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Nicotine, cotinine can potentially inhibit DNA damage caused by NNK in tobacco smoke

Nicotine, cotinine can potentially inhibit DNA damage caused by NNK in tobacco smoke

A new in vitro study has revealed that nicotine and cotinine, a metabolite of nicotine, can potentially inhibit DNA damage caused by a certain carcinogen in smoke. [More]
Chemoprevention and colon cancer: an interview with Dr. John Letterio, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine

Chemoprevention and colon cancer: an interview with Dr. John Letterio, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine

The basic idea of cancer chemopre­vention is to arrest or reverse the progression of pre­malignant cells towards full malignancy, using physiological mechanisms that do not kill healthy cells. [More]
Research highlights potential cancer risk in non-smokers

Research highlights potential cancer risk in non-smokers

Research led by the University of York has highlighted the potential cancer risk in non-smokers - particularly young children - of tobacco smoke gases and particles deposited to surfaces and dust in the home. [More]
Health concerns over arsenic in rice-especially for children

Health concerns over arsenic in rice-especially for children

Inorganic arsenic in rice and rice-based foods poses health concerns in infants and young children, and steps should be taken to minimize exposure, according to a commentary in the Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, official journal of the European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition (ESPGHAN) and the North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition. [More]
Mice exposed to low doses of arsenic in drinking water develop lung cancer

Mice exposed to low doses of arsenic in drinking water develop lung cancer

Mice exposed to low doses of arsenic in drinking water, similar to what some people might consume, developed lung cancer, researchers at the National Institutes of Health have found. [More]
Study explores metabolic activities of unique microbes for cleaning environmental contaminants

Study explores metabolic activities of unique microbes for cleaning environmental contaminants

Chlorinated chemicals perform a host of societally useful functions, but they also have a dark side. Once their use life has ended, such agents often become environmental contaminants, sometimes resistant to bioremediation. [More]
Researchers find way to diagnose aggressiveness of oral cancer

Researchers find way to diagnose aggressiveness of oral cancer

Studying mouth cancer in mice, researchers have found a way to predict the aggressiveness of similar tumors in people, an early step toward a diagnostic test that could guide treatment, according to researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. [More]
New vaccine effective at preventing lung cancer in mice

New vaccine effective at preventing lung cancer in mice

Tweaking a protein expressed by most liver cancer cells has enabled scientists to make a vaccine that is exceedingly effective at preventing the disease in mice. [More]
Consumer Reports reveals truth about sunscreen products

Consumer Reports reveals truth about sunscreen products

When it comes to sunscreen, SPF (sun protection factor) is the feature that influences consumers' purchasing decision most. [More]
High-voltage e-cigarettes may expose users to increased levels of toxic chemicals

High-voltage e-cigarettes may expose users to increased levels of toxic chemicals

High-voltage electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) may expose users to increased levels of toxic chemicals, including formaldehyde and acetaldehyde, according to research led by Maciej Goniewicz, PhD, PharmD, a researcher in the Department of Health Behavior at Roswell Park Cancer Institute (RPCI). [More]
Physicists recommend new strategies to make computed tomography safer

Physicists recommend new strategies to make computed tomography safer

UC Davis clinicians and physicists have recommended new strategies to make computed tomography (CT) safer, including adoption of a new metric for dose measurement, ways to manage exposure protocols that differ by CT brand and specific approaches to reduce exposure during needle biopsies. [More]
Compound from "third-hand smoke" damages DNA and potentially cause cancer

Compound from "third-hand smoke" damages DNA and potentially cause cancer

Leftover cigarette smoke that clings to walls and furniture is a smelly nuisance, but now research suggests that it could pose a far more serious threat, especially to young children who put toys and other smoke-affected items into their mouths. [More]
Bisphenol A may promote prostate tumourigenesis

Bisphenol A may promote prostate tumourigenesis

Bisphenol A, an organic compound that is ubiquitous in plastic products, may have a direct tumourigenic effect in the prostate, US researchers have shown. [More]
Levels of bisphenol A in men's urine could be marker of prostate cancer

Levels of bisphenol A in men's urine could be marker of prostate cancer

Findings by Cincinnati Cancer Center researchers show that levels of bisphenol A (BPA) in men's urine could be a marker of prostate cancer and that low levels of BPA exposure can cause cellular changes in both non-malignant and malignant prostate cells. [More]
NCI scientist recognized for AACR-American Cancer Society Award for Excellence in Cancer Epidemiology and Prevention

NCI scientist recognized for AACR-American Cancer Society Award for Excellence in Cancer Epidemiology and Prevention

The American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) and the American Cancer Society will recognize Curtis C. Harris, M.D., with the 23rd Annual AACR-American Cancer Society Award for Excellence in Cancer Epidemiology and Prevention at the AACR Annual Meeting 2014, to be held in San Diego, Calif., April 5-9. [More]
Third-hand smoke as deadly as first-hand smoke

Third-hand smoke as deadly as first-hand smoke

Do not smoke and do not allow yourself to be exposed to smoke because second-hand smoke and third-hand smoke are just as deadly as first-hand smoke, says a scientist at the University of California, Riverside who, along with colleagues, conducted the first animal study of the effects of third-hand smoke. [More]
High doses of 4-MEI in carbonated beverages may result in higher incidence of leukemia, says study

High doses of 4-MEI in carbonated beverages may result in higher incidence of leukemia, says study

Last week, Consumer Reports released a study on the levels of a caramel coloring agent known as 4-methylimidazole (4-MEI) in many popular, carbonated beverages. [More]
Smoking and cancer: an interview with Dr. Lewis Foxhall, VP of Health Policy, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center

Smoking and cancer: an interview with Dr. Lewis Foxhall, VP of Health Policy, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center

The report Smoking and Health: Report of the Advisory Committee to the Surgeon General, identified tobacco as the predominant cause of lung cancer in men. This was the first widely disseminated report based on scientific studies showing the clear link between smoking tobacco and serious health conditions including cancer, chronic lung diseases and heart disease. [More]
Researchers develop oral vaccine against Helicobacter pylori

Researchers develop oral vaccine against Helicobacter pylori

Researchers from Southern Medical University in Guangdong, Guangzhou, China, have developed an oral vaccine against Helicobacter pylori, the bacteria responsible for peptic ulcers and some forms of gastric cancer, and have successfully tested it in mice. The research is published ahead of print in the journal Clinical and Vaccine Immunology. [More]
Blending more ethanol into fuel to reduce air pollution carries hidden risk

Blending more ethanol into fuel to reduce air pollution carries hidden risk

​Blending more ethanol into fuel to cut air pollution from vehicles carries a hidden risk that toxic or even explosive gases may find their way into buildings, according to researchers at Rice University. [More]