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New hope for people suffering from obesity and diabetes

New hope for people suffering from obesity and diabetes

White, brown and beige adipocytes, or fat cells, are inherently different. Each of these cell types has different functions and each plays its own role in metabolism. In the human body, white adipose tissue is by far the most prevalent. [More]
Sequenom's total revenues increase 62% to $39.8 million in Q2 2014

Sequenom's total revenues increase 62% to $39.8 million in Q2 2014

Sequenom, Inc., a life sciences company providing innovative genetic analysis solutions, today reported total revenues of $39.8 million for the second quarter of 2014, an increase of 62% compared to revenues of $24.5 million for the second quarter of 2013. [More]
Galmed reports net loss of $3.9 million for six months ended June 30, 2014

Galmed reports net loss of $3.9 million for six months ended June 30, 2014

Galmed Pharmaceuticals Ltd., a clinical-stage biopharmaceutical company focused on the development and commercialization of a once-daily, oral therapy for the treatment of liver diseases and cholesterol gallstones, today announced financial results for the period ended June 30, 2014. [More]
Friendships allow children to value companionship, affection, and empathy

Friendships allow children to value companionship, affection, and empathy

Friends play an extremely important role in a person's life. From infancy on, we have a desire to connect and those early relationships help to mold and develop our adult character. [More]
People with higher levels of brown fat have better blood sugar control

People with higher levels of brown fat have better blood sugar control

Researchers at the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston have shown for the first time that people with higher levels of brown fat, or brown adipose tissue, in their bodies have better blood sugar control, higher insulin sensitivity and a better metabolism for burning fat stores. [More]
Loyola burn patient boasts 0 handicap, helps other burn patients to lead normal life

Loyola burn patient boasts 0 handicap, helps other burn patients to lead normal life

Once told he would never golf again, burn victim Jamie Nieto, now head pro at Pheasant Run Resort in St. Charles, is leading the ninth annual Burn Awareness Golf Outing and silent auction there on Friday, August 29. [More]
First publication describing use of CytoSorb during cardiac surgery

First publication describing use of CytoSorb during cardiac surgery

CytoSorbents Corporation, a critical care immunotherapy company commercializing its CytoSorb® cytokine adsorber in multiple countries worldwide, announced the PDF availability of the first publication describing the use of CytoSorb® intra-operatively during cardiac surgery at the Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich Hospital - Grosshadern Campus, in Germany. [More]
Game theory identifies ideal time to disrupt metastatic cancer cell cooperation

Game theory identifies ideal time to disrupt metastatic cancer cell cooperation

Cancer's no game, but researchers at Johns Hopkins are borrowing ideas from evolutionary game theory to learn how cells cooperate within a tumor to gather energy. [More]
New study reveals how genetic defect may make people more susceptible to developing melanoma

New study reveals how genetic defect may make people more susceptible to developing melanoma

A new study by University of Kentucky researchers shows how a genetic defect in a specific hormonal pathway may make people more susceptible to developing melanoma, the deadliest type of skin cancer. [More]
Women experiencing stressful events the day before eating high-fat meal can slow body's metabolism

Women experiencing stressful events the day before eating high-fat meal can slow body's metabolism

A new study in women suggests that experiencing one or more stressful events the day before eating a single high-fat meal can slow the body's metabolism, potentially contributing to weight gain. [More]
New hope for patients with tuberous sclerosis complex

New hope for patients with tuberous sclerosis complex

Although it is rare, tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) can be a difficult and frightening diagnosis for parents and children. The genetic disorder causes nonmalignant tumors to form in many different organs, including the brain, eyes, kidneys and heart. [More]
Transcription factor IRF4 plays key role in brown fat's thermogenic process

Transcription factor IRF4 plays key role in brown fat's thermogenic process

The body contains two types of fat cells, easily distinguished by color: White and brown. While white fat serves to store excess calories until they're needed by the body, brown adipocytes actually burn fat by turning it into heat. [More]
Researchers use simple tactics to reduce unnecessary blood tests, health care spending

Researchers use simple tactics to reduce unnecessary blood tests, health care spending

Researchers at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center used two relatively simple tactics to significantly reduce the number of unnecessary blood tests to assess symptoms of heart attack and chest pain and to achieve a large decrease in patient charges. [More]
Children who undergo simple emergency surgeries on weekends are more likely to die

Children who undergo simple emergency surgeries on weekends are more likely to die

Children who undergo simple emergency surgeries, such as hernia repairs or appendix removals, on weekends are more likely to suffer complications and even die than children getting the same kind of treatment during the week, according to results of a Johns Hopkins Children's Center study. [More]
CTI completes recruitment in PERSIST-1 clinical trial of pacritinib for treatment of myelofibrosis

CTI completes recruitment in PERSIST-1 clinical trial of pacritinib for treatment of myelofibrosis

CTI BioPharma Corp. announced today that it has completed recruitment in the PERSIST-1 pivotal Phase 3 clinical trial of pacritinib, a novel oral JAK2/FLT3 inhibitor that is being evaluated for the treatment of myelofibrosis. [More]
Doctor offers tips on fireworks safety to prevent injuries

Doctor offers tips on fireworks safety to prevent injuries

Fireworks can result in severe burns, scars and disfigurement that can last a lifetime.
Fireworks that are often thought to be safe, such as sparklers, can reach temperatures above 2000 degrees Fahrenheit, and can burn users and bystanders. [More]

FDA grants Encision 510(k) approval for AEM Endoshield Burn Protection System

Encision Inc., a medical device company owning patented surgical technology that prevents dangerous stray electrosurgical burns in minimally invasive surgery, today announced that it has received FDA 510(k) premarket notification approval for its AEM Endoshield™ Burn Protection System ("EndoShield"). [More]

Individualized climate control for burns victims can improve comfort and working conditions

Individualized climate control for burns victims in hospitals might not only improve comfort for such patients, but improve working conditions for those taking care of them. [More]
Hormonal imbalance is not the sole cause of childhood obesity, say experts

Hormonal imbalance is not the sole cause of childhood obesity, say experts

The number of children who are obese remains alarmingly high in the U.S. and, unfortunately, diseases associated with obesity are on the rise. [More]

New guidelines to protect burn victims from hypothermia risk during surgery

Loyola University Health System has established new guidelines to protect burn victims at risk for hypothermia during surgery. [More]