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Super-resolution imaging of biological specimens: an interview with Dr. Manasa Gudheti

Super-resolution imaging of biological specimens: an interview with Dr. Manasa Gudheti

Traditional light microscopy techniques such as confocal and wide-field are diffraction-limited in resolution, which is about 200 nm laterally (in xy) and 500 to 600 nm axially (in z). Features that are closer than the diffraction limit will appear blurred in the image. [More]
Increasing adoption of SBRT improves survival rates for older patients with early stage lung cancer

Increasing adoption of SBRT improves survival rates for older patients with early stage lung cancer

Survival rates for elderly patients who received stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for early stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) rose from roughly 40 to 60 percent over the past decade, concurrent with the increasing adoption of SBRT, according to research presented today at the 58th Annual Meeting of the American Society for Radiation Oncology. [More]
Researchers identify new immune cell that protects mice from lung infections during chemotherapy

Researchers identify new immune cell that protects mice from lung infections during chemotherapy

St. Jude Children's Research Hospital investigators have identified a new form of an immune cell that protected mice from life-threatening lung infections under conditions that mimic cancer chemotherapy. [More]
Nanoparticle injections may help prevent cartilage degeneration in osteoarthritis patients

Nanoparticle injections may help prevent cartilage degeneration in osteoarthritis patients

Osteoarthritis is a debilitating condition that affects at least 27 million people in the United States, and at least 12 percent of osteoarthritis cases stem from earlier injuries. [More]
Cross-disciplinary concepts may lead to effective, personalised cancer treatments

Cross-disciplinary concepts may lead to effective, personalised cancer treatments

It is not only tumours and metastases that differ in each type of cancer and each individual sufferer but also receptors in cells. [More]
Increasing specific brain fats could be potential strategy for preventing epileptic seizures

Increasing specific brain fats could be potential strategy for preventing epileptic seizures

Increasing the concentration of specific fats in the brain could suppress epileptic seizures. This is evident from ground-breaking research carried out by the research groups of Professor Patrik Verstreken and Professor Wim Versées. [More]
Research shows degenerative diseases affecting the retina may be treatable with gene therapy

Research shows degenerative diseases affecting the retina may be treatable with gene therapy

Researchers have demonstrated the ability to deliver a fully functional copy of the CLN3 gene to stem cells of patients with juvenile NCL, an inherited neurodegenerative disease in which a mutation in the CLN3 gene causes early-onset severe central vision loss. [More]
Study suggests calorie-restricted diet can protect mice from abdominal aortic aneurysms

Study suggests calorie-restricted diet can protect mice from abdominal aortic aneurysms

Mice placed on a low-calorie diet are less likely to develop abdominal aortic aneurysms, according to a new study in The Journal of Experimental Medicine. [More]
University of Bonn researchers develop new method to combat complex brain tumors

University of Bonn researchers develop new method to combat complex brain tumors

Glioblastomas are incurable malignant brain tumors. Usually the patients affected survive for only a few months. [More]
Hypofractionated RT can reduce treatment time by half in stage II and III NSCLC patients

Hypofractionated RT can reduce treatment time by half in stage II and III NSCLC patients

For patients with stage II and III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) unable to receive standard treatments of surgery or chemoradiation (CRT), hypofractionated radiation therapy (RT) results in similar overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) rates, limited severe side effects and shorter treatment times when compared to conventional RT, according to research presented today at the 58th Annual Meeting of the American Society for Radiation Oncology. [More]
Increased use of SBRT linked to improved survival outcomes of NSCLC patients

Increased use of SBRT linked to improved survival outcomes of NSCLC patients

A new analysis of records in the Veteran's Affairs Central Cancer Registry demonstrates a clear positive impact of the increased use of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) to treat patients with stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in recent years, according to research presented today at the 58th Annual Meeting of the American Society for Radiation Oncology. [More]
Approval of PD-1 inhibitor scratches surface of potential immunotherapies in recurrent HNSCC

Approval of PD-1 inhibitor scratches surface of potential immunotherapies in recurrent HNSCC

The recent approval of pembrolizumab (Keytruda) in recurrent or metastatic head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) following progression on a platinum-based chemotherapy was a significant advancement for the disease. [More]
New study reports both young men and women with ACS have good one-year prognosis

New study reports both young men and women with ACS have good one-year prognosis

It has become commonly accepted that women do worse than men following a heart attack or other coronary event. [More]
Study suggests babies born to women with hearing loss more likely to be premature and have low birth weight

Study suggests babies born to women with hearing loss more likely to be premature and have low birth weight

Hearing loss is a marginalizing and disabling condition, resulting in various adverse social and health outcomes. Babies born to women with hearing loss were significantly more likely to be premature and have low birth weight, according to a new study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine. [More]
Salk scientist Clodagh O'Shea named recipient of grant from Faculty Scholars Program

Salk scientist Clodagh O'Shea named recipient of grant from Faculty Scholars Program

Clodagh O'Shea, an associate professor in the Salk Institute's Molecular and Cell Biology Laboratory, is among the first recipients of a grant from the Faculty Scholars Program, a new partnership of Howard Hughes Medical Institute, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and the Simons Foundation for early career researchers whose work shows the potential for groundbreaking contributions in their fields. [More]
Batavia Biosciences receives $8 million grant to develop safe, affordable rotavirus vaccine

Batavia Biosciences receives $8 million grant to develop safe, affordable rotavirus vaccine

Batavia Biosciences received an $8 million grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation to develop a low cost manufacturing process to bring an affordable rotavirus vaccine to the global health market. [More]
KAUST researchers develop biocompatible nanostructures for use in gene delivery

KAUST researchers develop biocompatible nanostructures for use in gene delivery

A tiny therapeutic delivery system that can control the body’s ability to manufacture proteins has been developed by Saudi Arabia's King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) researchers. [More]
Breakthrough research opens door to potential new therapies for inflammatory diseases

Breakthrough research opens door to potential new therapies for inflammatory diseases

Scientists have made a major breakthrough in understanding the workings of the cellular machinery involved in a host of inflammatory diseases. [More]
Antibody drug offers new therapeutic approach for treating AML

Antibody drug offers new therapeutic approach for treating AML

An antibody drug that targets a surface marker on cancer stem cells could offer a promising new therapeutic approach for treating acute myeloid leukemia (AML), a form of blood cancer that affects an estimated 50,000 people in Saudi Arabia. [More]
DGIST researchers uncover mechanisms that control appetite during low glucose conditions in the brain

DGIST researchers uncover mechanisms that control appetite during low glucose conditions in the brain

Researchers from Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology (DGIST) in Korea have uncovered the mechanisms behind the enzyme that controls our appetite in response to low glucose availability in the brain. [More]
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