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Cartilage is a stiff yet flexible connective tissue found in many areas in the bodies of humans and other animals, including the joints between bones, the rib cage, the ear, the nose, the elbow, the knee, the ankle, the bronchial tubes and the intervertebral discs.
AlloSource's AlloWrap DS amniotic membrane moved to high-cost reimbursement category

AlloSource's AlloWrap DS amniotic membrane moved to high-cost reimbursement category

AlloSource, one of the nation's largest providers of cartilage, cellular, bone, skin and soft-tissue allografts for use in surgical procedures and wound care to advance patient healing, today announced that AlloWrap DS, its double-sided human amniotic membrane allograft, has been moved to the high-cost reimbursement category. [More]
Chemical compound shows promise in treating rheumatoid arthritis

Chemical compound shows promise in treating rheumatoid arthritis

Montana State University researchers and their collaborators have published their findings about a chemical compound that shows potential for treating rheumatoid arthritis. [More]
Novel drug target identified for treating rheumatoid arthritis

Novel drug target identified for treating rheumatoid arthritis

Researchers at the La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology, in collaboration with colleagues the University of California, San Diego, identified a novel drug target for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis that focuses on the cells that are directly responsible for the cartilage damage in affected joints. [More]
Loyola study examines survival outcomes in patients with mesenchymal chondrosarcoma

Loyola study examines survival outcomes in patients with mesenchymal chondrosarcoma

Among the deadliest cancers is a rare malignancy called mesenchymal chondrosarcoma, which begins in cartilage around bones and typically strikes young adults. [More]
Scientists identify gene that causes hereditary hypertension and brachydactyly type E

Scientists identify gene that causes hereditary hypertension and brachydactyly type E

Individuals with this altered gene have hereditary hypertension (high blood pressure) and at the same time a skeletal malformation called brachydactyly type E, which is characterized by unusually short fingers and toes. The effect on blood pressure is so serious that -- if left untreated -- it most often leads to death before age fifty. [More]
Study could provide new approaches to treating meniscal injuries

Study could provide new approaches to treating meniscal injuries

Within the knee, two specialized, C-shaped pads of tissue called menisci perform many functions that are critical to knee-joint health. The menisci, best known as the shock absorbers in the knee, help disperse pressure, reduce friction and nourish the knee. [More]
Bone-marrow-derived MSCs can promote fracture healing

Bone-marrow-derived MSCs can promote fracture healing

Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been transplanted to successfully treat a variety of diseases and conditions. The benefit of using MSCs is their ability to self-renew and differentiate into a variety of specialized cell types, such as osteoblasts (cells contributing to bone formation), chondrocytes (cartilage cells), adipocytes (fat cells), myocardiocytes (the muscle cells that make up the cardiac muscle), and neurons (nervous system cells). [More]
UI orthopedics researchers working on injectable, bioactive gel that can repair cartilage damage

UI orthopedics researchers working on injectable, bioactive gel that can repair cartilage damage

Knee injuries are the bane of athletes everywhere, from professionals and college stars to weekend warriors. Current surgical options for repairing damaged cartilage caused by knee injuries are costly, can have complications, and often are not very effective in the long run. Even after surgery, cartilage degeneration can progress leading to painful arthritis. [More]
Moirai Orthopaedics receives FDA approval for IDE application to initiate clinical study of PIR System

Moirai Orthopaedics receives FDA approval for IDE application to initiate clinical study of PIR System

Moirai Orthopaedics, L.L.C., an orthopaedic implant development company based in Metairie, Louisiana, is pleased to announce it has received approval from the US Food and Drug Administration for its Investigational Device Exemption (IDE) application to initiate clinical study of the company's Pyrocarbon Implant Replacement (PIR) System. [More]
TGen scientists discover the likely cause of rare type of muscle weakness in six children

TGen scientists discover the likely cause of rare type of muscle weakness in six children

Scientists at the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen), using state-of-the-art genetic technology, have discovered the likely cause of a child's rare type of severe muscle weakness. [More]
Younger patients can benefit from ACL surgery

Younger patients can benefit from ACL surgery

A new study appearing in the April issue of The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery (JBJS), found that most patients who underwent surgery to repair and rebuild an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear, showed significant improvement in physical function at two years, which continued for at least six years following surgery. [More]
Higher levels of vitamin D decrease pain, improve function in obese patients with osteoarthritis

Higher levels of vitamin D decrease pain, improve function in obese patients with osteoarthritis

Got milk? If you are overweight and have osteoarthritis, you may want to bone up on your dairy products that have vitamin D. [More]
UAB scientist explores the bone development function of runx2 gene

UAB scientist explores the bone development function of runx2 gene

Amjad Javed, Ph.D., of the University of Alabama at Birmingham, has taken a major step forward in understanding the bone development function of a gene called runx2, which could lead to future ways to speed bone healing, aid bone bioengineering, stem osteoporosis and reduce arthritis. [More]
Zyga reports commercial use of modernized SImmetry Sacroiliac Joint Fusion System for low back pain

Zyga reports commercial use of modernized SImmetry Sacroiliac Joint Fusion System for low back pain

Zyga Technology, Inc., a medical device company focused on the design, development and commercialization of minimally invasive devices to treat underserved conditions of the lumbar spine, today announced the launch and first commercial use of an updated SImmetry Sacroiliac Joint Fusion System. The surgery was performed by Dr. Brett Menmuir. [More]
Previous joint pain, diabetes and overall health status may predict arthritis pain

Previous joint pain, diabetes and overall health status may predict arthritis pain

Diabetes and previous joint pain, along with a patient's overall physical health status, may predict arthritis pain with nearly 100 percent accuracy, in new research presented today at the 2015 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS). [More]
Stem cell treatment for osteoarthritis of the knee may help rebuild lost cartilage

Stem cell treatment for osteoarthritis of the knee may help rebuild lost cartilage

Recent studies employing adult stem cells obtained from bone marrow and fat have been used in patients suffering from osteoarthritis of the knee. Results have indicated not only symptomatic improvement but also suggest that cartilage healing and regeneration may be taking place. [More]
Researchers identify new role for VEGFA that may help target metastatic neuroblastoma

Researchers identify new role for VEGFA that may help target metastatic neuroblastoma

Healthy bone is continuously involved in a dynamic process that includes bone deposition and bone resorption. [More]
Somna Therapeutics receives FDA clearance to market REZA BAND UES Assist Device in U.S.

Somna Therapeutics receives FDA clearance to market REZA BAND UES Assist Device in U.S.

Somna Therapeutics today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration cleared the REZA BAND UES Assist Device for marketing in the U.S. The REZA BAND is a ground-breaking, new, externally-worn, non-medication, non-surgical medical device designed to reduce symptoms of laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR) by stopping regurgitation of stomach contents through the upper esophageal sphincter (UES). [More]
Scientists produce cartilage from embryonic stem cells

Scientists produce cartilage from embryonic stem cells

Scientists have succeeded in producing cartilage formed from embryonic stem cells that could in future be used to treat the painful joint condition osteoarthritis. [More]
Advances in stem cell therapy can improve outcomes for patients with chronic diabetic foot ulcers

Advances in stem cell therapy can improve outcomes for patients with chronic diabetic foot ulcers

According to data presented at the 73rd Annual Scientific Conference of the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons, advances in stem cell therapy can significantly improve outcomes for patients with chronic diabetic foot ulcers. Use of stem cells to treat foot problems like diabetic ulcers may speed up the healing process, preventing infection and hospitalization during recovery. [More]
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