Catheter News and Research RSS Feed - Catheter News and Research

In medicine, a catheter is a tube that can be inserted into a body cavity, duct, or vessel. Catheters . In most uses, a catheter is a thin, flexible tube ("soft" catheter), though in some uses, it is a larger, solid ("hard") catheter. A catheter left inside the body, either temporarily or permanently, may be referred to as an indwelling catheter. A permanently inserted catheter may be referred to as a permcath.
Direct catheter-based thrombectomy equally effective to bridging thrombolysis in acute ischaemic stroke

Direct catheter-based thrombectomy equally effective to bridging thrombolysis in acute ischaemic stroke

Direct catheter-based thrombectomy is equally effective to bridging thrombolysis in the treatment of acute ischaemic stroke, according to results from the observational PRAGUE-16 registry study presented at ESC Congress 2016 today. [More]
First ESC Guidelines on Atrial Fibrillation published online

First ESC Guidelines on Atrial Fibrillation published online

The first European Society of Cardiology (ESC) Guidelines on Atrial Fibrillation developed in collaboration with the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery (EACTS) are published online today in European Heart Journal and the European Journal of Cardio-Thoracic Surgery, and on the ESC Website. [More]
New imaging technique may help detect amyloid-related heart failure

New imaging technique may help detect amyloid-related heart failure

A type of heart failure caused by a build-up of amyloid can be accurately diagnosed and prognosticated with an imaging technique, eliminating the need for a biopsy, according to a multicenter study led by researchers at Columbia University Medical Center. [More]
Cerebral protection device reduces brain lesions after TAVI in patients with severe aortic stenosis

Cerebral protection device reduces brain lesions after TAVI in patients with severe aortic stenosis

Among patients with severe aortic stenosis (narrowing of the aortic valve) undergoing transcatheter aortic valve implantation, the use of a cerebral protection device (a filter that captures debris [tissue and plaque] dislodged during the procedure) reduced the number and volume of brain lesions, according to a study appearing in the August 9 issue of JAMA. [More]
MID's Permaseal transapical access and closure device receives FDA Market clearance

MID's Permaseal transapical access and closure device receives FDA Market clearance

Micro Interventional Devices, Inc., the world leader in minimally invasive and catheter-based compliant fixation technologies addressing structural heart disease announced today that it received FDA Market clearance for the Company's first product: Permaseal transapical access and closure device. [More]

SAPIEN 3 trans-catheter aortic valve replacement system improves survival in patients with aortic stenosis

Overall one-year survival was over 85 percent for high-risk or inoperable patients who underwent aortic valve replacement with the SAPIEN 3 trans-catheter aortic valve replacement system, according to a study published in the July 12 issue of the American Heart Association journal Circulation. [More]
Updated AAN guidelines state closure not recommended for individuals with stroke and heart defect

Updated AAN guidelines state closure not recommended for individuals with stroke and heart defect

An updated recommendation from the American Academy of Neurology states that catheter-based closure should not be routinely recommended for people who have had a stroke and also have a heart defect called a patent foramen ovale (PFO), a channel between the top two chambers in the heart. [More]
New series of treatments may provide another option for families of unborn babies with CPAM

New series of treatments may provide another option for families of unborn babies with CPAM

A medical team at Osaka University Hospital, Japan, has conducted successful treatment for the fetal lung disorder Congenital Pulmonary Airway Malformattion (CPAM), also known as Congenital Cystic Adenomatoid Malformation (CCAM). [More]
Clinical trial to assess safety of using umbilical cord cells to treat macular degeneration

Clinical trial to assess safety of using umbilical cord cells to treat macular degeneration

UIC is part of a national phase 2 clinical trial to evaluate the safety and tolerability of using cells derived from multipotent umbilical cord cells to treat age-related macular degeneration, the most common cause of vision loss in people over 55. [More]
FDA approves Absorb GT1 BVS to treat coronary artery disease

FDA approves Absorb GT1 BVS to treat coronary artery disease

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved the first fully absorbable stent to treat coronary artery disease. [More]
New research holds potential to improve fetal surgery outcomes

New research holds potential to improve fetal surgery outcomes

University of California, Berkeley engineer Phillip Messersmith is happy to be learning lessons from a lowly mollusk, with the expectation that the knowledge gained will enable him and fellow physicians to prevent deaths among their youngest patients -- those who haven't been born yet. [More]
ADAPT technique offers promising outcomes for stroke patients with large-vessel clots

ADAPT technique offers promising outcomes for stroke patients with large-vessel clots

In an article published online April 16, 2016 by the Journal of Neurointerventional Surgery, investigators at the Medical University of South Carolina report promising 90-day outcomes for stroke patients with large-vessel clots who underwent thrombectomy or clot removal using the direct-aspiration, first pass technique. [More]
Stent retriever devices revolutionize acute ischemic stroke care

Stent retriever devices revolutionize acute ischemic stroke care

New devices called stent retrievers, which effectively reverse strokes, have revolutionized the treatment of certain stroke patients, according to an article in the journal Expert Review of Neurotherapeutics. [More]
Experts discuss innovative, non-surgical approaches to treat varicose veins

Experts discuss innovative, non-surgical approaches to treat varicose veins

Are you embarrassed to show off your legs this summer? Well you're not alone. Varicose veins affect more than 30 million adults in the US between the ages of 18 to 70, with women twice as likely as men to develop the condition. They are often unattractive, uncomfortable and could cause further medical problems. [More]
VentureMed Group receives FDA 510(k) clearance for FLEX Scoring Catheter

VentureMed Group receives FDA 510(k) clearance for FLEX Scoring Catheter

VentureMed Group, Ltd., a medical device company based in northwest Ohio, has received 510(k) clearance from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for the commercial distribution of a new surgical device for treating peripheral artery disease (PAD). [More]
Watchman device for irregular heart rhythms may be preferable to standard blood thinning medications

Watchman device for irregular heart rhythms may be preferable to standard blood thinning medications

A new study by a Yale researcher may support the use of a device for patients suffering from irregular heart rhythms. [More]
Study evaluates effectiveness of robotic approach over manual ablation in treating heart arrhythmia

Study evaluates effectiveness of robotic approach over manual ablation in treating heart arrhythmia

Whether ablation of the highest-risk heart arrhythmia is best handled by a robot or the hands of an electrophysiologist should be answered by an international comparison of the two. [More]
New drug-capture device can soak up chemotherapy drugs to limit toxicity

New drug-capture device can soak up chemotherapy drugs to limit toxicity

Doctors have a powerful arsenal of cancer-fighting chemotherapy drugs to choose from, though a key challenge is to better target these drugs to kill tumors while limiting their potentially harmful side effects. [More]
Large national effort shows promise in reducing both catheter use and UTI rates

Large national effort shows promise in reducing both catheter use and UTI rates

Right now, about one in five hospital patients has a catheter collecting their urine - and putting them at risk of a painful and potentially dangerous urinary tract infection, or UTI. [More]
Computerized virtual haptic system for NGT placement can provide students with safe, self-paced training

Computerized virtual haptic system for NGT placement can provide students with safe, self-paced training

Nasogastric intubation, through the nostril and the throat, is an essential clinical procedure for inserting a plastic tube into the stomach for feeding or drainage. However, the placement is a blind process in which the tube may be misplaced and could lead to unexpected complications or fatal incidents. [More]
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