Catheter News and Research RSS Feed - Catheter News and Research

In medicine, a catheter is a tube that can be inserted into a body cavity, duct, or vessel. Catheters . In most uses, a catheter is a thin, flexible tube ("soft" catheter), though in some uses, it is a larger, solid ("hard") catheter. A catheter left inside the body, either temporarily or permanently, may be referred to as an indwelling catheter. A permanently inserted catheter may be referred to as a permcath.
Clear Guide Medical signs agreement with USAISR to test effectiveness of Clear Guide ONE

Clear Guide Medical signs agreement with USAISR to test effectiveness of Clear Guide ONE

Clear Guide Medical has signed a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement with the U.S. Army Institute of Surgical Research to test the physician performance enhancements possible when using the Clear Guide ONE and the VisiTIP needles. [More]
UTHealth professor awarded $1 million grant from Stryker Neurovascular for stroke research

UTHealth professor awarded $1 million grant from Stryker Neurovascular for stroke research

A $1 million grant for stroke research has been awarded from Stryker Neurovascular to Amrou Sarraj, M.D., assistant professor of neurology at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston. [More]
New guide helps doctors, nurses to identify hospital patients who may benefit from urinary catheter

New guide helps doctors, nurses to identify hospital patients who may benefit from urinary catheter

What's the only thing worse than having a urinary catheter when you're in the hospital? Having one and getting a urinary tract infection (UTI) - or worse - as a result. Now, a new detailed guide gives doctors and nurses information to help decide which hospital patients may benefit from a urinary catheter - and which ones don't. [More]
RIT's Behnaz Ghoraani awarded NIH grant to develop new atrial fibrillation solution

RIT's Behnaz Ghoraani awarded NIH grant to develop new atrial fibrillation solution

Behnaz Ghoraani, engineering faculty at Rochester Institute of Technology, was recently awarded a $456,000 grant from the National Institutes for Health for the project "Catheter guidance algorithm for identification of atrial fibrillation ablation." [More]
Imprimis has exclusive US commercial rights for patented Hep-Lido-A formulation

Imprimis has exclusive US commercial rights for patented Hep-Lido-A formulation

Imprimis Pharmaceuticals, Inc., a pharmaceutical company focused on the development and commercialization of proprietary compounded drug formulations, today announced it now has the exclusive US commercial rights to the patented compounded alkalinized lidocaine and heparin formulation ("Hep-Lido-A" or "HLA") for the treatment of interstitial cystitis ("IC"), commonly referred to as painful bladder syndrome ("PBS"). [More]
James Shapiro's latest research could soon mark new standard for diabetes treatment

James Shapiro's latest research could soon mark new standard for diabetes treatment

James Shapiro, one of the world's leading experts in emerging treatments of diabetes, can't help but be excited about his latest research. The results he says, could soon mark a new standard for treatment--not only in diabetes, but in several other diseases as well. [More]
CPAP use reduces atrial fibrillation recurrence in patients with obstructive sleep apnea

CPAP use reduces atrial fibrillation recurrence in patients with obstructive sleep apnea

The use of continuous positive airway pressure was associated with a significant reduction in the recurrence of atrial fibrillation in patients with obstructive sleep apnea, according to an analysis of data from past research published today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology: Clinical Electrophysiology. [More]
Clot removal improves outcomes in stroke patients

Clot removal improves outcomes in stroke patients

Stroke is the leading cause of severe long-term disability in the United States, and less than 40 percent of patients who experience the most severe form of stroke regain functional independence if they receive the standard drug intervention alone. [More]
Maple syrup makes disease-causing bacteria more susceptible to antibiotics, study shows

Maple syrup makes disease-causing bacteria more susceptible to antibiotics, study shows

A concentrated extract of maple syrup makes disease-causing bacteria more susceptible to antibiotics, according to laboratory experiments by researchers at McGill University. [More]
Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute sets new national standard for most adult heart transplants

Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute sets new national standard for most adult heart transplants

The Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute completed 120 adult heart transplants and two adult heart-lung transplants in 2014, setting a new national standard for the most adult heart transplants performed in a single year. [More]
Researchers examine catheter-related bloodstream infections in patients receiving home parenteral nutrition

Researchers examine catheter-related bloodstream infections in patients receiving home parenteral nutrition

Catheter-related bloodstream infection is the most prevalent and severe complication for patients who receive parenteral nutrition therapy at home. [More]
MHIF investigator performs first atrial fibrillation ablation in U.S. using SMARTTOUCH SF catheter

MHIF investigator performs first atrial fibrillation ablation in U.S. using SMARTTOUCH SF catheter

Dr. Daniel Melby, an investigator at the Minneapolis Heart Institute Foundation, performed the first atrial fibrillation ablation in the U.S. using Biosense Webster's new THERMOCOOL SMARTTOUCH SF contact force sensing catheter as part of an FDA regulated safety trial (SMART-SF). [More]
New oral drug shows promise in patients with chronic kidney disease

New oral drug shows promise in patients with chronic kidney disease

Patients with chronic kidney disease may be treated with a class of medications called Renin Angiotensin Aldosterone System inhibitors (RAASI's). Although these drugs protect the heart and kidney, a significant percentage of patients develop a dangerous side effect -- high potassium levels in the blood (hyperkalemia). [More]
New stent retriever device reduces stroke damage

New stent retriever device reduces stroke damage

Elizabeth Celli was experiencing a moderate-to-severe stroke when she arrived at Loyola University Medical Center's Emergency Department. Mrs. Celli was weak on her left side, had difficulty speaking and was unable to walk. But after being treated with a new device called a stent retriever, her symptoms dramatically reversed. [More]
Data demonstrates benefits associated with use of EXPAREL in hip, knee replacement patients

Data demonstrates benefits associated with use of EXPAREL in hip, knee replacement patients

Pacira Pharmaceuticals, Inc. today announced data demonstrating the benefits associated with the use of EXPAREL (bupivacaine liposome injectable suspension) in a study of over 2,200 hip and knee replacement patients. [More]
TVA Medical's novel hemodialysis access technique shows positive outcomes in clinical study

TVA Medical's novel hemodialysis access technique shows positive outcomes in clinical study

TVA Medical, Inc., today announced promising results from a clinical study evaluating a novel hemodialysis access technique that has the potential to revolutionize vascular access for patients with chronic kidney disease without the use of traditional open surgery. [More]
Boston Scientific announces successful implantations of WATCHMAN Device in three US patients

Boston Scientific announces successful implantations of WATCHMAN Device in three US patients

This week, three patients in the United States received the first implants of the Boston Scientific Corporation WATCHMANâ„¢ Left Atrial Appendage Closure (LAAC) Device. [More]
UM experts warn of serious risks associated with common IV devices

UM experts warn of serious risks associated with common IV devices

Every day, patients around the country get IV devices placed in their arms, to make it easier to receive medicines or have blood drawn over the course of days or weeks. But these PICC lines, as they're called, also raise the risk of potentially dangerous blood clots. [More]
Anticoagulant drug bivalirudin shows mixed results in MATRIX trial

Anticoagulant drug bivalirudin shows mixed results in MATRIX trial

Patients with acute coronary syndrome undergoing angioplasty who received the anticoagulant drug bivalirudin did not show significant improvements in either of two co-primary endpoints--a composite of rate of death, heart attack or stroke at 30 days, or a composite of those events plus major bleeding--as compared to patients receiving standard anticoagulation therapy, according to a study presented at the American College of Cardiology's 64th Annual Scientific Session. [More]
Using arm as access point for catheter-based heart procedures lowers risk of major bleeding, death

Using arm as access point for catheter-based heart procedures lowers risk of major bleeding, death

Patients with acute coronary syndrome undergoing coronary angiogram, a procedure used to assess blockages in the heart's arteries, had a significantly lower risk of major bleeding and death if their interventional cardiologist accessed the heart through an artery in the arm rather than the groin, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology's 64th Annual Scientific Session. [More]
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