Catheter News and Research RSS Feed - Catheter News and Research

In medicine, a catheter is a tube that can be inserted into a body cavity, duct, or vessel. Catheters . In most uses, a catheter is a thin, flexible tube ("soft" catheter), though in some uses, it is a larger, solid ("hard") catheter. A catheter left inside the body, either temporarily or permanently, may be referred to as an indwelling catheter. A permanently inserted catheter may be referred to as a permcath.
UK's first heart operation uses new Topera system to analyse electrical activity during AF

UK's first heart operation uses new Topera system to analyse electrical activity during AF

The UK's first heart operations using a novel software platform to pinpoint the source of the heart condition have been carried out in Leicester thanks to research at the University of Leicester. [More]
New IVPA catheter design helps imaging system to reveal deeper details of fatty arteries

New IVPA catheter design helps imaging system to reveal deeper details of fatty arteries

As plaque accumulates on the inside of arteries, it can cause the arteries to thicken and harden. When that plaque ruptures, it can ultimately block blood flow and lead to a heart attack, stroke or other problem throughout the body. [More]
Wolff-Parkinson-White patients continue to have atrial fibrillation risk even after catheter ablation, study finds

Wolff-Parkinson-White patients continue to have atrial fibrillation risk even after catheter ablation, study finds

Patients with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome who receive catheter ablation to cure their abnormal heart rhythms are just as likely as non-ablated patients to develop atrial fibrillation no matter what age they receive ablation, according to a new study. [More]
New technology allows for safer, more precise removal of plaque during atherectomy procedure

New technology allows for safer, more precise removal of plaque during atherectomy procedure

Rush Oak Park Hospital is the first hospital in the surrounding area to acquire and use a newly approved technology that allows vascular surgeons to see in real-time the plaque they are removing during an atherectomy, a minimally invasive procedure that helps treat peripheral artery disease (PAD). [More]
Older adults become more sensitive to pain, study shows

Older adults become more sensitive to pain, study shows

When older relatives complain about their pains, show a little empathy, because new research suggests that as we age, we may all become more sensitive to pain. A small, preliminary University of Florida Health study has suggested for the first time that inflammation may occur more quickly and at a higher magnitude -- and stays around longer -- when older adults experience pain versus when younger adults experience pain. [More]
Detailed digital models of human organs could bring substantial benefits to clinical trials

Detailed digital models of human organs could bring substantial benefits to clinical trials

Computer simulations of disease processes and detailed digital models of our organs could provide more accurate monitoring and outcome measurements for clinical trials, according to research being presented in Sheffield today. [More]
Clinicians describe placement of first implantable hemodynamic monitor in single ventricle Fontan anatomy

Clinicians describe placement of first implantable hemodynamic monitor in single ventricle Fontan anatomy

While the Fontan procedure has improved the short- and mid-term outcomes for patients born with single ventricle anatomy, long-term complications of Fontan circulation include heart failure. These complications are thought to be secondary to elevated central venous pressure, chronic venous congestion and low cardiac output. [More]
New catheter infection alert system could help tackle life-threatening urinary infections

New catheter infection alert system could help tackle life-threatening urinary infections

A new infection alert system in catheters could prevent serious infections in millions of hospital patients worldwide. The system, detailed in a new paper in Biosensors and Bioelectronics, changes the color of the urine so patients and carers can see easily if bacteria are starting to block the catheter. [More]
Newly developed implantable device can deliver chemotherapy drugs directly to pancreatic tumors

Newly developed implantable device can deliver chemotherapy drugs directly to pancreatic tumors

Pancreatic cancer is the third leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States, in part because it is very difficult for chemotherapy drugs to reach the pancreas, which is located deep within the abdomen. [More]
Quality improvement intervention in ICUs does not reduce in-hospital mortality, study reveals

Quality improvement intervention in ICUs does not reduce in-hospital mortality, study reveals

Implementation of a multifaceted quality improvement intervention with daily checklists, goal setting, and clinician prompting did not reduce in-hospital mortality compared with routine care among critically ill patients treated in intensive care units (ICUs) in Brazil, according to a study appearing in the April 12 issue of JAMA. [More]
Two established atrial fibrillation ablation techniques show similar effects, safety outcomes

