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Cognizin citicoline shows promise in patients with bipolar disorder and cocaine dependence

Cognizin citicoline shows promise in patients with bipolar disorder and cocaine dependence

The results of a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial showed that Cognizin citicoline (Jarrow Formulas) was effective at reducing cocaine use, based on urine drug screens, in patients with bipolar disorder and cocaine dependence. The study, published in the American Journal of Psychiatry in Advance, included a total of 130 outpatients with bipolar I disorder and cocaine dependence, who received either Cognizin citicoline or placebo add-on therapy for 12 weeks. [More]
Southern Research receives $22 million to support HIV cure initiative

Southern Research receives $22 million to support HIV cure initiative

Southern Research has been awarded a seven-year contract of up to $22 million to support research that could contribute to the cure of HIV disease. Under this contract, Southern Research will develop and standardize assays that quantitate latent reservoirs of HIV. [More]
Aspirin may inhibit the growth of mesothelioma, shows study

Aspirin may inhibit the growth of mesothelioma, shows study

Aspirin may inhibit the growth of mesothelioma, an aggressive and deadly asbestos-related cancer, University of Hawai'i Cancer Center researchers have found. [More]
Changes in key biomarkers of Alzheimer’s disease during midlife may help predict future dementia risk

Changes in key biomarkers of Alzheimer’s disease during midlife may help predict future dementia risk

Studying brain scans and cerebrospinal fluid of healthy adults, scientists have shown that changes in key biomarkers of Alzheimer's disease during midlife may help identify those who will develop dementia years later, according to new research. [More]
Tests reveal that FY26 cancer drug is 49 times more potent than Cisplatin drug

Tests reveal that FY26 cancer drug is 49 times more potent than Cisplatin drug

Tests have shown that a new cancer drug, FY26, is 49 times more potent than the clinically used treatment Cisplatin. [More]
Study sheds light on how dengue virus adapts, causes outbreaks as it travels

Study sheds light on how dengue virus adapts, causes outbreaks as it travels

A researcher from The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston is an integral member of a collaborative group that is the first to explain the mechanisms that the Dengue virus has developed to optimize its ability to cause outbreaks as it travels across the globe to new places and revisits old ones. [More]
City of Hope researchers to use patients' own modified T cells to treat advanced brain tumors

City of Hope researchers to use patients' own modified T cells to treat advanced brain tumors

Already pioneers in the use of immunotherapy, City of Hope researchers are now testing the bold approach to cancer treatment against one of medicine's biggest challenges: brain cancer. This month, they will launch a clinical trial using patients' own modified T cells to fight advanced brain tumors. [More]
LSD1 enzyme turns off genes needed to maintain cancer stem cell properties in glioblastoma

LSD1 enzyme turns off genes needed to maintain cancer stem cell properties in glioblastoma

Cancer's ability to grow unchecked is often attributed to cancer stem cells, a small fraction of cancer cells that have the capacity to grow and multiply indefinitely. How cancer stem cells retain this property while the bulk of a tumor's cells do not remains largely unknown. Using human tumor samples and mouse models, researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine and Moores Cancer Center discovered that cancer stem cell properties are determined by epigenetic changes -- chemical modifications cells use to control which genes are turned on or off. [More]
Dental pulp stem cell transplants can contribute to peripheral nerve regeneration

Dental pulp stem cell transplants can contribute to peripheral nerve regeneration

Peripheral nerve injuries often are caused by trauma or surgical complications and can result in considerable disabilities. Regeneration of peripheral nerves can be accomplished effectively using autologous (self-donated) nerve grafts, but that procedure may sacrifice a functional nerve and cause loss of sensation in another part of the patient's body. [More]
Findings reveal new pathway to develop effective treatments and therapies for asthma, allergy

Findings reveal new pathway to develop effective treatments and therapies for asthma, allergy

