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Novel approach may help detect invasive aspergillosis

Novel approach may help detect invasive aspergillosis

Many different microbes can cause pneumonia, and treatment may be delayed or off target if doctors cannot tell which bug is the culprit. A novel approach—analyzing a patient's breath for key chemical compounds made by the infecting microbe—may help detect invasive aspergillosis, a fungal infection that is a leading cause of mortality in patients with compromised immune systems, according to a proof-of-concept study now online in Clinical Infectious Diseases. [More]
Couple renews multi-million dollar commitment to screen newborn babies for SCID disorders

Couple renews multi-million dollar commitment to screen newborn babies for SCID disorders

Frustrated with the slow pace of implementation of Newborn Screening for Severe Combined Immune Deficiency (SCID), Vicki and Fred Modell renewed a multi-million dollar commitment to screen every baby born in every state for this life threatening condition, often referred to as "Bubble Boy" disease. [More]
Scientists say fundamental theory about how thymus educates immune police appears to be wrong

Scientists say fundamental theory about how thymus educates immune police appears to be wrong

A fundamental theory about how our thymus educates our immune police appears to be wrong, scientists say. [More]
Cyclophosphamide drug can eliminate life-threatening immune response after bone marrow transplants

Cyclophosphamide drug can eliminate life-threatening immune response after bone marrow transplants

Johns Hopkins and other cancer researchers report that a very short course of a chemotherapy drug, called cyclophosphamide, not only can prevent a life-threatening immune response in some bone marrow transplant recipients, but also can eliminate such patients' need for the usual six months of immune suppression medicines commonly prescribed to prevent severe forms of this immune response. [More]
Daiichi Sankyo, Ambit Biosciences enter into definitive merger agreement

Daiichi Sankyo, Ambit Biosciences enter into definitive merger agreement

Daiichi Sankyo Company, Ltd. (hereinafter Daiichi Sankyo) and Ambit Biosciences, jointly announced today that they have entered into a definitive merger agreement under which Daiichi Sankyo will acquire all of the outstanding common stock of Ambit Biosciences for $15 per share in cash through a tender offer followed by a merger with a subsidiary of Daiichi Sankyo, or approximately $315 million on a fully diluted basis. [More]
Researchers discover new molecule that allows for multiplication of stem cells in cord blood

Researchers discover new molecule that allows for multiplication of stem cells in cord blood

Investigators from the Institute for Research in Immunology and Cancer at the Université de Montréal have just published, in the prestigious magazine Science, the announcement of the discovery of a new molecule, the first of its kind, which allows for the multiplication of stem cells in a unit of cord blood. [More]
Human stem cells can be reset to their native undifferentiated state

Human stem cells can be reset to their native undifferentiated state

Scientists at the Babraham Institute, in collaboration with colleagues at the Cambridge Stem Cell Institute and the European Bioinformatics Institute, have made a breakthrough in stem cell research. Their paper, published today in Cell, describes how human stem cells can be reverted back to non-specialised cells. [More]
HICCC receives $18 million grant from the National Cancer Institute

HICCC receives $18 million grant from the National Cancer Institute

Outstanding basic research, a growing focus on translating discoveries into treatments, and a dedication to patient care have earned the Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center (HICCC) of Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC) and NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital an $18 million, five-year Cancer Center Support Grant from the National Cancer Institute (NCI). [More]

Scientists grow fully functional organ in animal from transplanted laboratory-created cells

Laboratory-grown replacement organs have moved a step closer with the completion of a new study. Scientists have grown a fully functional organ from transplanted laboratory-created cells in a living animal for the first time. [More]
UChicago Medicine and Advocate Health Care wins NIH grant to find new ways to prevent type 1 diabetes

UChicago Medicine and Advocate Health Care wins NIH grant to find new ways to prevent type 1 diabetes

The University of Chicago Medicine and Advocate Children's Hospital / Advocate Health Care have received a five-year, $1.8-million grant from the National Institutes of Health to find new ways to delay and prevent type 1 diabetes. The grant will establish the first Type 1 Diabetes TrialNet Clinical Center in Chicago. [More]
University of Chicago adds six new members to governing Board of Trustees

University of Chicago adds six new members to governing Board of Trustees

The University of Chicago Medical Center added six new members to its governing Board of Trustees, and named a new president of the medical staff. [More]
3SBio enters into exclusive license with DiNonA for development of Leukotuximab

