Cartilage News and Research RSS Feed - Cartilage News and Research

Cartilage is a stiff yet flexible connective tissue found in many areas in the bodies of humans and other animals, including the joints between bones, the rib cage, the ear, the nose, the elbow, the knee, the ankle, the bronchial tubes and the intervertebral discs.
Study shows sprifermin reduces cartilage thickness loss in patients with knee osteoarthritis

Study shows sprifermin reduces cartilage thickness loss in patients with knee osteoarthritis

In a new study in patients with osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee, at 12 months, total femorotibial cartilage thickness loss was reduced in sprifermin (recombinant human fibroblast growth factor 18)-treated knees compared to placebo-treated knees, with effects being significant in the lateral femorotibial compartment but not in the central femorotibial compartment. [More]

Tissue reconstruction using autologous engineered implants has been successfully achieved in humans

Reconstruction of damaged/absent tissue using engineered autologous (from the patients’ own cells) implants has been successfully achieved in humans for the first time. [More]
Study shows link between overuse injury rates in young athletes and their socioeconomic status

Study shows link between overuse injury rates in young athletes and their socioeconomic status

A Loyola University Medical Center study is reporting for the first time a link between overuse injury rates in young athletes and their socioeconomic status. [More]
Loyola study reports link between overuse injury rates and socioeconomic status in young athletes

Loyola study reports link between overuse injury rates and socioeconomic status in young athletes

​A Loyola University Medical Center study is reporting for the first time a link between overuse injury rates in young athletes and their socioeconomic status. [More]

Scientists report successful nose reconstruction surgery using cartilage grown in laboratory

Scientists at the University of Basel report first ever successful nose reconstruction surgery using cartilage grown in the laboratory. Cartilage cells were extracted from the patient's nasal septum, multiplied and expanded onto a collagen membrane. [More]

Stem cells culled from bone marrow may prove beneficial in stroke recovery

Stem cells culled from bone marrow may prove beneficial in stroke recovery, scientists at UC Irvine's Sue & Bill Gross Stem Cell Research Center have learned. [More]
Osiris Therapeutics receives $15 million cash payment from Mesoblast for Prochymal

Osiris Therapeutics receives $15 million cash payment from Mesoblast for Prochymal

Osiris Therapeutics, Inc., the leading stem cell company focused on developing and marketing products to treat conditions in wound care, orthopedic and sports medicine markets, announced that it has received the next $15 million cash payment from Mesoblast in accordance with the Purchase Agreement relating to the Prochymal business. [More]

Adolescents who have ACL reconstruction are more likely to demonstrate osteoarthritic changes later in life

Researchers presented results today at the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine's (AOSSM) Specialty Day in New Orleans that adolescents who have an Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) reconstruction are more likely to demonstrate osteoarthritic changes later in life. [More]
Study finds gene expression differences in male and female athletes with ACL injuries

Study finds gene expression differences in male and female athletes with ACL injuries

Female athletes are two-to-eight times more likely to suffer an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury than males. And while there have been reports about possible anatomic, hormonal and neuromuscular factors that may place females at greater risk for these injuries, little research has looked specifically at the role of genetics. [More]

Genetics may explain why some athletes are high functioning despite having hip abnormalities

Genetics may explain why some senior athletes are high functioning despite having one or both hip abnormalities typically associated with early onset osteoarthritis (OA): developmental dislocation of the hip (dysplasia), a loose hip joint; or femoroacetabular impingement (FAI), a condition in which the hip bones are abnormally shaped, according to new research presented today at the 2014 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS). [More]

Glucosamine not reduces knee cartilage deterioration among individuals with chronic knee pain

A short-term study found that oral glucosamine supplementation is not associated with a lessening of knee cartilage deterioration among individuals with chronic knee pain. [More]
New bioinspired gel material could help repair damaged teeth and bone

New bioinspired gel material could help repair damaged teeth and bone

A bit of pressure from a new shrinking, sponge-like gel is all it takes to turn transplanted unspecialized cells into cells that lay down minerals and begin to form teeth. [More]
Anika Therapeutics receives marketing approval from FDA for MONOVISC injection

Anika Therapeutics receives marketing approval from FDA for MONOVISC injection

Anika Therapeutics, Inc. today announced it has received marketing approval for MONOVISC from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. MONOVISC is a single injection supplement to synovial fluid of the osteoarthritic joint, used to treat pain and improve joint mobility in patients suffering from osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee. [More]

Zimmer issues 5 new patents directed to Subchondroplasty Procedure

Zimmer Holdings, Inc. (NYSE and SIX: ZMH) today announced that the United States Patent and Trademark Office has issued five new patents directed to the Subchondroplasty® Procedure, the innovative new joint preservation procedure developed by Zimmer Knee Creations: U.S. Patent No. 8,551,178, U.S. Patent No. 8,574,303, U.S. Patent No. 8,608,802, U.S. Patent No. 8,617,166 and U.S. Patent No. 8,623,089. [More]

OrthoTrophix commences TPX-100 Phase 2 clinical study in knee osteoarthritis patients

OrthoTrophix, Inc., a privately held biopharmaceutical company, announced today that the Company started a Phase 2 clinical study of its cartilage repair therapeutic agent, TPX-100, with knee osteoarthritis patients in the U.S. The Company also announced that it had successfully closed the second and last tranche of its Series A preferred stock financing. [More]
Ways to help manage chronic pain

Ways to help manage chronic pain

Musculoskeletal pain of the bone, joint and muscles is one of the most common reasons for primary care visits in the United States. According to a literature review appearing in a recent issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (JAAOS), chronic pain, or pain that persists beyond an expected period of healing, is estimated to affect 100 million Americans. [More]
Duke researchers getting closer to generate replacement cartilage

Duke researchers getting closer to generate replacement cartilage

By combining a synthetic scaffolding material with gene delivery techniques, researchers at Duke University are getting closer to being able to generate replacement cartilage where it's needed in the body. [More]
Scientists receive new awards from CIRM to advance revolutionary stem cell science in medicine

Scientists receive new awards from CIRM to advance revolutionary stem cell science in medicine

Scientists from UCLA's Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research have received new awards from the California Institute of Regenerative Medicine (CIRM), the state stem cell research agency, that will forward revolutionary stem cell science in medicine. [More]

Single stem cell injection after meniscus knee surgery may provide pain relief, aid in meniscus regrowth

​A single stem cell injection following meniscus knee surgery may provide pain relief and aid in meniscus regrowth, according to a novel study appearing in the January issue of the Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery (JBJS). [More]
Researchers develop "smart" hydrogel that can deliver medicine on demand

Researchers develop "smart" hydrogel that can deliver medicine on demand

Researchers at the University of Delaware have developed a "smart" hydrogel that can deliver medicine on demand, in response to mechanical force. [More]