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New research reveals advances that could change gynecologic cancer standard-of-care treatments

New research reveals advances that could change gynecologic cancer standard-of-care treatments

Advances that could change gynecologic cancer standard-of-care treatments are the centerpiece of key studies being presented by researchers from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center's Department of Gynecologic Oncology and Reproductive Medicine at the 2016 Annual Meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology. [More]
Denosumab drug that inhibits RANKL gene can prevent genetic breast cancer

Denosumab drug that inhibits RANKL gene can prevent genetic breast cancer

An international team led by researchers at the Austrian Institute of Molecular Biotechnology in Vienna and the University of Maryland School of Medicine in Baltimore discovered that genetically determined breast cancer can be largely prevented by blocking a bone gene. An already approved drug could be quickly available and would then be the first breast cancer prevention drug. [More]
Initiatives to improve adolescent, young adult cancer outcomes justified

Initiatives to improve adolescent, young adult cancer outcomes justified

Analysis of the EUROCARE-5 data shows that although survival for adolescents and young adults with cancer has improved overall, the survival rates for certain malignancies still lag behind those for children. [More]
Scalp cooling provides safe, effective treatment in prevention of chemotherapy-induced alopecia

Scalp cooling provides safe, effective treatment in prevention of chemotherapy-induced alopecia

Scalp cooling is a safe, feasible and an effective treatment in the prevention of chemotherapy induced alopecia (CIA) according to a German study being presented at the American Society of Clinical Oncology Annual meeting (ASCO). [More]
Study links lower concentration of heat-shock proteins to recurrence of thymic tumors

Study links lower concentration of heat-shock proteins to recurrence of thymic tumors

In most cases, tumors of the thymus gland are removed by surgical resection. However, they recur after a few years in up to one third of patients. A research team headed up by thoracic surgeon Bernhard Moser of the Thoracic Surgery Department at MedUni Vienna has successfully demonstrated that these tumors form heat-shock proteins. The lower the concentration of these proteins, the more quickly tumors recur. The study has been published in the leading journal Scientific Reports. [More]
Fish oil supplements combined with anti-cancer therapy can reduce renal cell carcinoma

Fish oil supplements combined with anti-cancer therapy can reduce renal cell carcinoma

Researchers at UC Davis have shown that docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), a fatty acid commonly found in fish and fish oil supplements, reduces renal cell carcinoma invasiveness, growth rate, and blood vessel growth when combined with the anti-cancer therapy regorafenib. The study was published in the journal Molecular Cancer Therapeutics. [More]
Immunotherapy drug pembrolizumab shrinks tumors in patients with Merkel cell carcinoma

Immunotherapy drug pembrolizumab shrinks tumors in patients with Merkel cell carcinoma

In a clinical trial of the immunotherapy drug pembrolizumab, half of 25 patients with a rare type of virus-linked skin cancer called Merkel cell carcinoma experienced substantial tumor shrinkage lasting nearly three times as long, on average, than with conventional chemotherapy. [More]
Innovative scanning-led surveillance can help identify need for neck dissection

Innovative scanning-led surveillance can help identify need for neck dissection

Head and neck cancer patients may no longer have to undergo invasive post-treatment surgery to remove remaining cancer cells, as research shows that innovative scanning-led surveillance can help identify the need for, and guidance of, neck dissection. [More]
Molecular basis for tongue cancer progression: an interview with Dr Simona Principe

Molecular basis for tongue cancer progression: an interview with Dr Simona Principe

Head and neck cancers (HNC) are the sixth most common cancers worldwide, with approximately 600,000 new cases diagnosed every year. [More]
Smartphone microscopes could improve detection of skin cancer in developing countries

Smartphone microscopes could improve detection of skin cancer in developing countries

Everyone knows smartphones can be used as calendars, calculators, radios and cameras. But, did you know they can also be used as microscopes that have the potential to save lives? They are called smartphone microscopes and dermatologists at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston think these devices could improve the detection of skin cancer in developing countries. [More]
Study on kidney cancer can help pave way toward more effective personalized medicine

