Catheter News and Research RSS Feed - Catheter News and Research

In medicine, a catheter is a tube that can be inserted into a body cavity, duct, or vessel. Catheters . In most uses, a catheter is a thin, flexible tube ("soft" catheter), though in some uses, it is a larger, solid ("hard") catheter. A catheter left inside the body, either temporarily or permanently, may be referred to as an indwelling catheter. A permanently inserted catheter may be referred to as a permcath.
Hospitals can make patients sick, reveals Consumer Reports

Hospitals can make patients sick, reveals Consumer Reports

Hospitals are thought to be sterile, safe environments where sick people get better, not sicker. But that's not always the case according to a new investigation by Consumer Reports into hospital-acquired infections. [More]
Rutgers physicians use new treatments to restore teenager’s life

Rutgers physicians use new treatments to restore teenager’s life

At first, 13-year-old Christina Blumstein thought she had an ordinary headache. She and her parents were returning from a visit to Long Island in July 2014 when the pain struck. Was it a bout of carsickness? Too much screen time on her iPad? But a few hours later, back home in Old Bridge, New Jersey, her mother MaryAnn says, "Christina started screaming that somebody was stabbing her in the head with a knife." Soon afterward Christina was comatose and in an ambulance - and her life was in grave danger. [More]
Ben Taub Hospital building national reputation for cardiovascular services

Ben Taub Hospital building national reputation for cardiovascular services

For most of the day, Graciela Del Angel felt shortness of breath and a tightness in her chest. Though her symptoms were uncomfortable, they became unbearable about midnight. By then, she had difficulty breathing and deep chest pains—all signs of a heart attack. [More]
Higher case volume linked with improved outcomes for catheter-based blood clot removal in LE-DVT patients

Higher case volume linked with improved outcomes for catheter-based blood clot removal in LE-DVT patients

Patients who have lower extremity proximal deep vein thrombosis (LE-DVT), or a blood clot in their leg, are increasingly undergoing minimally invasive catheter-based blood clot removal - also referred to as catheter-directed thrombolysis (CDT) - rather than solely being treated with traditional blood-thinning medications (anticoagulation alone). [More]
Less invasive endovascular aortic repair benefits most patients, provides quick recovery

Less invasive endovascular aortic repair benefits most patients, provides quick recovery

Each year, nearly 40,000 Americans undergo elective surgery to repair an abdominal aortic aneurysm with the goal of preventing a life-threatening rupture of this potentially dangerous cardiovascular condition. [More]
New review article analyzes pros and cons of different treatment approaches to gallbladder disease

New review article analyzes pros and cons of different treatment approaches to gallbladder disease

More than 25 million Americans have gallstones, and each year about 1 million new cases are diagnosed. Each year about 1.8 million people develop abdominal pain as a result of gallstones and go see a doctor about it. About 40 percent of these, more than 725,000 people a year, ultimately have surgery to resolve the problem. [More]
MPI applications: an interview with Tobias Knopp, University Hospital Hamburg

MPI applications: an interview with Tobias Knopp, University Hospital Hamburg

Up to now, we've seen a lot of improvements made, but now we're almost at the point of focusing on the application of MPI and proving what the real benefits of this technology are, which is very exciting... [More]
Edwards Lifesciences agrees to acquire CardiAQ Valve Technologies

Edwards Lifesciences agrees to acquire CardiAQ Valve Technologies

Edwards Lifesciences Corporation, the global leader in the science of heart valves and hemodynamic monitoring, today announced that it has agreed to acquire CardiAQ Valve Technologies, Inc., a privately held company and developer of a transcatheter mitral valve replacement system. [More]
Graphene coating can help boost chemotherapy treatment

Graphene coating can help boost chemotherapy treatment

Silver is often used as a coating on medical equipment used for chemotherapy. The problem is that this silver coating can break down drugs. Now, researchers have found a graphene coating that will help boost chemotherapy's effects. [More]
UT Arlington, UNTHSC scientists to build prototype for implantable shunt flow monitoring system

UT Arlington, UNTHSC scientists to build prototype for implantable shunt flow monitoring system

