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Researchers uncover novel function of Amyloid Precursor Protein linked to Alzheimer's disease

Researchers uncover novel function of Amyloid Precursor Protein linked to Alzheimer's disease

A research team led by the National Neuroscience Institute has uncovered a novel function of the Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP), one of the main pathogenic culprits of Alzheimer's disease. This discovery may help researchers understand how the protein goes awry in the brains of Alzheimer's disease patients, and potentially paves the way for the development of innovative therapeutics to improve the brain function of dementia patients. [More]
Harvard neuroscientists present new view of myelin

Harvard neuroscientists present new view of myelin

Harvard neuroscientists have made a discovery that turns 160 years of neuroanatomy on its head. [More]
Researchers discover new marker derived from human umbilical cord blood

Researchers discover new marker derived from human umbilical cord blood

The development of stem cell therapies to cure a variety of diseases depends on the ability to characterize stem cell populations based on cell surface markers. [More]
Study shows R9-caPep compound blocks PCNA actions in neuroblastoma cells

Study shows R9-caPep compound blocks PCNA actions in neuroblastoma cells

Neuroblastoma is one of the deadliest childhood cancers, accounting for 15 percent of pediatric cancer deaths. For patients with high-risk neuroblastomas, the five-year survival rate is 40 to 50 percent even with the most rigorous treatments available today. [More]
Understanding GPCRs and controlling inflammation: an interview with Dr. Richard Proia, NIDDK, NIH

Understanding GPCRs and controlling inflammation: an interview with Dr. Richard Proia, NIDDK, NIH

GPCRs are one of the largest families of cellular signalling proteins consisting of more than a thousand different types. They reside on the surface membranes of cells where they are poised to recognize molecules in the exterior environment and then transmit this information through the membrane allowing cells to respond accordingly. [More]

Research opens new possibilities for blocking runaway cell division in cancer

The structure of a key part of the machinery that allows cells to divide has been identified by researchers at the University of California, Davis -- opening new possibilities for throwing a wrench in the machine and blocking runaway cell division in cancer. [More]
New lab at the Nencki Institute conducts research on neurodegenerative diseases

New lab at the Nencki Institute conducts research on neurodegenerative diseases

The Laboratory of Preclinical Studies of Higher Standard, the newest lab of the Neurobiology Center at the Nencki Institute in Warsaw, Poland, will conduct basic research aimed to explain molecular mechanisms responsible for neurodegenerative diseases. [More]
Researchers examine role of antioxidants play in blocking harmful effects of omega 6 fatty acid

Researchers examine role of antioxidants play in blocking harmful effects of omega 6 fatty acid

Given omega 6 fatty acid's reputation for promoting cancer - at least in animal studies - researchers are examining the role that antioxidants play in blocking the harmful effects of this culprit, found in many cooking oils. [More]
Recipients of the Bitplane Attendance Awards announced

Recipients of the Bitplane Attendance Awards announced

Bitplane, an Oxford Instruments Company and the world leader in 2 to 4D image visualisation, analysis and interpretation, today announced the three recipients of the Bitplane Attendance Awards. The prize covers the registration fees for the 2014 IEEE Symposium on Biomedical Imaging in Beijing, with the recipients being recognised during the challenge workshop on April 30th. The winners have been selected by the organizers of the 2nd Cell Tracking Challenge from among the participating scientists, and were chosen due to the high quality of their submitted results. [More]
3D cell culture: an interview with Dr. Elad Katz, Senior Scientist, AMSBIO

3D cell culture: an interview with Dr. Elad Katz, Senior Scientist, AMSBIO

For over fifty years now, we have used 2D cell cultures to culture a variety of cells such as epithelial and blood cells and these are excellent for maintaining cells in their inherent state, under controlled, temperature and other conditions. However, they are limited in preserving the genotype and the phenotype of the original tissue these cells came from. [More]
IRB researchers identify dual role of p38 protein in colon cancer

