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Allen Institute for Brain Science welcomes visiting scientist engineer

Allen Institute for Brain Science welcomes visiting scientist engineer

The Allen Institute for Brain Science welcomes a visiting scientist from Harvard and a visiting engineer from Georgia Tech: Sharad Ramanathan, Ph.D.; and Craig Forest, Ph.D. Both Ramanathan and Forest will bring their distinct knowledge and backgrounds to the expanding scientific teams at the Allen Institute. [More]
Live cell imaging solution launched by QImaging

Live cell imaging solution launched by QImaging

QImaging™ today launched a new, all-in-one camera package that supports demanding live cell fluorescence imaging requirements. The Live Cell Imaging Package provides researchers with the sensitivity of EMCCD and the versatility of sCMOS camera technologies by combining QImaging’s Rolera™ Thunder EMCCD and optiMOS™ sCMOScameras. Now, researchers can address their unique imaging needs for a broader, more diverse set of scientific applications. [More]
Study sheds light on genetic alterations that may contribute to luminal B breast cancer

Study sheds light on genetic alterations that may contribute to luminal B breast cancer

Researchers from the Lester and Sue Smith Breast Center at Baylor College of Medicine have uncovered new information about the genetic alterations that may contribute to the development of a subtype breast cancer typically associated with more aggressive forms of the disease and higher recurrence rates. [More]
Researchers at NIH-FEI Living Lab for Structural Biology achieve breakthrough biological results using FEI’s Titan Krios™ transmission electron microscope

Researchers at NIH-FEI Living Lab for Structural Biology achieve breakthrough biological results using FEI’s Titan Krios™ transmission electron microscope

FEI is pleased to announce that researchers at the NIH-FEI Living Lab for Structural Biology have achieved breakthrough biological results, using FEI’s Titan Krios™ transmission electron microscope (TEM), to elucidate the structural mechanism by which glutamate receptors participate in the transmission of signals between neurons in the brain. Their work is described in Nature, “Structural Mechanism of Glutamate Receptor Activation and Desensitization,” by Meyerson, et al., (DOI: 10.1038/nature13603), http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/vaop/ncurrent/full/nature13603.html . [More]

Study shows that mice can identify specific odors amid complex olfactory environments

For many animals, making sense of the clutter of sensory stimuli is often a matter or literal life or death. Exactly how animals separate objects of interest, such as food sources or the scent of predators, from background information, however, remains largely unknown. [More]
AMSBIO-Trevigen prize winner announced

AMSBIO-Trevigen prize winner announced

AMSBIO, regular sponsor of the annual Beatson International Cancer Conference announces that the winner of the AMSBIO-Trevigen prize for the best poster was Katarzyna Grzes - a PhD researcher specialising in Cell Signaling and Immunology at the University of Dundee (Scotland, UK).
Miss Grzes was named as winner of the Poster Prize for the best presented and most interesting poster for her work entitled 'Metabolic regulation in PTEN null T lymphoma / leukemia'. [More]
Study reveals novel epilepsy pathway linked to neurodegenerative diseases

Study reveals novel epilepsy pathway linked to neurodegenerative diseases

A recent scientific discovery showed that mutations in prickle genes cause epilepsy, which in humans is a brain disorder characterized by repeated seizures over time. However, the mechanism responsible for generating prickle-associated seizures was unknown. [More]
Unnatural DNA bases: an interview with Professor Floyd E. Romesberg, The Scripps Research Institute

Unnatural DNA bases: an interview with Professor Floyd E. Romesberg, The Scripps Research Institute

The natural DNA bases that form the letters of DNA are usually referred to as G, C, A, and T. Those are only the first letters of the chemical names. They’re often called nucleotides by their scientific name and all of them have in common a phosphate part, a sugar part and a nucleobase part. [More]
Study provides evidence for intranasal nerve growth factor for repair of spinal cord injury

Study provides evidence for intranasal nerve growth factor for repair of spinal cord injury

