tests may not be beneficial to patients with age-related disorder

Series of routine tests may not be beneficial to patients with age-related disorder

A series of tests physicians routinely order to help diagnose and follow their patients with an elevated antibody level that is a marker for cancer risk, often do not benefit the patient but do increase health care costs, pathologists report. [More]
High doses of commonly-used chemotherapy drug may increase survival rate of ALL patients

High doses of commonly-used chemotherapy drug may increase survival rate of ALL patients

With a cure rate approaching 90 percent, acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) - the most common type of childhood cancer - is often hailed as one of the "success stories" of modern cancer treatment. But up to 20 percent of patients with a high risk of relapse are not cured. That could change with the results from a clinical trial co-led by investigators from NYU Langone Medical Center, which shows giving high doses of a commonly-used chemotherapy drug increases the survival rate for these patients. [More]
Rab inhibition may be a promising antimyeloma strategy

Rab inhibition may be a promising antimyeloma strategy

Roswell Park Cancer Institute researchers are investigating agents that target and disrupt the trafficking of monoclonal antibodies in multiple myeloma, a cancer of the bone marrow. The results will be presented at the American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting 2016, to be held April 16-20 in New Orleans. [More]
Vegetable-based polyphenol enhances wound healing

Vegetable-based polyphenol enhances wound healing

A research group led by Osaka University found a plant-based polyphenol, promotes the migration of Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSCs) in blood circulation and accumulates them in damaged tissues to improve wound healing. It is anticipated that the results will be used for stem cell treatments for cutaneous disorders associated with various damage and lesions. [More]
Novel gene therapy can improve symptoms of Bubble Boy disease in young adults

Novel gene therapy can improve symptoms of Bubble Boy disease in young adults

Adolescents and young adults with a severe inherited immunodeficiency disorder improved following treatment with novel gene therapy developed at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital and at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, part of the National Institutes of Health. The results of this study appear today in the journal Science Translational Medicine. [More]
Inhibiting adrenaline receptors reduces breast cancer brain metastases

Inhibiting adrenaline receptors reduces breast cancer brain metastases

While we look to invent new medicines to treat cancer, a parallel approach to repurpose existing medicines may be highly effective. Stress, mediated by adrenaline, has been suspected to promote cancer growth and this research study shows that by blocking adrenaline receptors in breast cancers, they are less successful in spreading to and growing in the brain. [More]
Medi-551 antibody treatment decreases number of cancer stem cells by half in multiple myeloma patients

Medi-551 antibody treatment decreases number of cancer stem cells by half in multiple myeloma patients

An experimental antibody treatment decreased by half the number of cancer stem cells that drive the growth of tumors in nearly all patients with multiple myeloma, a cancer of the bone marrow and bone tissue, according to results of a preliminary clinical trial led by Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center scientists. [More]
Investigators find tacrolimus to be very effective in reducing ocular symptoms of GVHD

Investigators find tacrolimus to be very effective in reducing ocular symptoms of GVHD

Researchers from Massachusetts Eye and Ear/Harvard Medical School have conducted a clinical trial comparing the safety and efficacy of topical tacrolimus, an immunosuppressive therapy, and topical methylprednisolone, a steroid medication, in patients with ocular graft-versus-host-disease (GVHD) -- a complication associated with allogeneic bone marrow transplants in which the transplanted immune system's cells attack certain parts of the recipient's body, including the cornea and ocular surface. [More]
Inflammation after stroke may help the brain to self-repair

Inflammation after stroke may help the brain to self-repair

After a stroke, there is inflammation in the damaged part of the brain. Until now, the inflammation has been seen as a negative consequence that needs to be abolished as soon as possible. But, as it turns out, there are also some positive sides to the inflammation, and it can actually help the brain to self-repair. [More]
Pluristem granted two key cell therapy patents in Japan

Pluristem granted two key cell therapy patents in Japan

Pluristem Therapeutics Inc. (PSTI), a leading developer of placenta-based cell therapy products, has announced that the Japan Patent Office has granted the Company two key patents addressing... [More]
Scientists use FAN1 knockout mice to refine detailed mechanisms involved in damaged DNA repair

Scientists use FAN1 knockout mice to refine detailed mechanisms involved in damaged DNA repair

Like jewels in a vault, our precious genetic material is stored in the nucleus of a cell--sequestered away from potentially damaging cellular components and toxins so that no harm can come to it. Yet over the course of a life moving through this world, our DNA does get damaged, and our cells have a host of complicated repair mechanisms to deal with such injuries. [More]
Resuscitation drugs along with defibrillation shocks can help stabilize heart beat after cardiac arrest

Resuscitation drugs along with defibrillation shocks can help stabilize heart beat after cardiac arrest

Administering heart resuscitation drugs to patients whose cardiac arrest is witnessed at the time of the attack can improve survival, but needs to be done through an IV line rather than directly into bone marrow as is more commonly done by paramedics, a new study involving UT Southwestern Medical Center emergency physicians and Dallas-Fort Worth Emergency Medical Services agencies reveals. [More]
Advertisement
Advertisement