Cardiomyopathy News and Research RSS Feed - Cardiomyopathy News and Research

Cardiomyopathy is a group of diseases with primary, usually diffuse, involvement of the myocardium. The myocardial disease is not secondary to ischaemic, valvular, congenital or pericardial disease.
Nature Methods publishes comparative study of leading Protein-Protein Interaction Networks

Nature Methods publishes comparative study of leading Protein-Protein Interaction Networks

Nature Methods published (online) a comparative study of leading Protein-Protein Interaction (PPI) Networks. [More]
Research shows how machine-learning models can interpret echocardiographic images and enable HCM diagnosis

Research shows how machine-learning models can interpret echocardiographic images and enable HCM diagnosis

Computer algorithms can automatically interpret echocardiographic images and distinguish between pathological hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and physiological changes in athletes' hearts, according to research from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, published online yesterday in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. [More]
Titin gene mutations affect heart function in healthy individuals, study finds

Titin gene mutations affect heart function in healthy individuals, study finds

A multinational study by researchers from the UK, Singapore and Germany has discovered that gene mutations in a protein called titin affect heart function in healthy individuals. [More]
BAG3 protein plays protective role by limiting reperfusion injury to the heart

BAG3 protein plays protective role by limiting reperfusion injury to the heart

The inability of cells to eliminate damaged proteins and organelles following the blockage of a coronary artery and its subsequent re-opening with angioplasty or medications - a sequence known as ischemia/reperfusion - often results in irreparable damage to the heart muscle. [More]
Study assesses impact of diabetes mellitus on cardiac geometry

Study assesses impact of diabetes mellitus on cardiac geometry

A study of U.S. Hispanics with diabetes mellitus showed a link between impaired glucose regulation and adverse measures of cardiac function and structure. [More]
Researchers use Thai water bug to find clues for heart muscle diseases

Researchers use Thai water bug to find clues for heart muscle diseases

What can a Thai water bug teach us about our muscles, especially the heart? A lot, says Professor of Biological Science Kenneth Taylor. New research by Taylor published today in Science Advances gives scientists better insight into how the heart muscle works and how sometimes it fails. [More]
First-ever 'Cast & Blast' event to support research into deadly congenital heart condition

First-ever 'Cast & Blast' event to support research into deadly congenital heart condition

Patients, physicians and attendees will throw their lines in for an important catch today at the Caledon Mountain Trout Club during the first 'Cast & Blast' event to support research into the often fatal heart disorder called arrythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC). [More]
Heart specialists to examine benefit of ECG screening for student athletes

Heart specialists to examine benefit of ECG screening for student athletes

UT Southwestern Medical Center heart specialists will study whether electrocardiograms (ECGs) are useful in identifying Texas high school student athletes who are at risk of suffering sudden cardiac death. [More]
Monoclonal antibody removes brain amyloid plaques in patients with Alzheimer's disease

Monoclonal antibody removes brain amyloid plaques in patients with Alzheimer's disease

Scientists at Neurimmune today described results from the Phase 1b PRIME clinical trial of the monoclonal antibody aducanumab. [More]
New stem-cell model of heart tissue unravels mechanisms linked to hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

New stem-cell model of heart tissue unravels mechanisms linked to hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

Using advanced stem cell technology, scientists from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai have created a model of a heart condition called hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) — an excessive thickening of the heart that is associated with a number of rare and common illnesses, some of which have a strong genetic component. [More]
Less invasive infusion strategy not linked to cardiac functional improvements but enhances health status

Less invasive infusion strategy not linked to cardiac functional improvements but enhances health status

A single dose of mesenchymal stem cells delivered intravenously to patients with chronic non-ischemic cardiomyopathy was not associated with significant cardiac structural or functional improvements, but did result in several clinically relevant benefits, according to results from a phase II-a randomized trial. [More]
Sudden cardiac death in patients with HCM rarely linked to sport activity

Sudden cardiac death in patients with HCM rarely linked to sport activity

Sudden death in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is rarely associated with exercise, according to research presented at ESC Congress 2016 today by Dr Gherardo Finocchiaro, a cardiologist at St George's University of London, UK. [More]
Scientists link malfunctioning molecular pathways to specific heart abnormalities in SCA

Scientists link malfunctioning molecular pathways to specific heart abnormalities in SCA

Patients with sickle cell anemia (SCA) develop heart complications and nearly a quarter die a sudden death. Now, researchers have linked malfunctioning molecular pathways to specific heart anomalies in SCA that result from progressive fibrosis and result in sudden death. [More]
Healthy adults who regularly exercise may be misdiagnosed with heart disease, study shows

Healthy adults who regularly exercise may be misdiagnosed with heart disease, study shows

Scientists have shown that people who exercise for even a few hours each week can enlarge their hearts. This is a normal and beneficial response to exercise, but until now has only been recognised in athletes. [More]
Study identifies genetic mutations responsible for development of cardiac hypertrophy in adults

Study identifies genetic mutations responsible for development of cardiac hypertrophy in adults

Investigators at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center have identified a developmental cause of adult-onset cardiac hypertrophy, a dangerous thickening of the heart muscle that can lead to heart failure and death. [More]
European Commission approves extended indication for Amgen's Kyprolis (carfilzomib) for the treatment of relapsed multiple myeloma patients

European Commission approves extended indication for Amgen's Kyprolis (carfilzomib) for the treatment of relapsed multiple myeloma patients

Amgen has announced that the European Commission (EC) has approved a variation to the marketing authorization for Kyprolis® (carfilzomib) to include use in combination with dexamethasone alone for adult patients with multiple myeloma who have received at least one prior therapy. The extended indication marks the second approval for Kyprolis by the EC in less than a year. [More]
Alnylam reports new results from investigational RNAi therapeutic programs

Alnylam reports new results from investigational RNAi therapeutic programs

Alnylam Pharmaceuticals, Inc. (Nasdaq: ALNY), the leading RNAi therapeutics company, announced today preliminary results from its ongoing Phase 2 open-label extension (OLE) studies with patisiran and revusiran, both investigational RNAi therapeutics targeting transthyretin (TTR) for the treatment of hereditary TTR-mediated amyloidosis (hATTR amyloidosis). [More]
Genetic testing worthwhile in sudden cardiac death

Genetic testing worthwhile in sudden cardiac death

Genetic testing and family screening help to provide explanations for sudden cardiac death in children and young adults, shows a population-based study. [More]
Study finds ARNI therapy could potentially prevent 28,484 deaths from heart failure each year

Study finds ARNI therapy could potentially prevent 28,484 deaths from heart failure each year

A UCLA-led study estimates that almost 28,500 deaths could be prevented each year in the U.S. through use of a new FDA-approved class of cardiovascular medication that helps reduce mortality in patients diagnosed with heart failure and reduced ejection fraction, the percentage of blood pumped from the heart with each contraction. [More]
Scientists aim to heal failing heart with the body’s own cells

Scientists aim to heal failing heart with the body’s own cells

Babies born with heart defects live longer than ever thanks to advances in the diagnosis and treatment of congenital heart disease. Yet, despite substantial progress, many continue to face bleak odds, lifelong medication, multiple surgeries and progressive heart failure, often requiring a transplant. [More]
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