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CML guidelines highlight need for TKI switch timing, choice

CML guidelines highlight need for TKI switch timing, choice

A review of the European LeukemiaNet guidelines on the care of patients with chronic myeloid leukaemia highlights the need for research into the timing and use of second-line and third-line tyrosine kinase inhibitors. [More]
Novel treatment strategy targets treatment-resistant CML

Novel treatment strategy targets treatment-resistant CML

Researchers have shown that the coiled-coil mimetic CCmut3 can inhibit cell growth and promote apoptosis in cell lines expressing BCR–ABL1, including those resistant to tyrosine kinase inhibitors. [More]
HSCT increases fracture risk

HSCT increases fracture risk

Fracture incidence is greatly increased in individuals who undergo haematopoietic stem cell transplantation compared with the general US population, research shows. [More]
MGH researchers find probable mechanism associated with risk of developing serious diseases

MGH researchers find probable mechanism associated with risk of developing serious diseases

Massachusetts General Hospital investigators have found the probable mechanism underlying a previously described biomarker associated with the risk of developing serious diseases ranging from cancer to cardiovascular disease and the risk of serious complications. In a paper published in the American Journal of Hematology, the research team reports finding that higher levels of a measure routinely taken as part of the complete blood count - the extent of variation in the size of red blood cells - is caused by reduced clearance of aging cells from the bloodstream. [More]
Two existing drugs may potentially become new drug target for multiple sclerosis

Two existing drugs may potentially become new drug target for multiple sclerosis

Two drugs already on the market -- an antifungal and a steroid -- may potentially take on new roles as treatments for multiple sclerosis. According to a study published in Nature today, researchers discovered that these drugs may activate stem cells in the brain to stimulate myelin producing cells and repair white matter, which is damaged in multiple sclerosis. [More]
Ibrutinib (IMBRUVICA) may be effective for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma

Ibrutinib (IMBRUVICA) may be effective for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma

Ibrutinib (IMBRUVICA) data presented yesterday by Pharmacyclics, Inc. at the American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting suggest that ibrutinib may be an effective therapeutic option for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), as shown in both a transgenic mouse model and an in-vivo model of patient-derived xenograft (PDX) mice (grafts of tissue taken from a pancreatic cancer patient and grafted into a mouse). [More]
Immunocore reports clinical trial data from IMCgp100 Phase I/IIa study at AACR 2015

Immunocore reports clinical trial data from IMCgp100 Phase I/IIa study at AACR 2015

Immunocore Limited, a world-leading biotechnology company developing novel biological drugs to treat cancer, viral infections and autoimmune diseases, today announced clinical trial data from the Phase I/IIa study of its lead programme IMCgp100, at the American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting 2015, in Philadelphia, USA. [More]
UNM Cancer Center enrolls first patient in phase 3 international clinical trial for kidney cancer vaccine

UNM Cancer Center enrolls first patient in phase 3 international clinical trial for kidney cancer vaccine

The University of New Mexico Cancer Center recently enrolled its first patient in a phase 3 international clinical trial to test a personalized vaccine against metastatic kidney cancer. Kidney cancer has proven particularly difficult to treat with chemotherapy, and numerous attempts to create a kidney cancer vaccine have not improved survival rates. [More]
MD Anderson researchers identify key factor that may explain drug resistance in glioblastoma

MD Anderson researchers identify key factor that may explain drug resistance in glioblastoma

Researchers at the NFCR Center for Cancer System Informatics at MD Anderson Cancer Center have discovered a key factor that may explain drug resistance in glioblastoma (GBM), the most common and deadliest form of brain cancer. [More]
Bionomics begins BNC210 Phase II clinical trial for treatment of anxiety, depression

Bionomics begins BNC210 Phase II clinical trial for treatment of anxiety, depression

Bionomics Limited, a biopharmaceutical company focused on the discovery and development of innovative therapeutics for the treatment of cancer and diseases of the central nervous system, today announced the initiation of a Phase II clinical study of BNC210, the Company's drug candidate in development for the treatment of anxiety and depression. [More]
Elements Behavioral Health launches new app to help people keep their recovery on track

