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Researchers find how microtubules, motor proteins assemble into macroscopic networks

Researchers find how microtubules, motor proteins assemble into macroscopic networks

What bones are to bodies, the cytoskeleton is to cells. The cytoskeleton maintains cellular structure, builds appendages like flagella and, together with motor proteins, powers cellular movement, transport, and division. Microtubules are a critical component of the cytoskeleton, vital for cell division and, because of that, an excellent target for chemotherapy drugs. [More]
Researchers identify liver-derived hormone that regulates sugar intake

Researchers identify liver-derived hormone that regulates sugar intake

We all love our sugar, especially during the holidays. Cookies, cake, and candy are simply irresistible. While sugar cravings are common, the physiological mechanisms that trigger our "sweet tooth" are not well defined. [More]
Shells of plant virus trigger immune system to wipe out tumors, provide protection against metastases

Shells of plant virus trigger immune system to wipe out tumors, provide protection against metastases

The shells of a common plant virus, inhaled into a lung tumor or injected into ovarian, colon or breast tumors, not only triggered the immune system in mice to wipe out the tumors, but provided systemic protection against metastases, researchers from Case Western Reserve University and Dartmouth University report. [More]
Researchers identify transporters responsible for arsenic accumulation in plant seeds

Researchers identify transporters responsible for arsenic accumulation in plant seeds

Researchers from FIU's Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine Barry P. Rosen and Jian Chen, both from the Department of Cellular Biology and Pharmacology, are part of an international team that has identified how arsenic gets into the seeds of plants such as rice. T [More]
Excess body fat may affect bone growth in children

Excess body fat may affect bone growth in children

Studies have shown that obese children tend to have more muscle, but recent University of Georgia research on the muscle and bone relationship shows that excess body fat may compromise other functions in their bodies, such as bone growth. [More]
New GSA e-book provides detailed overviews of aging process across multiple organisms

New GSA e-book provides detailed overviews of aging process across multiple organisms

A new e-book published by The Gerontological Society of America provides a primary resource for detailed overviews of the aging process across multiple organisms -- from microbes to humans. This seminal publication, "Molecular and Cellular Biology of Aging," is intended as a textbook for emerging scholars of all levels. [More]
Antibiotic resistance may help find drugs to combat amyloid formation

Antibiotic resistance may help find drugs to combat amyloid formation

Amyloid diseases such as Parkinson's, Alzheimer's and type-2 diabetes pose a particular problem for drug designers because they do not present a clear target structure to aim at. [More]
Boston Children's Hospital selects Vijay G. Sankaran to receive Rising Star Award

Boston Children's Hospital selects Vijay G. Sankaran to receive Rising Star Award

Saluting his spectacular track record to date of innovative research on red blood cell disorders and his future promise as a physician/scientist, Boston Children's Hospital has selected Vijay G. Sankaran, MD, PhD, of Dana-Farber/Boston Children's Cancer and Blood Disorders Center to receive the Rising Star Award at the hospital's third annual Global Pediatric Innovation Summit, Taking on Tomorrow (#PedInno15). [More]
Novel method for examining small molecules may provide platform for new drug design

Novel method for examining small molecules may provide platform for new drug design

Most pharmaceutical drugs consist of tiny molecules, which target a class of proteins found on the surfaces of cell membranes. Studying these subtle interactions is essential for the design of effective drugs, but the task is extremely challenging. [More]
New studies suggest ways to improve cancer care by inhibiting oncogenes, boosting tumor-suppressor activity

New studies suggest ways to improve cancer care by inhibiting oncogenes, boosting tumor-suppressor activity

Two new studies by cancer scientists at The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center - Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute (OSUCCC - James) suggest new approaches for treating cancer by inhibiting overactive cancer-promoting genes and by enhancing the activity of sluggish tumor-suppressor genes. [More]
Fungi research may lead to cheaper anti-cancer drugs for humans

Fungi research may lead to cheaper anti-cancer drugs for humans

Cheaper anti-cancer drugs for humans might ultimately stem from a new study by University of Guelph scientists into a kind of microbial "bandage" that protects yew trees from disease-causing fungi. [More]
Northwestern University receives $11.7 million NCI grant to use nanotechnology for cancer treatments

Northwestern University receives $11.7 million NCI grant to use nanotechnology for cancer treatments

Northwestern University, a leader in cancer nanotechnology research, has received a five-year, $11.7 million grant from the National Cancer Institute to use nanotechnology to develop next-generation cancer treatments. [More]
UC Davis researchers reveal how four proteins come together to help assemble tubulin

UC Davis researchers reveal how four proteins come together to help assemble tubulin

When they think about how cells put together the molecules that make life work, biologists have tended to think of assembly lines: Add A to B, tack on C, and so on. But the reality might be more like a molecular version of a 3-D printer, where a single mechanism assembles the molecule in one go. [More]
Blavatnik Biomedical Accelerator funds advanced biomedical research projects

Blavatnik Biomedical Accelerator funds advanced biomedical research projects

A few years ago, Andrew Myers' laboratory discovered a new way to synthesize an important class of antibiotics that could one day tackle the toughest, most resistant infections. [More]
UC Davis researchers set out to identify biomarkers for early diagnosis of lung cancer

UC Davis researchers set out to identify biomarkers for early diagnosis of lung cancer

Despite decades of warnings about smoking, lung cancer is still the second-most common cancer and the leading cause of death from cancer in the U.S. Patients are often diagnosed only when their disease is already at an advanced stage and hard to treat. Researchers at the West Coast Metabolomics Center at UC Davis are trying to change that, by identifying biomarkers that could be the basis of early tests for lung cancer. [More]
Sigma 1 receptor appears to play vital role in supporting the retina

Sigma 1 receptor appears to play vital role in supporting the retina

A receptor that is already a target for treating neurodegenerative disease also appears to play a key role in supporting the retina, scientists report. [More]
Protein imbalances within cells can cause ovarian cancer

Protein imbalances within cells can cause ovarian cancer

Cancer can be caused solely by protein imbalances within cells, a study of ovarian cancer has found. The discovery is a major breakthrough because, until now, genetic aberrations have been seen as the main cause of almost all cancer. [More]
Endocrine Society selects 18 endocrinologists as winners of 2016 Laureate Awards

Endocrine Society selects 18 endocrinologists as winners of 2016 Laureate Awards

The Endocrine Society today announced it has chosen 18 accomplished endocrinologists as winners of the organization's prestigious 2016 Laureate Awards. [More]
NDSU assistant professor receives NIH grant to study regulation of transporters in Gram-negative bacteria

NDSU assistant professor receives NIH grant to study regulation of transporters in Gram-negative bacteria

Christopher Colbert, assistant professor of biochemistry at North Dakota State University, Fargo, has received a $348,000 grant award from the National Institute of General Medical Sciences of the National Institutes of Health to conduct research on structure-function relationships of iron transport and transcriptional regulation in Gram-negative bacteria. [More]
Georgia researchers develop new tools to genetically manipulate parasite that causes cryptosporidiosis

Georgia researchers develop new tools to genetically manipulate parasite that causes cryptosporidiosis

Researchers at the University of Georgia have developed new tools to study and genetically manipulate cryptosporidium, a microscopic parasite that causes the diarrheal disease cryptosporidiosis. [More]
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