Two established atrial fibrillation ablation techniques show similar effects, safety outcomes

Two established techniques for correcting the root cause of the heart rhythm disorder atrial fibrillation show similar effects and safety outcomes, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology's 65th Annual Scientific Session. [More]
Investigational stem cell therapy improves outcomes in patients with severe heart failure

Investigational stem cell therapy improves outcomes in patients with severe heart failure

An investigational stem cell therapy derived from patients' own blood marrow significantly improved outcomes in patients with severe heart failure, according to a study from the Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute. [More]
End-stage heart failure patients treated with cell therapy experience fewer cardiac events

End-stage heart failure patients treated with cell therapy experience fewer cardiac events

End-stage heart failure patients treated with stem cells harvested from their own bone marrow experienced 37 percent fewer cardiac events - including deaths and heart failure hospital admissions - than a placebo-controlled group, according to a new study. [More]
Study evaluates long-term outcomes of TAVR with SAPIEN 3 in intermediate-risk patients

Study evaluates long-term outcomes of TAVR with SAPIEN 3 in intermediate-risk patients

To account for baseline differences, TAVR patients were compared by a propensity score analysis with patients randomized to receive surgical intervention in a precursor study, PARTNER 2A. Propensity scoring analysis is a statistical technique used to reduce bias from potential confounding variables, which in this case was used to identify surgical patients from a previous study who would be comparable to TAVR patients in this study. [More]
Ischemic postconditioning for STEMI patients shows no clinical outcomes

Ischemic postconditioning for STEMI patients shows no clinical outcomes

A large randomized controlled trial of ischemic postconditioning in patients who had experienced the deadliest form of heart attack—ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI)—failed to show that this procedure significantly reduces death from any cause or hospitalization for heart failure, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology's 65th Annual Scientific Session. [More]
Prostatic artery embolization improves sleep, quality of life for men with enlarged prostates

Prostatic artery embolization improves sleep, quality of life for men with enlarged prostates

An innovative interventional radiology treatment for men with enlarged prostates decreases the number of times they wake to urinate in the night, according to research presented at the Society of Interventional Radiology's 2016 Annual Scientific Meeting. Researchers said the majority of men with enlarged prostates and lower urinary tract symptoms reported better sleep that resulted in an improved quality of life after they underwent a treatment called prostatic artery embolization (PAE). [More]
Intravenous beta blockers offer no clinical benefit to patients with STEMI

Intravenous beta blockers offer no clinical benefit to patients with STEMI

Giving intravenous beta blockers before performing a coronary angioplasty in patients who had experienced the deadliest form of heart attack—ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI)—was safe but did not reduce heart attack severity or improve blood flow from the heart's main pumping chamber, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology's 65th Annual Scientific Session. [More]
Bariatric arterial embolization safe, effective in sustaining weight loss in severely obese people

Bariatric arterial embolization safe, effective in sustaining weight loss in severely obese people

Findings from the early phase of a clinical trial led by Johns Hopkins investigators indicates that a new, minimally invasive weight loss treatment known as bariatric arterial embolization is safe and effective in sustaining weight loss in severely obese people. [More]
Deferred stent implantation fails to show benefit in STEMI patients

Deferred stent implantation fails to show benefit in STEMI patients

Delayed or deferred stent implantation in patients experiencing the deadliest form of heart attack--ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI)—failed to reduce death from any cause, hospitalization for heart failure, subsequent heart attacks or the need for a repeat procedure to restore blood flow to the heart, researchers reported at the American College of Cardiology's 65th Annual Scientific Session. [More]
Frequent TAVR to replace damaged aortic heart valve improves patient outcomes

Frequent TAVR to replace damaged aortic heart valve improves patient outcomes

The more frequently a hospital performs a minimally invasive technique called transcatheter aortic valve replacement, or TAVR, to replace a damaged aortic heart valve, the better patients fare, on average, immediately after the procedure, researchers reported at the American College of Cardiology's 65th Annual Scientific Session. [More]
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