Cartilage News and Research RSS Feed - Cartilage News and Research

Cartilage is a stiff yet flexible connective tissue found in many areas in the bodies of humans and other animals, including the joints between bones, the rib cage, the ear, the nose, the elbow, the knee, the ankle, the bronchial tubes and the intervertebral discs.
Scientists produce cartilage from embryonic stem cells

Scientists produce cartilage from embryonic stem cells

Scientists have succeeded in producing cartilage formed from embryonic stem cells that could in future be used to treat the painful joint condition osteoarthritis. [More]
Advances in stem cell therapy can improve outcomes for patients with chronic diabetic foot ulcers

Advances in stem cell therapy can improve outcomes for patients with chronic diabetic foot ulcers

According to data presented at the 73rd Annual Scientific Conference of the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons, advances in stem cell therapy can significantly improve outcomes for patients with chronic diabetic foot ulcers. Use of stem cells to treat foot problems like diabetic ulcers may speed up the healing process, preventing infection and hospitalization during recovery. [More]
High-impact exercise improves patellar cartilage quality of postmenopausal women at risk of osteoporosis

High-impact exercise improves patellar cartilage quality of postmenopausal women at risk of osteoporosis

Progressive high-impact training improved the patellar cartilage quality of the postmenopausal women who may be at risk of osteoporosis (bone loss) as well as at risk of osteoarthritis. [More]
Researchers show how gene mutations cause common forms of cartilage tumors

Researchers show how gene mutations cause common forms of cartilage tumors

Duke Medicine researchers have shown how gene mutations may cause common forms of cartilage tumors. In a study published in the Feb. 16, 2015, issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Duke researchers and their colleagues revealed that mutations in the isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) gene contribute to the formation of benign tumors in cartilage that can be a precursor to malignancies. [More]
TINA.org objects to proposed class-action settlement regarding Wellesse glucosamine supplement

TINA.org objects to proposed class-action settlement regarding Wellesse glucosamine supplement

Continuing its efforts to fight for settlements that are fair to consumers and mandate real changes in deceptive marketing, advocacy group truthinadvertising.org (TINA.org) has filed an objection in a proposed class-action settlement involving the brand-name glucosamine supplement, Wellesse®. Sold at retailers nationwide, the supplement is advertised as a joint pain remedy to ease pain and even rebuild cartilage. [More]
Japanese researchers explore use of bone marrow transplants to treat hypophosphatasia

Japanese researchers explore use of bone marrow transplants to treat hypophosphatasia

Recent research carried out by a team of researchers in Japan has investigated the use of bone marrow transplants (BMTs) to treat hypophosphatasia (HPP). In this study, the researchers carried out BMT for two infants with HPP in combination with allogenic (other-donated) mesenchymal stem cell transplants (MSCTs). The allogenic MSC donors were a parent of the infant. [More]
Duke University researchers devise new method to activate genes with light

Duke University researchers devise new method to activate genes with light

Duke University researchers have devised a method to activate genes in any specific location or pattern in a lab dish with the flip of a light switch by crossing a bacterium's viral defense system with a flower's response to sunlight. [More]
New technology preserves quality of donor tissue, allows natural joint repair option to patients

New technology preserves quality of donor tissue, allows natural joint repair option to patients

Currently, doctors have to throw away more than 80 percent of donated tissue used for joint replacements because the tissue does not survive long enough to be transplanted. Now, following a recent study, University of Missouri School of Medicine researchers have developed a new technology that more than doubles the life of the tissue. [More]
Investigators make medical breakthrough in repairing tracheal damage

Investigators make medical breakthrough in repairing tracheal damage

Investigators at The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research have made a medical breakthrough using 3D printing on a MakerBot Replicator 2X Experimental 3D Printer to create cartilage designed for tracheal repair or replacement. [More]
UAB Research Probes Molecular Basis Of Rare Genetic Disorder