Study on kidney cancer can help pave way toward more effective personalized medicine

Understanding the complexity of cancer is a major goal of the scientific community, and for kidney cancer researchers this goal just got closer. Dr. Chad Creighton, associate professor of medicine and member of the Dan L Duncan Comprehensive Cancer Center Division of Biostatistics at Baylor College of Medicine, led the study that analyzed close to 900 kidney cancers at the molecular level. [More]
Researchers reveal how butterfly disease patients develop cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas

Researchers reveal how butterfly disease patients develop cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas

Fragile skin that blisters easily: 90 percent of the patients that suffer from the skin condition recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (RDEB) develop rapidly progressing cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas, a type of skin cancer, by the age of 55. 80 percent of these patients will die due to metastasis within five years after the cancer has been first detected. [More]
RUVICA (ibrutinib) capsules approved for treatment-naïve CLL patients

RUVICA (ibrutinib) capsules approved for treatment-naïve CLL patients

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved IMBRUVICA (ibrutinib) capsules for treatment-naïve patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). [More]
New method uses MRT with Dixon sequence for accurate measurement of breast density

New method uses MRT with Dixon sequence for accurate measurement of breast density

A high breast density is an independent risk factor for breast cancer. MRT is the safest method for breast cancer diagnosis and is now used for early diagnosis. Medical University Vienna researchers at the University Clinic for Radiology and Nuclear Medicine have now successfully developed a method for the exact measurement of breast density using magnetic resonance tomography (MRT) examinations with the Dixon sequence. [More]
Duke researchers identify promising target for renal cell carcinomas

Duke researchers identify promising target for renal cell carcinomas

All cells need nutrients, but cancer cells are notoriously power hungry. As a result, cancer cells must alter their metabolism to provide the additional fuel needed for them to survive, grow and spread. [More]
LabCorp to offer Interpace's new ThyraMir microRNA classifier test

LabCorp to offer Interpace's new ThyraMir microRNA classifier test

Interpace Diagnostics announced today that Laboratory Corporation of America Holdings, the world's leading health care diagnostics company, will begin offering Interpace's new ThyraMir microRNA classifier test. [More]
Chromoendoscopy superior to other surveillance methods in detecting dysplasia in IBD patients

Chromoendoscopy superior to other surveillance methods in detecting dysplasia in IBD patients

Chromoendoscopy is superior to random biopsy or white-light colonoscopy in detecting dysplasia in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), according to a long-term surveillance study led by James F. Marion, MD, Professor of Medicine at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, and Director of Education and Outreach at The Susan and Leonard Feinstein Inflammatory Bowel Disease Clinical Center at The Mount Sinai Hospital, published online in the journal Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. [More]
Fraunhofer scientists use antibodies to detect cancer cells in tissue samples

Fraunhofer scientists use antibodies to detect cancer cells in tissue samples

Antibodies combat viruses and bacteria. They also attach themselves to cancer cells - in a typical, characteristic way. Fraunhofer scientists are using this property to detect cancer cells in tissue samples. Such rapid tests can already be applied by surgeons during operations - within a few minutes and without expensive equipment. [More]
Berkeley Lab researchers develop new mouse model for most common form of breast cancer

Berkeley Lab researchers develop new mouse model for most common form of breast cancer

The first clinically-relevant mouse model of human breast cancer to successfully express functional estrogen receptor positive (ER+) adenocarcinomas has been developed by researchers at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. [More]
New therapeutic target can prevent abnormal blood vessel growth that causes gastrointestinal bleeding

New therapeutic target can prevent abnormal blood vessel growth that causes gastrointestinal bleeding

A study by IRB Barcelona and IDIBAPS reveals a therapeutic target to prevent the development of the many abnormal blood vessels that cause gastrointestinal bleeding—the main complication in cirrhosis. [More]
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