Nerve growth factor can be delivered to the brain by intranasal administration without risk for treatment of brain diseases. [More]
Scientists build artificial cells programmed to eat their undesirable neighbors

Scientists build artificial cells programmed to eat their undesirable neighbors

A team of researchers has devised a Pac-Man-style power pellet that gets normally mild-mannered cells to gobble up their undesirable neighbors. The development may point the way to therapies that enlist patients’ own cells to better fend off infection and even cancer, the researchers say. A description of the work will be published July 15 in the journal Science Signaling. [More]
AMSBIO introduces revolutionary magnetic technology for bioseparations

AMSBIO introduces revolutionary magnetic technology for bioseparations

AMSBIO announces MagSi-Direct - a revolutionary technology that brings the power, simplicity, and convenience of magnetic separation to researchers involved in cell biology, protein chemistry, flow cytometry, diagnostics development and many other fields. [More]
Scientists develop RNA that binds cGMP

Scientists develop RNA that binds cGMP

The transmission of signals within cells is dependent on cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) as an important secondary messenger. German scientists have now developed an RNA that binds cGMP. As reported in the journal Angewandte Chemie, it is possible to suppress the cGMP signal cascade in genetically modified cells that produce this RNA. [More]
Neuroprotective effects of lithium are likely related to gene expressions

Neuroprotective effects of lithium are likely related to gene expressions

Lithium, as a neuroprotective agent, benefits for neuronal survival. Recent cDNA array studies have demonstrated that mood stabilizer lithium exhibits neuroprotective effects through multiple targets. [More]
Fabry disease awareness: an interview with Dr. Hartmann Wellhoefer, Head of Medical Affairs, Rare Disease, Shire

Fabry disease awareness: an interview with Dr. Hartmann Wellhoefer, Head of Medical Affairs, Rare Disease, Shire

Lysosomes are subcellular organelles that are present in most cells, with the major exception of red blood cells. [More]
Researcher describes possible implications of increased gravity effect on immunity

Researcher describes possible implications of increased gravity effect on immunity

Before you swat away the next fruit fly, consider instead just how similar its biological complexities are to our own. [More]

BINDER ultra low temperature freezer provides high safety for biological samples

In the field of cell biology in particular, a wide variety of samples including nucleic acid or protein samples have to be preserved for longer periods of time. At temperatures down to – 86°C, samples often remain frozen for several weeks up to several years. 100% reliability of the cooling system is essential. Otherwise, any interruption could result in the complete loss of the research results, requiring the results to be recreated, which costs time and money. [More]
University of Louisville researchers take a step forward in battle against lung cancer

University of Louisville researchers take a step forward in battle against lung cancer

Researchers at the University of Louisville have uncovered a cadre of small molecules that tell certain proteins to kill lung cancer cells. The team, led by Chi Li, Ph.D., assistant professor of medicine, published its finding in the April 2014 issue of Molecular and Cellular Biology. [More]
FEI announces the sale of a complete correlative workflow to the University of Maastricht

FEI announces the sale of a complete correlative workflow to the University of Maastricht

FEI (NASDAQ: FEIC) announces the sale of a complete correlative workflow to the University of Maastricht. The systems will be installed at the University’s Institute of Nanoscopy, a new research facility that will use the high-resolution microscopes to understand the working mechanisms of protein complexes in an effort to develop new and improved treatment and prevention for disease, such as cancer and tuberculosis. [More]
Protein-kinase interactions offer a new way to fight antimalarial drug resistance

Protein-kinase interactions offer a new way to fight antimalarial drug resistance

When it comes to the emergence of antimalarial drug resistance, it's not a question of 'if' but 'when'. In order to keep up with the quickly evolving Plasmodium parasite - the cause of malaria - new ways to treat and control the disease must be found. [More]
Progress in constructing protein nanomachines

Progress in constructing protein nanomachines

A route for constructing protein nanomachines engineered for specific applications may be closer to reality. [More]