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Bone Marrow is the soft, sponge-like tissue in the center of most bones. It produces white blood cells, red blood cells, and platelets.
Simple physics may play key role in helping the body to fight infection

Simple physics may play key role in helping the body to fight infection

Simple physics may play a larger role than previously thought in helping control key bodily processes - such as how the body fights infection. [More]
2D-NMR could be a powerful complementary technique for assessing biosimilarity of protein drugs

2D-NMR could be a powerful complementary technique for assessing biosimilarity of protein drugs

A first-ever interlaboratory study of four versions of a therapeutic protein drug—all manufactured from living cells—reports that an established analytical tool akin to magnetic resonance imaging reliably assessed the atomic structures of the biologically similar products, yielding the equivalent of a fingerprint for each. [More]
ST Asia signs licensing deal with PharmaMar to distribute new multiple myeloma drug in South East Asia

ST Asia signs licensing deal with PharmaMar to distribute new multiple myeloma drug in South East Asia

International biopharmaceutical company Specialised Therapeutics Asia will supply and distribute a novel oncology drug candidate throughout South East Asia, following an exclusive licensing deal with European pharmaceutical company PharmaMar. [More]
Study provides new insights into breast cancer metastasis

Study provides new insights into breast cancer metastasis

It has long been thought that cancer metastasizes, or spreads, when a single cancer cell escapes from the original tumor, travels through the bloodstream and sets up shop in distant organs. However, a growing body of evidence suggests that these bad actors don't travel alone; instead they migrate through the body in cellular clusters, like gangs. [More]
Biochemical compound demonstrates increasing potential for use in cancer imaging

Biochemical compound demonstrates increasing potential for use in cancer imaging

In the paper, an international team reviewed studies conducted over the past 30 years on a particular tracer, called “18F-FLT,” and found that it has the potential to improve diagnostic imaging, and thus treatment, of some cancers. [More]
Research points to potential use of radiotherapy in treating systemic cancer

Research points to potential use of radiotherapy in treating systemic cancer

An international team of researchers lead by the University of Granada has proven that mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) may be used as enhancer agents of local and systemic effects of radiotherapy, that is to say, those which affect the irradiated tumour and tumour cells located at a certain distance of the irradiated ones. [More]
UI researchers remind US doctors to watch for two diseases that could be passed from mother to child

UI researchers remind US doctors to watch for two diseases that could be passed from mother to child

While world health leaders race to contain the spread of the mosquito-borne Zika virus in the Americas, researchers at the University of Iowa are reminding doctors in the United States to be on the lookout for two other vector-borne and potentially life-threatening diseases that can be passed from mother to child through the placenta. [More]
Positive bosutinib response for elderly blast phase CML patient

Positive bosutinib response for elderly blast phase CML patient

A case study suggests that the third-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitor bosutinib may be considered as induction therapy for blast phase chronic myeloid leukaemia in older patients. [More]
UM SOM study leads to FDA approval of Neulasta drug for treatment of radiation injury

UM SOM study leads to FDA approval of Neulasta drug for treatment of radiation injury

As a result of research performed by scientists at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved the use of a drug to treat the deleterious effects of radiation exposure following a nuclear incident. The drug, Neulasta, is one of a very small number that have been approved for the treatment of acute radiation injury. [More]
IMP, WEHI scientists successfully characterize central regulator of plasma cell function

IMP, WEHI scientists successfully characterize central regulator of plasma cell function

Plasma cells play a key role in our immune system. Now scientists at the Research Institute of Molecular Pathology (IMP) in Vienna, Austria, and at the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute (WEHI) in Melbourne, Australia, succeeded in characterizing a central regulator of plasma cell function. [More]

New clinical imaging method may enable doctors to tackle lung infections

A new clinical imaging method developed in collaboration with a University of Exeter academic may enable doctors to tackle one of the main killers of patients with weakened immune systems sooner and more effectively. [More]
New study shows bone marrow lesions could help identify rapidly progressing osteoarthritis

