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New imaging technique may help detect amyloid-related heart failure

New imaging technique may help detect amyloid-related heart failure

A type of heart failure caused by a build-up of amyloid can be accurately diagnosed and prognosticated with an imaging technique, eliminating the need for a biopsy, according to a multicenter study led by researchers at Columbia University Medical Center. [More]
MILabs to provide new hybrid imaging system to Yale for advancing cardiovascular research

MILabs to provide new hybrid imaging system to Yale for advancing cardiovascular research

MILabs will provide an advanced U-SPECT4CT system to the Yale Translational Research Imaging Center (Y-TRIC) in New Haven-Connecticut, with support of an NIH Shared Instrument Grant for advancing their program in multimodality molecular and translational cardiovascular imaging research. [More]
Antioxidant compound could be effective to combat immune rejection after islet transplantation

Antioxidant compound could be effective to combat immune rejection after islet transplantation

A team of researchers has found that doses of bilirubin help provide suppression of the immune response following islet transplantation in mouse models. [More]
New drug could help decrease symptoms of asthma

New drug could help decrease symptoms of asthma

The first new asthma pill for nearly 20 years has the power to significantly reduce the severity of the condition, a study led by the University of Leicester has found. [More]
Mount Sinai neurosurgeon first to use CaptiView image injection system during microscopic surgery

Mount Sinai neurosurgeon first to use CaptiView image injection system during microscopic surgery

Joshua Bederson, MD, Professor and System Chair for the Department of Neurosurgery at Mount Sinai Health System, is the first neurosurgeon to use CaptiView - a microscope image injection system from Leica Microsystems that overlays critical virtual reality imaging directly onto the brain when viewed through the eyepiece, known as the ocular, during surgery. [More]
Watch-and-wait approach may prove successful in subset of adults with advanced kidney cancer

Watch-and-wait approach may prove successful in subset of adults with advanced kidney cancer

Watch-and-wait approach means some patients could delay taking highly toxic non-curative anticancer drugs that come with substantial side effects [More]
Small dense HDL particles protectively linked to coronary heart disease risk

Small dense HDL particles protectively linked to coronary heart disease risk

The idea that plasma high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) is protective against coronary heart disease has been part of medical conventional wisdom for five decades. [More]
Study shows link between inflammatory biomarkers and prevalence of CAD in HIV-infected men

Study shows link between inflammatory biomarkers and prevalence of CAD in HIV-infected men

A cardiac imaging study led by Hossein Bahrami, MD, PhD, assistant professor of cardiovascular medicine at the Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California, along with investigators from Johns Hopkins University and five other institutions, showed a correlation between higher inflammatory biomarkers and an increased prevalence of coronary artery disease (CAD) in men infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). [More]
Hyperkyphosis may be passed on from parents to children

Hyperkyphosis may be passed on from parents to children

Researchers from the Harvard affiliated Hebrew SeniorLife Institute for Aging Research recently published a study in the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research, suggesting that hyperkyphosis may be heritable, or passed on from parents to offspring. [More]
Researchers develop new approach for visualizing oxygen in tissue

Researchers develop new approach for visualizing oxygen in tissue

Learning how to look inside a body without having to cut it open is still an important part of medical research. One of the great challenges in imaging remains the visualization of oxygen in tissue. [More]
Introduction of CT lung screening for high-risk individuals could decrease cancer-related deaths

Introduction of CT lung screening for high-risk individuals could decrease cancer-related deaths

The introduction of lung cancer screening in the UK could significantly reduce deaths in high risk groups, without causing participants the undue stress sometimes associated with medical tests. [More]
Researchers find oldest evidence of cancer in 1.7 million-year-old fossil

Researchers find oldest evidence of cancer in 1.7 million-year-old fossil

An international team of researchers led by scientists from the University of the Witwatersrand's Evolutionary Studies Institute and the South African Centre for Excellence in PalaeoSciences today announced in two papers, published in the South African Journal of Science, the discovery of the most ancient evidence for cancer and bony tumours yet described in the human fossil record. [More]
Novel noninvasive scoring system can help predict strength and health of vascular network in the brain

Novel noninvasive scoring system can help predict strength and health of vascular network in the brain

A new study presented at the Society of NeuroInterventional Surgery's 13th Annual Meeting in Boston found that the Opercular Score Index (OIS) is a practical, noninvasive scoring system that can be used to predict the strength and health of the vascular network in the brain (known as collateral robustness) and good clinical outcome among stroke patients undergoing endovascular recanalization. [More]
Early initiation of prophylaxis linked to lower rates of PE and DVT in patients with severe brain injuries

Early initiation of prophylaxis linked to lower rates of PE and DVT in patients with severe brain injuries

People who sustain a traumatic brain injury (TBI) are at high risk for developing deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE). PE is a leading cause of death in these patients. [More]
New imaging tool may help detect presence of androgen receptor in prostate cancer patients

New imaging tool may help detect presence of androgen receptor in prostate cancer patients

Prostate cancer is one of the most common cancers in men. Tumor growth is critically regulated by the androgen receptor, and treatment strategies to lower androgens, such as testosterone, are a mainstay of clinical treatment. [More]
Chelsea and Westminster Hospital deploys new imaging systems from Siemens Healthineers following A&E expansion

Chelsea and Westminster Hospital deploys new imaging systems from Siemens Healthineers following A&E expansion

Chelsea and Westminster Hospital in West London has enhanced its provision of imaging services to ensure an efficient workflow throughout A&E as part of the first phase of a major redevelopment of the Emergency Department which includes a new imaging suite. [More]
First arthritis model in zebrafish offers new hope for finding biological cure

First arthritis model in zebrafish offers new hope for finding biological cure

The very first bony fish on Earth was susceptible to arthritis, according to a USC-led discovery that may fast-track therapeutic research in preventing or easing the nation's most common cause of disability. [More]
Study finds low rates of baseline BMD testing among older women with breast cancer

Study finds low rates of baseline BMD testing among older women with breast cancer

Aromatase inhibitors (AIs)—drugs that stop the production of estrogen in women—are standard adjuvant therapy for post-menopausal women with hormone-receptor positive breast cancer. [More]
New diagnostic model may become cheaper and easier alternative to screen for NAFLD

New diagnostic model may become cheaper and easier alternative to screen for NAFLD

Researchers have developed a diagnostic model that is highly predictive of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). [More]
FDA approves new ExAblate Neuro to treat patients with essential tremor

FDA approves new ExAblate Neuro to treat patients with essential tremor

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved the first focused ultrasound device to treat essential tremor in patients who have not responded to medication. ExAblate Neuro uses magnetic resonance (MR) images taken during the procedure to deliver focused ultrasound to destroy brain tissue in a tiny area thought to be responsible for causing tremors. [More]
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