Brain Tumor News and Research RSS Feed - Brain Tumor News and Research

A Brain Tumor is the growth of abnormal cells in the tissues of the brain. Brain tumors can be benign (not cancer) or malignant (cancer).
Tau Therapeutics presents data of T-type calcium channel inhibitors in treatment of pancreatic cancer

Tau Therapeutics presents data of T-type calcium channel inhibitors in treatment of pancreatic cancer

Tau Therapeutics LLC announced today that its academic collaborator, University of Virginia Professor Todd Bauer, MD, presented data at the 105th Annual Meeting of the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR), the premier cancer research event held in San Diego, California from April 5-9. [More]
Comprehensive genomic analysis of low-grade brain tumors sorts into three categories

Comprehensive genomic analysis of low-grade brain tumors sorts into three categories

Comprehensive genomic analysis of low-grade brain tumors sorts them into three categories, one of which has the molecular hallmarks and shortened survival of glioblastoma multiforme, the most lethal of brain tumors, researchers reported at the American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting 2014. [More]

Researchers find new molecular targets for aggressive brain tumor

Researchers from the Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth will present a scientific poster on Tuesday, April 8, 2014 at the American Association of Cancer Researchers conference in San Diego, CA. The research identifies a potential characteristic for predicting outcome in a deadly form of brain cancer known as glioblastoma multiforme. [More]

GenSpera enrolls first patient in Phase II trial of compound G-202 in patients with glioblastoma multiforme

GenSpera, Inc. (OTCQB:GNSZ) announced that the first patient was enrolled in the Phase II clinical trial of its lead compound, G-202, in patients who have glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the most prevalent type of primary brain cancer. [More]
Duke-NUS researchers shed light on process that inhibits tumor development

Duke-NUS researchers shed light on process that inhibits tumor development

A team of researchers from Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School have discovered a protein complex that disrupts the process known as dedifferentiation, known to promote tumor development. [More]
Viewpoints: The evolution of Medicare; generic drugs and patient safety; new food labels

Viewpoints: The evolution of Medicare; generic drugs and patient safety; new food labels

About half a century ago, organized medicine and the hospital industry in this country struck a deal with Congress that in retrospect seems as audacious as it seems incredible: Congress was asked to surrender to these industries the keys to the United States Treasury. In return, the industries would allow Congress to pass a 1965 amendment to the Social Security Act .... We have come to know it as Medicare. [More]
Study establishes innovative approaches to improve vision of young children with brain tumor

Study establishes innovative approaches to improve vision of young children with brain tumor

Robert Avery, DO, MSCE, of Children's National Health System and colleagues are establishing innovative approaches with technology and medication to improve the vision of young children who have visual pathway glioma, a type of brain tumor. [More]

Randomized trial of bevacizumab for glioblastoma shows disappointing results

"The results of this study are counter to most expectations," said Dr. Brachman, Director of Radiation Oncology at Barrow and St. Joseph's. "Bevacizumab had been shown in earlier studies to be an effective drug in the treatment of patients with recurrent disease. But, on newly diagnosed patients, it did not, in fact, prolong survival." [More]

Study identifies promising target for new drugs to treat lethal form of brain cancer

A molecule in cells that shuts down the expression of genes might be a promising target for new drugs designed to treat the most frequent and lethal form of brain cancer, according to a new study by researchers at The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center - Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute. [More]
Cedars-Sinai researchers develop unique imaging device to "light up" malignant brain tumors

Cedars-Sinai researchers develop unique imaging device to "light up" malignant brain tumors

Researchers at the Cedars-Sinai Maxine Dunitz Neurosurgical Institute and Department of Neurosurgery have developed a unique, compact, relatively inexpensive imaging device to "light up" malignant brain tumors and other cancers. [More]

Neurosurgeons use MRI-guided laser technology to treat deep brain tumor

Using a novel magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided laser technology, neurosurgeons at UC San Diego Health System have successfully treated a malignant tumor deep inside a patient's brain. This is the first time that this FDA-approved laser-based treatment has been performed in California. [More]

Dreams and delusions are associated with faulty "reality testing", shows research

New research from the University of Adelaide has delved into the reasons why some people are unable to break free of their delusions, despite overwhelming evidence explaining the delusion isn't real. [More]

Bevacizumab offers no benefit for patients newly diagnosed with glioblastoma

Adding bevacizumab (Avastin) to standard chemotherapy and radiation treatment does not improve survival for patients newly diagnosed with the often deadly brain cancer glioblastoma, researchers report in the Feb. 20 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine. [More]

Pediatric Cancer Genome Project identifies genetic alteration in brain tumor ependymoma

​The St. Jude Children's Research Hospital-Washington University Pediatric Cancer Genome Project has identified the most common genetic alteration ever reported in the brain tumor ependymoma and evidence that the alteration drives tumor development. The research appears February 19 as an advanced online publication in the scientific journal Nature. [More]
Certain fragments of DNA shed by tumors can be used to non-invasively screen for early-stage cancers

Certain fragments of DNA shed by tumors can be used to non-invasively screen for early-stage cancers

Certain fragments of DNA shed by tumors into the bloodstream can potentially be used to non-invasively screen for early-stage cancers, monitor responses to treatment and help explain why some cancers are resistant to therapies, according to results of an international study led by Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center investigators. [More]

Scientists develop mathematical method for classifying forms of glioblastoma

Scientists at The Wistar Institute have developed a mathematical method for classifying forms of glioblastoma, an aggressive and deadly type of brain cancer, through variations in the way these tumor cells "read" genes. Their system was capable of predicting the subclasses of glioblastoma tumors with 92 percent accuracy. With further testing, this system could enable physicians to accurately predict which forms of therapy would benefit their patients the most. [More]
Researchers use new technique that can partially move tumors from inoperable locations in brain

Researchers use new technique that can partially move tumors from inoperable locations in brain

One factor that makes glioblastoma cancers so difficult to treat is that malignant cells from the tumors spread throughout the brain by following nerve fibers and blood vessels to invade new locations. [More]

FDA approves IMRIS’ VISIUS Surgical Theatre that integrates high-field MR scanners

IMRIS Inc. today announced US Food and Drug Administration clearance of the newest generation VISIUS® Surgical Theatre which integrates Siemens' latest high-field MR scanners. [More]
Cedars-Sinai receives $1M grant to study molecular changes in brain due to air pollutants

Cedars-Sinai receives $1M grant to study molecular changes in brain due to air pollutants

Researchers at the Maxine Dunitz Neurosurgical Institute and Department of Neurosurgery at Cedars-Sinai will conduct a study to determine if several potentially toxic compounds that exist in polluted air are capable of entering the brain from the bloodstream and causing brain cancer. [More]
Combination of SYK and FLT3 enzymes promotes progression of acute myelogenous leukemia

Combination of SYK and FLT3 enzymes promotes progression of acute myelogenous leukemia

Reinforcing the need to look beyond genomic alterations to understand the complexity of cancer, researchers from Dana-Farber/Boston Children's Cancer and Blood Disorders Center report that a normal enzyme called SYK pairs with FLT3, the most commonly mutated enzyme found in acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), to promote progression of the disease. [More]