UAB Research Probes Molecular Basis Of Rare Genetic Disorder

An international group co-led by University of Alabama at Birmingham researcher Mary MacDougall, Ph.D., has unraveled the molecular basis for the rare, inherited genetic disorder, Singleton-Merten Syndrome (SMS). Individuals with SMS develop extreme, life-threatening calcification of the aorta and heart valves, early-onset periodontitis and root resorption of the teeth, decreases in bone density, and loss of bone tissue at the tips of fingers and toes. [More]
AMBER unveils new bone repair technology

AMBER unveils new bone repair technology

AMBER, the Science Foundation Ireland funded materials science centre, hosted in Trinity College Dublin, has today unveiled a new bone repair technology, which has led to an injured racehorse returning to winning ways after successful jaw reconstruction. [More]
QMUL researchers develop new 'microcapsule' method to treat osteoarthritis

QMUL researchers develop new 'microcapsule' method to treat osteoarthritis

A new 'microcapsule' treatment delivery method developed by researchers at Queen Mary University of London could reduce inflammation in cartilage affected by osteoarthritis and reverse damage to tissue. The research was funded by Arthritis Research UK and the AO Foundation. [More]
ETH Zurich researchers demonstrate promising method to fabricate cellulose-sheaths for implants

ETH Zurich researchers demonstrate promising method to fabricate cellulose-sheaths for implants

Artificial implants such as pacemakers often cause complications because the body identifies them as foreign objects. Researchers at ETH Zurich have now demonstrated a simple method to fabricate cellulose-sheaths for implants, whose micro-structured surface makes them especially biocompatible. [More]
CUMC researchers identify that OCR stem cells can regenerate bone and cartilage in mice

CUMC researchers identify that OCR stem cells can regenerate bone and cartilage in mice

A stem cell capable of regenerating both bone and cartilage has been identified in bone marrow of mice. The discovery by researchers at Columbia University Medical Center is reported today in the online issue of the journal Cell. [More]
Life satisfaction associated with higher bone density in older women

Life satisfaction associated with higher bone density in older women

Women aged 60-70 who are satisfied with their lives have a higher bone density and they suffer from osteoporosis less frequently than their unsatisfied peers, according to a recent study completed at the University of Eastern Finland. [More]
Injection technique provides pain relief following knee replacement surgery

Injection technique provides pain relief following knee replacement surgery

It's estimated that more than half of adults in the United States diagnosed with knee osteoarthritis will undergo knee replacement surgery. [More]
CARLINA, Atlangram partner to develop antibiotics for osteoarticular infectious diseases

CARLINA, Atlangram partner to develop antibiotics for osteoarticular infectious diseases

CARLINA Technologies, a biotechnology company specializing in the development of nanomedicines, today announces the signing of a partnership agreement with Atlangram for the development of innovative pharmaceutical forms of antibiotics for the targeting of osteoarticular infectious diseases. [More]
Revolutionising back pain treatments: an interview with Dr Kieran O’Sullivan

Revolutionising back pain treatments: an interview with Dr Kieran O’Sullivan

Back pain is exceptionally common. In fact, to not experience back pain at some point of your life would be thoroughly abnormal. Experiencing back pain is like becoming tired or becoming sad; we don’t necessarily like it, but it’s perfectly common. [More]
Meniscal surgery may increase risk of osteoarthritis, cartilage loss

Meniscal surgery may increase risk of osteoarthritis, cartilage loss

A popular surgery to repair meniscal tears may increase the risk of osteoarthritis and cartilage loss in some patients, according to research presented today at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America. The findings show that the decision for surgery requires careful consideration in order to avoid accelerated disease onset, researchers said. [More]
New therapeutic targets can prevent scarring within transplanted kidneys

New therapeutic targets can prevent scarring within transplanted kidneys

Kidneys donated by people born with a small variation in the code of a key gene may be more likely, once in the transplant recipient, to accumulate scar tissue that contributes to kidney failure, according to a study led by researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and published today in the Journal of Clinical Investigation. [More]