Cartilage News and Research RSS Feed - Cartilage News and Research

Cartilage is a stiff yet flexible connective tissue found in many areas in the bodies of humans and other animals, including the joints between bones, the rib cage, the ear, the nose, the elbow, the knee, the ankle, the bronchial tubes and the intervertebral discs.
Differences in timing of stem cells turning into cartilage play major role in shaping the face

Differences in timing of stem cells turning into cartilage play major role in shaping the face

Timing is everything when it comes to the development of the vertebrate face. In a new study published in PLoS Genetics, USC Stem Cell researcher Lindsey Barske from the laboratory of Gage Crump and her colleagues identify the roles of key molecular signals that control this critical timing. [More]
Study indicates that resolvin D1 has anti-arthritic properties

Study indicates that resolvin D1 has anti-arthritic properties

Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a debilitating autoimmune disorder that is characterized by the accumulation of inflammatory cells within the fluid of the joints. Current therapeutic strategies mostly serve to ease pain and rarely are able to reverse damage or resolve inflammation. [More]
Orthocell announces further validation of 'Cell Factory' concept for generation of bone, cartilage

Orthocell announces further validation of 'Cell Factory' concept for generation of bone, cartilage

Regenerative medicine company Orthocell Limited is pleased to announce further validation of ‘Cell Factory’ concepts for generating tissue specific growth factors and protein’s to aid in the healing and regeneration of bone, tendon and cartilage. [More]
Palovarotene drug may prevent multiple musculoskeletal problems linked with FOP

Palovarotene drug may prevent multiple musculoskeletal problems linked with FOP

New research in laboratory animals suggests that the drug palovarotene may prevent multiple skeletal problems caused by a rare but extremely disabling genetic bone disease, and may even be a candidate for use in newborn babies with the condition. [More]
High levels of COMP protein may lead to worse breast cancer prognosis

High levels of COMP protein may lead to worse breast cancer prognosis

Research from Lund University in Sweden shows that the protein COMP, which mainly exists in cartilage, can also be found in breast cancer tumours in patients with a poor prognosis. Studies on mice also showed that COMP contributed to the development and metastasis of the breast cancer. [More]
Carbohydrate-binding protein controls inflammation in osteoarthritis patients

Carbohydrate-binding protein controls inflammation in osteoarthritis patients

More and more people, particularly older people, are suffering from osteoarthritis due to wear and tear on their joints. This primarily affects the knee and hip joints but also the spine. In earlier studies, scientists at MedUni Vienna Department of Orthopaedics showed that raised levels of certain proteins, so-called galectins, and their docking sites are found in patients with osteoarthritis. [More]
UChicago Medicine to open new orthopaedic center in Orland Park

UChicago Medicine to open new orthopaedic center in Orland Park

The University of Chicago Medicine will begin treating adult and pediatric patients at its new orthopaedic center in Orland Park on April 6. [More]

Computational method helps assess patient-specific progression of osteoarthritis in knee joint

Osteoarthritis is a degenerative disease in which the articular cartilage protecting the joint starts to degenerate and wear off over time. The main risk factors of osteoarthritis are advanced age and overweight-induced significant stresses on the knee joint. [More]
YAP protein plays vital role in development of human neural crest

YAP protein plays vital role in development of human neural crest

The Hippo/YAP signalling pathway plays a crucial role when the cells of the neural crest - a structure that generates cell types such as bones and nerve tissue - specialise for a certain function in the human embryo and migrate to their target region within the body. [More]
Tiny gel slivers open way to personalised cancer treatment targeting particular tumour

Tiny gel slivers open way to personalised cancer treatment targeting particular tumour

They look like small, translucent gems but these tiny 'gel' slivers hold the world of a patient's tumour in microcosm ready for trials of anti-cancer drugs to find the best match between treatment and tumour. [More]
Study reveals direct regulatory role of serotonin in rheumatoid arthritis

Study reveals direct regulatory role of serotonin in rheumatoid arthritis

For the first time, serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) has been directly implicated in the pathophysiology of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Although 5-HT is predominantly known as a neurotransmitter within the central nervous system, new evidence points to additional important functions for serotonin in the periphery. [More]
HSS studies find cartilage restoration procedures as viable treatment for patients over 40 years old

HSS studies find cartilage restoration procedures as viable treatment for patients over 40 years old

Patients who have cartilage damage in their knees often experience pain and are unable to engage in sports and other activities they enjoy. Two studies at Hospital for Special Surgery find that cartilage restoration procedures are a viable treatment option for patients over 40 years old. [More]
Scientists hoping to use biomimetic gel to mechanically reinforce worn-out cartilage

Scientists hoping to use biomimetic gel to mechanically reinforce worn-out cartilage

Aching knees and stiff fingers: osteoarthritis is a widespread joint disease with few treatment options. However, there may finally be some hope: American scientists are hoping to mechanically reinforce worn-out cartilage by incorporating a biomimetic gel [More]
TSRI researchers find way to predict therapeutic potential of stem cells against different diseases

TSRI researchers find way to predict therapeutic potential of stem cells against different diseases

Scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute have for the first time developed a way to predict how a specific type of stem cell will act against different diseases. [More]
Study provides insights into cellular mechanisms that may contribute to new osteoarthritis treatments

Study provides insights into cellular mechanisms that may contribute to new osteoarthritis treatments

Researchers show that the protein CCN4 positively regulates the generation of cartilage matrix, which are depleted in osteoarthritis. [More]
Researchers develop effective technique for studying high-arched palate using mouse model

Researchers develop effective technique for studying high-arched palate using mouse model

Researchers from the laboratory of Paul Trainor, Ph.D., at the Stowers Institute of Medical Research have developed an effective and reliable technique for studying high-arched palate using a mouse model. The methodology could expand research into the genetic aspects of this craniofacial abnormality. [More]

New biological technique may provide better, longer-lasting joint function

According to the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, more than 300,000 total hip replacements are performed in the United States each year. The procedure reduces pain and restores mobility. However, for younger, more active patients, an artificial hip has a limited lifetime and usually requires restricted activity. [More]
New research reveals underlying biomechanics involved in meniscus fibrocartilage function

New research reveals underlying biomechanics involved in meniscus fibrocartilage function

Knee injuries are among the top five reasons people visit an orthopedic surgeon for treatments, which include 719,000 total knee replacements performed annually in the United States. Now, new research reveals underlying biomechanics that may be involved in meniscus fibrocartilage function as well as dysfunction and could guide novel treatments for some of the most debilitating and costly orthopedic problems in the U.S., including meniscus tears and age-related joint degeneration. [More]
Green tea compound has high potential as treatment for rheumatoid arthritis

Green tea compound has high potential as treatment for rheumatoid arthritis

Researchers at Washington State University in Spokane have identified a potential new approach to combating the joint pain, inflammation and tissue damage caused by rheumatoid arthritis. [More]
Wake Forest Baptist scientists prove feasibility of printing living tissue structures for surgical implantation

Wake Forest Baptist scientists prove feasibility of printing living tissue structures for surgical implantation

Using a sophisticated, custom-designed 3D printer, regenerative medicine scientists at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center have proved that it is feasible to print living tissue structures to replace injured or diseased tissue in patients. [More]
Advertisement
Advertisement