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DigiPath, Euphoria partner to set highest medical marijuana patient safety and education standards

DigiPath, Euphoria partner to set highest medical marijuana patient safety and education standards

DigiPath Labs of Las Vegas, a subsidiary of DigiPath, Inc., has entered into a one-year agreement with Euphoria Wellness to conduct comprehensive safety and potency tests on the products Euphoria will sell in its Las Vegas medical marijuana dispensary. [More]
Panorama SNP-based non-invasive prenatal test can detect complete molar pregnancy

Panorama SNP-based non-invasive prenatal test can detect complete molar pregnancy

Natera, Inc., a leader in non-invasive genetic testing, today announced a study published in Ultrasound in Obstetrics & Gynecology demonstrating that the Panorama single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-based non-invasive prenatal test (NIPT) can identify a complete molar pregnancy in the first trimester. [More]
Researchers identify chemical pathway associated with seizures, shorter survival in patients with malignant glioma

Researchers identify chemical pathway associated with seizures, shorter survival in patients with malignant glioma

Researchers at the University of Alabama at Birmingham have identified a chemical pathway that may be associated with seizures and shorter patient survival in some patients with malignant glioma, the most common and deadly form of brain tumor. In findings published May 27 in Science Translational Medicine, the researchers suggest that a transporter known as SXC is responsible for boosting levels of glutamate in the brains of some glioma patients. [More]
TxCell reports results from annual general meeting of shareholders

TxCell reports results from annual general meeting of shareholders

TxCell SA, a biotechnology company developing innovative, personalized T cell immunotherapies using antigen specific regulatory T-cells (Ag-Tregs) for severe chronic inflammatory and autoimmune diseases, today announces results of its annual general meeting of shareholders held in Valbonne, France. [More]
Research findings could help guide development of potential treatments for HCV

Research findings could help guide development of potential treatments for HCV

Warring armies use a variety of tactics as they struggle to gain the upper hand. Among their tricks is to attack with a decoy force that occupies the defenders while an unseen force launches a separate attack that the defenders fail to notice. [More]
Amgen to present clinical data on multiple blood cancer treatments at EHA 2015

Amgen to present clinical data on multiple blood cancer treatments at EHA 2015

Amgen today announced that it will present data from multiple Kyprolis (carfilzomib) for Injection, BLINCYTO (blinatumomab), oprozomib and Nplate (romiplostim)‎ studies at the 20th Congress of the European Hematology Association taking place in Vienna, June 11 - 14, 2015. [More]
Earlier antiretroviral treatment benefits HIV-infected individuals

Earlier antiretroviral treatment benefits HIV-infected individuals

A major international randomized clinical trial has found that HIV-infected individuals have a considerably lower risk of developing AIDS or other serious illnesses if they start taking antiretroviral drugs sooner, when their CD4+ T-cell count--a key measure of immune system health--is higher, instead of waiting until the CD4+ cell count drops to lower levels. Together with data from previous studies showing that antiretroviral treatment reduced the risk of HIV transmission to uninfected sexual partners, these findings support offering treatment to everyone with HIV. [More]
Brigatinib drug shows promise against ALK+ non-small cell lung cancer in phase I/II clinical trial

Brigatinib drug shows promise against ALK+ non-small cell lung cancer in phase I/II clinical trial

Phase I/II clinical trial results reported at the American Society for Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting 2015 show promising results for investigational drug brigatinib against ALK+ non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), with 58 of 78 ALK+ patients responding to treatment, including 50 of 70 patients who had progressed after previous treatment with crizotinib, the first licensed ALK inhibitor. [More]
Researchers design new model to identify promising candidates for total hip replacement surgery

Researchers design new model to identify promising candidates for total hip replacement surgery

Researchers at Sahlgrenska Academy have designed a new model to help doctors and patients decide whether or not to proceed with total hip replacement surgery. The researchers have also surveyed patient wellbeing after surgery: patients with high education achieve greater outcome scores, while those with antidepressant prescriptions do not. [More]
Positive clinical data of CytRx's aldoxorubicin to be presented at ASCO 2015

