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More than half of U.S. adults believe today's kids have diminished emotional and mental health

More than half of U.S. adults believe today's kids have diminished emotional and mental health

More than half of adults believe children today are more stressed, experience less quality family time and have worse mental and emotional health than children in past generations, according to the C.S. Mott Children's Hospital National Poll on Children's Health. [More]
School fitness reports ineffective in promoting weight loss among students

School fitness reports ineffective in promoting weight loss among students

Teens being classified as overweight in school fitness reports does not appear to have any impact on short-term changes in body mass index, finds a new study by New York University's Institute for Education and Social Policy, the Center for Policy Research at Syracuse University's Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs, and Columbia University. [More]
Bullied young children not at higher risk of substance abuse later in life

Bullied young children not at higher risk of substance abuse later in life

Being bullied can hurt young children in many ways, but a new UT Dallas study found that it does not lead to later substance abuse.The research by three criminologists in UT Dallas' School of Economic, Political and Policy Sciences discovered that students who were bullied in third grade did not have a greater risk of using drugs or alcohol by ninth grade. [More]
Short intervention program can lead to significant reduction in relational bullying among preschoolers

Short intervention program can lead to significant reduction in relational bullying among preschoolers

Physical and relational bullying can happen among children as young as 3- to 5-years-old, but the results of a new study suggest that a relatively short intervention program recently developed by researchers at the University at Buffalo can lead to significant reductions in some of these behaviors. [More]
Ohio State study shows sustained stress erodes memory

Ohio State study shows sustained stress erodes memory

Sustained stress erodes memory, and the immune system plays a key role in the cognitive impairment, according to a new study from researchers at The Ohio State University. [More]
Study shows bullied preemies more likely to develop mental health problems as adults

Study shows bullied preemies more likely to develop mental health problems as adults

Babies born at an extremely low birth weight (ELBW) are miracles, but they are more likely to be bullied as children, and this can significantly increase their risk for mental health problems as adults. [More]
New study assesses risk of lasting mental health problems for severely victimized LGBT teens

New study assesses risk of lasting mental health problems for severely victimized LGBT teens

Since 2010, more than 613,000 people have pledged to combat bullying of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) teens as part of the "It Gets Better" campaign. And a new Northwestern Medicine study has found that most adolescents would agree that it does, in fact, get better. But not all. [More]
Social and emotional skills intervention can help young Syrian refugees heal psychological wounds

Social and emotional skills intervention can help young Syrian refugees heal psychological wounds

A social and emotional skills intervention developed to help children recover from the trauma of natural disasters is being adapted to help young Syrian refugees heal their psychological wounds. [More]
Study evaluates effectiveness of F2F aggression prevention program in young African-American girls

Study evaluates effectiveness of F2F aggression prevention program in young African-American girls

A new study from the Violence Prevention Initiative at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) suggests that educators, particularly in urban schools, should teach elementary school-aged girls problem-solving skills and provide them leadership opportunities as a way to reduce their relational aggression. [More]
Kids who take ADHD medications twice as likely to be bullied by peers

Kids who take ADHD medications twice as likely to be bullied by peers

Kids and teens who take medications like Ritalin to treat attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder are twice as likely to be physically or emotionally bullied by peers than those who don't have ADHD, a new University of Michigan study found. [More]

McGill University study provides comprehensive look at youth violence on a global scale

Youth violence undermines social and economic development, especially in the poorest corners of the world, according to research from McGill University. However, increased government spending on education may be the key to facilitate policy efforts to protect youth. [More]
Bullies and victims at risk for eating disorders

Bullies and victims at risk for eating disorders

Being bullied in childhood has been associated with increased risk for anxiety, depression and even eating disorders. But according to new research, it's not only the victims who could be at risk psychologically, but also the bullies themselves. [More]
Pediatricians to discuss children's health issues at AAP National Conference & Exhibition

Pediatricians to discuss children's health issues at AAP National Conference & Exhibition

An expected 10,000 pediatricians and other health care professionals will gather in the nation's capital October 24-27 to deepen their knowledge and widen their scope on child advocacy at the American Academy of Pediatrics National Conference & Exhibition. [More]
Parents share different views on how schools should respond to cyberbullying

Parents share different views on how schools should respond to cyberbullying

The digital age has given teens new platforms for cruelty: A social media prank intended to embarrass a classmate. Spreading online rumors about peers. Posting unflattering pictures of others. [More]
Regular exercise significantly reduces suicide attempts among bullied students

Regular exercise significantly reduces suicide attempts among bullied students

As high schools across the country continue to reduce physical education, recess, and athletic programs, a new study shows that regular exercise significantly reduces both suicidal thoughts and attempts among students who are bullied. [More]
Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine professor discusses causes, consequences of weight stigma

Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine professor discusses causes, consequences of weight stigma

There's a dark side to obesity that's only recently getting attention; millions of people from all walks of life are often stigmatized and even shamed based on their weight -and it's one of the most pervasive and acceptable forms of bias and discrimination. In advance of Weight Stigma Awareness Week (September 21-25), Stacey Cahn, PhD, associate professor of clinical psychology at Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine, discusses the causes and consequences of weight stigma. [More]
Sexting, Internet safety climb higher on list of major health concerns for children

Sexting, Internet safety climb higher on list of major health concerns for children

With more kids online and using cell phones at increasingly younger ages, two issues have quickly climbed higher on the public's list of major health concerns for children across the U.S: sexting and Internet safety. [More]
Pennsylvania physicians examine back-to-school health, offer tips for parents and students

Pennsylvania physicians examine back-to-school health, offer tips for parents and students

As students start heading back to classes for the upcoming academic year, Pennsylvania physicians take a close look at back-to-school health and offer some tips for parents and students who strive to stay in class and not home in bed sick. [More]
Centene reports strong financial results for Q2 2015

Centene reports strong financial results for Q2 2015

Centene Corporation today announced its financial results for the quarter ended June 30, 2015. The following discussions, with the exception of cash flow information, are in the context of continuing operations. [More]
Study explores possible pathways that may lead kids toward aggressive behavior later in life

Study explores possible pathways that may lead kids toward aggressive behavior later in life

A University at Buffalo developmental psychologist has received a $550,000 grant from the National Science Foundation to study possible pathways that might lead young children toward different types of aggressive behavior later in life. [More]
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