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What do cells really look like in 3D?

What do cells really look like in 3D?

Nanolive SA, a start-up company founded in November 2013 at the EPFL Innovation Park in Lausanne, Switzerland, has developed a revolutionary microscope which allows for the very first time the exploration of a living cell in 3D without damaging it. [More]
Helen DeVos Children's Hospital uses two imaging techniques to produce hybrid 3D model of a patient's heart

Helen DeVos Children's Hospital uses two imaging techniques to produce hybrid 3D model of a patient's heart

Congenital heart experts from Spectrum Health Helen DeVos Children's Hospital have successfully integrated two common imaging techniques to produce a three-dimensional anatomic model of a patient's heart. [More]
Cell transplantation researchers successfully treat laboratory rats modeled with severe burns

Cell transplantation researchers successfully treat laboratory rats modeled with severe burns

Cell transplantation researchers have successfully used bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) to treat a variety of diseases and conditions. Now, using injections of MSCs, a research team in Brazil has successfully treated laboratory rats modeled with severe burns. [More]
OhioHealth Neuroscience Center launched at Riverside Methodist Hospital

OhioHealth Neuroscience Center launched at Riverside Methodist Hospital

On July 6, 2015, OhioHealth will open its doors to the new OhioHealth Neuroscience Center on Riverside Methodist Hospital's campus. [More]
Preclinical Magnetic Particle Imaging: an interview with Professor Jeff Bulte, Johns Hopkins

Preclinical Magnetic Particle Imaging: an interview with Professor Jeff Bulte, Johns Hopkins

I'm Jeff Bulte, professor of Radiology and Director of Cellular Imaging at the Institute for Cell Engineering at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland in the United States. I lead a group of about 20 to 25 people who focus their research on imaging cells. [More]
Annual LDCT screening safe, effective for monitoring patients with nonsolid lung nodules

Annual LDCT screening safe, effective for monitoring patients with nonsolid lung nodules

An annual exam using a key imaging technology could spare patients with lung nodules from unnecessary tests and surgery, while identifying the cases where the nodules are likely to become cancerous, according to a new study by researchers at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai (ISMMS) and published online today in journal Radiology. [More]
Johns Hopkins scientists use experimental therapy to reverse progression of atherosclerosis in rodents

Johns Hopkins scientists use experimental therapy to reverse progression of atherosclerosis in rodents

In what may be a major leap forward in the quest for new treatments of the most common form of cardiovascular disease, scientists at Johns Hopkins report they have found a way to halt and reverse the progression of atherosclerosis in rodents by loading microscopic nanoparticles with a chemical that restores the animals’ ability to properly handle cholesterol. [More]
CardiAQ Valve Technologies announces first human implant of transcatheter bioprosthetic mitral heart valve

CardiAQ Valve Technologies announces first human implant of transcatheter bioprosthetic mitral heart valve

CardiAQ Valve Technologies (CardiAQ), which has developed the world’s first self-conforming and self-anchoring technology for nonsurgical transfemoral-transseptal percutaneous Transcatheter Mitral Valve Implantation (TMVI), today announced that its second-generation bioprosthetic mitral heart valve was successfully implanted as a compassionate treatment into a 72-year-old male suffering from severe mitral regurgitation (MR 4+) with multiple co-morbidities and ineligible for alternate treatment modalities. [More]
'Virtual-reality' therapy can reduce people's craving for alcohol, new study suggests

'Virtual-reality' therapy can reduce people's craving for alcohol, new study suggests

A form of 'virtual-reality' therapy may help people with alcohol dependence reduce their craving for alcohol, a new study suggests. The findings, published in the July issue of the Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs, come from a small study of just 10 patients. [More]
Low-dose CT screening can help monitor people who have nonsolid lung nodules

Low-dose CT screening can help monitor people who have nonsolid lung nodules

People who have nonsolid lung nodules can be safely monitored with annual low-dose computed tomography (CT) screening, according to a new study published online in the journal Radiology. Researchers said the findings could help spare patients from unnecessary surgery and additional imaging. [More]

Methods used to compare brain size across species not appropriate, finds UC Santa Barbara researcher