Positive clinical data of CytRx's aldoxorubicin to be presented at ASCO 2015

CytRx Corporation, a biopharmaceutical research and development company specializing in oncology, today announced an upcoming poster presentation regarding its lead drug candidate, aldoxorubicin, at the 2015 American Society of Clinical Oncology Annual Meeting, which is being held May 29 - June 2, 2015 in Chicago. [More]
Quicker, more effective, and more reliable protocols for RNA extractions

Quicker, more effective, and more reliable protocols for RNA extractions

Ask any molecular plant biologist about RNA extractions and you might just open up the floodgates to the woes of troubleshooting. RNA extraction is a notoriously tricky and sensitive lab procedure. New protocols out of the University of Florida are quicker, more effective, and more reliable than previous methods. [More]
Scorpion venom could kill cancer cells

Scorpion venom could kill cancer cells

When the toxin invades channels in the cells with this disease produces cellular damage until killing them. [More]
Carbon monoxide may actually protect the brain from damage after subarachnoid hemorrhage

Carbon monoxide may actually protect the brain from damage after subarachnoid hemorrhage

Carbon monoxide is known by many as a poisonous gas that causes brain injury and other neurological symptoms, including memory loss and confusion. But a new study led by investigators at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center suggests the opposite may be true: When administered in small, carefully controlled amounts, carbon monoxide may actually protect the brain from damage following subarachnoid hemorrhage, a devastating stroke that results from bleeding in the brain. [More]
Clinical utility data for Guardant360 platform to be presented at ASCO 2015

Clinical utility data for Guardant360 platform to be presented at ASCO 2015

Guardant Health today announced that five abstracts submitted by the University of California, San Francisco; University of California, San Diego; and MD Anderson highlighting the performance and clinical utility of Guardant360 have been accepted for oral and poster presentations at the 2015 American Society of Clinical Oncology Annual Meeting in Chicago, May 29-June 2. [More]
New tool could help identify pathogens in food and beverages

New tool could help identify pathogens in food and beverages

Researchers at the National Polytechnic Institute (IPN) in Mexico, developed a technology capable of identifying pathogens in food and beverages. This technique could work in the restaurant industry as a biosensor to detect in what conditions food is before being eaten in order to avoid possible gastrointestinal diseases. [More]
Scientists identify molecular 'lock' that enables Ebola virus to gain entry to cells

Scientists identify molecular 'lock' that enables Ebola virus to gain entry to cells

An international team including scientists from Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University and the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases has identified the molecular "lock" that the deadly Ebola virus must pick to gain entry to cells. [More]
Tiny drug-delivery system can help identify brain tumor types through 'virtual biopsies'

Tiny drug-delivery system can help identify brain tumor types through 'virtual biopsies'

Biomedical researchers at Cedars-Sinai have invented a tiny drug-delivery system that can identify cancer cell types in the brain through "virtual biopsies" and then attack the molecular structure of the disease. [More]
Research findings cast new light on biological process that can lead to diabetes

Research findings cast new light on biological process that can lead to diabetes

Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation scientists have pinpointed a cell that begins the process of scarring in fatty tissue. The findings cast new light on a biological process that occurs with obesity and can lead to diabetes. [More]
NYU chemists find that microRNA can serve as 'decoder ring' for understanding biological functions

NYU chemists find that microRNA can serve as 'decoder ring' for understanding biological functions

MicroRNA can serve as a "decoder ring" for understanding complex biological processes, a team of New York University chemists has found. Their study, which appears in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, points to a new method for decrypting the biological functions of enzymes and identifying those that drive diseases. [More]
New stem-cell based therapy provides pain relief, reduces severity of RDEB in children

New stem-cell based therapy provides pain relief, reduces severity of RDEB in children

Promising results from a trial of a new stem-cell based therapy for a rare and debilitating skin condition have been published in the Journal of Investigative Dermatology. The therapy, involving infusions of stem cells, was found to provide pain relief and to reduce the severity of this skin condition for which no cure currently exists. [More]
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