Elements Behavioral Health launches new app to help people keep their recovery on track

Elements Behavioral Health introduces the Cassava app, a free recovery app that features a variety of tools to help people keep their recovery on track. [More]
Pembrolizumab drug halts tumor growth in 76% of patients with pleural mesothelioma

Pembrolizumab drug halts tumor growth in 76% of patients with pleural mesothelioma

The PD-1 inhibitor pembrolizumab, a cancer immunotherapy drug, shrank or halted growth of tumors in 76 percent of patients with pleural mesothelioma, a rare and deadly form of cancer that arises in the outer lining of the lungs and internal chest wall, according to a new study from researchers in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. [More]
Penn professor to be recognized with AACR-CRI Lloyd J. Old Award in Cancer Immunology

Penn professor to be recognized with AACR-CRI Lloyd J. Old Award in Cancer Immunology

The American Association for Cancer Research and the Cancer Research Institute will recognize Carl H. June, MD, the Richard W. Vague professor in immunotherapy at the Perelman School of Medicine and director of the Center for Cellular Immunotherapies at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, with the third annual AACR-CRI Lloyd J. Old Award in Cancer Immunology at the AACR Annual Meeting 2015, to be held in Philadelphia, April 18-22. [More]
RetroSense Therapeutics receives Luis Villalobos Award

RetroSense Therapeutics receives Luis Villalobos Award

RetroSense Therapeutics, LLC, a Wayne State University start-up biotechnology company, has received the Luis Villalobos Award from the Angel Capital Association, the world's leading professional association for angel investors. [More]
Study: 1 in 4 patients with advanced lung cancer does not receive EGFR test results before treatment

Study: 1 in 4 patients with advanced lung cancer does not receive EGFR test results before treatment

Almost one in four patients (24%) with advanced lung cancer in Europe, Asia and the US are not receiving EGFR test results before being started on treatment, researchers report at the European Lung Cancer Conference. [More]
Some lung cancer patients can benefit from melanoma drugs

Some lung cancer patients can benefit from melanoma drugs

A subset of lung cancer patients can derive important clinical benefits from drugs that are more commonly used to treat melanoma, the authors of a new academic clinical trial in Europe have reported at the European Lung Cancer Conference (ELCC) in Geneva, Switzerland. [More]
Study sheds light on the physical causes of sudden death

Study sheds light on the physical causes of sudden death

Sudden cardiac death accounts for approximately 10% of natural deaths, most of which are due to ventricular fibrillation. Each year it causes 300,000 deaths in the United States and 20,000 in Spain. [More]
Researchers reveal the precise mechanism used by bacteria to target invading viruses

Researchers reveal the precise mechanism used by bacteria to target invading viruses

One of the immune system's most critical challenges is to differentiate between itself and foreign invaders -- and the number of recognized autoimmune diseases, in which the body attacks itself, is on the rise. [More]
Study points to potential therapeutic targets to halt tumor cell movement

Study points to potential therapeutic targets to halt tumor cell movement

Tumor cells become lethal when they spread. Blocking this process can be a powerful way to stop cancer. Historically, scientists thought that tumor cells migrated by brute force, actively pushing through whatever tissue was in their way, but recent evidence has shown that tumor cells may be more methodical. And in a new study, Cornell University researchers report that tumor cells take advantage of already-cleared paths to migrate unimpeded [More]
May issue of Red Journal focuses on role of radiation therapy in current lymphoma treatment

May issue of Red Journal focuses on role of radiation therapy in current lymphoma treatment

The "Radiation and the Modern Management of Lymphoma" issue (May 1, 2015) of the International Journal of Radiation Oncology • Biology • Physics (Red Journal), the official scientific journal of the American Society for Radiation Oncology, is focused on the integral role of radiation therapy in current lymphoma treatment. [More]
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