Cartilage News and Research RSS Feed - Cartilage News and Research

Cartilage is a stiff yet flexible connective tissue found in many areas in the bodies of humans and other animals, including the joints between bones, the rib cage, the ear, the nose, the elbow, the knee, the ankle, the bronchial tubes and the intervertebral discs.
Researchers find high levels of neurotoxins linked to Alzheimer's, ALS in fins and muscles of sharks

Researchers find high levels of neurotoxins linked to Alzheimer's, ALS in fins and muscles of sharks

In a new study, University of Miami scientists found high concentrations of toxins linked to neurodegenerative diseases in the fins and muscles of 10 species of sharks. [More]
PinnacleHealth replaces aortic valve in two patients using minimally invasive surgery

PinnacleHealth replaces aortic valve in two patients using minimally invasive surgery

This week, PinnacleHealth became the first hospital in the country to implant the EDWARDS INTUITY Elite valve, a rapid deployment device for surgical aortic valve replacement, after U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval. [More]
New biomaterial allows scientists to study how stem cells sense stiffness of surrounding environment

New biomaterial allows scientists to study how stem cells sense stiffness of surrounding environment

A new biomaterial can be used to study how and when stem cells sense the mechanics of their surrounding environment, found a team led by Robert Mauck, PhD, the Mary Black Ralston Professor for Education and Research in Orthopaedic Surgery, in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. [More]
Tulane professor receives three-year grant to improve survival of mesenchymal stem cells

Tulane professor receives three-year grant to improve survival of mesenchymal stem cells

Kim O'Connor, a professor in Tulane University's Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, received a three-year $599,638 grant from the National Science Foundation to study ways to improve the survival of mesenchymal stem cells once they are implanted in patients. [More]
Mexican scientists develop micro valve to decrease microcephaly effects in developing fetus

Mexican scientists develop micro valve to decrease microcephaly effects in developing fetus

Microcephaly is a condition in which a decreased size in the skull of fetuses or babies occurs, preventing the full development of his brain. [More]
Cold plasma could help bones heal faster, study shows

Cold plasma could help bones heal faster, study shows

Cold plasma looks like the glow from the "Star Wars" blue light saber but this beam of energy, made of electrons that change polarity at micro-second or nanosecond speeds, could help bones heal faster, according to a study published August 11th in the Journal of Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine. [More]
Researchers find causal link between senescent cells and age-related osteoarthritis

Researchers find causal link between senescent cells and age-related osteoarthritis

Researchers at Mayo Clinic have reported a causal link between senescent cells — cells that accumulate with age and contribute to frailty and disease — and osteoarthritis in mice. [More]
Scientists discover tissue biomarkers that lead to joint degeneration linked to spine osteoarthritis

Scientists discover tissue biomarkers that lead to joint degeneration linked to spine osteoarthritis

A research team at the Krembil Research Institute has discovered a pair of tissue biomarkers that directly contribute to the harmful joint degeneration associated with spine osteoarthritis. [More]
Some WADA-banned substances may have potential medical applications

Some WADA-banned substances may have potential medical applications

As the world awaits the start of the 2016 Summer Olympics, doping in athletes remains a hot topic. [More]
Study shows how cancer cells pursue path toward greater concentrations of oxygen

Study shows how cancer cells pursue path toward greater concentrations of oxygen

Cancer cells need oxygen to survive, as do most other life forms, but scientists had never tracked their search for oxygen in their early growth stages until now -- a step toward a deeper understanding of one way cancer spreads that could help treat the disease. [More]
Scientists reveal new transmission path for yaws

Scientists reveal new transmission path for yaws

Lesions on arms and legs, deformed faces - yaws is a tropical disease that infects the skin, bones and cartilage. It is caused by the bacterium Treponema pallidum subspecies pertenue [More]
Scientists identify mutation responsible for new, rare genetic disorder

Scientists identify mutation responsible for new, rare genetic disorder

An international team of researchers has discovered the mutation responsible for a rare, newly identified genetic disorder that causes craniofacial abnormalities and developmental delays. [More]
Exercise therapy could be effective alternative for treating meniscus injuries

Exercise therapy could be effective alternative for treating meniscus injuries

Three out of four people could avoid knee surgery with a new form of exercise therapy, with significant cost savings for society [More]
High fat diet may accelerate cartilage repair

High fat diet may accelerate cartilage repair

Obesity is a well-known risk factor for osteoarthritis, but its effects on cartilage repair are unknown. [More]
New TSRI study may bring doctors closer to using gene therapies to grow, repair tendons

New TSRI study may bring doctors closer to using gene therapies to grow, repair tendons

With the Rio Olympics just weeks away, many are wondering how Jamaican sprinter Usain Bolt will perform. [More]
Scientists develop new way to resurface arthritic hip joint

Scientists develop new way to resurface arthritic hip joint

With a goal of treating worn, arthritic hips without extensive surgery to replace them, scientists have programmed stem cells to grow new cartilage on a 3-D template shaped like the ball of a hip joint. [More]
New nontoxic hydrogel bonds strongly to defected bones

New nontoxic hydrogel bonds strongly to defected bones

Researchers at Hokkaido University have developed a new kind of hydrogel that bonds spontaneously and strongly to defected bones, suggesting potential use in the treatments of joint injuries. [More]
NRS Healthcare launches free Healthy Living Family Pack to help parents tackle childhood obesity

NRS Healthcare launches free Healthy Living Family Pack to help parents tackle childhood obesity

As part of National Childhood Obesity Week, which was held from 4th-10th July 2016, NRS Healthcare had launched a digital Healthy Living Family Pack to help families with children who may be experiencing issues with overeating, inactivity or poor nutrition. [More]
OCA transplantation can be effective treatment option for active patients with knee cartilage injuries

OCA transplantation can be effective treatment option for active patients with knee cartilage injuries

For athletes and highly active patients who sustain cartilage injuries to their knee, an osteochondral allograft transplantation can be a successful treatment option, according to research presented today at the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine's Annual Meeting in Colorado Springs, CO. [More]
Computational modelling method can predict development and progression of osteoarthritis

Computational modelling method can predict development and progression of osteoarthritis

Computational modelling makes it possible to predict the onset and progression of knee osteoarthritis in overweight people, shows a new study from the University of Eastern Finland. [More]
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