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Scientists discover ways to detect several toxic flame retardants in people's bodies

Scientists discover ways to detect several toxic flame retardants in people's bodies

A new peer-reviewed study found that people are contaminated with several toxic flame retardants rarely studied in the US, including one that has never before been detected in Americans called TCEP. Scientists tested urine samples of California residents for biomarkers of six chemicals, all of which were present. [More]
Genetically diverse mouse model can predict human response to chemical exposures

Genetically diverse mouse model can predict human response to chemical exposures

A genetically diverse mouse model is able to predict the range of response to chemical exposures that might be observed in human populations, researchers from the National Institutes of Health have found. Like humans, each Diversity Outbred mouse is genetically unique, and the extent of genetic variability among these mice is similar to the genetic variation seen among humans. [More]
Hand blenders can emit chlorinated paraffins during normal household use

Hand blenders can emit chlorinated paraffins during normal household use

Eight out of twelve tested models of hand blenders are leaking chlorinated paraffins when used according to the suppliers' instructions. [More]

Routine gasoline spills can potentially impact public health

A new study suggests that drops of fuel spilled at gas stations — which occur frequently with fill-ups — could cumulatively be causing long-term environmental damage to soil and groundwater in residential areas in close proximity to the stations. [More]
Testosterone therapy raises risk of prostate tumors in rats

Testosterone therapy raises risk of prostate tumors in rats

A researcher who found that testosterone raised the risk of prostate tumors and exacerbated the effects of carcinogenic chemical exposure in rats is urging caution in prescribing testosterone therapy to men who have not been diagnosed with hypogonadism, according to a new study published in the Endocrine Society's journal Endocrinology. [More]
Scientists crack genetic code of liver fluke parasite

Scientists crack genetic code of liver fluke parasite

Singapore-An international team of scientists from Singapore, Thailand, China and Australia has cracked the genetic code of the liver fluke parasite, Opisthorchis viverrini, using a unique DNA analysis technique developed at A*STAR's Genome Institute of Singapore (GIS). [More]
Viewpoints: Va. GOP's 'Medicaid charade'; Paul Ryan's health Rx for poverty; giving the sick unapproved drugs

Viewpoints: Va. GOP's 'Medicaid charade'; Paul Ryan's health Rx for poverty; giving the sick unapproved drugs

Virginia lawmakers will convene in a special session next month to address the question of expanding Medicaid and, more broadly, the fact that hundreds of thousands of poor and disabled people in the state have no health insurance coverage. Democrats and some moderate Republicans have advanced a variety of ideas to tackle that problem. Conservative Republicans, who control the legislature in Richmond, have rejected those solutions while proposing no alternative. Does the GOP intend for the special session to be anything more than a charade at taxpayers' expense? (8/15). [More]
Nicotine, cotinine can potentially inhibit DNA damage caused by NNK in tobacco smoke

Nicotine, cotinine can potentially inhibit DNA damage caused by NNK in tobacco smoke

A new in vitro study has revealed that nicotine and cotinine, a metabolite of nicotine, can potentially inhibit DNA damage caused by a certain carcinogen in smoke. [More]
Chemoprevention and colon cancer: an interview with Dr. John Letterio, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine

Chemoprevention and colon cancer: an interview with Dr. John Letterio, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine

The basic idea of cancer chemopre­vention is to arrest or reverse the progression of pre­malignant cells towards full malignancy, using physiological mechanisms that do not kill healthy cells. [More]
Research highlights potential cancer risk in non-smokers

Research highlights potential cancer risk in non-smokers

Research led by the University of York has highlighted the potential cancer risk in non-smokers - particularly young children - of tobacco smoke gases and particles deposited to surfaces and dust in the home. [More]
Health concerns over arsenic in rice-especially for children

Health concerns over arsenic in rice-especially for children

Inorganic arsenic in rice and rice-based foods poses health concerns in infants and young children, and steps should be taken to minimize exposure, according to a commentary in the Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, official journal of the European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition (ESPGHAN) and the North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition. [More]
Mice exposed to low doses of arsenic in drinking water develop lung cancer

Mice exposed to low doses of arsenic in drinking water develop lung cancer

Mice exposed to low doses of arsenic in drinking water, similar to what some people might consume, developed lung cancer, researchers at the National Institutes of Health have found. [More]
Study explores metabolic activities of unique microbes for cleaning environmental contaminants

Study explores metabolic activities of unique microbes for cleaning environmental contaminants

Chlorinated chemicals perform a host of societally useful functions, but they also have a dark side. Once their use life has ended, such agents often become environmental contaminants, sometimes resistant to bioremediation. [More]
Researchers find way to diagnose aggressiveness of oral cancer

Researchers find way to diagnose aggressiveness of oral cancer

Studying mouth cancer in mice, researchers have found a way to predict the aggressiveness of similar tumors in people, an early step toward a diagnostic test that could guide treatment, according to researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. [More]
New vaccine effective at preventing lung cancer in mice

New vaccine effective at preventing lung cancer in mice

Tweaking a protein expressed by most liver cancer cells has enabled scientists to make a vaccine that is exceedingly effective at preventing the disease in mice. [More]
Consumer Reports reveals truth about sunscreen products

Consumer Reports reveals truth about sunscreen products

When it comes to sunscreen, SPF (sun protection factor) is the feature that influences consumers' purchasing decision most. [More]
High-voltage e-cigarettes may expose users to increased levels of toxic chemicals

High-voltage e-cigarettes may expose users to increased levels of toxic chemicals

High-voltage electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) may expose users to increased levels of toxic chemicals, including formaldehyde and acetaldehyde, according to research led by Maciej Goniewicz, PhD, PharmD, a researcher in the Department of Health Behavior at Roswell Park Cancer Institute (RPCI). [More]
Physicists recommend new strategies to make computed tomography safer

Physicists recommend new strategies to make computed tomography safer

UC Davis clinicians and physicists have recommended new strategies to make computed tomography (CT) safer, including adoption of a new metric for dose measurement, ways to manage exposure protocols that differ by CT brand and specific approaches to reduce exposure during needle biopsies. [More]
Compound from "third-hand smoke" damages DNA and potentially cause cancer

Compound from "third-hand smoke" damages DNA and potentially cause cancer

Leftover cigarette smoke that clings to walls and furniture is a smelly nuisance, but now research suggests that it could pose a far more serious threat, especially to young children who put toys and other smoke-affected items into their mouths. [More]
Bisphenol A may promote prostate tumourigenesis

Bisphenol A may promote prostate tumourigenesis

Bisphenol A, an organic compound that is ubiquitous in plastic products, may have a direct tumourigenic effect in the prostate, US researchers have shown. [More]