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Bielefeld University chemists develop copper molecule that could help prevent spread of cancer

Bielefeld University chemists develop copper molecule that could help prevent spread of cancer

Chemists at Bielefeld University have developed a molecule containing copper that binds specifically with DNA and prevents the spread of cancer. First results show that it kills the cancer cells more quickly than cisplatin - a widely used anti-cancer drug that is frequently administered in chemotherapy. [More]
U-M researchers reveal key role of two enzymes that help the body to remove cholesterol, other lipids

U-M researchers reveal key role of two enzymes that help the body to remove cholesterol, other lipids

With the aid of X-ray crystallography, researchers at the University of Michigan have revealed the structures of two closely related enzymes that play essential roles in the body's ability to metabolize excess lipids, including cholesterol. [More]
Minihepcidin reverses iron overload of hemochromatosis, stops susceptibility to infections

Minihepcidin reverses iron overload of hemochromatosis, stops susceptibility to infections

Hemochromatosis (HH) is the most common genetic disorder in the western world, and yet is barely known. Only in the US 1 in 9 people carry the mutation (although not necessarily the disease). [More]
Study details a new pathway for tumor formation

Study details a new pathway for tumor formation

Researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Veterinary Medicine (SVM) have identified the biological mechanism that may give some cancer cells the ability to form tumors in dogs. [More]
Blood tests in heart surgery patients can lead to anemia, blood transfusions

Blood tests in heart surgery patients can lead to anemia, blood transfusions

Laboratory testing among patients undergoing cardiac surgery can lead to excessive bloodletting, which can increase the risk of developing hospital-acquired anemia and the need for blood transfusion, according to an article in the March 2015 issue of The Annals of Thoracic Surgery. [More]
Findings may explain why HIV cure strategies have failed

Findings may explain why HIV cure strategies have failed

A major hurdle to curing people of HIV infection is the way the virus hides in a reservoir composed primarily of dormant immune cells. [More]
Scientists discover amyloid accumulation in young human brains

Scientists discover amyloid accumulation in young human brains

Amyloid -- an abnormal protein whose accumulation in the brain is a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease -- starts accumulating inside neurons of people as young as 20, a much younger age than scientists ever imagined, reports a surprising new Northwestern Medicine study. [More]
Culture conditions in which stem cells are grown can affect genetic stability

Culture conditions in which stem cells are grown can affect genetic stability

The therapeutic promise of human stem cells is indisputably huge, but the process of translating their potential into effective, real-world treatments involves deciphering and resolving a host of daunting complexities. [More]
CLL patients discontinue ibrutinib drug due to disease progression during clinical trials

CLL patients discontinue ibrutinib drug due to disease progression during clinical trials

About 10 percent of patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) discontinued therapy with the Bruton tyrosine kinase (BTK) inhibitor drug ibrutinib because of disease progression during clinical trials, according to a study published online in JAMA Oncology. [More]

Researchers solve secret of mysterious reverse-wired eyeball

From a practical standpoint, the wiring of the human eye - a product of our evolutionary baggage - doesn't make a lot of sense. In vertebrates, photoreceptors are located behind the neurons in the back of the eye - resulting in light scattering by the nervous fibers and blurring of our vision. [More]
New book provides in-depth, advanced understanding of Ebola and rabies viruses

New book provides in-depth, advanced understanding of Ebola and rabies viruses

Significant human and animal pathogens remain major scourges to human health. Recent devastating Ebola virus disease outbreak in West Africa underscores the importance of understanding the biology of replication and response of host cells to infection by these pathogens. [More]
Authors examine potential reasons for the persistence of FC, other autism fads

Authors examine potential reasons for the persistence of FC, other autism fads

The communication struggles of children with autism spectrum disorder can drive parents and educators to try anything to understand their thoughts, needs and wants. Unfortunately, specialists in psychology and communication disorders do not always communicate the latest science so well. [More]
Novel financing technique may unlock funding for developing 'orphan' drugs to treat rare diseases

Novel financing technique may unlock funding for developing 'orphan' drugs to treat rare diseases

A paper published today, "Financing translation: Analysis of the NCATS rare-diseases portfolio" in Science Translational Medicine, demonstrates the potential of a new financing technique to reduce the risk associated with investing in the treatment of new diseases and potentially unlock new levels of funding for developing so-called "orphan" drugs. [More]
Findings reveal variations between countries and regions in use of HSCT procedure

Findings reveal variations between countries and regions in use of HSCT procedure

Since the first experimental bone marrow transplant over 50 years ago, more than one million hematopoietic stem cell transplantations (HSCT) have been performed in 75 countries, according to new research charting the remarkable growth in the worldwide use of HSCT, published in The Lancet Haematology journal. [More]
Bionomics to present data from DisrupTOR-1 trial at ASCO Genitourinary Cancers Symposium

Bionomics to present data from DisrupTOR-1 trial at ASCO Genitourinary Cancers Symposium

Bionomics Limited is to present important additional data from the DisrupTOR-1 trial of BNC105 in patients with metastatic renal cancer at the ASCO Genitourinary Cancers Symposium in Orlando, Florida. The data will be presented by Dr. Sumanta Pal of the City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center in California in his poster presentation. [More]
Researchers successfully convert adult human skin cells into neurons that control appetite

Researchers successfully convert adult human skin cells into neurons that control appetite

Researchers have for the first time successfully converted adult human skin cells into neurons of the type that regulate appetite, providing a patient-specific model for studying the neurophysiology of weight control and testing new therapies for obesity. [More]
New strategy may ensure safety of adult epidermal stem cells before performing treatments

New strategy may ensure safety of adult epidermal stem cells before performing treatments

A team of European researchers has devised a strategy to ensure that adult epidermal stem cells are safe before they are used as treatments for patients. The approach involves a clonal strategy where stem cells are collected and cultivated, genetically modified and single cells isolated before being rigorously tested to make sure they meet the highest possible safety criteria. [More]
New pharmacological compounds block nerve cell damage in mouse models of MS

New pharmacological compounds block nerve cell damage in mouse models of MS

A newly characterized group of pharmacological compounds block both the inflammation and nerve cell damage seen in mouse models of multiple sclerosis, according to a study conducted at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and published online this week in the journal Nature Neuroscience. [More]

TxCell invited to speak at largest US meeting for investors in emerging growth companies

In the presentation, Damian Marron will provide an overview of TxCell and its personalized T cell immunotherapy platform ASTrIA. Additional details will also be provided to institutional investors in one on one meetings at the conference. [More]
Feast-or-famine diet may extend lifespan, improve age-related diseases

Feast-or-famine diet may extend lifespan, improve age-related diseases

University of Florida Health researchers have found that putting people on a feast-or-famine diet may mimic some of the benefits of fasting, and that adding antioxidant supplements may counteract those benefits. [More]