Cartilage News and Research RSS Feed - Cartilage News and Research

Cartilage is a stiff yet flexible connective tissue found in many areas in the bodies of humans and other animals, including the joints between bones, the rib cage, the ear, the nose, the elbow, the knee, the ankle, the bronchial tubes and the intervertebral discs.
Moirai Orthopaedics receives FDA approval for IDE application to initiate clinical study of PIR System

Moirai Orthopaedics receives FDA approval for IDE application to initiate clinical study of PIR System

Moirai Orthopaedics, L.L.C., an orthopaedic implant development company based in Metairie, Louisiana, is pleased to announce it has received approval from the US Food and Drug Administration for its Investigational Device Exemption (IDE) application to initiate clinical study of the company's Pyrocarbon Implant Replacement (PIR) System. [More]
TGen scientists discover the likely cause of rare type of muscle weakness in six children

TGen scientists discover the likely cause of rare type of muscle weakness in six children

Scientists at the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen), using state-of-the-art genetic technology, have discovered the likely cause of a child's rare type of severe muscle weakness. [More]
Younger patients can benefit from ACL surgery

Younger patients can benefit from ACL surgery

A new study appearing in the April issue of The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery (JBJS), found that most patients who underwent surgery to repair and rebuild an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear, showed significant improvement in physical function at two years, which continued for at least six years following surgery. [More]
Higher levels of vitamin D decrease pain, improve function in obese patients with osteoarthritis

Higher levels of vitamin D decrease pain, improve function in obese patients with osteoarthritis

Got milk? If you are overweight and have osteoarthritis, you may want to bone up on your dairy products that have vitamin D. [More]
UAB scientist explores the bone development function of runx2 gene

UAB scientist explores the bone development function of runx2 gene

Amjad Javed, Ph.D., of the University of Alabama at Birmingham, has taken a major step forward in understanding the bone development function of a gene called runx2, which could lead to future ways to speed bone healing, aid bone bioengineering, stem osteoporosis and reduce arthritis. [More]
Zyga reports commercial use of modernized SImmetry Sacroiliac Joint Fusion System for low back pain

Zyga reports commercial use of modernized SImmetry Sacroiliac Joint Fusion System for low back pain

Zyga Technology, Inc., a medical device company focused on the design, development and commercialization of minimally invasive devices to treat underserved conditions of the lumbar spine, today announced the launch and first commercial use of an updated SImmetry Sacroiliac Joint Fusion System. The surgery was performed by Dr. Brett Menmuir. [More]
Previous joint pain, diabetes and overall health status may predict arthritis pain

Previous joint pain, diabetes and overall health status may predict arthritis pain

Diabetes and previous joint pain, along with a patient's overall physical health status, may predict arthritis pain with nearly 100 percent accuracy, in new research presented today at the 2015 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS). [More]
Stem cell treatment for osteoarthritis of the knee may help rebuild lost cartilage

Stem cell treatment for osteoarthritis of the knee may help rebuild lost cartilage

Recent studies employing adult stem cells obtained from bone marrow and fat have been used in patients suffering from osteoarthritis of the knee. Results have indicated not only symptomatic improvement but also suggest that cartilage healing and regeneration may be taking place. [More]
Researchers identify new role for VEGFA that may help target metastatic neuroblastoma

Researchers identify new role for VEGFA that may help target metastatic neuroblastoma

Healthy bone is continuously involved in a dynamic process that includes bone deposition and bone resorption. [More]
Somna Therapeutics receives FDA clearance to market REZA BAND UES Assist Device in U.S.

Somna Therapeutics receives FDA clearance to market REZA BAND UES Assist Device in U.S.

