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Initiatives to improve adolescent, young adult cancer outcomes justified

Initiatives to improve adolescent, young adult cancer outcomes justified

Analysis of the EUROCARE-5 data shows that although survival for adolescents and young adults with cancer has improved overall, the survival rates for certain malignancies still lag behind those for children. [More]
Oncologists to present latest research findings at ASCO annual meeting

Oncologists to present latest research findings at ASCO annual meeting

Oncologists from NewYork-Presbyterian, Columbia University Medical Center and Weill Cornell Medicine will discuss their latest research findings at the American Society for Clinical Oncology annual meeting, June 3-7 in Chicago. [More]
Error model of hospital alarms underscores need for optimum alarm systems

Error model of hospital alarms underscores need for optimum alarm systems

Hospital alarms are currently ranked as the "top medical technology hazard" within the United States. On average, there are about 480,000 patients in hospitals — each generating about 135 clinical alarms per day. But studies show that more than 90 percent of these alarms result in no action. [More]
OIST scientists reveal how big protein complex inside E. coli cells divide and multiply

OIST scientists reveal how big protein complex inside E. coli cells divide and multiply

Escherichia coli (E. coli) are bacteria that live all around and inside of us. Most E. coli are harmless, but some strains can cause illness, and can even, in extreme cases, be deadly. With recent outbreaks of E. coli around the world, there is a fear of acquiring an infection from these bacteria. [More]
Slime mold provides key to understanding directional ability of immune cells

Slime mold provides key to understanding directional ability of immune cells

How white blood cells in our immune systems home in on and engulf bacterial invaders--like humans following the scent of oven-fresh pizza--has long been a mystery to scientists. [More]
Researchers demonstrate decisive role of cholesterol in T cell activation

Researchers demonstrate decisive role of cholesterol in T cell activation

T cell receptors are an important part of the human immune system. They are able to switch their conformation from an inactive to an active state spontaneously without any antigens present. [More]
New CRISPR-EZ method makes genome editing much easier in mice

New CRISPR-EZ method makes genome editing much easier in mice

University of California, Berkeley scientists have developed a quicker and more efficient method to alter the genes of mice with CRISPR-Cas9, simplifying a procedure growing in popularity because of the ease of using the new gene-editing tool. [More]

Study finds majority of older Americans work longer after retirement

Departing the workforce entirely and entering retirement at age 65 is no longer a reality for many older people in the United States, according to a recent survey by The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research. [More]
Vismodegib drug shows no addded benefit in advanced or symptomatic metastatic BCC patients

Vismodegib drug shows no addded benefit in advanced or symptomatic metastatic BCC patients

Vismodegib (trade name: Erivedge) has already been approved since 2013 for the treatment of patients with locally advanced basal cell carcinoma (BCC) or symptomatic metastatic BCC and has already undergone an early benefit assessment according to the Act on the Reform of the Market for Medicinal Products. [More]
New player in calcium signalling pathways acts as molecular brake to Orai activation

New player in calcium signalling pathways acts as molecular brake to Orai activation

Information flow in cells relies on calcium as a key agent in several signalling pathways. Calcium dependent signalling is crucial in nearly every aspect of life - muscle movement, immune reactions, nerve function, light sensing and many such processes. [More]
Scientists discover how Zika virus replicates in the placenta

Scientists discover how Zika virus replicates in the placenta

Zika virus can infect and replicate in immune cells from the placenta, without killing them, scientists have discovered. The finding may explain how the virus can pass through the placenta of a pregnant woman, on its way to infect developing brain cells in her fetus. [More]
Applying deep neural networks to predict pharmacologic properties of drugs and drug repurposing

Applying deep neural networks to predict pharmacologic properties of drugs and drug repurposing

Deep learning, frequently referred to as artificial intelligence, a branch of machine learning utilizing multiple layers of neurons to model high-level abstractions in data, has outperformed humans in tasks including image, text and voice recognition, autonomous driving and others, and is now being applied to drug discovery and biomarker development. [More]
Researchers develop new drugs for melanoma

Researchers develop new drugs for melanoma

Finding new, more effective and personalised treatments for cancer is the challenge of many researchers. A challenge that has been successfully met by a team from Inserm led by Stéphane Rocchi, which has just synthesised and developed new drugs for melanoma. [More]
Study identifies potential new treatment for subset of gastric cancer patients

Study identifies potential new treatment for subset of gastric cancer patients

Testing cancers for 'addiction' to a gene that boosts cell growth can pick out patients who may respond to a targeted drug under development, a major new study reports. [More]
Researchers discover ANKRD55 gene linked to multiple sclerosis

Researchers discover ANKRD55 gene linked to multiple sclerosis

The Ikerbasque researcher Koen Vandenbroeck, who heads the Neurogenomiks laboratory which reports to the Achucarro centre and the UPV/EHU-University of the Basque Country, together with other national and international groups, has shown that a genetic variant in the 5q11 chromosome, which is associated with susceptibility to developing multiple sclerosis, greatly regulates a gene known as ANKRD55. ANKRD55 is a gene with an unknown function. [More]
Increasing specific microRNA levels can restore chemotherapy sensitivity in pancreatic cancer cells

Increasing specific microRNA levels can restore chemotherapy sensitivity in pancreatic cancer cells

By increasing the level of a specific microRNA (miRNA) molecule, researchers have for the first time restored chemotherapy sensitivity in vitro to a line of human pancreatic cancer cells that had developed resistance to a common treatment drug. [More]
New understanding of neurotransmitter transporter mechanism gives hope for treating depression, addicition

New understanding of neurotransmitter transporter mechanism gives hope for treating depression, addicition

When nerve cells have to communicate with each other in our brains, it involves release of small signal molecules, the so-called neurotransmitters, which act as chemical messengers in specific points of contact between nerve cells, called synapses. [More]
Cell phone radiation exposure may lead to increased rates of rare cancers

Cell phone radiation exposure may lead to increased rates of rare cancers

According to new report from Microwave News, the U.S. National Toxicology Program has found increased rates of rare cancers of the heart and brain in animals exposed to cell phone radiation in a long-awaited multi-million dollar two-year study. [More]
Salk scientists discover REV-ERBα protein that controls strength of circadian rhythm

Salk scientists discover REV-ERBα protein that controls strength of circadian rhythm

At noon every day, levels of genes and proteins throughout your body are drastically different than they are at midnight. Disruptions to this 24-hour cycle of physiological activity are why jet lag or a bad night's sleep can alter your appetite and sleep patterns for days--and even contribute to conditions like heart disease, sleep disorders and cancers. [More]
Research sheds light on how subtle genetic differences in DMD patients produce variation in symptoms

Research sheds light on how subtle genetic differences in DMD patients produce variation in symptoms

Johns Hopkins researchers report they have inadvertently found a way to make human muscle cells bearing genetic mutations from people with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). [More]
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