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Walnuts may help prevent Alzheimer's disease, study finds

Walnuts may help prevent Alzheimer's disease, study finds

A new animal study published in the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease indicates that a diet including walnuts may have a beneficial effect in reducing the risk, delaying the onset, slowing the progression of, or preventing Alzheimer's disease. [More]
Scientists identify potent inhibitors to combat common obesity gene

Scientists identify potent inhibitors to combat common obesity gene

Individuals who are genetically predisposed to obesity may soon have a therapeutic solution to combat their condition. A research team led by scientists from the National University of Singapore (NUS) has identified several potent inhibitors that selectively target FTO, the common fat mass and obesity-associated gene. [More]
Finding could help improve treatment of hearing loss caused by noise, normal aging

Finding could help improve treatment of hearing loss caused by noise, normal aging

Scientists have restored the hearing of mice partly deafened by noise, using advanced tools to boost the production of a key protein in their ears. [More]
CHLA physician discusses urological issues in children

CHLA physician discusses urological issues in children

Children's Hospital Los Angeles physician-scientist Roger E. De Filippo, MD, an associate professor of urology and director of Pediatric Urology Stem Cell Research at the Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California discusses how science, technology and parental care can lead to improved pediatric urological health. [More]
New study reveals how cancer becomes drug resistant over time

New study reveals how cancer becomes drug resistant over time

Like a colony of bacteria or species of animals, cancer cells within a tumor must evolve to survive. A dose of chemotherapy may kill hundreds of thousands of cancer cells, for example, but a single cell with a unique mutation can survive and quickly generate a new batch of drug-resistant cells, making cancer hard to combat. [More]
Pentagon plans 30-person team to tackle Ebola in U.S.

Pentagon plans 30-person team to tackle Ebola in U.S.

The defense department announced Sunday that it would create a team to assist U.S. doctors responding to new Ebola cases, while the government issued more stringent guidelines for protective garb for health care workers treating Ebola patients. In addition, The Wall Street Journal profiles a biologist who has been working since 1997 on an Ebola vaccine which has been proven to block the disease in monkeys. [More]
Asterias, CIRM sign NGA to begin AST-OPC1 study for complete cervical spinal cord injury

Asterias, CIRM sign NGA to begin AST-OPC1 study for complete cervical spinal cord injury

Asterias Biotherapeutics, Inc. announced today that the Company has signed a Notice of Grant Award (NGA) with the California Institute of Regenerative Medicine (CIRM), effective October 1, 2014. [More]
Antibiotic-resistant bacteria share resources to cause chronic infections, show studies

Antibiotic-resistant bacteria share resources to cause chronic infections, show studies

Antibiotic-resistant bacteria can share resources to cause chronic infections, Vanderbilt University investigators have discovered. [More]
Janssen announces submission of IMBRUVICA sNDA to FDA for WM treatment

Janssen announces submission of IMBRUVICA sNDA to FDA for WM treatment

Janssen Research & Development, LLC today announced the submission of a supplemental New Drug Application (sNDA) for IMBRUVICA (ibrutinib) to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration by its strategic partner Pharmacyclics, Inc. [More]
Researchers uncover surprising way to reduce brain damage caused by head injuries

Researchers uncover surprising way to reduce brain damage caused by head injuries

Scientists have uncovered a surprising way to reduce the brain damage caused by head injuries - stopping the body's immune system from killing brain cells. The study, published in the open access journal Acta Neuropathologica Communications, showed that in experiments on mice, an immune-based treatment reduced the size of brain lesions. [More]
Researchers propose new milestones to augment National Alzheimer's Plan

Researchers propose new milestones to augment National Alzheimer's Plan

The U.S. Government has initiated a major effort to prevent and effectively treat Alzheimer's disease by 2025. However, a workgroup of nearly 40 Alzheimer's researchers and scientists says the research milestones in the U.S. Government's National Plan to Address Alzheimer's Disease must be broadened in scope, increased in scale, and adequately funded in order to successfully achieve this goal. [More]
Animal study shows high-fat diet is more harmful to males than females

Animal study shows high-fat diet is more harmful to males than females

Male and female brains are not equal when it comes to the biological response to a high-fat diet. [More]
MMP-3 disrupts brain/spinal cord barrier, promotes hemorrhage

MMP-3 disrupts brain/spinal cord barrier, promotes hemorrhage

Traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) is a devastating condition with few treatment options. Studies show that damage to the barrier separating blood from the spinal cord can contribute to the neurologic deficits that arise secondary to the initial trauma. Through a series of sophisticated experiments, researchers reporting in The American Journal of Pathology suggest that matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3) plays a pivotal role in disruption of the brain/spinal cord barrier (BSCB), cell death, and functional deficits after SCI. [More]
Esophageal tissue can be grown in vivo from human and mouse cells, say researchers

Esophageal tissue can be grown in vivo from human and mouse cells, say researchers

In a first step toward future human therapies, researchers at The Saban Research Institute of Children's Hospital Los Angeles have shown that esophageal tissue can be grown in vivo from both human and mouse cells. The study has been published online in the journal Tissue Engineering, Part A. [More]
Research findings could provide new insights into esophageal cancer, Barrett's esophagus

Research findings could provide new insights into esophageal cancer, Barrett's esophagus

Despite previous indications to the contrary, the esophagus does have its own pool of stem cells, said researchers from the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine in an animal study published online today in Cell Reports. [More]
State highlights: Calif.'s Prop. 45 fight; new benefits for same sex couples in N.C.; Aetna sheds jobs after Medicaid drop

State highlights: Calif.'s Prop. 45 fight; new benefits for same sex couples in N.C.; Aetna sheds jobs after Medicaid drop

A selection of health policy stories from California, North Carolina, Delaware, New York, Georgia, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Florida and Kansas. [More]
Anti-cancer nanomedicines with smaller sizes exhibit enhanced performance in vivo, show studies

Anti-cancer nanomedicines with smaller sizes exhibit enhanced performance in vivo, show studies

Nanomedicines consisting of nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery to specific tissues and cells offer new solutions for cancer diagnosis and therapy. [More]
TSRI scientists identify long-sought activating molecules for subset of immune system cells

TSRI scientists identify long-sought activating molecules for subset of immune system cells

Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have identified the long-sought activating molecules for a rare but crucial subset of immune system cells that help rally other white blood cells to fight infection. [More]

SynGen announces relocation of corporate headquarters

SynGen, Inc., a company focused on the development and commercialization of instrument systems that harvest stem and progenitor cells from umbilical cord blood, bone marrow, peripheral blood, and cell culture, announced today that it has moved its corporate headquarters to a new location in Sacramento, California. The headquarter’s new address is 100 Howe Avenue, Suite 185N, Sacramento, CA 95825-8219. All other contact information, including phone numbers, remains the same. [More]
New automaton model simulates various scenarios of tumor growth

New automaton model simulates various scenarios of tumor growth

Cancer constantly wages war on the human body. Battles are won, lost or sometimes end in a stalemate. In pancreatic cancer, this stalemate—known as tumor dormancy—can last up to 25 years before becoming aggressively malignant, a phenomena that is poorly understood. [More]