In research, sometimes setting out to demonstrate one concept actually results in proving something entirely different. It's important to be flexible. [More]
PSMA can be an ideal target for diagnosis and treatment of prostate cancer

PSMA can be an ideal target for diagnosis and treatment of prostate cancer

Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is a surface protein that is normally present on healthy prostate cells, but is found at much higher levels on prostate cancer cells. It is barely found in the rest of the body. "Therefore, PSMA is an ideal target for diagnostic purposes as well as targeted therapies against prostate cancer," says biotechnologist Dr. Matthias Eder of the German Cancer Research Center (Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, DKFZ). [More]
Long-term smokers and ex-smokers have respiratory-related impairments

Long-term smokers and ex-smokers have respiratory-related impairments

More than half of long-term smokers and ex-smokers who are considered disease-free because they passed lung-function tests have respiratory-related impairments when more closely evaluated with lung imaging, walking and quality-of-life tests. Many of those people likely have the earliest stages of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, an incurable progressive disease (COPD) that is the third leading cause of death in the United States. [More]
Findings could help improve patient care, reduce cancer screening costs around the world

Findings could help improve patient care, reduce cancer screening costs around the world

A large clinical trial led by researchers at The Ottawa Hospital and the University of Ottawa has found that contrary to expectations, a CT scan of the abdomen and pelvis does not improve cancer detection in people with unexplained blood clots in their legs and lungs. [More]
MESA announces acquisition of Sigil

MESA announces acquisition of Sigil

MESA Group Holdings, a Pantheon Healthcare Group company, today announced the acquisition of French diagnostic imaging service provider Sigil. Complementing MESA's recent business expansion into France with its core Multi-Vendor Service (MVS) and Managed Equipment Service (MES) offerings, the acquisition of Sigil will accelerate the development and adoption of more efficient asset management and medical equipment maintenance service solutions for public and private sector hospitals and imaging centres. [More]
New multidisciplinary Centre For Research into Obesity and Related Diseases opens In Sao Paulo

New multidisciplinary Centre For Research into Obesity and Related Diseases opens In Sao Paulo

Researchers, clinicians, health educators and policy makers all gathered on May 4th in Sao Paulo, Brazil, as the new Multidisciplinary Centre for Research into Obesity and Related Comorbidities (Cepid-OCRC) was opened at da Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP). [More]
Johns Hopkins researchers develop new imaging technology to help remove brain tumors safely

Johns Hopkins researchers develop new imaging technology to help remove brain tumors safely

Brain surgery is famously difficult for good reason: When removing a tumor, for example, neurosurgeons walk a tightrope as they try to take out as much of the cancer as possible while keeping crucial brain tissue intact — and visually distinguishing the two is often impossible. [More]
Identifying obstructive coronary artery disease in women: an interview with Dr. Ladapo, NYU School of Medicine

Identifying obstructive coronary artery disease in women: an interview with Dr. Ladapo, NYU School of Medicine

A recent study presented at the American College of Cardiology 64th Annual Scientific Meeting evaluated the impact of an age, sex, and gene expression score on clinical decision-making and the rate of further cardiac evaluation in symptomatic female patients suggestive of CAD in the outpatient setting. [More]
Antibiotic treatment not better than appendectomy for uncomplicated acute appendicitis

Antibiotic treatment not better than appendectomy for uncomplicated acute appendicitis

Among patients with uncomplicated appendicitis, antibiotic treatment did not meet a prespecified level of effectiveness compared with appendectomy, although most patients who received antibiotic therapy did not require an appendectomy, and for those who did, they did not experience significant complications, according to a study in the June 16 issue of JAMA. [More]
Phase I study: Idarucizumab reverses anticoagulant effect of dabigatran in healthy volunteers

Phase I study: Idarucizumab reverses anticoagulant effect of dabigatran in healthy volunteers

Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc. today announced that The Lancet published results from a phase I study investigating the effects of idarucizumab, an investigational agent, in reversing the anticoagulant effect of dabigatran in healthy volunteers. The data demonstrate that complete reversal was achieved following administration of idarucizumab. [More]
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