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Amgen seeks EMA approval for marketing talimogene laherparepvec

Amgen seeks EMA approval for marketing talimogene laherparepvec

Amgen today announced the submission of a Marketing Authorization Application (MAA) to the European Medicines Agency (EMA) via the centralized procedure for talimogene laherparepvec seeking approval for the treatment of adults with melanoma that is regionally or distantly metastatic. [More]
VentiRx's motolimod receives FDA Fast Track designation for ovarian cancer treatment

VentiRx's motolimod receives FDA Fast Track designation for ovarian cancer treatment

VentiRx Pharmaceuticals, Inc., a clinical stage biopharmaceutical company committed to the development and commercialization of novel Toll-like receptor 8 (TLR8) immunotherapies, today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has granted Fast Track designation to the investigation of motolimod (VTX-2337) when administered in combination with pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (PLD) for the treatment of women with ovarian cancer whose disease has progressed on or recurred after platinum-based chemotherapy. [More]
Soligenix announces promising preliminary results from study with ricin toxin vaccine

Soligenix announces promising preliminary results from study with ricin toxin vaccine

Soligenix, Inc., a clinical stage biopharmaceutical company focused on developing products to treat serious inflammatory diseases where there remains an unmet medical need, as well as developing several biodefense vaccines and therapeutics, announced today promising preliminary results from a preclinical study with its ricin toxin vaccine RiVax™, in a non-human primate (NHP) lethal aerosol exposure model. [More]
Concordia signs collaboration agreement with Orphan Canada for PHOTOFRIN

Concordia signs collaboration agreement with Orphan Canada for PHOTOFRIN

Concordia Healthcare Corp., a diverse healthcare company focused on legacy pharmaceutical products, orphan drugs, and medical devices for the diabetic population, today announced that its subsidiary, Pinnacle Biologics, Inc., a biopharmaceutical research and development company specializing in rare diseases, has signed a collaboration agreement for PHOTOFRIN® with Orphan Canada, a Toronto-based specialty pharmaceutical company that in‐licenses therapies for rare disorders and specialty medicines within Canada. Under the agreement, Pinnacle and Orphan Canada will partner to support the continued supply of Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) using PHOTOFRIN in Canada. [More]
Flow through pain-sensing molecule helps worms adapt to pain

Flow through pain-sensing molecule helps worms adapt to pain

When you accidentally touch a hot oven, you rapidly pull your hand away. Although scientists know the basic neural circuits involved in sensing and responding to such painful stimuli, they are still sorting out the molecular players. [More]
Researchers develop new test to identify sickle cell disease in minutes

Researchers develop new test to identify sickle cell disease in minutes

Within minutes after birth, every child in the U.S. undergoes a battery of tests designed to diagnose a host of conditions, including sickle cell disease. Thousands of children born in the developing world, however, aren't so lucky, meaning many suffer and die from the disease each year. [More]
New vaccine in bid to move away from needles and syringes to skin delivery procedures

New vaccine in bid to move away from needles and syringes to skin delivery procedures

Drug delivery technologies that improve access and overall efficacy are becoming an essential part of the entire drug development process. [More]
Research report on Drug Discovery Technologies - A Global Market Overview

Research report on Drug Discovery Technologies - A Global Market Overview

Reportlinker.com announces that a new market research report is available in its catalogue: Drug Discovery Technologies - A Global Market Overview [More]
Researchers reveal how alteration of single nucleotide could initiate fragile X syndrome

Researchers reveal how alteration of single nucleotide could initiate fragile X syndrome

Researchers reveal how the alteration of a single nucleotide—the basic building block of DNA—could initiate fragile X syndrome, the most common inherited form of intellectual disability. The study appears in The Journal of Cell Biology. [More]
Study for better understanding of neural circuitry and dynamic mechanisms controlling memory

Study for better understanding of neural circuitry and dynamic mechanisms controlling memory

A study just published in the prestigious Nature Neuroscience journal by, Sylvain Williams, PhD, and his team, of the Research Centre of the Douglas Mental Health University Institute and McGill University, opens the door towards better understanding of the neural circuitry and dynamic mechanisms controlling memory as well of the role of an essential element of the hippocampus - a sub-region named the subiculum. [More]
Researchers come up with new technique to diagnose malaria

Researchers come up with new technique to diagnose malaria

Over the past several decades, malaria diagnosis has changed very little. After taking a blood sample from a patient, a technician smears the blood across a glass slide, stains it with a special dye, and looks under a microscope for the Plasmodium parasite, which causes the disease. [More]
New blood test provides fast, accurate diagnosis of tuberculosis in children

New blood test provides fast, accurate diagnosis of tuberculosis in children

A new blood test provides a fast and accurate tool to diagnose tuberculosis in children, a new proof-of-concept study shows. The newly developed test (TAM-TB assay) is the first reliable immunodiagnostic assay to detect active tuberculosis in children. [More]
Researchers identify how Ebola virus dodges the body's antiviral defenses

Researchers identify how Ebola virus dodges the body's antiviral defenses

Researchers at the Washington University School of Medicine have identified one way the Ebola virus dodges the body's antiviral defenses, providing important insight that could lead to new therapies, in research results published in the journal Cell Host & Microbe. [More]
MS study uses fNIRS to examine brain activation during working memory task

MS study uses fNIRS to examine brain activation during working memory task

Using functional near infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS), Kessler Foundation researchers have shown differential brain activation patterns between people with multiple sclerosis (MS) and healthy controls. [More]
Internal production of hydrogen peroxide can lead cells to exit cell cycle and become senescent

Internal production of hydrogen peroxide can lead cells to exit cell cycle and become senescent

What happens inside cells when they detect the activation of a cancer-inducing gene? Sometimes, cells are able to signal internally to stop the cell cycle. Such cells are able to enter, at least for a time, a protective non-growth state. [More]
Scientists identify developmental on-off switch for Streptomyces

Scientists identify developmental on-off switch for Streptomyces

Scientists have identified the developmental on-off switch for Streptomyces, a group of soil microbes that produce more than two-thirds of the world's naturally derived antibiotic medicines. [More]
Nasal septum cells can repair human articular cartilage defects

Nasal septum cells can repair human articular cartilage defects

Human articular cartilage defects can be treated with nasal septum cells. Researchers at the University and the University Hospital of Basel report that cells taken from the nasal septum are able to adapt to the environment of the knee joint and can thus repair articular cartilage defects. [More]
Study compares FK506 and rapamycin for Schwann cell migration, peripheral nerve regeneration

Study compares FK506 and rapamycin for Schwann cell migration, peripheral nerve regeneration

FK506 possesses a well-studied neuroregenerative effect, stimulating neurite extension in the presence of nerve growth factor in vitro, and enhancing nerve regeneration following nerve crush injury and isografting. [More]
Researchers reveal how distinct areas of frontal lobes are critical for person's ability to learn

Researchers reveal how distinct areas of frontal lobes are critical for person's ability to learn

Until the last few decades, the frontal lobes of the brain were shrouded in mystery and erroneously thought of as nonessential for normal function-hence the frequent use of lobotomies in the early 20th century to treat psychiatric disorders. [More]

Surgical researchers rarely use female animals in medical research

A new study from Northwestern Medicine- has found that surgical researchers rarely use female animals or female cells in their published studies -- despite a huge body of evidence showing that sex differences can play a crucial role in medical research. [More]