Caffeine News and Research RSS Feed - Caffeine News and Research

Caffeine is a bitter substance found in coffee, tea, soft drinks, chocolate, some nuts and certain medicines. It has many effects on the body's metabolism, including stimulating the central nervous system. This can make you more alert and give you a boost of energy.

For most people, the amount of caffeine in two to four cups of coffee a day is not harmful. However, too much caffeine can make you restless, anxious and irritable. It may also keep you from sleeping well and cause headaches, abnormal heart rhythms or other problems. If you stop using caffeine, you could get withdrawal symptoms.

Some people are more sensitive to the effects of caffeine than others. They should limit their use of caffeine. So should pregnant and nursing women. Certain drugs and supplements may interact with caffeine. If you have questions about whether caffeine is safe for you, talk with your health care provider.
Short-term sleep loss affects cardiac function

Short-term sleep loss affects cardiac function

Too little sleep takes a toll on your heart, according to a new study to be presented today at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America. [More]
Moderate coffee consumption may offer protection against age-related cognitive decline

Moderate coffee consumption may offer protection against age-related cognitive decline

A new report from the Institute for Scientific Information on Coffee (ISIC), a not-for-profit organisation devoted to the study and disclosure of science related to coffee and health, highlights the potential role of coffee consumption in reducing the risk of cognitive decline. [More]
Research shows mechanism that induces heart arrhythmias in diabetic mice

Research shows mechanism that induces heart arrhythmias in diabetic mice

One of the most serious complications of diabetes, heart arrhythmias, is now on its way to be prevented and combated. [More]
Dietary supplement extracted from Amaranthus can increase plasma nitrate, study shows

Dietary supplement extracted from Amaranthus can increase plasma nitrate, study shows

A new, clinical study confirms that dietary supplementation of nitrate from a natural extract of Amaranthus species nicknamed "red spinach," results in a significant increase in plasma nitrite that ultimately enhances nitric oxide. [More]
UAB case study details patient experiencing hemorrhagic stroke after consumption of energy drink

UAB case study details patient experiencing hemorrhagic stroke after consumption of energy drink

Investigators at the University of Alabama at Birmingham have presented the first case study of a patient experiencing a hemorrhagic stroke — a brain bleed — following consumption of an energy drink. [More]
Short sleepers likely to consume significantly more sugary caffeinated drinks, study finds

Short sleepers likely to consume significantly more sugary caffeinated drinks, study finds

People who sleep five or fewer hours a night are likely to also drink significantly more sugary caffeinated drinks, such as sodas and energy drinks, according to a new study of more than 18,000 adults led by UC San Francisco scientists. [More]
Genetic variation, environmental conditions can have significant impact on human health

Genetic variation, environmental conditions can have significant impact on human health

Scientists at the Wayne State University School of Medicine's Center for Molecular Medicine and Genetics have shown for the first time the extent by which interactions between environmental exposures and genetic variation across individuals have a significant impact on human traits and diseases like diabetes, heart disease and obesity, strengthening the case for precision medicine initiatives. [More]
Vanderbilt sleep specialists offer tips to manage daylight saving time transition

Vanderbilt sleep specialists offer tips to manage daylight saving time transition

When daylight saving time ends at 2 a.m. on Sunday, Nov. 6, we set clocks back one hour, and essentially gain an extra hour of sleep—but that extra hour of sleep comes at the price of early evening darkness. [More]
Low fat and low carbohydrate diets may prevent migraines

Low fat and low carbohydrate diets may prevent migraines

Eliminating that morning 'Cup of Joe,' consuming processed foods high in nitrites or monosodium glutamate (MSG) and enjoying too much alcohol are potential headache triggers for individuals battling migraines, says Vincent Martin, MD, professor in the Department of Internal Medicine at the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine. [More]
Brown scientists developing new self-contained SleepCoacher app

Brown scientists developing new self-contained SleepCoacher app

There are plenty of cellphone apps on the market designed to help people monitor their sleep patterns. [More]
Highly caffeinated alcoholic drinks may induce changes in the adolescent brain similar to cocaine

Highly caffeinated alcoholic drinks may induce changes in the adolescent brain similar to cocaine

Drinking highly caffeinated alcoholic beverages triggers changes in the adolescent brain similar to taking cocaine, and the consequences last into adulthood as an altered ability to deal with rewarding substances, according to a Purdue University study. [More]
Hormone levels in hair can predict chances of pregnancy in women undergoing IVF treatment

Hormone levels in hair can predict chances of pregnancy in women undergoing IVF treatment

Levels of a hormone when measured in hair can significantly predict the likelihood of pregnancy in women undergoing in vitro fertilisation (IVF) treatment, scientists at The University of Nottingham have revealed. [More]
Healthy fruit-rich Mediterranean diet may help protect against macular degeneration

Healthy fruit-rich Mediterranean diet may help protect against macular degeneration

People who closely follow the Mediterranean diet - -especially by eating fruit -- may be more than a third less likely to develop age-related macular degeneration, a leading cause of blindness, according to a study presented today at AAO 2016, the 120th annual meeting of the American Academy of Ophthalmology. [More]
Fiscal policies could help reduce consumption of sugary drinks, new WHO report reveals

Fiscal policies could help reduce consumption of sugary drinks, new WHO report reveals

Taxing sugary drinks can lower consumption and reduce obesity, type 2 diabetes and tooth decay, says a new World Health Organization report. [More]
Regulating mealtimes during days off can help alleviate jet-lag in long-haul cabin crew

Regulating mealtimes during days off can help alleviate jet-lag in long-haul cabin crew

A study published today in the journal Psychology and Health has found that jet-lag in long-haul cabin crew is alleviated when meal times are regulated on their days off. [More]
Caffeine consumption linked to reduction in risk of incident dementia in older women

Caffeine consumption linked to reduction in risk of incident dementia in older women

Among a group of older women, self-reported caffeine consumption of more than 261 mg per day was associated with a 36 percent reduction in the risk of incident dementia over 10 years of follow-up. [More]
Novel bifunctional dimers show promise in preventing Parkinson's disease

Novel bifunctional dimers show promise in preventing Parkinson's disease

A team of researchers from the University of Saskatchewan has developed two caffeine-based chemical compounds that show promise in preventing the ravages of Parkinson's disease. [More]

ED consumption with or without alcohol contributes to risk for drunk driving

Highly caffeinated energy drinks (EDs) have been of concern to the public-health community for almost a decade. [More]
CUMC researchers uncover new details of intracellular channel that controls skeletal muscle

CUMC researchers uncover new details of intracellular channel that controls skeletal muscle

Using high-resolution electron microscopy, Columbia University Medical Center researchers have uncovered new details of the structure and function of an intracellular channel that controls the contraction of skeletal muscle. [More]
Americans believe cancer to be major health care challenge, Mayo Clinic survey reveals

Americans believe cancer to be major health care challenge, Mayo Clinic survey reveals

While Zika remains a hot topic in the news, a new survey by Mayo Clinic reveals that Americans believe the country's most significant health care challenge is cancer. [More]
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