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New device uses space-tested concept of capillary flow to diagnose infectious diseases

New device uses space-tested concept of capillary flow to diagnose infectious diseases

A new medical-testing device is being prepped to enter the battle against infectious disease. This instrument could improve diagnosis of certain diseases in remote areas, thanks in part to knowledge gained from a series of investigations aboard the International Space Station on the behavior of liquids. The device uses the space-tested concept of capillary flow to diagnose infectious diseases such as HIV/AIDS and tuberculosis. [More]
Harvard neuroscientists present new view of myelin

Harvard neuroscientists present new view of myelin

Harvard neuroscientists have made a discovery that turns 160 years of neuroanatomy on its head. [More]
U.Va. researchers named recipients of 2013 Hartwell Individual Biomedical Research Awards

U.Va. researchers named recipients of 2013 Hartwell Individual Biomedical Research Awards

University of Virginia neurologist Dr. Erin Pennock Foff, biologist Sarah Kucenas and biomedical engineer Shayn Peirce-Cotter have been named recipients of 2013 Hartwell Individual Biomedical Research Awards to benefit children of the United States. Each scientist will receive $100,000 in direct annual research support from The Hartwell Foundation for three years. [More]

Research report on flow cytometry market

According to the new market research report "Flow Cytometry Market by Technology (Cell & Bead-based), Products & Services (Reagents, Instruments, Software, & Accessories), Application (Research & Clinical), End User (Commercial Organizations & Diagnostics Laboratories) - Global Forecasts to 2018", analyzes and studies the major market drivers, restraints, opportunities, and challenges in North America, Europe, Asia-Pacific, and Rest of the world (RoW). [More]

Study sheds light on how extra chromosome 21 upsets equilibrium of entire genome in Down syndrome

Occurring in about one per eight hundred births, Down syndrome - or trisomy 21 - is the most frequent genetic cause of intellectual disability. It results from a chromosomal abnormality where cells of affected individuals contain a third copy of chromosome 21 (1% of the human genome). [More]
Researchers discover new marker derived from human umbilical cord blood

Researchers discover new marker derived from human umbilical cord blood

The development of stem cell therapies to cure a variety of diseases depends on the ability to characterize stem cell populations based on cell surface markers. [More]

Scientists uncover new way immune system may fight cancers and viral infections

Scientists have uncovered a new way the immune system may fight cancers and viral infections. The finding could aid efforts to use immune cells to treat illness. [More]
Drug used to treat TB may also act against various infections, says study

Drug used to treat TB may also act against various infections, says study

A drug under clinical trials to treat tuberculosis could be the basis for a class of broad-spectrum drugs that act against various bacteria, fungal infections and parasites, yet evade resistance, according to a study by University of Illinois chemists and collaborators. [More]
Research by UCI, Salk Institute points to novel therapies for minimizing stroke-induced brain damage

Research by UCI, Salk Institute points to novel therapies for minimizing stroke-induced brain damage

​By discovering a new mechanism that allows blood to enter the brain immediately after a stroke, researchers at UC Irvine and the Salk Institute have opened the door to new therapies that may limit or prevent stroke-induced brain damage. [More]

Engineering cell-based, biological devices may selectively kill cancer cells without disrupting healthy cells

​A Northwestern University synthetic biology team has created a new technology for modifying human cells to create programmable therapeutics that could travel the body and selectively target cancer and other sites of disease. [More]

Scientist receives $1.8M defense grant from Kessler Foundation for spinal cord injury research

Kessler Foundation has been named awardee of a three-year grant for $1.8 million from the Department of Defense Spinal Cord Injury Research Program. Gail Forrest, PT, PhD, is principal investigator for the randomized, double-blinded, controlled, multi-site clinical trial, which will test strategies to improve bone and muscle strength after spinal cord injury. Dr. Forrest is assistant director of Human Performance & Engineering Research at Kessler Foundation. [More]

Queen's University professor elected as Fellow of European Academy of Cancer Sciences

Queen's University Belfast's Vice-Chancellor, Professor Patrick Johnston, whose work has transformed cancer care in Northern Ireland, has been elected as a Fellow of the European Academy of Cancer Sciences. [More]
B1/Cdk1 protein which plays key role in cell division also boosts power of mitochondrial activity

B1/Cdk1 protein which plays key role in cell division also boosts power of mitochondrial activity

​An international team led by researchers at UC Davis has shown that the cyclin B1/Cdk1 protein complex, which plays a key role in cell division, also boosts the mitochondrial activity to power that process. [More]
Hydrogen sulfide regulates bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells, shows study

Hydrogen sulfide regulates bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells, shows study

Stem cells in bone marrow need to produce hydrogen sulfide in order to properly multiply and form bone tissue, according to a new study from the Center for Craniofacial Molecular Biology at the Herman Ostrow School of Dentistry of USC. [More]
Princeton professor receives Agilent Thought Leader Award to research on cellular metabolism activity

Princeton professor receives Agilent Thought Leader Award to research on cellular metabolism activity

Agilent Technologies Inc. today announced that Joshua Rabinowitz, M.D., Ph.D., professor at Princeton University's Department of Chemistry and the Lewis-Sigler Institute for Integrative Genomics, has received an Agilent Thought Leader Award to support his work on quantitative analysis of cellular metabolism. [More]

Agios begins AG-348 Phase 1 study for treatment of PK deficiency

Agios Pharmaceuticals, Inc., a leader in the fields of cancer metabolism and inborn errors of metabolism (IEM), today announced dose administration of AG-348 in a Phase 1 study in healthy volunteers. [More]
New research may help scientists develop treatments or vaccines for Dengue fever

New research may help scientists develop treatments or vaccines for Dengue fever

Two recent papers by a University of Colorado School of Medicine researcher and colleagues may help scientists develop treatments or vaccines for Dengue fever, West Nile virus, Yellow fever, Japanese encephalitis and other disease-causing flaviviruses. [More]
New insight provides potential to improve treatment for sepsis

New insight provides potential to improve treatment for sepsis

In a review published in the April issue of Immunity, Kevin J. Tracey, MD, president of The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, says it's time to take a fresh look at the medical community's approach to treating sepsis, which kills millions worldwide every year, including more than 200,000 Americans. [More]

Research provides fresh insight into structure of sodium channels

Sodium channels are implicated in many serious conditions such as heart disease, epilepsy and pain, making them an important potential target for drug therapies. Unfortunately, there is still much scientists do not know about the molecules. [More]

Special supplement explores the causes of distracted driving among teens

Motor vehicle crashes rank as the leading cause of teen deaths and in 2008, 16% of all distraction-related fatal automobile crashes involved drivers under 20 years of age. [More]