Catheter News and Research RSS Feed - Catheter News and Research

In medicine, a catheter is a tube that can be inserted into a body cavity, duct, or vessel. Catheters . In most uses, a catheter is a thin, flexible tube ("soft" catheter), though in some uses, it is a larger, solid ("hard") catheter. A catheter left inside the body, either temporarily or permanently, may be referred to as an indwelling catheter. A permanently inserted catheter may be referred to as a permcath.
UMass Amherst biologist partners with Chinese scientist to develop novel drug platform

UMass Amherst biologist partners with Chinese scientist to develop novel drug platform

Margaret Riley, an evolutionary biologist at the University of Massachusetts Amherst and pioneer in fighting antibiotic-resistant bacteria, announced this week that she is partnering with a Chinese scientist to develop a new drug platform, pheromonicins. The Chinese government is committing $400 million per year to support the newly created Pheromonicin Institute of Beijing. [More]
Cook Medical Launches SialoCath™ Salivary Duct Catheter

Cook Medical Launches SialoCath™ Salivary Duct Catheter

SialoCath is one device in a growing suite of Cook Medical sialendoscopy access and interventional tools that are now available to clinicians in the United Kingdom, Germany, France, Italy and North America. [More]

TE Connectivity signs definitive agreement to acquire AdvancedCath

TE Connectivity Ltd., a world leader in connectivity, announced today that it has entered into a definitive agreement to acquire AdvancedCath for $190 million USD in cash. [More]
CTCA presents research on new cancer nutrition therapies at A.S.P.E.N. Clinical Nutrition Week

CTCA presents research on new cancer nutrition therapies at A.S.P.E.N. Clinical Nutrition Week

Several Cancer Treatment Centers of America clinicians presented research from studies evaluating new cancer nutrition techniques and therapies at the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition Clinical Nutrition Week held in Long Beach, Calif., February 14-17, 2015. CTCA clinicians led a plenary session and an oral abstract presentation, and presented eight posters to Clinical Nutrition Week attendees. [More]
Teddy leg bags set to make life more bearable for young children

Teddy leg bags set to make life more bearable for young children

The child-friendly bags, developed by the National Institute for Health Research’s (NIHR) Devices for Dignity Healthcare Technology Co-operative offer a far less unpleasant experience for young children and are imprinted with Mummy and Baby bear images. [More]
Clinical Innovations introduces traxi Panniculus Retractor with Retentus Technology

Clinical Innovations introduces traxi Panniculus Retractor with Retentus Technology

Clinical Innovations, a leading manufacturer of labor and delivery equipment, today announced the launch of traxi Panniculus Retractor with Retentus Technology. traxi lifts and retracts the dense layer of fatty tissue during abdominal procedures. When used in cesarean sections, it allows for a safer labor and delivery experience for mothers with a high BMI (body mass index). [More]
Fungal infections rarely develop resistance to combination drug therapy

Fungal infections rarely develop resistance to combination drug therapy

Researchers at the University of Toronto have discovered that Candida albicans -- a leading cause of potentially fatal hospital-acquired infections -- rarely develops resistance to combination drug therapy and, when it becomes resistant, it also becomes less dangerous. [More]
Bathing critically ill patients with chlorhexidine wipes does not prevent ICU infections

Bathing critically ill patients with chlorhexidine wipes does not prevent ICU infections

Vanderbilt University Medical Center researchers have found that bathing critically ill patients with disposable chlorhexidine cloths did not decrease the incidence of health care-associated infections when compared to less expensive nonantimicrobial cloths, according to a study appearing online in JAMA this week. [More]
Using breath tests to diagnose liver diseases: an interview with Larry Cohen

Using breath tests to diagnose liver diseases: an interview with Larry Cohen

It was back in the 1960s that scientists first started to understand that breath could be used to find out different things about diseases and other factors. I’m sure you’re familiar with alcohol breath testing, which was patented back in the ‘50s and has been used since the ‘60s. [More]
United Therapeutics submits pre-market approval application for use of Remodulin with implantable drug infusion system

United Therapeutics submits pre-market approval application for use of Remodulin with implantable drug infusion system

