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Duke researchers identify promising target for renal cell carcinomas

Duke researchers identify promising target for renal cell carcinomas

All cells need nutrients, but cancer cells are notoriously power hungry. As a result, cancer cells must alter their metabolism to provide the additional fuel needed for them to survive, grow and spread. [More]
LabCorp to offer Interpace's new ThyraMir microRNA classifier test

LabCorp to offer Interpace's new ThyraMir microRNA classifier test

Interpace Diagnostics announced today that Laboratory Corporation of America Holdings, the world's leading health care diagnostics company, will begin offering Interpace's new ThyraMir microRNA classifier test. [More]
Chromoendoscopy superior to other surveillance methods in detecting dysplasia in IBD patients

Chromoendoscopy superior to other surveillance methods in detecting dysplasia in IBD patients

Chromoendoscopy is superior to random biopsy or white-light colonoscopy in detecting dysplasia in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), according to a long-term surveillance study led by James F. Marion, MD, Professor of Medicine at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, and Director of Education and Outreach at The Susan and Leonard Feinstein Inflammatory Bowel Disease Clinical Center at The Mount Sinai Hospital, published online in the journal Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. [More]
Fraunhofer scientists use antibodies to detect cancer cells in tissue samples

Fraunhofer scientists use antibodies to detect cancer cells in tissue samples

Antibodies combat viruses and bacteria. They also attach themselves to cancer cells - in a typical, characteristic way. Fraunhofer scientists are using this property to detect cancer cells in tissue samples. Such rapid tests can already be applied by surgeons during operations - within a few minutes and without expensive equipment. [More]
Berkeley Lab researchers develop new mouse model for most common form of breast cancer

Berkeley Lab researchers develop new mouse model for most common form of breast cancer

The first clinically-relevant mouse model of human breast cancer to successfully express functional estrogen receptor positive (ER+) adenocarcinomas has been developed by researchers at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. [More]
New therapeutic target can prevent abnormal blood vessel growth that causes gastrointestinal bleeding

New therapeutic target can prevent abnormal blood vessel growth that causes gastrointestinal bleeding

A study by IRB Barcelona and IDIBAPS reveals a therapeutic target to prevent the development of the many abnormal blood vessels that cause gastrointestinal bleeding—the main complication in cirrhosis. [More]
Researchers identify new regulatory pathway that may play vital role in basal-like breast cancer

Researchers identify new regulatory pathway that may play vital role in basal-like breast cancer

Researchers have identified a new regulatory pathway that may play an important role in basal-like breast cancer (BLBC), a particularly aggressive form of breast cancer often referred to as "triple negative." This pathway may serve as a target for the development of an effective therapeutic. [More]
ATA announces research grants to support projects proposed by young researchers

ATA announces research grants to support projects proposed by young researchers

The American Thyroid Association is pleased to announce that grants have been awarded to support projects proposed by leading young researchers. Three of these projects involve the genetic analysis of thyroid tumors carrying the BRAFV600E mutation, which is associated with the development of some forms of thyroid cancer and increased risk for distant metastases, more advanced disease, and higher mortality. [More]
Proposed thin-plate model sheds light on structural basis of chromosomal aberrations in cancer cells

Proposed thin-plate model sheds light on structural basis of chromosomal aberrations in cancer cells

During cell division, each metaphase chromosome contains a single enormously long DNA molecule that is associated with histone proteins and forms a long chromatin filament with many nucleosomes. [More]
Researchers reveal new subtypes of invasive lobular carcinoma

Researchers reveal new subtypes of invasive lobular carcinoma

Researchers from the UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center and other academic centers have revealed new subtypes of invasive lobular carcinoma, the second most commonly diagnosed invasive breast cancer type. The findings could lead to personalized treatment approaches for the disease. [More]
Inhibition of FGFR3 receptor could be a new way of treating patients with liver cell cancer

Inhibition of FGFR3 receptor could be a new way of treating patients with liver cell cancer

