Caffeine News and Research RSS Feed - Caffeine News and Research

Caffeine is a bitter substance found in coffee, tea, soft drinks, chocolate, some nuts and certain medicines. It has many effects on the body's metabolism, including stimulating the central nervous system. This can make you more alert and give you a boost of energy.

For most people, the amount of caffeine in two to four cups of coffee a day is not harmful. However, too much caffeine can make you restless, anxious and irritable. It may also keep you from sleeping well and cause headaches, abnormal heart rhythms or other problems. If you stop using caffeine, you could get withdrawal symptoms.

Some people are more sensitive to the effects of caffeine than others. They should limit their use of caffeine. So should pregnant and nursing women. Certain drugs and supplements may interact with caffeine. If you have questions about whether caffeine is safe for you, talk with your health care provider.
Uncontrollable sweating of hyperhidrosis can have serious impact on person

Uncontrollable sweating of hyperhidrosis can have serious impact on person

Sweating is a natural function of the body to cool it down during physical exertion or from a warm environment or to even help cope with emotional situations. [More]
FAST Upset Stomach offers one shot dose of Liquid Relief for people suffering from heartburn

FAST Upset Stomach offers one shot dose of Liquid Relief for people suffering from heartburn

First Aid Shot Therapy, makers of First Aid Shot Therapy Pain Relief, today announced the launch of its newest offering, First Aid Shot Therapy Upset Stomach. Upset Stomach is the second variant to be launched in the F.A.S.T. range of products and it is formulated to relive upset stomach symptoms. [More]

Caffeine has positive effect on tau deposits in Alzheimer's disease

As part of a German-French research project, a team led by Dr. Christa E. Müller from the University of Bonn and Dr. David Blum from the University of Lille was able to demonstrate for the first time that caffeine has a positive effect on tau deposits in Alzheimer's disease. [More]
New evidence indicates another risk factor for young adults consuming energy drinks

New evidence indicates another risk factor for young adults consuming energy drinks

Newfound evidence indicates another risk factor for young adults consuming energy drinks. A research team representing six American universities found that the frequency of energy drink use is associated with increased odds of illicit prescription stimulant medication use. [More]
Thorne Research launches NiaCel that supports endurance, energy and healthy aging

Thorne Research launches NiaCel that supports endurance, energy and healthy aging

Thorne Research today announced the launch of NiaCel™, an innovative nutritional supplement that supports endurance, energy, and healthy aging. [More]
Study finds that stress can make allergies worse

Study finds that stress can make allergies worse

Stress doesn't cause allergies, but easing your mind might mean less allergy flare-ups this spring. According to a study published in the April issue of Annals of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology, the scientific journal of the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology, allergy sufferers with persistent stress experience more allergy flares. [More]
ChromaDex declares full-year 2013 financial results

ChromaDex declares full-year 2013 financial results

ChromaDex® Corp., an innovative natural products company that provides proprietary, ingredients and science-based solutions to the dietary supplement, food and beverage, animal health, cosmetic and pharmaceutical industries, announced today the financial results for the year ended December 28, 2013. [More]
Smokers cannot perceive bitter taste

Smokers cannot perceive bitter taste

Smokers and those who have quit cannot fully appreciate the full flavor of a cup of coffee, because many cannot taste the bitterness of their regular caffeine kick. [More]

Smokers find difficult to savor bitter taste of caffeine, says study

Smokers and those who have quit cannot fully appreciate the full flavor of a cup of coffee, because many cannot taste the bitterness of their regular caffeine kick. This is the finding of a study led by Nelly Jacob of the Piti--Salp-tri-re Hospital APHP in France, published in Springer's journal Chemosensory Perception. [More]
Consumption of energy drinks may be linked with poor mental health, substance use among teens

Consumption of energy drinks may be linked with poor mental health, substance use among teens

The uplifting effects of energy drinks are well advertised, but a new report finds consumption among teenagers may be linked with poor mental health and substance use. [More]

Tips to ease daylight saving time transition

Daylight saving time begins at 2 a.m. on Sunday, March 9, bringing more sunshine in the evenings at the price of an hour of sleep. Vanderbilt Sleep Disorders Center specialist Kelly Brown, M.D., says a little extra planning can alleviate that groggy feeling that often accompanies the time change. [More]
Elevated homocysteine not gender-specific in schizophrenia

Elevated homocysteine not gender-specific in schizophrenia

Japanese researchers have demonstrated that both men and women with schizophrenia have significantly higher plasma homocysteine levels than healthy controls. [More]
Caffeine-based compound with small amount of gold could be used as anticancer agent

Caffeine-based compound with small amount of gold could be used as anticancer agent

The side effects of ingesting too much caffeine - restlessness, increased heart rate, having trouble sleeping - are well known, but recent research has shown that the stimulant also has a good side. It can kill cancer cells. [More]
Adolescent consumption of energy drink is strongly associated with substance use, says study

Adolescent consumption of energy drink is strongly associated with substance use, says study

​Nearly one-third of US adolescents consume high-caffeine energy drinks or "shots," and these teens report higher rates of alcohol, cigarette, or drug use, reports a study in the January/February Journal of Addiction Medicine, the official journal of the American Society of Addiction Medicine. [More]
Study analyzing concussion data for NFL players may provide insight that could lead to safer play

Study analyzing concussion data for NFL players may provide insight that could lead to safer play

A new study analyzing concussion data for NFL players during the16-game regular season schedules for 2012 and 2013 may provide insight that could lead to safer play, including a pathway for concussion-prevention strategies. [More]
Study outlines agenda to help direct future caffeine dependence research

Study outlines agenda to help direct future caffeine dependence research

"I'm a zombie without my morning coffee." "My blood type is Diet Coke." "Caffeine isn't a drug, it's a vitamin." Most people make jokes like these about needing a daily boost from their favorite caffeinated beverage-whether first thing in the morning or to prevent the after-lunch slump. [More]
Clues of "silent thief of sight”: Glaucoma

Clues of "silent thief of sight”: Glaucoma

Glaucoma is sometimes called the "silent thief of sight" because it slowly damages the eyes and can cause irreparable harm before there is any vision loss. But this disease is stealthy in more ways than one. [More]
Study links later school start times to improved sleep and mood in teens

Study links later school start times to improved sleep and mood in teens

Julie Boergers, Ph.D., a psychologist and sleep expert from the Bradley Hasbro Children's Research Center, recently led a study linking later school start times to improved sleep and mood in teens. [More]

Unprecedented, atom-scale simulation of G protein-coupled receptor site's transformation

Roughly 40 percent of all medications act on cells' G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). One of these receptors, beta 2 adrenergic receptor site (B2AR), naturally transforms between two base configurations; knowing the precise location of each of approximately 4,000 atoms is crucial for ensuring a snug fit between it and the drug. [More]

Psychiatrist offers tips for dealing with holiday stress and sadness problems of the season

During the holidays, the goal should be to set the course somewhere "between Hallmark and heartache," a Vanderbilt psychiatrist says. In other words, don't strive for the perfect (you won't achieve it), and recognize and deal head-on with some of the stressors of the season. [More]