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Migraine surgery found effective among adolescent patients

Migraine surgery found effective among adolescent patients

As in adults, migraine surgery is effective for selected adolescent patients with severe migraine headaches that don't respond to standard treatments, reports a study in the June issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, the official medical journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons. [More]

Researchers explore new approaches to designing prosthetic limb with the ability to feel

Researchers are exploring new approaches to designing prosthetic hands capable of providing "sensory feedback." Advances toward developing prostheses with a sense of touch are presented in a special topic article in the June issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, the official medical journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons. [More]
Sanford-Burnham, Takeda partner to develop new therapeutic targets for cardiovascular disease

Sanford-Burnham, Takeda partner to develop new therapeutic targets for cardiovascular disease

Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute at Lake Nona today announced it has signed a two-year partnership agreement with Takeda Pharmaceutical Company Ltd. of Japan to study the potential role of several gene regulatory proteins as targets for the treatment of heart failure. [More]
CSL Behring awarded NHF's 2015 Corporate Leadership Award

CSL Behring awarded NHF's 2015 Corporate Leadership Award

The National Hemophilia Foundation has awarded CSL Behring its 2015 Corporate Leadership Award as recognition for the company's longstanding and unwavering commitment to advancing science and improving the care of the bleeding disorders community. The award was accepted by Paul Perreault, CEO and Managing Director, CSL Limited, during the NHF Annual Spring Soiree in New York City on May 21. [More]
Scientists uncover role of HTRA3 protease in Cockayne syndrome

Scientists uncover role of HTRA3 protease in Cockayne syndrome

Scientists from the Institut Pasteur and CNRS, in collaboration with scientists from the Institut Gustave Roussy and CEA, have succeeded in restoring normal activity in cells isolated from patients with the premature aging disease Cockayne syndrome. They have uncovered the role played in these cells by an enzyme, the HTRA3 protease. [More]
Vitamin E helps build strong muscles

Vitamin E helps build strong muscles

Body builders have it right: vitamin E does help build strong muscles, and scientists appear to have figured out one important way it does it. [More]
Bronchitis can cause pneumonia, says Loyola physician

Bronchitis can cause pneumonia, says Loyola physician

When a cold has lasted too long or a cough is especially bothersome, it's important to see a medical professional. [More]
LSTM scientists one step closer to understanding why HAP increases risk of pneumonia

LSTM scientists one step closer to understanding why HAP increases risk of pneumonia

Scientists at LSTM have come a step closer to understanding why people exposed to household air pollution (HAP) are at higher risk of lung infections such as pneumonia and tuberculosis. [More]
GenVec reports net loss of $1.5 million for first quarter 2015

GenVec reports net loss of $1.5 million for first quarter 2015

GenVec, Inc. today reported financial results for the first quarter ended March 31, 2015. For the three months ended March 31, 2015, GenVec reported a net loss of $1.5 million, or $0.09 per share, on revenues of $0.4 million, compared with a net loss of $1.0 million, or $0.07 per share, on revenues of $2.1 million, for the same period in the prior year. [More]
Loyola's Ronald McDonald Children's Hospital implements pediatric early warning scoring system

Loyola's Ronald McDonald Children's Hospital implements pediatric early warning scoring system

The Ronald McDonald Children's Hospital at Loyola University Medical Center has implemented a pediatric early warning scoring system to better identify children who are at-risk of becoming critically ill while in the hospital. [More]
Imprimis has exclusive US commercial rights for patented Hep-Lido-A formulation

Imprimis has exclusive US commercial rights for patented Hep-Lido-A formulation

Imprimis Pharmaceuticals, Inc., a pharmaceutical company focused on the development and commercialization of proprietary compounded drug formulations, today announced it now has the exclusive US commercial rights to the patented compounded alkalinized lidocaine and heparin formulation ("Hep-Lido-A" or "HLA") for the treatment of interstitial cystitis ("IC"), commonly referred to as painful bladder syndrome ("PBS"). [More]
Specific altered function in heart's left atrium may signal stroke risk in people with a-fib

Specific altered function in heart's left atrium may signal stroke risk in people with a-fib

Stroke is a frequent and dreaded complication of atrial fibrillation. But predicting which of the estimated six million Americans with a-fib are at highest risk has long challenged physicians weighing stroke risk against the serious side effects posed by lifelong therapy with warfarin and other blood thinners. [More]
Proviso Partners for Health awarded IHI grant to improve community health

Proviso Partners for Health awarded IHI grant to improve community health

The Proviso Partners for Health was awarded a grant from the Institute of Healthcare Improvement to support their efforts to improve community health. Proviso Partners for Health is comprised of Loyola University Health System, Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine and Marcella Niehoff School of Nursing as well as Proviso-Leyden Council for Community Action, Proviso East High School, Triton College, Cook County Department of Public Health and several other community organizations. [More]
Choosing the right type of car seats can help reduce risk of death in infants, children

Choosing the right type of car seats can help reduce risk of death in infants, children

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, car seats reduce the risk of death in infants and children by up to 71 percent. Still, for many parents it can be confusing to know which type of car seat to use at which age. Often car seats are not installed correctly, minimizing their effectiveness in protecting children in the event of an accident. [More]
New study could point to potential ways to address defects in learning, memory

New study could point to potential ways to address defects in learning, memory

Just as some people seem built to run marathons and have an easier time going for miles without tiring, others are born with a knack for memorizing things, from times tables to trivia facts. These two skills—running and memorizing—are not so different as it turns out. [More]
Recognizing and preventing child abuse

Recognizing and preventing child abuse

Every 10 seconds a report is made concerning a child being abused. Child abuse can lead to life-long physical, emotional and psychological conditions. Each year in the U.S., more than 1,600 children die from abuse or neglect. April is National Child Abuse Awareness Month and Loyola University Health System is working with physicians, nurses, parents and communities to help bring awareness to this preventable childhood danger. [More]
New biodegradable membrane reduces wound healing time by 50%

New biodegradable membrane reduces wound healing time by 50%

Treatments to regenerate skin from burns become tedious and long lasting; however, Mexican researchers developed a biodegradable membrane that allows to transfer skin cells (keratinocytes) to burn wounds, when placed on the wound. The method reduces healing time by 50 percent. [More]
Two different fat grafting approaches have similar effects in reversing signs of aging skin

Two different fat grafting approaches have similar effects in reversing signs of aging skin

Two approaches to fat grafting--injection of fat cells versus fat-derived stem cells--have similar effects in reversing the cellular-level signs of aging skin, reports a study in the April issue of , the official medical journal of the [More]
COPD patients receiving home oxygen have higher risk of burn injury

COPD patients receiving home oxygen have higher risk of burn injury

Researchers from the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston have found that patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease receiving home oxygen have a higher risk of burn injury. This study was published on March 30 in Mayo Clinic Proceedings. [More]
CNIO researchers describe presence of MDH2 gene mutations in hereditary neuroendocrine tumors

CNIO researchers describe presence of MDH2 gene mutations in hereditary neuroendocrine tumors

Researchers in the Hereditary Endocrine Cancer Group of the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre -- led by Alberto Cascón and Mercedes Robledo -- have described the presence of mutations in the MDH2 gene, in a family with very rare neuroendocrine tumours associated with a high hereditary component: pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas that affect the suprarenal and parathyroid glands (groups of chromaffin cells in the central nervous system), respectively. [More]
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