Caffeine News and Research RSS Feed - Caffeine News and Research

Caffeine is a bitter substance found in coffee, tea, soft drinks, chocolate, some nuts and certain medicines. It has many effects on the body's metabolism, including stimulating the central nervous system. This can make you more alert and give you a boost of energy.

For most people, the amount of caffeine in two to four cups of coffee a day is not harmful. However, too much caffeine can make you restless, anxious and irritable. It may also keep you from sleeping well and cause headaches, abnormal heart rhythms or other problems. If you stop using caffeine, you could get withdrawal symptoms.

Some people are more sensitive to the effects of caffeine than others. They should limit their use of caffeine. So should pregnant and nursing women. Certain drugs and supplements may interact with caffeine. If you have questions about whether caffeine is safe for you, talk with your health care provider.
New survey reveals truths and untruths about sleep

New survey reveals truths and untruths about sleep

We’ve all heard the theories of what can help and hinder you having a good night’s sleep, but how much of what we all believe is fact and how much is fiction? [More]
Study shows regular caffeine consumption does not lead to extra heartbeats

Study shows regular caffeine consumption does not lead to extra heartbeats

Contrary to current clinical belief, regular caffeine consumption does not lead to extra heartbeats, which, while common, can lead in rare cases to heart- or stroke-related morbidity and mortality, according to UC San Francisco researchers. [More]
UT Southwestern pediatric researchers identify key trigger of neonatal lung disease

UT Southwestern pediatric researchers identify key trigger of neonatal lung disease

Pediatric researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center have identified a key component of the pathogenesis of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), a devastating and sometimes fatal lung disease that affects premature infants. Their findings clarify what prompts the inflammatory response that results in BPD, which previously had been unclear. [More]
New QUT research reveals road rumble strip could be a wake-up call to pull over

New QUT research reveals road rumble strip could be a wake-up call to pull over

Drowsy drivers are being urged to stop and take a break the first time they hit a road rumble strip these school holidays, with new QUT research revealing the audio-tactile vibrations should be a wake-up call to pull over. [More]
Coffee may help improve athletic endurance

Coffee may help improve athletic endurance

The caffeine in a morning cup of coffee could help improve athletic endurance, according to a new University of Georgia review study. [More]
New ICN Food List app can help people struggling with urinary tract food sensitivity

New ICN Food List app can help people struggling with urinary tract food sensitivity

If you're scared to drink a cup of coffee out of fear that you'll spend the day in the restroom, you're not alone. Mild urinary frequency and urgency are common but for patients with urinary disorders, these same foods can provoke days of pain and discomfort. A new android application, the ICN Food List, seeks to change that by giving patients a reference guide that they can easily use while shopping and eating out at restaurants. [More]
Vibration-based technology reduces apneic events, improves critical clinical parameters in premature infants

Vibration-based technology reduces apneic events, improves critical clinical parameters in premature infants

Scientists and clinicians at the University of Massachusetts Medical School, Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering, and the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center have shown in a clinical trial that a new, vibration-based prevention technology tested in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) reduces apneic events and improves critical clinical parameters in prematurely born infants. [More]
Stony Brook Medicine expert shares tips to minimize heartburn during holiday season

Stony Brook Medicine expert shares tips to minimize heartburn during holiday season

The holiday season is upon us and most days and nights will be filled with delicious festivities! However, with millions of Americans suffering from heartburn, fear may set in when anticipating these celebrations. [More]
Vibration-based therapy can successfully treat apnea events in preterm infants

Vibration-based therapy can successfully treat apnea events in preterm infants

Researchers from Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center's Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU), the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University and the University of Massachusetts Medical School have found that a vibration-based therapy known as stochastic resonance (SR) stimulation can successfully treat preterm infants experiencing apnea of prematurity (AOP), disrupted breathing, bradycardia (slowed heart rate) and oxygen desaturation (diminished oxygen levels). [More]
Drinking moderate amounts of caffeine during pregnancy does not harm baby's intelligence

Drinking moderate amounts of caffeine during pregnancy does not harm baby's intelligence

