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E-cigarettes damage cells in ways that could lead to cancer

E-cigarettes damage cells in ways that could lead to cancer

Adding to growing evidence on the possible health risks of electronic cigarettes, a lab team at the Veterans Affairs San Diego Healthcare System tested two products and found they damaged cells in ways that could lead to cancer. The damage occurred even with nicotine-free versions of the products. [More]
Researchers identify transporters responsible for arsenic accumulation in plant seeds

Researchers identify transporters responsible for arsenic accumulation in plant seeds

Researchers from FIU's Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine Barry P. Rosen and Jian Chen, both from the Department of Cellular Biology and Pharmacology, are part of an international team that has identified how arsenic gets into the seeds of plants such as rice. T [More]
U.S. adults who use smokeless tobacco products have higher levels of nicotine, carcinogen

U.S. adults who use smokeless tobacco products have higher levels of nicotine, carcinogen

U.S. adults who used only smokeless tobacco products had higher levels of biomarkers of exposure to nicotine and a cancer-causing toxicant -- the tobacco-specific nitrosamine NNK -- compared with those who used only cigarettes [More]
UF Health researcher reveals how betel nut's psychoactive chemical works in the brain

UF Health researcher reveals how betel nut's psychoactive chemical works in the brain

For hundreds of millions of people around the world, chewing betel nut produces a cheap, quick high but also raises the risk of addiction and oral cancer. Now, new findings by a University of Florida Health researcher reveal how the nut's psychoactive chemical works in the brain and suggest that an addiction treatment may already exist. [More]
WSU scientist wins federal grant to explore metabolism pathways, tobacco carcinogens

WSU scientist wins federal grant to explore metabolism pathways, tobacco carcinogens

A Washington State University researcher has received a $2.6 million federal grant to study the body's ability to keep tobacco smoke components from causing cancer. [More]
Paradigm failure is primary reason for lack of progress in cancer research, says cancer biologist

Paradigm failure is primary reason for lack of progress in cancer research, says cancer biologist

A recent publication, which received sustained media attention, claimed that most cancers are just “bad luck”. Its authors stated that only about one-third of cancer mutations are caused by known lifestyle or environmental factors. [More]
Metabolic imbalance caused by radiation from wireless devices linked to many health risks

Metabolic imbalance caused by radiation from wireless devices linked to many health risks

A metabolic imbalance caused by radiation from your wireless devices could be the link to a number of health risks, such as various neurodegenerative diseases and cancer, a recent study suggests. [More]
Researchers identify genetic abnormalities that lead to skin SCC

Researchers identify genetic abnormalities that lead to skin SCC

Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the skin is one of the most frequent cancers in humans affecting more than half million new persons every year in the world. The transformation of a normal cell to a cancer cell is caused by an accumulation of genetic abnormalities in the progeny of single cells. The spectrum of genetic anomalies found in a variety of human cancers have been described. [More]
New nanometer catalyst filter removes 100% of particle substances of cigarette smoke

New nanometer catalyst filter removes 100% of particle substances of cigarette smoke

The research team led by Dr. Jongsoo Jurng and Dr. Gwi-Nam at KIST stated that, "In cooperation with KT&G, KIST has developed a nano-catalyst filter coated with a manganese oxide-based nano-catalyst, which can be used in a smoking room to reduce and purify major harmful substances of cigarette smoke. [More]
Montefiore dermatologist debunks myths regarding skin care, offers information to help people enjoy summer days

Montefiore dermatologist debunks myths regarding skin care, offers information to help people enjoy summer days

As many begin to spend long summer days outside, it's crucial to have the right information about skin protection and the dangers of sun exposure. Today, Montefiore dermatologist Dr. Holly Kanavy debunks many widely-shared myths regarding skin care and offers accurate information to help people enjoy the outdoors this summer while preserving their skin. [More]

Aflatoxin exposure associated with increased risk of gallbladder cancer

In a small study in Chile that included patients with gallbladder cancer, exposure to aflatoxin (a toxin produced by mold) was associated with an increased risk of gallbladder cancer, according to a study in the May 26 issue of JAMA. [More]
Differences in mechanical, chemical makeup of e-cigarettes can have adverse effects on human health

Differences in mechanical, chemical makeup of e-cigarettes can have adverse effects on human health

Unlike standard cigarettes, the components of electronic cigarettes are not regulated and standardized, thus they vary widely between products. [More]
Smoking-related DNA damage can be detected in cheek swabs

Smoking-related DNA damage can be detected in cheek swabs

DNA damage caused by smoking can be detected in cheek swabs, finds research published today in JAMA Oncology. The study provides evidence that smoking induces a general cancer program that is also present in cancers which aren't usually associated with it - including breast and gynaecological cancers. [More]
Cleaver Scientific launch safe series DNA electrophoresis products

Cleaver Scientific launch safe series DNA electrophoresis products

The 'Safe' Series of products from Cleaver Scientific have been designed to make DNA electrophoresis procedures safer, more convenient and more economical to run. [More]
Researchers describe critical connection associated with environmental cause of silicosis, lung cancer

Researchers describe critical connection associated with environmental cause of silicosis, lung cancer

Researchers at the University of Louisville have detailed a critical connection associated with a major environmental cause of silicosis and a form of lung cancer. Their study is reported in today's Nature Communications. [More]

Significant progress for Epigem in SYMPHONY aflatoxin research

Epigem has developed, using microfluidics, a de-fatting device which is as efficient as a centrifuge and will reduce animal tests times from hours to minutes... [More]
EHT expert paper raises important and unanswered questions about safety of wearable tech

EHT expert paper raises important and unanswered questions about safety of wearable tech

Wearable technology is raising health concerns worldwide. A recent New York Times article by Nick Bilton is raising important and unanswered questions about the safety of wearable tech, according to the non-profit research group, Environmental Health Trust. [More]
Saccharin could potentially lead to development of drugs for difficult-to-treat cancers

Saccharin could potentially lead to development of drugs for difficult-to-treat cancers

Saccharin, the artificial sweetener that is the main ingredient in Sweet 'N Low, Sweet Twin and Necta, could do far more than just keep our waistlines trim. According to new research, this popular sugar substitute could potentially lead to the development of drugs capable of combating aggressive, difficult-to-treat cancers with fewer side effects. [More]
UConn Health cancer epidemiologist reveals effect of artificial light on health

UConn Health cancer epidemiologist reveals effect of artificial light on health

Modern life, with its preponderance of inadequate exposure to natural light during the day and overexposure to artificial light at night, is not conducive to the body's natural sleep/wake cycle. [More]
Scientists examine how substances at low concentrations may impact human health

Scientists examine how substances at low concentrations may impact human health

A public and scientific discussion is currently taking place focusing on the question whether substances at low concentrations may lead to health impairments in humans. For this reason, an increasing number of experimental studies to test such effects are currently conducted using different chemicals. [More]
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