In a recent study, scientists from the Institute for Cancer Research at MedUni Vienna have shown that the growth factor receptor FGFR3 increases the rate of growth and aggressiveness of hepatocellular carcinomas (liver cell cancer). Inhibition of this receptor could be a new and effective way of treating patients. [More]
Common drug used for treating fungal infections in lung transplant recipients increases risk for skin cancer, death

Common drug used for treating fungal infections in lung transplant recipients increases risk for skin cancer, death

Voriconazole, a prescription drug commonly used to treat fungal infections in lung transplant recipients, significantly increases the risk for skin cancer and even death, according to a new study by UC San Francisco researchers. [More]
New study suggests potential use of targeted therapies for two subtypes of esophageal cancer

New study suggests potential use of targeted therapies for two subtypes of esophageal cancer

Nearly all advanced esophageal cancers harbor genetic mutations that can be targeted with emerging drug therapies, according to a new study published in The Oncologist on September 2, 2015. [More]
MACC1 gene can help predict better treatment options for patients with Klatskin carcinoma

MACC1 gene can help predict better treatment options for patients with Klatskin carcinoma

Bile duct cancer is rare and is usually detected too late. Often only extensive liver surgery can help or, in rare cases, liver transplantation. But which patients will benefit from surgery and which will not, because their risk of cancer recurrence is too high? With the oncogene MACC1 as a biomarker, physicians for the first time have a tool to decide which treatment option is best for patients with Klatskin carcinoma, one type of bile duct cancer. [More]
Researchers identify new virus that plays role in rare type of liver cancer

Researchers identify new virus that plays role in rare type of liver cancer

More than a cause of a simple infection, viruses are often involved in the development of serious diseases. Such is the case with liver cancer, which often develops in an organ that has been weakened by hepatitis B or C virus. [More]
HPPI commences enrollment for Phase II(b) SCORING clinical trial for cancer treatment

HPPI commences enrollment for Phase II(b) SCORING clinical trial for cancer treatment

HedgePath Pharmaceuticals, Inc., a clinical stage biopharmaceutical company that discovers, develops and plans to commercialize innovative therapeutics for patients with cancer, announced today enrollment has commenced in its Phase II(b) SCORING (SUBA-Cap Objective Response in Gorlin's) clinical trial. [More]
Meta-analysis confirms oral contraceptives reduce endometrial cancer risk

Meta-analysis confirms oral contraceptives reduce endometrial cancer risk

Oral contraceptive use protects against endometrial cancer, with effects persisting for decades after cessation of use, shows a meta-analysis of individual patient data published in The Lancet Oncology. [More]
One sunburn increases risk of skin cancer by 50%

One sunburn increases risk of skin cancer by 50%

Everybody's got a story about that "one bad burn" - the time you fell asleep next to the pool and tattooed a white handprint on your lobster-red chest, or forgot to pack the sunscreen while hiking a Colorado 14er. [More]
New surgical method preserves long-term renal function following removal of renal tumours

New surgical method preserves long-term renal function following removal of renal tumours

Renal cell carcinomas are one of the most common types of cancer. In order to preserve its wide range of functions, every effort is made not to remove the entire kidney, but rather just a portion of it. A surgical method that preserves long-term renal function has now been carried out successfully for the first time in the Department of Urology at the MedUni Vienna and Vienna General Hospital. [More]
IMBRUVICA (ibrutinib) approved in Europe for treatment of Waldenstrom's macroglobulinemia

IMBRUVICA (ibrutinib) approved in Europe for treatment of Waldenstrom's macroglobulinemia

Today AbbVie announced the European Commission granted marketing authorization for IMBRUVICA (ibrutinib) as the first treatment option available in all 28 member states of the European Union for the treatment of Waldenstrom's macroglobulinemia (WM), a rare, slow growing blood cancer, in adult patients who have received at least one prior therapy, or in first line treatment for patients unsuitable for chemo-immunotherapy. [More]
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