3SBio enters into exclusive license with DiNonA for development of Leukotuximab

3SBio Inc., a leading China-based biotechnology company focused on researching, developing, manufacturing and marketing biopharmaceutical products, today announced it has entered into an exclusive license with DiNonA Inc. for the development, manufacturing and marketing of Leukotuximab, an anti JL-1 antibody for acute leukemia (AL), including acute myelocytic leukemia (AML) and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), in the territory of Greater China (including Mainland China, Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau) and the Middle East (excluding Cyprus, Egypt, Israel and Turkey). [More]
States of Maine and Rhode Island add SCID to newborn screening panels

States of Maine and Rhode Island add SCID to newborn screening panels

The Immune Deficiency Foundation commends the states of Maine and Rhode Island for adding Severe Combined Immune Deficiency to their states' newborn screening panels, effective August 1, 2014. These states join 21 other states currently screening newborns for SCID, ensuring over two thirds of all babies in the U.S. are now being screened. [More]
Blood-forming stem cell transplantation benefits infants with severe combined immunodeficiency

Blood-forming stem cell transplantation benefits infants with severe combined immunodeficiency

Babies who are born with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) can be successfully treated with a transplant of blood-forming stem cells, according to experts led by Memorial Sloan Kettering's Richard J. O'Reilly, MD, a world-renowned pioneer in the development of transplant protocols. [More]
Scientist develops highly accurate device for diagnosing fatal lung disease

Scientist develops highly accurate device for diagnosing fatal lung disease

A scientist from the University of Exeter has developed a simple, cheap and highly accurate device for diagnosing a frequently fatal lung disease which attacks immune deficient individuals such as cancer patients and bone marrow transplant recipients. [More]
Immune marker predicts infection risk in critically ill children with traumatic injuries

Immune marker predicts infection risk in critically ill children with traumatic injuries

Researchers studying critically ill children with traumatic injuries have identified an immune marker that predicts which patients are likely to develop a hospital-acquired infection. [More]
Janssen seeks expanded approval of VELCADE from EU for Mantle Cell Lymphoma

Janssen seeks expanded approval of VELCADE from EU for Mantle Cell Lymphoma

Janssen-Cilag International NV today announced its submission of a type II variation to the European Medicines Agency to expand the label for VELCADE (bortezomib) to include its use, in combination with rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin and prednisone, for the treatment of adult patients with previously untreated Mantle Cell Lymphoma (MCL). [More]
Actinium's Chairman to discuss role of alpha-particle radiopharmaceuticals at SNMMI Annual Meeting

Actinium's Chairman to discuss role of alpha-particle radiopharmaceuticals at SNMMI Annual Meeting

Actinium Pharmaceuticals, Inc. ("Actinium" or "the Company"), a biopharmaceutical company developing innovative targeted payload immunotherapeutics for the treatment of advanced cancers, today announced that Actinium's Clinical Advisory Board Chairman Joseph Jurcic, MD will participate in an upcoming panel discussion highlighting the role of Actinium's alpha-particle radiopharmaceuticals in the treatment of leukemia patients. [More]
Interim data from Promedior’s PRM-151 Phase 2 myelofibrosis clinical trial to be presented at 19th EHA Congress

Interim data from Promedior’s PRM-151 Phase 2 myelofibrosis clinical trial to be presented at 19th EHA Congress

Promedior, Inc., a clinical stage biotechnology company developing novel therapeutics for the treatment of fibrosis, today announced that Ruben Mesa, MD, will present interim data from the Company's ongoing Phase 2 clinical trial of its lead product candidate, PRM-151, for the treatment of myelofibrosis, in a poster presentation on June 14, 2014 at the 19th Congress of European Hematology Association (EHA) which is being held in Milan, Italy, from June 12-15, 2014. [More]
Ibrutinib outperforms ofatumumab as second-line therapy for CLL treatment

Ibrutinib outperforms ofatumumab as second-line therapy for CLL treatment

In a head-to-head comparison of two Food and Drug Administration-approved drugs for the treatment of relapsed chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), ibrutinib significantly outperformed ofatumumab as a second-line therapy, according to a multicenter interim study published in the OnLine First edition of the New England Journal of Medicine. [More]