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New report estimates burden of cancer in Ontario from environmental carcinogens

New report estimates burden of cancer in Ontario from environmental carcinogens

Between 3,540 and 6,510 new cancer cases in Ontario each year result from environmental factors, says a new report from Cancer Care Ontario and Public Health Ontario. [More]
Scientists identify factors that affect levels of toxic compounds in e-cigarette vapor

Scientists identify factors that affect levels of toxic compounds in e-cigarette vapor

Electronic cigarettes, or e-cigs, have grown in popularity as an alternative to traditional cigarette smoking. [More]
New study reports gymnastics equipment contains toxic flame-retardants linked to ADHD, cancer risks

New study reports gymnastics equipment contains toxic flame-retardants linked to ADHD, cancer risks

As the summer Olympics get underway, a new study co-authored by Boston University School of Public Health researchers reports that popular gymnastics training equipment contains mixtures of flame-retardant chemicals that have been linked to increased risks of ADHD, cancer and brain development delays. [More]
Light alcohol consumption linked to increased breast cancer risk

Light alcohol consumption linked to increased breast cancer risk

Alcohol was established as a carcinogen in 1987, with a causal relationship between alcohol and breast cancer being acknowledged in 2007. Research conducted as recently as 2014 yielded convincing evidence that alcohol increases the risk of breast cancer. [More]
Cell phone radiation exposure may lead to increased rates of rare cancers

Cell phone radiation exposure may lead to increased rates of rare cancers

According to new report from Microwave News, the U.S. National Toxicology Program has found increased rates of rare cancers of the heart and brain in animals exposed to cell phone radiation in a long-awaited multi-million dollar two-year study. [More]
CSU researchers develop colorful potatoes that are high in antioxidants, rich in nutrients

CSU researchers develop colorful potatoes that are high in antioxidants, rich in nutrients

Purple potatoes might not be the first thing that comes to mind when trying to increase vitamin, mineral and antioxidant intake. However, a group of researchers from Colorado State University have recently developed potato varieties that satisfy these nutritional needs and could act as a preventive measure to several diseases. [More]
Maintaining balance of P1 and P2 isoforms vital for reducing colon cancer, colitis risk

Maintaining balance of P1 and P2 isoforms vital for reducing colon cancer, colitis risk

Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), of which Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis are the main types, is on the increase in the United States, affecting more than 1.6 million people and explaining perhaps the increase in advertisements offering treatments and cures. [More]
Residential radon exposure may lead to hematologic cancer risk in women

Residential radon exposure may lead to hematologic cancer risk in women

A new report finds a statistically-significant, positive association between high levels of residential radon and the risk of hematologic cancer (lymphoma, myeloma, and leukemia) in women. The study is the first prospective, population-based study of residential radon exposure and hematologic cancer risk, leading the authors to caution that it requires replication to better understand the association and whether it truly differs by sex. It appears early online in Environmental Research. [More]
Clinical study shows watercress extract inhibits carcinogen activation in cigarette smokers

Clinical study shows watercress extract inhibits carcinogen activation in cigarette smokers

Watercress extract taken multiple times a day significantly inhibits the activation of a tobacco-derived carcinogen in cigarette smokers, researchers at the University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, partner with UPMC Cancer Center, demonstrated in a phase II clinical trial presented today at the American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting in New Orleans. [More]
EADV's Global Call to Action urges policy makers to protect Europe’s outdoor workers from UV-induced skin cancer

EADV's Global Call to Action urges policy makers to protect Europe’s outdoor workers from UV-induced skin cancer

The European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology launched a Global Call to Action urging policy makers, employers, workers’ organisations and physicians to protect Europe’s outdoor workers from skin cancer caused by solar UV-radiation. [More]
Moderate drinking not linked to longer life, study shows

Moderate drinking not linked to longer life, study shows

Many people believe a glass of wine with dinner will help them live longer and healthier--but the scientific evidence is shaky at best, according to a new research analysis. [More]
Dietary broccoli may protect against liver cancer

Dietary broccoli may protect against liver cancer

Consumption of broccoli has increased in the United States over the last few decades as scientists have reported that eating the vegetable three to five times per week can lower the risk of many types of cancer including breast, prostate, and colon cancers. [More]
Latinas who eat processed meats at increased risk for breast cancer

Latinas who eat processed meats at increased risk for breast cancer

Latinas who eat processed meats such as bacon and sausage may have an increased risk for breast cancer, according to a new study that did not find the same association among white women. [More]
E-cigarettes damage cells in ways that could lead to cancer

E-cigarettes damage cells in ways that could lead to cancer

Adding to growing evidence on the possible health risks of electronic cigarettes, a lab team at the Veterans Affairs San Diego Healthcare System tested two products and found they damaged cells in ways that could lead to cancer. The damage occurred even with nicotine-free versions of the products. [More]
Researchers identify transporters responsible for arsenic accumulation in plant seeds

Researchers identify transporters responsible for arsenic accumulation in plant seeds

Researchers from FIU's Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine Barry P. Rosen and Jian Chen, both from the Department of Cellular Biology and Pharmacology, are part of an international team that has identified how arsenic gets into the seeds of plants such as rice. T [More]
U.S. adults who use smokeless tobacco products have higher levels of nicotine, carcinogen

U.S. adults who use smokeless tobacco products have higher levels of nicotine, carcinogen

U.S. adults who used only smokeless tobacco products had higher levels of biomarkers of exposure to nicotine and a cancer-causing toxicant -- the tobacco-specific nitrosamine NNK -- compared with those who used only cigarettes [More]
UF Health researcher reveals how betel nut's psychoactive chemical works in the brain

UF Health researcher reveals how betel nut's psychoactive chemical works in the brain

For hundreds of millions of people around the world, chewing betel nut produces a cheap, quick high but also raises the risk of addiction and oral cancer. Now, new findings by a University of Florida Health researcher reveal how the nut's psychoactive chemical works in the brain and suggest that an addiction treatment may already exist. [More]
WSU scientist wins federal grant to explore metabolism pathways, tobacco carcinogens

WSU scientist wins federal grant to explore metabolism pathways, tobacco carcinogens

A Washington State University researcher has received a $2.6 million federal grant to study the body's ability to keep tobacco smoke components from causing cancer. [More]
Paradigm failure is primary reason for lack of progress in cancer research, says cancer biologist

Paradigm failure is primary reason for lack of progress in cancer research, says cancer biologist

A recent publication, which received sustained media attention, claimed that most cancers are just “bad luck”. Its authors stated that only about one-third of cancer mutations are caused by known lifestyle or environmental factors. [More]
Metabolic imbalance caused by radiation from wireless devices linked to many health risks

Metabolic imbalance caused by radiation from wireless devices linked to many health risks

A metabolic imbalance caused by radiation from your wireless devices could be the link to a number of health risks, such as various neurodegenerative diseases and cancer, a recent study suggests. [More]
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