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Study focuses on regulation of neuronal plasticity

Study focuses on regulation of neuronal plasticity

A team of scientists has linked changes in the structure of a handful of central brain neurons to understanding how animals adjust to changing seasons. Its findings enhance our understanding of the mechanisms vital to the regulation of our circadian system, or internal clock. [More]
New synthetic gene drives could one day improve human health and the environment

New synthetic gene drives could one day improve human health and the environment

Gene drives are genetic elements - found naturally in the genomes of most of the world's organisms - that increase the chance of the gene they carry being passed on to all offspring, and thus, they can quickly spread through populations. Looking to these natural systems, researchers around the world, including some Wyss Institute scientists, are developing synthetic gene drives that could one day be leveraged by humans to purposefully alter the traits of wild populations of organisms to prevent disease transmission and eradicate invasive species. [More]
Researchers reconstruct ancient virus to improve gene therapy

Researchers reconstruct ancient virus to improve gene therapy

Researchers at Massachusetts Eye and Ear/Schepens Eye Research Institute have reconstructed an ancient virus that is highly effective at delivering gene therapies to the liver, muscle, and retina. This discovery, published July 30 in Cell Reports, could potentially be used to design gene therapies that are not only safer and more potent than therapies currently available, but may also help a greater number of patients. [More]
Researchers uncover new mechanism that p53 protein uses to trigger cell death

Researchers uncover new mechanism that p53 protein uses to trigger cell death

Researchers have identified a new mechanism that the tumor suppressor protein p53 uses to trigger cell death via apoptosis and have shown how the process could be harnessed to kill cancer cells. St. Jude Children's Research Hospital scientists led the study, which appears today in the scientific journal Molecular Cell. [More]
Scientists produce functional liver cells from human embryonic and genetic engineered stem cells

Scientists produce functional liver cells from human embryonic and genetic engineered stem cells

The liver plays a critical role in human metabolism. As the gatekeeper of the digestive track, this massive organ is responsible for drug breakdown and is therefore the first to be injured due to overdose or misuse. Evaluating this drug-induced liver injury is a critical part of pharmaceutical drug discovery and must be carried out on human liver cells. Regretfully, human liver cells, called hepatocytes, are in scarce supply as they can only be isolated from donated organs. [More]
DNA study reveals potential treatments to delay or prevent onset of Huntington's disease

DNA study reveals potential treatments to delay or prevent onset of Huntington's disease

Scientists from Cardiff University believe that a treatment to prevent or delay the symptoms of Huntington’s disease could now be much closer, following a major breakthrough. [More]
New blood test could help diagnose severity of traumatic brain injury

New blood test could help diagnose severity of traumatic brain injury

A new blood test could help emergency room doctors quickly diagnose traumatic brain injury and determine its severity. [More]
Daiichi Sankyo, Plexxikon’s Phase 1 trial shows PLX3397 induced prolonged tumor regression in TGCT patients

Daiichi Sankyo, Plexxikon’s Phase 1 trial shows PLX3397 induced prolonged tumor regression in TGCT patients

Daiichi Sankyo Europe and Plexxikon Inc., a member of the Daiichi Sankyo Group, announced today that The New England Journal of Medicine published clinical trial results demonstrating that the investigational drug, PLX3397, an oral targeted CSF-1R inhibitor, induced prolonged tumor regressions in most patients with tenosynovial giant cell tumor, a rare, locally aggressive neoplasm of the joint or tendon sheath. [More]
Researchers uncover master regulators that govern the fate of TFH cells

Researchers uncover master regulators that govern the fate of TFH cells

Follicular helper Tcells (TFH cells), a rare type of immune cell that is essential for inducing a strong and lasting antibody response to viruses and other microbes, have garnered intense interest in recent years but the molecular signals that drive their differentiation had remained unclear. [More]
New Penn study questions relevance of fish oil-derived SPMs and their anti-inflammatory effects in humans

New Penn study questions relevance of fish oil-derived SPMs and their anti-inflammatory effects in humans

The importance of a diet rich in fish oils - now a billion dollar food-supplement industry -- has been debated for over half a century. A few large clinical trials have supported the idea that fish oils confer therapeutic benefits to patients with cardiovascular disease. Researchers think that hearts and blood vessels may benefit in part from their anti-inflammatory properties. [More]
Prostate cancer discovery may improve treatment strategies

