Bone Marrow News and Research RSS Feed - Bone Marrow News and Research

Bone Marrow is the soft, sponge-like tissue in the center of most bones. It produces white blood cells, red blood cells, and platelets.
Study provides link between common mutations in blood cells of older adults and atherosclerosis

Study provides link between common mutations in blood cells of older adults and atherosclerosis

A new study provides some of the first links between relatively common mutations in the blood cells of elderly humans and atherosclerosis. [More]
Enzyme identified in baker's yeast can efficiently annihilate leukemia cells

Enzyme identified in baker's yeast can efficiently annihilate leukemia cells

An enzyme identified in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, commonly known as brewer's or baker's yeast, has passed in vitro trials, demonstrating its capacity to kill acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cells. [More]
Research offers new clues to prolong lifespan of the body's disease-fighting NK cells

Research offers new clues to prolong lifespan of the body's disease-fighting NK cells

A team of researchers from Australia and France have uncovered new insights into how to prolong the lifespan of the body's disease-fighting natural killer (NK) cells. [More]
Chemotherapy-induced senescent cells promote side effects and cancer relapse

Chemotherapy-induced senescent cells promote side effects and cancer relapse

Standard chemotherapy is a blunt force instrument against cancer - and it's a rare cancer patient who escapes debilitating side effects from systemic treatments that mostly affect dividing cells, both malignant and healthy, throughout the body. [More]
Knowledge bank approach could help find best treatment option for AML patients

Knowledge bank approach could help find best treatment option for AML patients

An international collaboration led by clinical researchers at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute has shown proof-of-concept that truly personalised therapy will be possible in the future for people with cancer. [More]
Study reveals brain activity may be key to link between stress and heart disease

Study reveals brain activity may be key to link between stress and heart disease

Increased activity in a deep-lying region of the brain called the amygdala is associated with a higher risk of heart attack and stroke, according to a study published in The Lancet.

The amygdala is known to process emotions such as fear and anger and the finding sheds light on the possible mechanism by which stress can lead to cardiovascular disease (CVD), say the study authors. [More]
Inhibition of EZH2 protein could be new strategy to treat multiple myeloma

Inhibition of EZH2 protein could be new strategy to treat multiple myeloma

In a study published in the scientific journal Oncotarget, researchers from Uppsala University show how the protein EZH2 affects the development of multiple myeloma, and that inhibition of EZH2 could be used as a new strategy to treat the disease. [More]
New review finds successful outcomes for Achilles tendon tear with surgical and nonsurgical treatments

New review finds successful outcomes for Achilles tendon tear with surgical and nonsurgical treatments

A new literature review published in the Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons found successful outcomes for an Achilles tendon tear with either minimally invasive surgery or nonsurgical bracing with a removable boot, especially in recreational athletes. [More]
Researchers identify possible treatment targets for myelodysplasia syndromes

Researchers identify possible treatment targets for myelodysplasia syndromes

Cincinnati Children's researchers report in Nature Immunology a new mechanism that controls blood cell function and several possible molecular targets for treating myelodysplasia syndromes (MDS) - a group of pre-malignant disorders in which bone marrow does not produce enough healthy blood cells. [More]
Blocking protein that initiates immune response against viral infections may help combat HIV

Blocking protein that initiates immune response against viral infections may help combat HIV

In findings they call counterintuitive, a team of UCLA-led researchers suggests that blocking a protein, which is crucial to initiating the immune response against viral infections, may actually help combat HIV. [More]
Localized chemotherapy may be effective way to keep immune system intact, animal study suggests

Localized chemotherapy may be effective way to keep immune system intact, animal study suggests

In experiments on mice with a form of aggressive brain cancer, Johns Hopkins researchers have shown that localized chemotherapy delivered directly to the brain rather than given systemically may be the best way to keep the immune system intact and strong when immunotherapy is also part of the treatment. [More]
Clinical study tests adult stem cell therapy for infants with congenital HLHS

Clinical study tests adult stem cell therapy for infants with congenital HLHS

In a first-in-children randomized clinical study, medical researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine and the Interdisciplinary Stem Cell Institute at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine have begun testing to see whether adult stem cells derived from bone marrow benefit children with the congenital heart defect hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS). [More]
Researchers use CRISPR-based genetic screening to identify three promising HIV treatment targets

Researchers use CRISPR-based genetic screening to identify three promising HIV treatment targets

Investigators from Whitehead Institute, the Ragon Institute of MGH, MIT and Harvard and the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard have used CRISPR-Cas9 gene-editing technology to identify three promising new targets for treatment of HIV infection. [More]
FDA awards accelerated approval to new ovarian cancer drug

FDA awards accelerated approval to new ovarian cancer drug

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today granted accelerated approval to Rubraca (rucaparib) to treat women with a certain type of ovarian cancer. [More]
Research finds link between p53 pathway and ribosome biogenesis, nucleotide metabolism in DBA

Research finds link between p53 pathway and ribosome biogenesis, nucleotide metabolism in DBA

Diamond Blackfan Anemia (DBA) is a condition that is characterized by a failure of the bone marrow to produce red blood cells, congenital abnormalities, and a predisposition to cancer. [More]
New clinical study for children with AML aims to kill leukemia cells and minimize cardiac damage

New clinical study for children with AML aims to kill leukemia cells and minimize cardiac damage

Imagine conquering childhood cancer, only to find out that years down the road your heart may fail. [More]
Study provides new insights into fundamental characteristics of dendritic cells

Study provides new insights into fundamental characteristics of dendritic cells

Dendritic cells represent an important component of the immune system: they recognize and engulf invaders, which subsequently triggers a pathogen-specific immune response. [More]
First-in-human study of cell bandage for common sporting knee injury shows promising results

First-in-human study of cell bandage for common sporting knee injury shows promising results

A 'living bandage' made from stem cells, which could revolutionise the treatment and prognosis of a common sporting knee injury, has been trialled in humans for the first time by scientists at the Universities of Liverpool and Bristol. [More]
Newborns with CMV may have increased risk of developing acute lymphocytic leukemia

Newborns with CMV may have increased risk of developing acute lymphocytic leukemia

Newborns with congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) -- a common virus in the herpes family -- may have an increased risk of developing acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL), according to new research published online today in Blood, the Journal of the American Society of Hematology. The study suggests the risk is even greater in Hispanic children. [More]
New technology that increases Natural Killer cells to stop cancers gets licensed

New technology that increases Natural Killer cells to stop cancers gets licensed

Our bodies contain Natural Killer (NK) cells - an army that stops cancers and viruses before they can make us sick. [More]
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