Women drinking and eating moderate amounts of caffeine during pregnancy should be reassured that they are not harming their child's intelligence, according to a study from The Research Institute at Nationwide Children's Hospital that was published in the American Journal of Epidemiology. [More]
New technological solution improves physical health, vitality and brain fitness of seniors

New technological solution improves physical health, vitality and brain fitness of seniors

A new technological solution developed by researchers from the University of Notre Dame is aimed at enhancing the physical health, vitality and brain fitness of seniors residing in independent living communities. [More]
Study may lead to development of highly accurate screening test for early-stage ovarian cancer

Study may lead to development of highly accurate screening test for early-stage ovarian cancer

Studying blood serum compounds of different molecular weights has led scientists to a set of biomarkers that may enable development of a highly accurate screening test for early-stage ovarian cancer. [More]
Drinking one 16-ounce energy drink may increase risk of cardiovascular events in young adults

Drinking one 16-ounce energy drink may increase risk of cardiovascular events in young adults

New research shows that drinking one 16-ounce energy drink can increase blood pressure and stress hormone responses significantly. This raises the concern that these response changes could increase the risk of cardiovascular events, according to a study presented today at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2015. [More]
Brief manualized treatment helps people with problematic caffeine use lower caffeine consumption

Brief manualized treatment helps people with problematic caffeine use lower caffeine consumption

Engaging in brief, cognitive-behavioral therapy is an effective treatment for helping people with problematic caffeine use lower their caffeine consumption, according to a new study coauthored by Laura M. Juliano, Ph.D., a professor of psychology at American University. [More]
Energy drink consumption linked with serious cardiovascular events

Energy drink consumption linked with serious cardiovascular events

Anna Svatikova, M.D., Ph.D., of the Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn., and colleagues randomly assigned 25 healthy volunteers (age 18 years or older) to consume a can (480 mL; 16 fl. oz.) of a commercially available energy drink (Rockstar; Rockstar Inc) and placebo drink within 5 minutes, in random order on 2 separate days, maximum 2 weeks apart. [More]
Psychoactive drugs can help sedentary people to exercise, suggests Kent endurance expert

Psychoactive drugs can help sedentary people to exercise, suggests Kent endurance expert

Endurance expert suggests drugs could help 'lazy people' exercise In what has been described as 'doping for lazy people' a University of Kent endurance expert has advocated the use of psychoactive drugs to encourage sedentary people to exercise. [More]
New analysis confirms presence of mycotoxins in coffees sold in Spain

New analysis confirms presence of mycotoxins in coffees sold in Spain

An analysis of one hundred coffees sold in Spain has confirmed the presence of mycotoxins -toxic metabolites produced by fungi. In addition, five of the samples that were tested were found to contain ochratoxin A, the only legislated mycotoxin, in amounts that exceeded maximum permitted levels. [More]
UF Health researcher reveals how betel nut's psychoactive chemical works in the brain

UF Health researcher reveals how betel nut's psychoactive chemical works in the brain

For hundreds of millions of people around the world, chewing betel nut produces a cheap, quick high but also raises the risk of addiction and oral cancer. Now, new findings by a University of Florida Health researcher reveal how the nut's psychoactive chemical works in the brain and suggest that an addiction treatment may already exist. [More]
Limiting consumption of sugary drinks helps combat childhood and adolescent obesity

Limiting consumption of sugary drinks helps combat childhood and adolescent obesity

More than one-third of children in the United States ages 6 to 19 years old are overweight or obese. Over the past 30 years, the number of obese adolescents has more than quadrupled, which also has led to an increase in children diagnosed with diabetes. To combat this trend, Aneesh Tosh, M.D., adolescent medicine physician at University of Missouri Health Care and associate professor of clinical child health at the MU School of Medicine, recommends that sugary drinks be removed from adolescents' diets. [More]
Nicotine reinforcement demonstrated in study with ‘never-smokers’

Nicotine reinforcement demonstrated in study with ‘never-smokers’

In a study with 18 adults who had never smoked, scientists at Johns Hopkins report they have demonstrated one of the earliest steps — nicotine “reinforcement” — in the process of addiction, and shown that some people are far more vulnerable to nicotine addiction than others. [More]
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