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Violent behavior of middle school students can be reduced by implementation of Vanderbilt’s program

Violent behavior and beliefs among middle school students can be reduced through the implementation of a targeted violence intervention program, according to a Vanderbilt study released in the Journal of Injury and Violence Research. [More]
Adolescents with higher social status face increased risk of being bullied

Adolescents with higher social status face increased risk of being bullied

A new study suggests that for most x, becoming more popular both increases their risk of getting bullied and worsens the negative consequences of being victimized. [More]

Righttime Medical Care CEO presents lecture on MTBI at Maryland’s annual conference

Robert G. Graw, Jr., M.D., Chief Executive Officer of Maryland-based Righttime Medical Care, presented his lecture, An Integrated Community Model for the Education, Evaluation and Treatment: An Update, on mild traumatic brain injuries (MTBI) at the Brain Injury Association of Maryland's annual conference on March 20. [More]
Study captures experiences of transgender and gender variant children and their parents

Study captures experiences of transgender and gender variant children and their parents

Amy Przeworski, assistant professor of psychology at Case Western Reserve University, and graduate student Jennifer Birnkrant will lead an online study that captures the experiences of transgender and gender variant children and their parents. [More]
Study: Rise of 'selfies' have huge impact on facial plastic surgery industry

Study: Rise of 'selfies' have huge impact on facial plastic surgery industry

The rise of 'selfies' is having a huge impact on the facial plastic surgery industry according to a new study by the American Academy of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery (AAFPRS). The annual poll studies a select group of the organization's 2,700 members to uncover the latest trends in facial plastic surgery. [More]

SBA to honor CEO of 3C Institute with Award of Excellence for Innovation and Social Entrepreneurship

SBA North Carolina District Director Ms. Lynn L. Douthett will honor Dr. Melissa DeRosier, founder and CEO of Cary-based 3C Institute with a special Award of Excellence for Innovation and Social Entrepreneurship. [More]
Researchers encourage parents to create nurturing, healthy home environment and lifestyle for children

Researchers encourage parents to create nurturing, healthy home environment and lifestyle for children

Remember that slim kid in school - the one with the cook-from-scratch mom? He's likely one of the fittest dudes at your high school reunion according to new research from Cornell University, published online in the journal PLOS ONE. [More]
Frequently moving schools during childhood can increase risk of psychotic symptoms in later years

Frequently moving schools during childhood can increase risk of psychotic symptoms in later years

Researchers at Warwick Medical School have shown that frequently moving schools during childhood can increase the risk of psychotic symptoms in later years. [More]

MacLeod's Introduction to Medicine: A collection of short medical stories

MacLeod's Introduction to Medicine: A Doctor's Memoir by Jonathan Waxman is a collection of short stories that gives the reader an insight into the humorous side of a doctor's life before the dawn of management. [More]
Study examines long-term effects of bullying on child's overall health

Study examines long-term effects of bullying on child's overall health

The longer the period of time a child is bullied, the more severe and lasting the impact on a child's health, according to a new study from Boston Children's Hospital published online Feb. 17 in Pediatrics. The study is the first to examine the compounding effects of bullying from elementary school to high school. [More]

Viewpoints: Health overhaul helps ease inequality issues; nuns triumph over health law; deinstitutionalization's mental health legacy

Intense as it is, the current debate over rising income inequality is hardly new. ... The good news is that there's more good news than one might expect. ... In addition to avoiding making things worse, the country has adopted, at least in part, several of the policy improvements we thought made sense eight years ago. Most prominent among these was President Obama's health-care reform, which, for all its problems, promises to ease the health-care cost squeeze on middle- and lower-income Americans (1/25). [More]
AACN invites nurses, other healthcare professionals to 2014 National Teaching Institute & Critical Care Exposition

AACN invites nurses, other healthcare professionals to 2014 National Teaching Institute & Critical Care Exposition

The American Association of Critical-Care Nurses (AACN) invites nurses and other healthcare professionals who care for high acuity and critically ill patients and their families to its 2014 National Teaching Institute & Critical Care Exposition (NTI) in Denver, May 19-22, with preconferences May 17-18. [More]

Kids bullied during P.E. class less likely to participate in physical activity one year later

A new study found that children who were bullied during P.E. class or other physical activities were less likely to participate in physical activity one year later. [More]

New book provides guidelines on managing cyberbullying

Cyberbullying is one of the darker and most troubling aspects of the growing use of new media technologies. [More]

Study explores social and emotional impact of Tourette syndrome in secondary schools

Secondary school can be a stressful enough time for any teenager, but for those living with Tourette Syndrome (TS) their neurological condition can present a whole new set of challenges. [More]

New tool provides first comprehensive guide to optimize ostomy management

Nurses caring for ostomy patients will now be equipped with an essential new tool that provides them with the first comprehensive guide to optimize ostomy management and enhance patient safety. [More]

Share of young people affected by digital abuse has declined, shows survey

MTV and The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research today released the results of a new survey exploring the pervasiveness of digital abuse among teens and young adults, how it is affecting America's youth and how they're responding to it. According to the survey, trends show that the share of young people affected by digital abuse has declined since 2011, with less than half (49 percent) of those surveyed stating that they have experienced digital abuse, compared to 56 percent in 2011. [More]
Ghrelin hormone released during chronic stress may predispose people to PTSD

Ghrelin hormone released during chronic stress may predispose people to PTSD

​About a dozen years ago, scientists discovered that a hormone called ghrelin enhances appetite. Dubbed the "hunger hormone," ghrelin was quickly targeted by drug companies seeking treatments for obesity - none of which have yet panned out. [More]

Study: Social media can become early warning system to help prevent suicide tragedies

Heart-breaking accounts of cyber bullying and suicide seem all too common, but a new study offers hope that social media can become an early warning system to help prevent such tragedies. [More]

Study reveals sadists seem to derive pleasure from behaviors that hurt others

Most of the time, we try to avoid inflicting pain on others - when we do hurt someone, we typically experience guilt, remorse, or other feelings of distress. But for some, cruelty can be pleasurable, even exciting. New research suggests that this kind of everyday sadism is real and more common than we might think. [More]