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New blood test could help diagnose severity of traumatic brain injury

New blood test could help diagnose severity of traumatic brain injury

A new blood test could help emergency room doctors quickly diagnose traumatic brain injury and determine its severity. [More]
Patients undergoing surgery for lung cancer wait too long to receive treatment, skip vital diagnostic steps

Patients undergoing surgery for lung cancer wait too long to receive treatment, skip vital diagnostic steps

Patients undergoing surgery for lung cancer may wait too long to receive treatment, and too many patients skip vital diagnostic steps that are needed to help determine the best possible treatment, according to an article in the August 2015 issue of The Annals of Thoracic Surgery. [More]
New computer-based system provides real-time feedback before and during facial transplant surgery

New computer-based system provides real-time feedback before and during facial transplant surgery

Following several years of research and collaboration, physicians and engineers at Johns Hopkins and Walter Reed National Military Medical Center say they have developed a computer platform that provides rapid, real-time feedback before and during facial transplant surgery, which may someday improve face-jaw-teeth alignment between donor and recipient. [More]
Many children with sports-related head injuries undergo unnecessary CT scans

Many children with sports-related head injuries undergo unnecessary CT scans

Visits to emergency departments by children with sports-related head injuries have skyrocketed in the past decade, and new research finds that many patients undergo unnecessary computed tomography or CT scans that expose them to radiation and increase the cost of treatment. [More]
Hospitals can make patients sick, reveals Consumer Reports

Hospitals can make patients sick, reveals Consumer Reports

Hospitals are thought to be sterile, safe environments where sick people get better, not sicker. But that's not always the case according to a new investigation by Consumer Reports into hospital-acquired infections. [More]
Research brief provides clinical validation of LOXO-101 Phase 1 trial for treatment of TRK fusion cancer

Research brief provides clinical validation of LOXO-101 Phase 1 trial for treatment of TRK fusion cancer

The University of Colorado Cancer Center and Loxo Oncology, Inc., a biopharmaceutical company focused on the discovery, development and commercialization of targeted cancer therapies, today announced the publication of a research brief in the online edition of the journal Cancer Discovery, describing the first patient with a tropomyosin receptor kinase fusion cancer enrolled in the Phase 1 dose escalation trial of LOXO-101, the only selective TRK inhibitor in clinical development. [More]
Research brief describes enrollment of first patient with TRK fusion cancer in LOXO-101 Phase 1 trial

Research brief describes enrollment of first patient with TRK fusion cancer in LOXO-101 Phase 1 trial

The University of Colorado Cancer Center and Loxo Oncology, Inc., a biopharmaceutical company focused on the discovery, development and commercialization of targeted cancer therapies, today announced the publication of a research brief in the online edition of the journal Cancer Discovery, describing the first patient with a tropomyosin receptor kinase (TRK) fusion cancer enrolled in the Phase 1 dose escalation trial of LOXO-101, the only selective TRK inhibitor in clinical development. [More]
Helping relieve headaches in school-aged children

Helping relieve headaches in school-aged children

As the school year approaches and begins, many parents may start to hear their children complain about headaches. [More]
Mobile Stroke Treatment Units can improve survival rates and enhance patient's chance of recovery

Mobile Stroke Treatment Units can improve survival rates and enhance patient's chance of recovery

Two new studies presented today at the Society of NeuroInterventional Surgery 12th Annual Meeting in San Francisco, report that Mobile Stroke Treatment Units (MSTUs) can significantly reduce the time it takes to diagnose and treat patients for stroke, greatly improving survival rates and enhancing a patient's chance of recovery. [More]
Extremes of stroke symptoms attract misdiagnoses

Extremes of stroke symptoms attract misdiagnoses

Patients with very mild or very severe stroke symptoms are at the greatest risk of being misdiagnosed in the emergency department, research suggests. [More]
ADPT generates systemwide net patient services revenue of $104.5 million for Q2 2015

ADPT generates systemwide net patient services revenue of $104.5 million for Q2 2015

