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Choosing the right type of car seats can help reduce risk of death in infants, children

Choosing the right type of car seats can help reduce risk of death in infants, children

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, car seats reduce the risk of death in infants and children by up to 71 percent. Still, for many parents it can be confusing to know which type of car seat to use at which age. Often car seats are not installed correctly, minimizing their effectiveness in protecting children in the event of an accident. [More]
New study could point to potential ways to address defects in learning, memory

New study could point to potential ways to address defects in learning, memory

Just as some people seem built to run marathons and have an easier time going for miles without tiring, others are born with a knack for memorizing things, from times tables to trivia facts. These two skills—running and memorizing—are not so different as it turns out. [More]
Recognizing and preventing child abuse

Recognizing and preventing child abuse

Every 10 seconds a report is made concerning a child being abused. Child abuse can lead to life-long physical, emotional and psychological conditions. Each year in the U.S., more than 1,600 children die from abuse or neglect. April is National Child Abuse Awareness Month and Loyola University Health System is working with physicians, nurses, parents and communities to help bring awareness to this preventable childhood danger. [More]
New biodegradable membrane reduces wound healing time by 50%

New biodegradable membrane reduces wound healing time by 50%

Treatments to regenerate skin from burns become tedious and long lasting; however, Mexican researchers developed a biodegradable membrane that allows to transfer skin cells (keratinocytes) to burn wounds, when placed on the wound. The method reduces healing time by 50 percent. [More]
Two different fat grafting approaches have similar effects in reversing signs of aging skin

Two different fat grafting approaches have similar effects in reversing signs of aging skin

Two approaches to fat grafting--injection of fat cells versus fat-derived stem cells--have similar effects in reversing the cellular-level signs of aging skin, reports a study in the April issue of , the official medical journal of the [More]
COPD patients receiving home oxygen have higher risk of burn injury

COPD patients receiving home oxygen have higher risk of burn injury

Researchers from the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston have found that patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease receiving home oxygen have a higher risk of burn injury. This study was published on March 30 in Mayo Clinic Proceedings. [More]
CNIO researchers describe presence of MDH2 gene mutations in hereditary neuroendocrine tumors

CNIO researchers describe presence of MDH2 gene mutations in hereditary neuroendocrine tumors

Researchers in the Hereditary Endocrine Cancer Group of the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre -- led by Alberto Cascón and Mercedes Robledo -- have described the presence of mutations in the MDH2 gene, in a family with very rare neuroendocrine tumours associated with a high hereditary component: pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas that affect the suprarenal and parathyroid glands (groups of chromaffin cells in the central nervous system), respectively. [More]
RSV infection rate on the rise among young children

RSV infection rate on the rise among young children

Children with Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV), a common virus that infects the lungs and breathing passageways, has been on the rise across the nation for the last several years. Though it may only produce minor cold symptoms in adults, it can lead to serious illness in young children and those with compromised immune systems. [More]
Brown fat tissue communicates with the brain through sensory nerves

Brown fat tissue communicates with the brain through sensory nerves

Brown fat tissue, the body's "good fat," communicates with the brain through sensory nerves, possibly sharing information that is important for fighting human obesity, such as how much fat we have and how much fat we've lost, according to researchers at Georgia State University. [More]
GenVec reports record financial results for Q4 and fiscal year 2014

GenVec reports record financial results for Q4 and fiscal year 2014

GenVec, Inc. today reported financial results for the fourth quarter and year ended December 31, 2014. For the year ended December 31, 2014, the company reported a net loss of $2.5 million, or $0.16 per share, compared with a net loss of $10.0 million, or $0.77 per share, for the year ended December 31, 2013. [More]
Loyola's Bridget Boyd suggests ways to handle diaper rash

Loyola's Bridget Boyd suggests ways to handle diaper rash

Diaper rash may not be a serious condition, but it can be extremely painful. It is common and causes concern for many parents trying to comfort their child. [More]
Study shows fatigue pathways are more sensitive in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome

Study shows fatigue pathways are more sensitive in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome

The mechanism that causes high-performance athletes to "feel the burn" turns out to be the culprit in what makes people with chronic fatigue syndrome feel exhausted by the most common daily activities, new University of Florida Health research shows. [More]
Ember Therapeutics, Mariel Therapeutics sign definitive merger agreement

Ember Therapeutics, Mariel Therapeutics sign definitive merger agreement

Ember Therapeutics, Inc., a Boston-based biotechnology company dedicated to the discovery and development of novel obesity and diabetic related therapies, and Mariel Therapeutics, a privately held, New York-based biotechnology company developing targeted therapies for osteoarthritis and kidney fibrosis using Bone Morphogenetic Protein (BMP)-7, jointly announce today that they have entered into a definitive agreement to merge the two companies. [More]
Scientists develop mathematical model to digitally map communication between heart cells

Scientists develop mathematical model to digitally map communication between heart cells

A team of scientists led by Johns Hopkins cardiologist and biomedical engineer Hiroshi Ashikaga, M.D., Ph.D., has developed a mathematical model to measure and digitally map the beat-sustaining electrical flow between heart cells. [More]
Plant molecule helps female mice combat weight gain

Plant molecule helps female mice combat weight gain

A molecule found in some plants can combat weight gain induced by a high-fat diet, but only in female mice, not males. 7,8-dihydroxyflavone (7,8-DHF) is thought to mimic the effects of a growth factor induced by exercise. [More]
New insights into the use, outcomes of gluteoplasty and vaginal labiaplasty procedures

New insights into the use, outcomes of gluteoplasty and vaginal labiaplasty procedures

Two of the fastest-growing plastic surgery procedures are gluteoplasty or "butt augmentation," to improve the appearance of the buttocks; and labiaplasty to address cosmetic and functional concerns with the vagina. [More]
CSL Behring donates protein therapies to World Federation of Hemophilia

CSL Behring donates protein therapies to World Federation of Hemophilia

In recognition of Rare Disease Day and as part of its ongoing commitment to the global bleeding disorders community, CSL Behring announced today that it is donating 2 million international units (IUs) of protein therapies to the World Federation of Hemophilia. [More]
Loyola physician reveals top five health concerns for men, offers tips to prevent them

Loyola physician reveals top five health concerns for men, offers tips to prevent them

Men lead women in the likelihood to die from nearly all the most common causes of death. Still, men are less likely to go to the doctor than women and often try to ignore symptoms of health problems. [More]
Researchers develop targeted approach that allows muscle to burn more energy

Researchers develop targeted approach that allows muscle to burn more energy

What started as an evolutionary protection against starvation has become a biological "bad joke" for people who need to lose weight. The human body doesn't distinguish between dieting and possible starvation, so when there is a decrease in calories consumed, human metabolism increases its energy efficiency and weight loss is resisted. [More]
Loyola pediatrician offers tips to help ease spit-up in babies after feeding

Loyola pediatrician offers tips to help ease spit-up in babies after feeding

A baby's feeding habits are a common source of questions for pediatricians. Though every baby will spit up, some do it considerably more than others, which can cause parents to think something might be wrong. [More]
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