Caffeine News and Research RSS Feed - Caffeine News and Research

Caffeine is a bitter substance found in coffee, tea, soft drinks, chocolate, some nuts and certain medicines. It has many effects on the body's metabolism, including stimulating the central nervous system. This can make you more alert and give you a boost of energy.

For most people, the amount of caffeine in two to four cups of coffee a day is not harmful. However, too much caffeine can make you restless, anxious and irritable. It may also keep you from sleeping well and cause headaches, abnormal heart rhythms or other problems. If you stop using caffeine, you could get withdrawal symptoms.

Some people are more sensitive to the effects of caffeine than others. They should limit their use of caffeine. So should pregnant and nursing women. Certain drugs and supplements may interact with caffeine. If you have questions about whether caffeine is safe for you, talk with your health care provider.
Experts discuss new insights into early stages of Parkinson’s disease at EAN Congress

Experts discuss new insights into early stages of Parkinson’s disease at EAN Congress

Early diagnosis and starting treatment as early as possible are decisive factors in achieving improved quality of life for Parkinson's sufferers. Experts are discussing a wide range of new insights into the early stages of the disease at the Congress of the European Academy of Neurology in Copenhagen. [More]
Study explores how lighting impacts healthy food choices

Study explores how lighting impacts healthy food choices

Dining in dimly lit restaurants has been linked to eating slowly and ultimately eating less than in brighter restaurants, but does lighting also impact how healthfully we order? [More]
Diet-based therapy may improve quality of life in IBS patients

Diet-based therapy may improve quality of life in IBS patients

A change in diet can improve the lives of those diagnosed with a common, but hard-to-treat gut disorder. [More]
Raging with anger may increase risk of cardiovascular problems

Raging with anger may increase risk of cardiovascular problems

Those who rage with frustration during a marital spat have an increased risk of cardiovascular problems such as chest pain or high blood pressure later in life, according to new research from Northwestern University and the University of California, Berkeley. [More]
Telephone-based intervention helps reduce menopause-related insomnia, hot flashes

Telephone-based intervention helps reduce menopause-related insomnia, hot flashes

Chatting on the phone with a "sleep coach" and keeping a nightly sleep diary significantly improve sleep quality and reduce insomnia in women through all stages of menopause, according to a new study published today in JAMA Internal Medicine. [More]
Daily dose of coffee could help reverse non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

Daily dose of coffee could help reverse non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

Adding coffee to the diet of people with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) could help reverse the condition, according to a new study conducted in mice presented at The International Liver Congress 2016 in Barcelona, Spain. [More]
Distribution of c-Myc protein during asymmetric cell division influences fate, roles of activated T cells

Distribution of c-Myc protein during asymmetric cell division influences fate, roles of activated T cells

The fates of immune cells can be decided at the initial division of a cell. Researchers at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital have discovered that the production of daughter cells with different roles in the immune system is driven by the lopsided distribution of the signaling protein c-Myc. Nudging c-Myc in one direction or the other could make vaccines more effective or advance immunotherapies for cancer treatment. The research appears online today in the scientific journal Nature. [More]
Breast cancer medication letrozole could increase ovulation in women with PCOS

Breast cancer medication letrozole could increase ovulation in women with PCOS

A medicine used in breast cancer treatment is now considered the best option for treating the most common cause of infertility. [More]
USC study finds coffee consumption decreases colorectal cancer risk

USC study finds coffee consumption decreases colorectal cancer risk

Whether you like your coffee black, decaf, half-caff or even instant, feel free to drink up. Researchers at the University of Southern California (USC) Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center of Keck Medicine of USC have found that coffee consumption decreases the risk of colorectal cancer. [More]
Four commonly used medications to treat pregnant women with migraines may not be safe

Four commonly used medications to treat pregnant women with migraines may not be safe

According to doctors at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center, medications and treatments long considered safe to treat pregnant women with migraines may not be. [More]
Couple's caffeinated beverage consumption can increase risk of miscarriage

Couple's caffeinated beverage consumption can increase risk of miscarriage

A woman is more likely to miscarry if she and her partner drink more than two caffeinated beverages a day during the weeks leading up to conception, according to a new study from researchers at the National Institutes of Health and Ohio State University, Columbus. [More]
Chronic lack of sleep lowers grades of students

Chronic lack of sleep lowers grades of students

Students who have a chronic lack of sleep have lower grades and find it harder to concentrate. Around a third of students do not feel well rested enough to be able to study properly. [More]
World sleep day tackles poor sleep due to nocturia

World sleep day tackles poor sleep due to nocturia

Today is World Sleep Day, an annual global event that aims to improve sleep health worldwide. World Sleep Day is organized by the World Association of Sleep Medicine (WASM) to spread awareness of important sleep-related issues and the burden insomnia places on society through a series of special events. This year it is focussing on sleep loss resulting from the need to urinate during the night. [More]
AliveCor's new Kardia Band for Apple Watch allows people to capture medical-grade EKG anytime, anywhere

AliveCor's new Kardia Band for Apple Watch allows people to capture medical-grade EKG anytime, anywhere

AliveCor, Inc., the leader in FDA-cleared electrocardiogram (EKG) technology for mobile devices, announced today the introduction of the first medical-grade EKG band for the Apple Watch, Kardia Band (pending 510k clearance, available in late spring) along with a new app for smartphones (available now). [More]
Vanderbilt sleep specialist provides important tips for easing into seasonal time change

Vanderbilt sleep specialist provides important tips for easing into seasonal time change

The Monday after daylight saving time takes effect doesn't have to be a heart-stressed, mad-dash, car-crash kind of a day. [More]
Increased education may lead to better decision-making regarding caffeine intake among adolescents

Increased education may lead to better decision-making regarding caffeine intake among adolescents

Caffeine is the most available and widely used psychoactive substance in the world and is the only drug legally accessible and socially acceptable for consumption by children and adolescents. Some studies have shown that adolescents are the fastest-growing population of caffeine users, with 83.2% consuming caffeinated beverages regularly and at least 96% consuming them occasionally. [More]
Drinking more coffee may reduce risk of multiple sclerosis

Drinking more coffee may reduce risk of multiple sclerosis

Drinking a lot of coffee every day--more than 900 ml (30 fluid ounces) or around six cups--is linked to a reduced risk of multiple sclerosis (MS), finds research published online in the Journal of Neurology Neurosurgery & Psychiatry. [More]
Mississippi Department of Education voted to adopt Smart Snack standards

Mississippi Department of Education voted to adopt Smart Snack standards

The Mississippi Department of Education voted on Thursday, February 18, 2016 to adopt Smart Snack standards, ensuring all public school students have healthy options beyond what is provided in the School Meal Program. [More]
GWAS can help pinpoint genetic variants that predict lifestyle risks for diseases

GWAS can help pinpoint genetic variants that predict lifestyle risks for diseases

Genome wide association studies (GWAS) scan the entire genome in order to pinpoint genetic variants associated with a particular disease. The technique is employed to identify biological pathways - the series of actions and changes that have occurred in cells and genetic material - that can be linked to the causation of a disease. [More]
Taste deficits appear to be more prevalent in MS patients

Taste deficits appear to be more prevalent in MS patients

Taste deficits appear to be more prevalent among multiple sclerosis (MS) patients than previously reported and correlate with brain lesions left by the debilitating disease, a new study from the University of Pennsylvania's Smell and Taste Center and the department of Radiology found. [More]
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