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Cartilage is a stiff yet flexible connective tissue found in many areas in the bodies of humans and other animals, including the joints between bones, the rib cage, the ear, the nose, the elbow, the knee, the ankle, the bronchial tubes and the intervertebral discs.
Signaling pathway key player in formation of front-most portion of developing vertebrate embryos

Signaling pathway key player in formation of front-most portion of developing vertebrate embryos

A signaling pathway once thought to have little if any role during embryogenesis is a key player in the formation of the front-most portion of developing vertebrate embryos. [More]
BRI researchers use tetramer technology to find T cells that drive rheumatoid arthritis

BRI researchers use tetramer technology to find T cells that drive rheumatoid arthritis

Researchers at Benaroya Research Institute at Virginia Mason used cutting-edge tetramer technology developed at BRI to find the T cells that drive rheumatoid arthritis (RA). "By using tetramer technology, we were able to examine whether T cells in people with rheumatoid arthritis were increased in number or were unique in other ways," says BRI Associate Director Jane Buckner, MD, who led the study with BRI Tetramer Core Laboratory Manager Eddie James, PhD. [More]
Intake of monounsaturated fatty acids, cholesterol influence disease activity in RA and OA respectively

Intake of monounsaturated fatty acids, cholesterol influence disease activity in RA and OA respectively

Two new studies presented today at the European League Against Rheumatism Annual Congress have helped clarify the relationship between the dietary intake of monounsaturated fatty acids and cholesterol with disease activity in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and osteoarthritis (OA) respectively. [More]
Grain legume crops overlooked as potentially valuable sources of micronutrients

Grain legume crops overlooked as potentially valuable sources of micronutrients

Popular diets across the world typically focus on the right balance of essential components like protein, fat, and carbohydrates. These items are called macronutrients, and we consume them in relatively large quantities. [More]
Scientist unlocks potential of stem cells for repairing neural damage to brain

Scientist unlocks potential of stem cells for repairing neural damage to brain

A QUT scientist is hoping to unlock the potential of stem cells as a way of repairing neural damage to the brain. [More]
Tissue-engineered medical devices: an interview with Anna Wynn, Business Development Manager, Instron

Tissue-engineered medical devices: an interview with Anna Wynn, Business Development Manager, Instron

Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine (TERM) are dedicated to creating new tissue-engineered medical devices that replace and/or enhance tissue function that has been impaired by disease, injury, or age. [More]
Ultrasound beam 'tweezers' can grip and manipulate tiny clusters of cells

Ultrasound beam 'tweezers' can grip and manipulate tiny clusters of cells

Pioneering 'tweezers' that use ultrasound beams to grip and manipulate tiny clusters of cells under electronic, push-button control could lead to life-changing medical advances, such as better cartilage implants that reduce the need for knee replacement operations. [More]
Two new Manchester research centres aim at improving lives of people with arthritis

Two new Manchester research centres aim at improving lives of people with arthritis

Two major new research centres at The University of Manchester aimed at improving the lives of people with arthritis are to be officially launched on May 19. [More]
Regular grape consumption may help alleviate pain linked with symptomatic osteoarthritis of knee

Regular grape consumption may help alleviate pain linked with symptomatic osteoarthritis of knee

New research presented last week at the Experimental Biology conference in San Diego, California, suggests that regular grape consumption may help alleviate pain associated with symptomatic osteoarthritis of the knee, and improve joint flexibility and overall mobility. [More]
Researchers identify novel proceed to treat brittle bone disease

Researchers identify novel proceed to treat brittle bone disease

Researchers at Baylor College of Medicine have identified a new approach to treating brittle bone disease, a congenital disorder that results in fragile bones that break easily. [More]
Scientists find key information that may lead to new therapeutic approaches to epilepsy

Scientists find key information that may lead to new therapeutic approaches to epilepsy

A team of researchers from Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute (Sanford-Burnham) and SUNY Downstate Medical Center (SUNY Downstate) has found that deficiencies in hyaluronan, also known as hyaluronic acid or HA, can lead to spontaneous epileptic seizures. [More]
P4 pain scale found suitable for use in knee osteoarthritis

P4 pain scale found suitable for use in knee osteoarthritis

The P4 pain scale compares favorably with other commonly used measures for patients with severe knee osteoarthritis, a Canadian study has found. [More]
Sprifermin reduces cartilage loss in patients with knee osteoarthritis

Sprifermin reduces cartilage loss in patients with knee osteoarthritis

In a new study in patients with osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee, at 12 months, total femorotibial cartilage thickness loss was reduced in sprifermin (recombinant human fibroblast growth factor 18)-treated knees compared to placebo-treated knees, with effects being significant in the lateral femorotibial compartment but not in the central femorotibial compartment. [More]
Tissue reconstruction using autologous engineered implants has been successfully achieved in humans

Tissue reconstruction using autologous engineered implants has been successfully achieved in humans

Reconstruction of damaged/absent tissue using engineered autologous (from the patients’ own cells) implants has been successfully achieved in humans for the first time. [More]
Study shows link between overuse injury rates in young athletes and their socioeconomic status

Study shows link between overuse injury rates in young athletes and their socioeconomic status

A Loyola University Medical Center study is reporting for the first time a link between overuse injury rates in young athletes and their socioeconomic status. [More]
Loyola study reports link between overuse injury rates and socioeconomic status in young athletes

Loyola study reports link between overuse injury rates and socioeconomic status in young athletes

​A Loyola University Medical Center study is reporting for the first time a link between overuse injury rates in young athletes and their socioeconomic status. [More]
Scientists report successful nose reconstruction surgery using cartilage grown in laboratory

Scientists report successful nose reconstruction surgery using cartilage grown in laboratory

Scientists at the University of Basel report first ever successful nose reconstruction surgery using cartilage grown in the laboratory. Cartilage cells were extracted from the patient's nasal septum, multiplied and expanded onto a collagen membrane. [More]
Stem cells culled from bone marrow may prove beneficial in stroke recovery

Stem cells culled from bone marrow may prove beneficial in stroke recovery

Stem cells culled from bone marrow may prove beneficial in stroke recovery, scientists at UC Irvine's Sue & Bill Gross Stem Cell Research Center have learned. [More]
Osiris Therapeutics receives $15 million cash payment from Mesoblast for Prochymal

Osiris Therapeutics receives $15 million cash payment from Mesoblast for Prochymal

Osiris Therapeutics, Inc., the leading stem cell company focused on developing and marketing products to treat conditions in wound care, orthopedic and sports medicine markets, announced that it has received the next $15 million cash payment from Mesoblast in accordance with the Purchase Agreement relating to the Prochymal business. [More]
Adolescents who have ACL reconstruction are more likely to demonstrate osteoarthritic changes later in life

Adolescents who have ACL reconstruction are more likely to demonstrate osteoarthritic changes later in life

Researchers presented results today at the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine's (AOSSM) Specialty Day in New Orleans that adolescents who have an Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) reconstruction are more likely to demonstrate osteoarthritic changes later in life. [More]