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Cook Medical's Instinct Endoscopic Hemoclip now available to gastroenterologists

Cook Medical's Instinct Endoscopic Hemoclip now available to gastroenterologists

The Instinct Endoscopic Hemoclip is now available to gastroenterologists in major global markets. The clip is used to stop gastrointestinal (GI) tract bleeding, which is a condition that can be challenging to treat because of the variations among bleeds. [More]
Tolero Pharmaceuticals' Alvocidib gets Orphan Drug Designation for acute myeloid leukemia treatment

Tolero Pharmaceuticals' Alvocidib gets Orphan Drug Designation for acute myeloid leukemia treatment

Tolero Pharmaceuticals, Inc., a clinical-stage company developing treatments for serious hematological diseases, today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has granted Orphan Drug designation for Alvocidib for the treatment of patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). [More]
Captisol-enabled Melphalan meets primary end points in phase 2 pivotal trial

Captisol-enabled Melphalan meets primary end points in phase 2 pivotal trial

Spectrum Pharmaceuticals, a biotechnology company with fully integrated commercial and drug development operations with a primary focus in Hematology and Oncology, today announced that its pivotal trial of Captisol-enabled (propylene glycol-free) Melphalan met its primary end points. [More]
Research grants could improve patients' recovery from athletic and nonathletic injuries

Research grants could improve patients' recovery from athletic and nonathletic injuries

Two orthopedic organizations have presented Beaumont Health System with prestigious, competitive research grants that could improve patients' recovery from both athletic and nonathletic injuries. [More]

Exposure to microgravity can simulate aging for immune cells

Telling someone to "act your age" is another way of asking him or her to behave better. Age, however, does not always bring improvements. [More]

Researchers examine interaction between alcohol and tobacco in risk of ESCC

The rate of developing esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) nearly doubles in those who both smoke and drink compared to those who only smoke or drink, according to new research published in The American Journal of Gastroenterology. [More]

Study suggests that variant of cell surface protein is ideal target to treat gastric cancer

New study by the Cancer Science Institute of Singapore and National University Hospital Singapore suggests that a variant of a cell surface protein is an ideal target for developing drugs to treat gastric cancer [More]
SIOG, EORTC update expert opinion on managing treatment for aged patients with NSCLC

SIOG, EORTC update expert opinion on managing treatment for aged patients with NSCLC

Half of all patients diagnosed with non-small cell lung cancer are 70 years of age or older, yet despite this high percentage, these elderly patients are not well represented in clinical trials. Therefore, the paucity of clinical data has made it difficult to reach evidence based clinical recommendations. [More]
Scientists develop DNA nanodevices that survive body's immune defenses

Scientists develop DNA nanodevices that survive body's immune defenses

It's a familiar trope in science fiction: In enemy territory, activate your cloaking device. And real-world viruses use similar tactics to make themselves invisible to the immune system. [More]

Investigators use computer-assisted approach to identify and rank new clock genes

Over the last few decades researchers have characterized a set of clock genes that drive daily rhythms of physiology and behavior in all types of species, from flies to humans. [More]
Researchers develop first size-based form of chromatography using nanodot technology

Researchers develop first size-based form of chromatography using nanodot technology

Using nanodot technology, Berkeley Lab researchers have demonstrated the first size-based form of chromatography that can be used to study the membranes of living cells. [More]
Study reveals how human genome is protected from inadvertent import of viral RNA into cell

Study reveals how human genome is protected from inadvertent import of viral RNA into cell

Scientists of the Max F. Perutz Laboratories of the University of Vienna and the Medical University of Vienna, together with colleagues of the ETH Zurich, have now shown how double stranded RNA, such as viral genetic information, is prevented from entering the nucleus of a cell. [More]
Johns Hopkins scientists find a way to prevent atherosclerosis

Johns Hopkins scientists find a way to prevent atherosclerosis

Working with mice and rabbits, Johns Hopkins scientists have found a way to block abnormal cholesterol production, transport and breakdown, successfully preventing the development of atherosclerosis, the main cause of heart attacks and strokes and the number-one cause of death among humans. The condition develops when fat builds inside blood vessels over time and renders them stiff, narrowed and hardened, greatly reducing their ability to feed oxygen-rich blood to the heart muscle and the brain. [More]

Studies identify 2 genes highly associated with IBD

Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD), a group of chronic inflammatory disorders of the intestine that result in painful and debilitating complications, affects over 1.4 million people in the U.S., and while there are treatments to reduce inflammation for patients, there is no cure. [More]
Plymouth scientists receive MRC grant to lead new and effective therapies for Parkinson's disease

Plymouth scientists receive MRC grant to lead new and effective therapies for Parkinson's disease

A team of scientists led by researchers at Plymouth University Peninsula Schools of Medicine and Dentistry, has received a grant from the Medical Research Council (MRC) for work which could lead to new and effective therapies for those with Parkinson's Disease. [More]
Men's health conditions may be influenced by exposure to testosterone in womb, says study

Men's health conditions may be influenced by exposure to testosterone in womb, says study

Men's susceptibility to serious health conditions may be influenced by low exposure to testosterone in the womb, new research suggests. [More]
Pfizer reports positive results from two tofacitinib Phase 3 trials for moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis

Pfizer reports positive results from two tofacitinib Phase 3 trials for moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis

Pfizer Inc. announced today top-line results from two pivotal Phase 3 trials from the Oral treatment Psoriasis Trials (OPT) Program, OPT Pivotal #1 (A3921078) and OPT Pivotal #2 (A3921079), evaluating the efficacy and safety of tofacitinib, an oral Janus kinase (JAK) inhibitor, the first in a new class of medicines being investigated for the treatment of moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis. [More]
IMPAKT breast cancer conference abstracts online

IMPAKT breast cancer conference abstracts online

Xenografts and mathematical modelling; liquid biopsy; nanotechnology; next generation genomics- Science is running fast and the impact of new technologies in the care of patients with breast cancer will be at the core of the sixth edition of the IMPAKT conference on translational research in breast cancer. [More]

Cedars-Sinai researchers to receive $8M grant to fund Phase II clinical trial of experimental drug for stroke

​Cedars-Sinai stroke intervention researchers have been informed that the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, part of the National Institutes of Health, will award an $8 million grant to fund a multicenter Phase II clinical trial of an experimental drug for stroke. [More]

Neoadjuvant targeted treatment shows feasibility for limited clear-cell RCC

Treating patients with nonmetastatic clear-cell renal cell carcinoma with the tyrosine kinase inhibitor axitinib could not only prevent disease progression, but also shrink tumours before surgery, show the results of a phase II trial. [More]