Investigators have discovered the precise molecular steps that enable immune cells implicated in certain forms of asthma and allergy to develop and survive in the body. The findings from Weill Cornell Medical College reveal a new pathway that scientists could use to develop more effective treatments and therapies for the chronic lung disorder. [More]
Researchers identify link between autoimmune diseases, medications and Long QT syndrome

Researchers identify link between autoimmune diseases, medications and Long QT syndrome

Mohamed Boutjdir, PhD, professor of medicine, cell biology, and physiology and pharmacology at SUNY Downstate Medical Center, has led a study with international collaborators identifying the mechanism by which patients with various autoimmune and connective tissue disorders may be at risk for life-threatening cardiac events if they take certain anti-histamine or anti-depressant medications. [More]
AOSSM to present awards and grants to encourage cutting-edge research in orthopaedic sports medicine

AOSSM to present awards and grants to encourage cutting-edge research in orthopaedic sports medicine

In order to recognize and encourage cutting-edge research in key areas of orthopaedic sports medicine, the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine will present ten research awards and seven grants during its Annual Meeting, July 9-12 in Orlando, FL. [More]
New findings can help scientists generate tailor-made proteins optimized for use in optogenetics

New findings can help scientists generate tailor-made proteins optimized for use in optogenetics

Optogenetics techniques, which allow scientists to map and control nerve cells using light stimulation, are being used to study neural circuits in the brain with unprecedented precision. This revolutionary technology relies on light-sensitive proteins such as channelrhodopsins, and researchers at UC Santa Cruz have now determined the molecular mechanism involved in the light-induced activation of one of these proteins. [More]
Study uncovers complicated role of simple protein in spread of osteosarcoma

Study uncovers complicated role of simple protein in spread of osteosarcoma

The investigation of a simple protein has uncovered its uniquely complicated role in the spread of the childhood cancer, osteosarcoma. It turns out the protein, called ezrin, acts like an air traffic controller, coordinating multiple functions within a cancer cell and allowing it to endure stress conditions encountered during metastasis. [More]
Study could provide paradigm shift in treatment of age-related disease, cancer

Study could provide paradigm shift in treatment of age-related disease, cancer

Intermittent dosing with rapamycin selectively breaks the cascade of inflammatory events that follow cellular senescence, a phenomena in which cells cease to divide in response to DNA damaging agents, including many chemotherapies. [More]
New therapeutic alternative found for children suffering from Ewing's sarcoma

New therapeutic alternative found for children suffering from Ewing's sarcoma

A research consortium made up of the Virgen del Rocio hospital in Seville, Sant Joan de Deu and the Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute in Barcelona, has found a new therapeutic alternative for children who suffer from a malignant pediatric tumor bone and soft tissue called Ewing's sarcoma. [More]
Blood-borne molecule promotes age-related cognitive decline

Blood-borne molecule promotes age-related cognitive decline

A blood-borne molecule that increases in abundance as we age blocks regeneration of brain cells and promotes cognitive decline, suggests a new study by researchers at UC San Francisco and Stanford School of Medicine. [More]
New research suggests that Bcl-Rambo protein can protect against heart failure

New research suggests that Bcl-Rambo protein can protect against heart failure

A protein dubbed 'Bcl-Rambo' can protect against heart failure, suggests new research from King's College London and funded by the British Heart Foundation. [More]
University of Adelaide research may lead to new treatments for transplant patients

University of Adelaide research may lead to new treatments for transplant patients

Researchers at the University of Adelaide have discovered a new method for culturing stem cells which sees the highly therapeutic cells grow faster and stronger. [More]
Transitioning infrared imaging into clinical use: an interview with Dr Matthew Baker

Transitioning infrared imaging into clinical use: an interview with Dr Matthew Baker

The CLIRSPEC network is a UK Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC – EP/L012952/1) funded network in clinical infrared and Raman spectroscopy. Infrared and Raman spectroscopy can identify the hallmarks of disease and distinguish between diseased and non-diseased samples based upon inherent chemistry. [More]
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