Adeptus Health Inc., the largest operator of freestanding emergency rooms in the U.S., announced its results for the second quarter ended June 30, 2015. [More]
Six hot line sessions set to reveal latest research in cardiovascular disease at ESC Congress 2015

Six hot line sessions set to reveal latest research in cardiovascular disease at ESC Congress 2015

Six hot line sessions at ESC Congress 2015 are set to reveal the latest in cardiovascular disease research across a range of conditions and comorbidities. Hot topics include atrial fibrillation, pacing, acute myocardial infarction, heart failure, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, pharmacology and coronary artery disease. [More]
New diagnostic criteria can help distinguish malignant cancerous chest cavity masses from histoplasmosis

New diagnostic criteria can help distinguish malignant cancerous chest cavity masses from histoplasmosis

Researchers led by St. Jude Children's Research Hospital scientists have developed new diagnostic criteria to enable clinicians to distinguish malignant cancerous chest cavity masses from those caused by fungal histoplasmosis infection. [More]
Late- and post-menopausal women have more fat around hearts compared to pre-menopausal counterparts

Late- and post-menopausal women have more fat around hearts compared to pre-menopausal counterparts

Late- and post-menopausal women have significantly greater volumes of fat around their hearts - a risk factor for heart disease - than their pre-menopausal counterparts, a University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health study has shown for the first time. [More]
Researchers report new drug combination that effectively treats HCV patients co-infected with HIV

Researchers report new drug combination that effectively treats HCV patients co-infected with HIV

Roughly 20 to 30 percent of patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV) are also infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV). Both blood-borne viruses share the same modes of transmission, but many HCV medications currently have significant limitations due to adverse interactions with HIV treatments. Researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine report a new combination that effectively treats HCV in patients co-infected with HIV. [More]
Hospital for Special Surgery named top hospital in nation for orthopedics for sixth consecutive year

Hospital for Special Surgery named top hospital in nation for orthopedics for sixth consecutive year

For the sixth consecutive year, Hospital for Special Surgery has been ranked the top hospital in the country for orthopedics by U.S. News & World Report in its 2015 "Best Hospitals" survey. The hospital was also nationally recognized as a leader in rheumatology, ranking No. 3 in association with NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital. [More]
Patients' own genetically engineered immune cells show significant success against multiple myeloma

Patients' own genetically engineered immune cells show significant success against multiple myeloma

In recent years, immunotherapy has emerged as a promising treatment for certain cancers. Now this strategy, which uses patients' own immune cells, genetically engineered to target tumors, has shown significant success against multiple myeloma, a cancer of the plasma cells that is largely incurable. [More]
Transplanted MSCs slow progression of lupus nephritis by suppressing Tfh cells in SLE animal model

Transplanted MSCs slow progression of lupus nephritis by suppressing Tfh cells in SLE animal model

Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease that produces autoantibodies and subsequent immune reactions that can lead to a variety of symptoms, including inflammation of the kidneys, or nephritis. When researchers transplanted mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) derived from human bone marrow into mice modeled with SLE, they found that inflammation was reduced and nephritis "attenuated." [More]
Clinical data on TomoTherapy System presented at AAPM 2015

Clinical data on TomoTherapy System presented at AAPM 2015

Accuray Incorporated announced today that studies on the clinical use of the TomoTherapy System continue to demonstrate its mainstream use and the benefits of its gold-standard treatment planning and delivery capabilities. More than 30 studies were presented during poster or oral sessions at the 57th Annual Meeting of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine held in Anaheim, California July 12 – July 16, 2015. [More]
Stopping cocaine use may lower levels of ET-1 protein that plays key role in coronary artery disease

Stopping cocaine use may lower levels of ET-1 protein that plays key role in coronary artery disease

For people who use cocaine, stopping or reducing cocaine use is associated with decreased levels of endothelin-1 (ET-1)--a protein that plays a key role in the development of coronary artery disease, reports a study in the Journal of Addiction Medicine, the official journal of the American Society of Addiction Medicine. [More]
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