Cartilage News and Research RSS Feed - Cartilage News and Research

Cartilage is a stiff yet flexible connective tissue found in many areas in the bodies of humans and other animals, including the joints between bones, the rib cage, the ear, the nose, the elbow, the knee, the ankle, the bronchial tubes and the intervertebral discs.
Researchers explore how Sox9 protein regulates production of cartilage

Researchers explore how Sox9 protein regulates production of cartilage

Cartilage does a lot more than determine the shapes of people's ears and noses. It also enables people to breathe and to form healthy bones -- two processes essential to life. In a study published in Cell Reports, USC Stem Cell researcher Xinjun He and University of Tokyo researcher Shinsuke Ohba explore how a protein called Sox9 regulates the production of cartilage. [More]
Two-thirds of patients with T4a larynx cancer not receiving total laryngectomy

Two-thirds of patients with T4a larynx cancer not receiving total laryngectomy

Despite findings of previous studies and published guidelines, nearly two-thirds of patients with T4a larynx ("voice box") cancer are not receiving a total laryngectomy (surgical removal of the larynx), the recommended form of treatment, and as a result, have significantly worse survival rates versus those treated with a total laryngectomy, a new study published in the International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics by experts at Penn Medicine found. [More]
R-Japan receives license for cell processing facility

R-Japan receives license for cell processing facility

R-Japan Co.,Ltd. obtained the license of cell processing facility under the Act on the Safety of Regenerative Medicine from the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare Kinki Bureau of Health and Welfare on June 29, 2015. [More]
ProfNet network experts available to discuss timely issues in your coverage area

ProfNet network experts available to discuss timely issues in your coverage area

Below are experts from the ProfNet network that are available to discuss timely issues in your coverage area. You can also submit a query to the hundreds of thousands of experts in our network – it's easy and free! [More]
MSD announces EC approval of SIMPONI (golimumab) for treatment of adult patients with nr-axial SpA

MSD announces EC approval of SIMPONI (golimumab) for treatment of adult patients with nr-axial SpA

MSD (Merck & Co., Inc., Kenilworth, New Jersey, USA) today announced that on 22 June the European Commission approved SIMPONI (golimumab) for the treatment of adult patients with severe, active non-radiographic axial spondyloarthritis (nr-axial SpA). [More]
Cell transplantation researchers successfully treat laboratory rats modeled with severe burns

Cell transplantation researchers successfully treat laboratory rats modeled with severe burns

Cell transplantation researchers have successfully used bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) to treat a variety of diseases and conditions. Now, using injections of MSCs, a research team in Brazil has successfully treated laboratory rats modeled with severe burns. [More]
Near-infrared imaging techniques for visualization of cartilage tissue

Near-infrared imaging techniques for visualization of cartilage tissue

The mainstream techniques for visualization of cartilage tissue in the body are magnetic resonance imaging and computer tomography, but both techniques do not provide optimum quality images. [More]
New Christian Doppler Laboratory for Clinical Molecular MR Imaging opens at MedUni Vienna

New Christian Doppler Laboratory for Clinical Molecular MR Imaging opens at MedUni Vienna

Today the new Christian Doppler Laboratory for Clinical Molecular MR Imaging (MOLIMA) was opened at the University Clinic of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine at MedUni Vienna. Its aim is to bring about a significant improvement in the prognosis or course of a disease. The research institute, which is funded by the Federal Ministry of Science, Research and Economy, develops high-resolution, quantitative imaging techniques to allow disease to be identified at an even earlier stage. [More]
New tissue 'scaffold' technology could one day help produce large organs

New tissue 'scaffold' technology could one day help produce large organs

Scientists have developed a new tissue 'scaffold' technology that could one day enable the engineering of large organs. Research led by the Universities of Bristol and Liverpool has shown that it is possible to combine cells with a special scaffold to produce living tissue in the laboratory. It is hoped this can then be implanted into patients as a way of replacing diseased parts of the body. [More]
New therapy for osteoporosis may be in the pipeline

New therapy for osteoporosis may be in the pipeline

Researchers from The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI), Florida, have reported a novel therapeutic approach that could promote the formation of new bone cells in people suffering from bone loss. [More]
Ampio reports effects of Ampion in treating chronic pain caused by osteoarthritis of the knee

Ampio reports effects of Ampion in treating chronic pain caused by osteoarthritis of the knee

Ampio Pharmaceuticals, Inc. today announced three peer-review publications that report the multifaceted and synergistic effects of Ampion in the treatment of osteoarthritis in the knee. [More]
Oxygen regulatory pathway can act to trigger tissue regeneration in mice

Oxygen regulatory pathway can act to trigger tissue regeneration in mice

A study led by Ellen Heber-Katz, PhD, of the Lankenau Institute for Medical Research, part of Main Line Health, shows that a primordial form of energy production that still exists in mammals can be harnessed to achieve spontaneous tissue regeneration in mice, without the need for added stem cells. [More]
MGH researchers develop bioartificial replacement limbs suitable for transplantation

MGH researchers develop bioartificial replacement limbs suitable for transplantation

A team of Massachusetts General Hospital investigators has made the first steps towards development of bioartificial replacement limbs suitable for transplantation. In their report, which has been published online in the journal Biomaterials, the researchers describe using an experimental approach previously used to build bioartificial organs to engineer rat forelimbs with functioning vascular and muscle tissue. [More]

Rhinoplasty procedure more popular amongst men

Earlier this year, data was released by the American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery (ASAPS) that detailed the rise in male plastic surgery procedures. The overall conclusion was that male procedures had risen 43 percent in the past 5 years. [More]
ERC Advanced Grants awarded to seven ETH researchers

ERC Advanced Grants awarded to seven ETH researchers

Seven ETH Zurich professors have applied successfully for an ERC Advanced Grant, which is worth about CHF 2.5 million. Two of the seven received the coveted award for the second time. [More]
AlloSource's AlloWrap DS amniotic membrane moved to high-cost reimbursement category

AlloSource's AlloWrap DS amniotic membrane moved to high-cost reimbursement category

AlloSource, one of the nation's largest providers of cartilage, cellular, bone, skin and soft-tissue allografts for use in surgical procedures and wound care to advance patient healing, today announced that AlloWrap DS, its double-sided human amniotic membrane allograft, has been moved to the high-cost reimbursement category. [More]
Chemical compound shows promise in treating rheumatoid arthritis

Chemical compound shows promise in treating rheumatoid arthritis

Montana State University researchers and their collaborators have published their findings about a chemical compound that shows potential for treating rheumatoid arthritis. [More]
Novel drug target identified for treating rheumatoid arthritis

Novel drug target identified for treating rheumatoid arthritis

Researchers at the La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology, in collaboration with colleagues the University of California, San Diego, identified a novel drug target for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis that focuses on the cells that are directly responsible for the cartilage damage in affected joints. [More]
Loyola study examines survival outcomes in patients with mesenchymal chondrosarcoma

Loyola study examines survival outcomes in patients with mesenchymal chondrosarcoma

Among the deadliest cancers is a rare malignancy called mesenchymal chondrosarcoma, which begins in cartilage around bones and typically strikes young adults. [More]
Scientists identify gene that causes hereditary hypertension and brachydactyly type E

Scientists identify gene that causes hereditary hypertension and brachydactyly type E

Individuals with this altered gene have hereditary hypertension (high blood pressure) and at the same time a skeletal malformation called brachydactyly type E, which is characterized by unusually short fingers and toes. The effect on blood pressure is so serious that -- if left untreated -- it most often leads to death before age fifty. [More]
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