Somna Therapeutics today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration cleared the REZA BAND UES Assist Device for marketing in the U.S. The REZA BAND is a ground-breaking, new, externally-worn, non-medication, non-surgical medical device designed to reduce symptoms of laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR) by stopping regurgitation of stomach contents through the upper esophageal sphincter (UES). [More]
Scientists produce cartilage from embryonic stem cells

Scientists produce cartilage from embryonic stem cells

Scientists have succeeded in producing cartilage formed from embryonic stem cells that could in future be used to treat the painful joint condition osteoarthritis. [More]
Advances in stem cell therapy can improve outcomes for patients with chronic diabetic foot ulcers

Advances in stem cell therapy can improve outcomes for patients with chronic diabetic foot ulcers

According to data presented at the 73rd Annual Scientific Conference of the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons, advances in stem cell therapy can significantly improve outcomes for patients with chronic diabetic foot ulcers. Use of stem cells to treat foot problems like diabetic ulcers may speed up the healing process, preventing infection and hospitalization during recovery. [More]
High-impact exercise improves patellar cartilage quality of postmenopausal women at risk of osteoporosis

High-impact exercise improves patellar cartilage quality of postmenopausal women at risk of osteoporosis

Progressive high-impact training improved the patellar cartilage quality of the postmenopausal women who may be at risk of osteoporosis (bone loss) as well as at risk of osteoarthritis. [More]
Researchers show how gene mutations cause common forms of cartilage tumors

Researchers show how gene mutations cause common forms of cartilage tumors

Duke Medicine researchers have shown how gene mutations may cause common forms of cartilage tumors. In a study published in the Feb. 16, 2015, issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Duke researchers and their colleagues revealed that mutations in the isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) gene contribute to the formation of benign tumors in cartilage that can be a precursor to malignancies. [More]
TINA.org objects to proposed class-action settlement regarding Wellesse glucosamine supplement

TINA.org objects to proposed class-action settlement regarding Wellesse glucosamine supplement

Continuing its efforts to fight for settlements that are fair to consumers and mandate real changes in deceptive marketing, advocacy group truthinadvertising.org (TINA.org) has filed an objection in a proposed class-action settlement involving the brand-name glucosamine supplement, Wellesse®. Sold at retailers nationwide, the supplement is advertised as a joint pain remedy to ease pain and even rebuild cartilage. [More]
Japanese researchers explore use of bone marrow transplants to treat hypophosphatasia

Japanese researchers explore use of bone marrow transplants to treat hypophosphatasia

Recent research carried out by a team of researchers in Japan has investigated the use of bone marrow transplants (BMTs) to treat hypophosphatasia (HPP). In this study, the researchers carried out BMT for two infants with HPP in combination with allogenic (other-donated) mesenchymal stem cell transplants (MSCTs). The allogenic MSC donors were a parent of the infant. [More]
Duke University researchers devise new method to activate genes with light

Duke University researchers devise new method to activate genes with light

Duke University researchers have devised a method to activate genes in any specific location or pattern in a lab dish with the flip of a light switch by crossing a bacterium's viral defense system with a flower's response to sunlight. [More]
New technology preserves quality of donor tissue, allows natural joint repair option to patients

New technology preserves quality of donor tissue, allows natural joint repair option to patients

Currently, doctors have to throw away more than 80 percent of donated tissue used for joint replacements because the tissue does not survive long enough to be transplanted. Now, following a recent study, University of Missouri School of Medicine researchers have developed a new technology that more than doubles the life of the tissue. [More]
Investigators make medical breakthrough in repairing tracheal damage

Investigators make medical breakthrough in repairing tracheal damage

Investigators at The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research have made a medical breakthrough using 3D printing on a MakerBot Replicator 2X Experimental 3D Printer to create cartilage designed for tracheal repair or replacement. [More]
UAB Research Probes Molecular Basis Of Rare Genetic Disorder

UAB Research Probes Molecular Basis Of Rare Genetic Disorder

An international group co-led by University of Alabama at Birmingham researcher Mary MacDougall, Ph.D., has unraveled the molecular basis for the rare, inherited genetic disorder, Singleton-Merten Syndrome (SMS). Individuals with SMS develop extreme, life-threatening calcification of the aorta and heart valves, early-onset periodontitis and root resorption of the teeth, decreases in bone density, and loss of bone tissue at the tips of fingers and toes. [More]
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