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Cartilage is a stiff yet flexible connective tissue found in many areas in the bodies of humans and other animals, including the joints between bones, the rib cage, the ear, the nose, the elbow, the knee, the ankle, the bronchial tubes and the intervertebral discs.
New imaging methods could help identify early stages of arthrosis

New imaging methods could help identify early stages of arthrosis

Arthrosis, a degenerative disease that affects the joints, becomes more common as people become older. The disease is becoming increasingly common among older people in Finland as well. Arthrosis is currently the subject of research in a number of projects funded by the Academy of Finland. [More]
Computational model may provide new tool for patient-specific prediction of arthrosis progression

Computational model may provide new tool for patient-specific prediction of arthrosis progression

Associate Professor Rami Korhonen from the University of Eastern Finland has studied the use of computer modelling to simulate the progression of osteoarthritis of the knee. [More]
Georgia Tech engineers developing device to listen to and measure sounds inside the joint

Georgia Tech engineers developing device to listen to and measure sounds inside the joint

You've injured your knee. A doctor straps a listening device to it, and the noises you hear coming out of it are cringe-worthy. "Crackle! Krglkrglkrgl! Snap!" [More]
New study aims to identify biomarkers linked to cartilage degradation in OA patients

New study aims to identify biomarkers linked to cartilage degradation in OA patients

Joint injury can lead to post-traumatic osteoarthritis (PTOA). In fact, about half of all people who rupture the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) in their knee will develop PTOA within 10-20 years of the injury. [More]
Arthroscopic surgery may not be best option for older, arthritis patients

Arthroscopic surgery may not be best option for older, arthritis patients

For patients with serious, ongoing hip pain, sometimes surgery is their best bet for relief. Given the choice between minimally invasive hip surgery and total hip replacement, most patients would choose the less invasive procedure, often done on an outpatient basis. [More]
UCL researchers identify four genes that drive shape of human noses

UCL researchers identify four genes that drive shape of human noses

Genes that drive the shape of human noses have been identified by a UCL-led study. The four genes mainly affect the width and 'pointiness' of noses which vary greatly between different populations. The new information adds to our understanding of how the human face evolved and may help contribute to forensic DNA technologies that build visual profiles based on an individual's genetic makeup. [More]
New bio-mimicry method allows scientists to track cells in vivo using MRI during preclinical, clinical trials

New bio-mimicry method allows scientists to track cells in vivo using MRI during preclinical, clinical trials

Researchers led by Carnegie Mellon University Professor of Biological Sciences Chien Ho have developed a new method for preparing mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) that not only leads to the production of more native stem cells, but also labels them with a FDA approved iron-oxide nanoparticle (Ferumoxytol). [More]
Japanese surgeons develop new technique to relieve airway obstruction in children

Japanese surgeons develop new technique to relieve airway obstruction in children

Several pediatric medical conditions, such as congenital heart disease, vascular compression, and congenital softening of the cartilage lining the trachea or bronchi, can compromise the airway and cause breathing difficulty. [More]
University of Colorado Boulder combines Raman spectroscopy and nanoindentation for improved materials characterisation

University of Colorado Boulder combines Raman spectroscopy and nanoindentation for improved materials characterisation

The University of Colorado Boulder, USA, combines Raman spectroscopy and nanoindentation for improved materials characterisation. [More]
Genetic change to non-DNA structures in cell can cause cancer

Genetic change to non-DNA structures in cell can cause cancer

A mutation that affects the proteins that package DNA--without changing the DNA itself--can cause a rare form of cancer, according to new findings in this week's Science from researchers at The Rockefeller University. [More]
Histone mutation linked to fatal pediatric brain tumor

Histone mutation linked to fatal pediatric brain tumor

A single defect in a gene that codes for a histone — a "spool" that wraps idle DNA — is linked to pediatric cancers in a study published today in the journal Science. [More]
Stimulating stem cells to make special type of cartilage may potentially heal broken bones

Stimulating stem cells to make special type of cartilage may potentially heal broken bones

Stem cells could one day be stimulated to make a special type of cartilage to help repair large, hard-to-heal bone fractures - a potential boon for doctors treating big-money athletes, USC researchers say. [More]
Researchers develop bio-glass material that mimics real cartilage

Researchers develop bio-glass material that mimics real cartilage

Scientists have developed a material that can mimic cartilage and potentially encourage it to re-grow. [More]
Study highlights significance of tiny RNA molecules in tissue regeneration process

Study highlights significance of tiny RNA molecules in tissue regeneration process

Dr. Elizabeth Hutchins, a Post-Doctoral Fellow in TGen's Neurogenomics Division, and co-lead author of the study, said she hopes this investigation eventually enables such things as regenerating cartilage in knees, repairing spinal cords in accident victims, and reproducing the muscles of injured war veterans. [More]
Differences in timing of stem cells turning into cartilage play major role in shaping the face

Differences in timing of stem cells turning into cartilage play major role in shaping the face

Timing is everything when it comes to the development of the vertebrate face. In a new study published in PLoS Genetics, USC Stem Cell researcher Lindsey Barske from the laboratory of Gage Crump and her colleagues identify the roles of key molecular signals that control this critical timing. [More]
Study indicates that resolvin D1 has anti-arthritic properties

Study indicates that resolvin D1 has anti-arthritic properties

Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a debilitating autoimmune disorder that is characterized by the accumulation of inflammatory cells within the fluid of the joints. Current therapeutic strategies mostly serve to ease pain and rarely are able to reverse damage or resolve inflammation. [More]
Orthocell announces further validation of 'Cell Factory' concept for generation of bone, cartilage

Orthocell announces further validation of 'Cell Factory' concept for generation of bone, cartilage

Regenerative medicine company Orthocell Limited is pleased to announce further validation of ‘Cell Factory’ concepts for generating tissue specific growth factors and protein’s to aid in the healing and regeneration of bone, tendon and cartilage. [More]
Palovarotene drug may prevent multiple musculoskeletal problems linked with FOP

Palovarotene drug may prevent multiple musculoskeletal problems linked with FOP

New research in laboratory animals suggests that the drug palovarotene may prevent multiple skeletal problems caused by a rare but extremely disabling genetic bone disease, and may even be a candidate for use in newborn babies with the condition. [More]
High levels of COMP protein may lead to worse breast cancer prognosis

High levels of COMP protein may lead to worse breast cancer prognosis

Research from Lund University in Sweden shows that the protein COMP, which mainly exists in cartilage, can also be found in breast cancer tumours in patients with a poor prognosis. Studies on mice also showed that COMP contributed to the development and metastasis of the breast cancer. [More]
Carbohydrate-binding protein controls inflammation in osteoarthritis patients

Carbohydrate-binding protein controls inflammation in osteoarthritis patients

More and more people, particularly older people, are suffering from osteoarthritis due to wear and tear on their joints. This primarily affects the knee and hip joints but also the spine. In earlier studies, scientists at MedUni Vienna Department of Orthopaedics showed that raised levels of certain proteins, so-called galectins, and their docking sites are found in patients with osteoarthritis. [More]
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