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Physicists recommend new strategies to make computed tomography safer

UC Davis clinicians and physicists have recommended new strategies to make computed tomography (CT) safer, including adoption of a new metric for dose measurement, ways to manage exposure protocols that differ by CT brand and specific approaches to reduce exposure during needle biopsies. [More]
Compound from "third-hand smoke" damages DNA and potentially cause cancer

Compound from "third-hand smoke" damages DNA and potentially cause cancer

Leftover cigarette smoke that clings to walls and furniture is a smelly nuisance, but now research suggests that it could pose a far more serious threat, especially to young children who put toys and other smoke-affected items into their mouths. [More]

Bisphenol A may promote prostate tumourigenesis

Bisphenol A, an organic compound that is ubiquitous in plastic products, may have a direct tumourigenic effect in the prostate, US researchers have shown. [More]
Levels of bisphenol A in men's urine could be marker of prostate cancer

Levels of bisphenol A in men's urine could be marker of prostate cancer

Findings by Cincinnati Cancer Center researchers show that levels of bisphenol A (BPA) in men's urine could be a marker of prostate cancer and that low levels of BPA exposure can cause cellular changes in both non-malignant and malignant prostate cells. [More]
NCI scientist recognized for AACR-American Cancer Society Award for Excellence in Cancer Epidemiology and Prevention

NCI scientist recognized for AACR-American Cancer Society Award for Excellence in Cancer Epidemiology and Prevention

The American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) and the American Cancer Society will recognize Curtis C. Harris, M.D., with the 23rd Annual AACR-American Cancer Society Award for Excellence in Cancer Epidemiology and Prevention at the AACR Annual Meeting 2014, to be held in San Diego, Calif., April 5-9. [More]
Third-hand smoke as deadly as first-hand smoke

Third-hand smoke as deadly as first-hand smoke

Do not smoke and do not allow yourself to be exposed to smoke because second-hand smoke and third-hand smoke are just as deadly as first-hand smoke, says a scientist at the University of California, Riverside who, along with colleagues, conducted the first animal study of the effects of third-hand smoke. [More]
High doses of 4-MEI in carbonated beverages may result in higher incidence of leukemia, says study

High doses of 4-MEI in carbonated beverages may result in higher incidence of leukemia, says study

Last week, Consumer Reports released a study on the levels of a caramel coloring agent known as 4-methylimidazole (4-MEI) in many popular, carbonated beverages. [More]
Smoking and cancer: an interview with Dr. Lewis Foxhall, VP of Health Policy, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center

Smoking and cancer: an interview with Dr. Lewis Foxhall, VP of Health Policy, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center

The report Smoking and Health: Report of the Advisory Committee to the Surgeon General, identified tobacco as the predominant cause of lung cancer in men. This was the first widely disseminated report based on scientific studies showing the clear link between smoking tobacco and serious health conditions including cancer, chronic lung diseases and heart disease. [More]
Researchers develop oral vaccine against Helicobacter pylori

Researchers develop oral vaccine against Helicobacter pylori

Researchers from Southern Medical University in Guangdong, Guangzhou, China, have developed an oral vaccine against Helicobacter pylori, the bacteria responsible for peptic ulcers and some forms of gastric cancer, and have successfully tested it in mice. The research is published ahead of print in the journal Clinical and Vaccine Immunology. [More]

Blending more ethanol into fuel to reduce air pollution carries hidden risk

​Blending more ethanol into fuel to cut air pollution from vehicles carries a hidden risk that toxic or even explosive gases may find their way into buildings, according to researchers at Rice University. [More]
New review calls for action to reduce illness and death from silica exposure at work

New review calls for action to reduce illness and death from silica exposure at work

A new review highlights new developments in understanding the health effects of silica, and calls for action to reduce illness and death from silica exposure at work, including stronger regulations, heightened awareness and prevention, and increased attention to early detection of silicosis and lung cancer using low dose CT scanning. [More]

Biohit Oyj to distribute Dynex automated ELISA systems with Gastropanel

Finnish healthcare company Biohit Oyj and American company Dynex Technologies, Inc. have signed an agreement for the distribution of the two-microplate DS2®, four-microplate DSX® and 12-microplate Agility® automated ELISA (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) processing systems, for use with the Biohit Oyj GastroPanel. [More]
Scientists make seminal breakthrough in understanding molecular basis of bile duct cancer

Scientists make seminal breakthrough in understanding molecular basis of bile duct cancer

A team of scientists from the National Cancer Centre Singapore, Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School Singapore, Fundeni Clinical Institute (Romania) and Koen Kaen University (Thailand), have made a seminal breakthrough in understanding the molecular basis of bile duct cancer or cholangiocarcinoma, a rare but highly lethal form of liver cancer. [More]

Study shows concentration levels of PAHs in smokeless tobacco products

A new study shows that the concentration of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in smokeless tobacco products (STPs) can differ by as much as 60 fold, with the highest levels in moist snuff, and dry snuff and soft pellets; the lowest levels were in snus. [More]
Scientists have made breakthrough in understanding cancer-promoting action of herbal products

Scientists have made breakthrough in understanding cancer-promoting action of herbal products

A team of scientists from the National Cancer Centre Singapore, Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School Singapore, and Taiwan's Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, LinKou, have made a breakthrough in understanding the cancer-promoting action of Aristolochic Acid (AA), a natural product of Aristolochia plants traditionally used in some Asian herbal remedies for weight loss and slimming. [More]
DNA mutation 'signature' identified in urinary tract cancers linked to birthwort herb

DNA mutation 'signature' identified in urinary tract cancers linked to birthwort herb

Genomic sequencing experts at Johns Hopkins partnered with pharmacologists at Stony Brook University to reveal a striking mutational signature of upper urinary tract cancers caused by aristolochic acid, a plant compound contained in herbal remedies used for thousands of years to treat a variety of ailments such as arthritis, gout and inflammation. [More]
Study shows how bioactive component in soy foods plays a role against colon cancer

Study shows how bioactive component in soy foods plays a role against colon cancer

University of Illinois scientists have evidence that lifelong exposure to genistein, a bioactive component in soy foods, protects against colon cancer by repressing a signal that leads to accelerated growth of cells, polyps, and eventually malignant tumors. [More]
Incidence of blood cancer is significantly higher in regions near facilities that release benzene

Incidence of blood cancer is significantly higher in regions near facilities that release benzene

The incidence of a particular type of blood cancer is significantly higher in regions near facilities that release the chemical benzene into the environment. That is the conclusion of a new study published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society. This and other studies like it will be critical to identifying and enacting public health policies to decrease or prevent cancer. [More]
High levels of arsenic in rice associated with elevated genetic damage in humans

High levels of arsenic in rice associated with elevated genetic damage in humans

High levels of arsenic in rice have been shown to be associated with elevated genetic damage in humans, a new study has found. [More]

High arsenic levels in rice pose potential threat to human health: Study

High levels of arsenic in rice have been shown to be associated with elevated genetic damage in humans, a new study has found. [More]