United Therapeutics Corporation (NASDAQ: UTHR) announced today that Medtronic, Inc. (NYSE: MDT) has submitted a pre-market approval application to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the use of Medtronic's SynchroMed® II implantable drug infusion system (including a newly developed catheter) for use with United Therapeutics' Remodulin® (treprostinil) Injection delivered intravenously to patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension. [More]
CorMedix signs Neutrolin sales/distribution agreement with Arabian Trade House

CorMedix signs Neutrolin sales/distribution agreement with Arabian Trade House

CorMedix Inc., a pharmaceutical company focused on developing and commercializing therapeutic products for the prevention and treatment of cardiac, renal and infectious disease, announced today the first signed Middle East sales/distribution agreement for lead product Neutrolin with distributor Arabian Trade House in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. [More]
Using laparoscopy for VP shunt placement can decrease rate of distal shunt failures

Using laparoscopy for VP shunt placement can decrease rate of distal shunt failures

Researchers conducted a prospective randomized controlled clinical trial at Bern University Hospital in Switzerland to compare a laparoscopic procedure with a mini-laparotomy for insertion of a peritoneal catheter during ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt surgery. The deciding factor was the rate of shunt malfunction. [More]
C3BS enrols 240th patient in CHART-1 European trial of C-Cure for treatment of congestive heart failure

C3BS enrols 240th patient in CHART-1 European trial of C-Cure for treatment of congestive heart failure

Cardio3 BioSciences, a leader in the discovery and development of regenerative, protective and reconstructive therapies, announces today the enrolment of the 240th patient in its CHART-1 European trial for C-Cure, the first and only stem cell therapeutic using guided stem cells for the treatment of congestive heart failure. [More]
New 3-D imaging catheter aims to reduce risk of complications during cardiac interventions

New 3-D imaging catheter aims to reduce risk of complications during cardiac interventions

An emerging 3-D imaging catheter aims to provide cardiologists with a live view from inside the heart during cardiac catheterizations. Developed by RTI International, the catheter contains an ultrasound microarray made using semiconductor circuit fabrication that can provide unprecedented volumetric field-of-view, in real time. [More]
Reducing the risk of sudden cardiac arrest during sports

Reducing the risk of sudden cardiac arrest during sports

Time and again, the topic of sudden cardiac death grabs the public's attention when football stars or other top athletes collapse from cardiac arrest in front of the live cameras. This important issue has long been a concern of heart specialists, for cardiac arrest often hits young, apparently healthy and athletic people out of the blue. [More]
Arrhythmia patients who manage lifestyle factors more likely to have long-term survival

Arrhythmia patients who manage lifestyle factors more likely to have long-term survival

Patients suffering from the world's most common heart rhythm disorder can have their long-term outcomes significantly improved with an aggressive management of their underlying cardiac risk factors, according to University of Adelaide researchers. [More]
Loyola University Medical Center opens center to provide treatments for diseased heart valves

Loyola University Medical Center opens center to provide treatments for diseased heart valves

Loyola University Medical Center has opened a multidisciplinary Valve Center that offers patients a full range of treatments for diseased heart valves. [More]
CorMedix seeks QIDP designation from FDA for Neutrolin Catheter Lock Solution

CorMedix seeks QIDP designation from FDA for Neutrolin Catheter Lock Solution

CorMedix Inc., a pharmaceutical company focused on developing and commercializing therapeutic products for the prevention and treatment of cardiac, renal and infectious disease, has filed a request with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for designation of its lead product candidate, Neutrolin Catheter Lock Solution, as a qualified infectious disease product (QIDP) pursuant to the Generating Antibiotic Incentives Now (GAIN) title of the Food and Drug Administration Safety and Innovation Act. [More]
New guideline now available to help prevent, treat delirium in older patients

New guideline now available to help prevent, treat delirium in older patients

A new guideline is available to help health care providers prevent and treat one of the most common postoperative complications in older patients, delirium, which is an episode of sudden confusion. [More]
Interventional X-ray guidance device may reduce radiation exposure of liver cancer patients

Interventional X-ray guidance device may reduce radiation exposure of liver cancer patients

Johns Hopkins researchers report that their test of an interventional X-ray guidance device approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in 2013 has the potential to reduce the radiation exposure of patients undergoing intra-arterial therapy (IAT) for liver cancer. [More]