Prostate cancer discovery may improve treatment strategies

Scientists from Cancer Research UK have discovered that there are five different types of prostate cancer and have found a way of distinguishing between them. These findings could change how the condition is treated, providing more effective therapies where they are needed the most. [More]
Cryoport to offer cryogenic logistics solutions to HemaCare

Cryoport to offer cryogenic logistics solutions to HemaCare

Cryoport, Inc., the leading provider of advanced cryogenic logistics solutions for the life sciences industry, serving markets including immunotherapies, stem cells, cell lines, clinical research organizations, vaccine manufacturers, animal health, and reproductive medicine, today announced that the Company will provide cryogenic logistics solutions to HemaCare Corporation, a leading global provider of high-quality biological material to the scientific community. [More]
Intracellular microlasers may allow accurate measurement of small changes occurring within cells

Intracellular microlasers may allow accurate measurement of small changes occurring within cells

Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) investigators have induced structures incorporated within individual cells to produce laser light. [More]
Roche submits cobas EGFR v2 test PMA to FDA as companion diagnostic test for AZD9291

Roche submits cobas EGFR v2 test PMA to FDA as companion diagnostic test for AZD9291

Roche today announced it has submitted the cobas EGFR Mutation Test v2 for Premarket Approval (PMA) to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, as a companion diagnostic test for AZD9291, an AstraZeneca investigational therapy for non-small cell lung cancer patients with an acquired resistant mutation. [More]
Novel 3D human skin tissue model could help detect presence of known skin sensitizers in medical device extracts

Novel 3D human skin tissue model could help detect presence of known skin sensitizers in medical device extracts

New research shows that exposing a 3D human skin tissue model to extracts of medical device materials can detect the presence of sensitizers known to cause an allergic response on contact in some individuals. Conventional skin sensitization testing of medical devices relies on animal testing, whereas human skin models could replace animal methods, according to an article in the new journal Applied In Vitro Toxicology, a peer-reviewed publication from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. [More]
Study sheds light on certain antagonist drugs that block physiological responses

Study sheds light on certain antagonist drugs that block physiological responses

Members of the Consolidated Research Group of Molecular Neurobiology of the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology of the University of Barcelona (UB), affiliated with the Centre for Networked Biomedical Research on Neurodegenerative Diseases (CIBERNED), have published a study in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) about the formation of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) which allows understanding the unexpected behaviour of some antagonists that block physiological responses. [More]
Balancing cellular aging and cancer risk through biotechnology

Balancing cellular aging and cancer risk through biotechnology

In a way, trying to repair age-related heart damage and trying to fight cancer are opposite problems. Your heart cells' ability to regenerate themselves and proliferate into new, young cells degrades as you get older. [More]
Intraoperative fluorescent imaging detects lung adenocarcinoma during pulmonary resection

Intraoperative fluorescent imaging detects lung adenocarcinoma during pulmonary resection

More than 80,000 people undergo resection of a pulmonary tumor each year, and currently the only method to determine if the tumor is malignant is histologic analysis. A new study reports that a targeted molecular contrast agent can be used successfully to cause lung adenocarcinomas to fluoresce during pulmonary surgery. [More]
Study on marine snails could help better understand underlying mechanisms of age-related memory loss

Study on marine snails could help better understand underlying mechanisms of age-related memory loss

A new research study on marine snails uncovered the first cells in the nervous system to fail during aging. The University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science researchers' findings are important to better understanding the underlying mechanisms of age-related memory loss in humans. [More]
New research shows promising progress in use of anti-inflammatory cytokine for T1D treatment

New research shows promising progress in use of anti-inflammatory cytokine for T1D treatment

New research from Uppsala University shows promising progress in the use of anti-inflammatory cytokine for treatment of type 1 diabetes. The study, published in the open access journal Scientific Reports (Nature Publishing Group), reveals that administration of interleukin-35 (a protein made by immune cells) to mice with type 1 diabetes, reverses or cures the disease by maintaining a normal blood glucose level and the immune tolerance. [More]
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