New study shows bone marrow lesions could help identify rapidly progressing osteoarthritis

A new study from the Medical Research Council Lifecourse Epidemiology Unit, University of Southampton, shows lesions, which can best be seen on MRI scans, could help identify individuals who are more likely to suffer from more rapidly progressing osteoarthritis. [More]
IQWiG finds no added benefit for pomalidomide drug in multiple myeloma

IQWiG finds no added benefit for pomalidomide drug in multiple myeloma

Pomalidomide (trade name: Imnovid) has been approved since 2013 for the treatment of multiple myeloma that has returned and is difficult to treat. The drug is an option for adults who have received two or more prior treatment regimens, including treatment with the drugs lenalidomide and bortezomib, and in whom the last treatment had no sufficient effect. [More]
New mechanism of differentiation may offer novel therapeutic approaches to blood malignancies, solid tumors

New mechanism of differentiation may offer novel therapeutic approaches to blood malignancies, solid tumors

In humans the differentiation of stem cells into hundreds of specialized cell types is vital. Differentiation drives development from fertilized egg to a newborn, and it underlies the continuous replacement of the 5 billion cells that die every hour in an adult. On the downside, mutations in differentiation pathways of different cell types can be drivers of cancers. [More]
Increasing levels of FGF21 hormone protects against loss of immune function in the elderly

Increasing levels of FGF21 hormone protects against loss of immune function in the elderly

A hormone that extends lifespan in mice by 40% is produced by specialized cells in the thymus gland, according to a new study by Yale School of Medicine researchers. The team also found that increasing the levels of this hormone, called FGF21, protects against the loss of immune function that comes with age. [More]
FDA-approved, once-daily 24-hour aspirin now available for prevention of stroke and acute cardiac events

FDA-approved, once-daily 24-hour aspirin now available for prevention of stroke and acute cardiac events

New Haven Pharmaceuticals, Inc. today announced the availability by prescription of DURLAZA, the first and only 24-hour, extended-release aspirin capsules (162.5mg) approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the secondary prevention of stroke and acute cardiac events, including myocardial infarction (heart attack) in high-risk cardiovascular patients. [More]
Combining NELL-1 with BMP2 therapy may promote bone development

Combining NELL-1 with BMP2 therapy may promote bone development

Bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP2) is used clinically to promote bone repair. However, the high BMP2 concentrations required to stimulate bone growth in humans may produce life-threatening adverse effects such as cervical swelling in spinal fusion procedures, a problem that prompted an FDA warning in 2008. [More]
New TAU study offers tangible hope of curing Mantle Cell Lymphoma

New TAU study offers tangible hope of curing Mantle Cell Lymphoma

With a median survival rate of just five to seven years, Mantle Cell Lymphoma (MCL) is considered the most aggressive known blood cancer -- and available therapies are scarce. Three thousand Americans are diagnosed with MCL every year, and despite progress in personalized therapies to treat metastases elsewhere in the body, systemic therapeutic drug delivery to cancerous blood cells continues to challenge the world of cancer research. [More]
Argon Medical Devices completes acquisition of three vascular products from Rex Medical

Argon Medical Devices completes acquisition of three vascular products from Rex Medical

Argon Medical Devices, Inc. announced the completed acquisition of three vascular products from Rex Medical, LLC. The OptionELITE Retrievable Vena Cava Filter, CLEANER Rotational Thrombectomy System, and UltraStream Chronic Hemodialysis Catheter are now wholly owned by Argon Medical Devices, Inc. [More]
Bayer to present new research findings on Xofigo (radium Ra 223 dichloride) injection at ASCO GU 2016

Bayer to present new research findings on Xofigo (radium Ra 223 dichloride) injection at ASCO GU 2016

Bayer announced today that new research findings on Xofigo (radium Ra 223 dichloride) injection will be presented at the 2016 Genitourinary Cancers Symposium of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO GU) taking place January 7 – 9 in San Francisco. [More]
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