IRB researchers identify dual role of p38 protein in colon cancer

A team headed by Angel R. Nebreda at the Institute for Research in Biomedicine identifies a dual role of the p38 protein in colon cancer. The study demonstrates that, on the one hand, p38 is important for the optimal maintenance of the epithelial barrier that protects the intestine against toxic agents, thus contributing to decreased tumour development. [More]
Scientist receives $147,157 grant from NIH to find cure for infectious disease

Scientist receives $147,157 grant from NIH to find cure for infectious disease

A Clemson University scientist was awarded a two-year, $147,157 grant from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, part of the National Institutes of Health, to find a cure for an infectious disease. [More]
Thirteen graduate students to receive 2014 Harold M. Weintraub Graduate Student Award

Thirteen graduate students to receive 2014 Harold M. Weintraub Graduate Student Award

Thirteen graduate students from institutes throughout North America have been chosen to receive the 2014 Harold M. Weintraub Graduate Student Award sponsored by the Basic Sciences Division of Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center. [More]
Researchers find that protein synthesis can be studied in adult stem cells

Researchers find that protein synthesis can be studied in adult stem cells

For the first time, researchers have shown that an essential biological process known as protein synthesis can be studied in adult stem cells - something scientists have long struggled to accomplish. The groundbreaking findings from the Children's Medical Center Research Institute at UT Southwestern (CRI) also demonstrate that the precise amount of protein produced by blood-forming stem cells is crucial to their function. [More]
A-PARADDISE consortium obtains funds to develop innovative therapies for neglected parasitic diseases

A-PARADDISE consortium obtains funds to develop innovative therapies for neglected parasitic diseases

The international consortium A-PARADDISE (Anti-Parasitic Drug Discovery in Epigenetics), coordinated by Inserm, has just obtained funds of €6 million from the European Commission to conduct large-scale testing of innovative therapies against four neglected parasitic diseases: schistosomiasis, leishmaniasis, Chagas disease and malaria. [More]

Blocking mechanisms for DNA repair may help to potentiate chemotherapy, says study

Chemotherapies are cancer treatments that work by inducing lesions in the DNA of tumour cells in order to inhibit their proliferation. However, the body naturally tries to repair these lesions, and thus reduces the efficacy of chemotherapy. [More]

Phasefocus’ KTP associate Dr Suman receives runners up spot for Cellular Heaven and Hell time-lapse video

Phase Focus Ltd (Phasefocus), the company that is revolutionizing microscopy and imaging with the Phasefocus Virtual Lens® technology, reports on the Celldance competition results held at the recent annual ASCB meeting. KTP associate, Dr Rakesh Suman, was runner up with his video entitled "Cellular Heaven & Hell." [More]
Study findings suggest potential targets for treating HCV

Study findings suggest potential targets for treating HCV

The hepatitis C virus (HCV) has a previously unrecognized tactic to outwit antiviral responses and sustain a long-term infection. It also turns out that some people are genetically equipped with a strong countermeasure to the virus' attempt to weaken the attack on it. [More]
Keystone Symposia to convene conference focusing on the science of malaria eradication

Keystone Symposia to convene conference focusing on the science of malaria eradication

Keystone Symposia, in collaboration with MESA (Malaria Eradication Scientific Alliance), is convening its first conference in Mexico – on "The Science of Malaria Eradication" at the Fiesta Americana Hotel in Merida, Yucatan. The four-day conference begins Sunday evening, February 2, 2014 and is part of the Keystone Symposia Global Health Series, supported by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, which has also funded travel awards for investigators from malaria-endemic countries to attend. The conference will gather experts from 37 countries. [More]

Study: Genetic mutations in titin gene can cause skeletal muscle disease

A University of Arizona doctoral candidate has shown for the first time that genetic mutations in the titin gene can cause skeletal muscle myopathy, a disease in which muscle fibers do not function properly, resulting in muscle weakness. [More]