Scientists from The University of Texas at Arlington and the University of North Texas Health Science Center are building a prototype for an implantable in-line shunt flow monitoring system that would deliver both on-demand and continuous readings of hydrocephalus. [More]
New AHA/ASA guidelines recommend stent retrievers to treat strokes in selected patients

New AHA/ASA guidelines recommend stent retrievers to treat strokes in selected patients

New devices called stent retrievers are enabling physicians to benefit selected patients who suffer strokes caused by blood clots. The devices effectively stop strokes in their tracks. [More]
WATCHMAN Device helps reduce stroke risk, stop use of blood thinners in patients with atrial fibrillation

WATCHMAN Device helps reduce stroke risk, stop use of blood thinners in patients with atrial fibrillation

MedStar Heart & Vascular Institute now offers patients with irregular heart rhythm a minimally invasive option to reduce the risk of stroke, as well as enable stopping long-term use of blood thinning medication. Physicians at MedStar Heart at MedStar Washington Hospital Center were the first in the Washington metropolitan region to successfully implant the WATCHMAN Device on June 16 in two patients with atrial fibrillation (A-fib). [More]
UCLA cardiologists use less invasive approach to replace heart valve

UCLA cardiologists use less invasive approach to replace heart valve

Last summer, after a long career as a successful entrepreneur and a brief retirement, Richard Whitaker was helping to start another new company. Unfortunately, a serious health concern caused a couple of interruptions in his work on the new venture. One of Whitaker's heart valves wasn't working properly, which caused congestive heart failure and led to two hospitalizations within several months. [More]
DGIST researchers set on creating microrobot-assisted procedure for dealing with blocked arteries

DGIST researchers set on creating microrobot-assisted procedure for dealing with blocked arteries

Swarms of microscopic, magnetic, robotic beads could be scrubbing in next to the world's top vascular surgeons--all taking aim at blocked arteries. [More]

Inari Medical closes $12.4 million Series B venture capital financing

Inari Medical, Inc. announced today that it has closed a $12.4 million Series B venture capital financing. The financing was led by members of the board of directors and returning investors Versant Ventures and US Venture Partners. The round also included participation by several medical device industry veterans. [More]
New stroke treatment guidelines recommend use of stent retrievers as first-line treatment for eligible patients

New stroke treatment guidelines recommend use of stent retrievers as first-line treatment for eligible patients

Today, the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association published new stroke treatment guidelines that recommend the use of stent retriever technology – such as Medtronic plc’s SolitaireTM stent retriever device – in conjunction with the current standard of care, IV-tPA, as a first-line treatment for eligible patients. [More]
Helen DeVos Children's Hospital uses two imaging techniques to produce hybrid 3D model of a patient's heart

Helen DeVos Children's Hospital uses two imaging techniques to produce hybrid 3D model of a patient's heart

Congenital heart experts from Spectrum Health Helen DeVos Children's Hospital have successfully integrated two common imaging techniques to produce a three-dimensional anatomic model of a patient's heart. [More]
Daily CHG bathing protocol for pediatric patients reduces bloodstream infections by 59%: Study

Daily CHG bathing protocol for pediatric patients reduces bloodstream infections by 59%: Study

Daily bathing of pediatric patients with disposable cloths containing 2 percent chlorhexidine gluconate (CHG) reduced central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs) by 59 percent and saved approximately $300,000 in one hospital over a six-month period, according to a new study. [More]
Uninterrupted NOAC treatment during catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation is safe, shows research

Uninterrupted NOAC treatment during catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation is safe, shows research

Uninterrupted treatment with novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs) during catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation (AF) is safe, reveals research presented today at EHRA EUROPACE - CARDIOSTIM 2015 by Dr Carsten Wunderlich, senior consultant in the Department of Invasive Electrophysiology, Heart Centre Dresden, Germany. [More]
Study reveals how geography affects the survival of people with end-stage kidney disease

Study reveals how geography affects the survival of people with end-stage kidney disease

The notion that geography often shapes economic and political destiny has long informed the work of economists and political scholars. Now a study led by medical scientists at Johns Hopkins reveals how geography also appears to affect the very survival of people with end-stage kidney disease in need of dialysis. [More]
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