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UC Davis researchers reveal how four proteins come together to help assemble tubulin

UC Davis researchers reveal how four proteins come together to help assemble tubulin

When they think about how cells put together the molecules that make life work, biologists have tended to think of assembly lines: Add A to B, tack on C, and so on. But the reality might be more like a molecular version of a 3-D printer, where a single mechanism assembles the molecule in one go. [More]
Blavatnik Biomedical Accelerator funds advanced biomedical research projects

Blavatnik Biomedical Accelerator funds advanced biomedical research projects

A few years ago, Andrew Myers' laboratory discovered a new way to synthesize an important class of antibiotics that could one day tackle the toughest, most resistant infections. [More]
UC Davis researchers set out to identify biomarkers for early diagnosis of lung cancer

UC Davis researchers set out to identify biomarkers for early diagnosis of lung cancer

Despite decades of warnings about smoking, lung cancer is still the second-most common cancer and the leading cause of death from cancer in the U.S. Patients are often diagnosed only when their disease is already at an advanced stage and hard to treat. Researchers at the West Coast Metabolomics Center at UC Davis are trying to change that, by identifying biomarkers that could be the basis of early tests for lung cancer. [More]
Sigma 1 receptor appears to play vital role in supporting the retina

Sigma 1 receptor appears to play vital role in supporting the retina

A receptor that is already a target for treating neurodegenerative disease also appears to play a key role in supporting the retina, scientists report. [More]
Protein imbalances within cells can cause ovarian cancer

Protein imbalances within cells can cause ovarian cancer

Cancer can be caused solely by protein imbalances within cells, a study of ovarian cancer has found. The discovery is a major breakthrough because, until now, genetic aberrations have been seen as the main cause of almost all cancer. [More]
Endocrine Society selects 18 endocrinologists as winners of 2016 Laureate Awards

Endocrine Society selects 18 endocrinologists as winners of 2016 Laureate Awards

The Endocrine Society today announced it has chosen 18 accomplished endocrinologists as winners of the organization's prestigious 2016 Laureate Awards. [More]
NDSU assistant professor receives NIH grant to study regulation of transporters in Gram-negative bacteria

NDSU assistant professor receives NIH grant to study regulation of transporters in Gram-negative bacteria

Christopher Colbert, assistant professor of biochemistry at North Dakota State University, Fargo, has received a $348,000 grant award from the National Institute of General Medical Sciences of the National Institutes of Health to conduct research on structure-function relationships of iron transport and transcriptional regulation in Gram-negative bacteria. [More]
Georgia researchers develop new tools to genetically manipulate parasite that causes cryptosporidiosis

Georgia researchers develop new tools to genetically manipulate parasite that causes cryptosporidiosis

Researchers at the University of Georgia have developed new tools to study and genetically manipulate cryptosporidium, a microscopic parasite that causes the diarrheal disease cryptosporidiosis. [More]
New study reveals highly promising approach to coating tissue engineered constructs

New study reveals highly promising approach to coating tissue engineered constructs

A new study showing the ability to apply a thin coating of viable respiratory epithelial cells to tissue engineered constructs using a commercially available spray device is especially promising for therapeutic approaches in development to repair or replace challenging structures such as trachea or bronchi. [More]
Study uncovers complicated role of simple protein in spread of osteosarcoma

Study uncovers complicated role of simple protein in spread of osteosarcoma

The investigation of a simple protein has uncovered its uniquely complicated role in the spread of the childhood cancer, osteosarcoma. It turns out the protein, called ezrin, acts like an air traffic controller, coordinating multiple functions within a cancer cell and allowing it to endure stress conditions encountered during metastasis. [More]
Researchers map physical properties of live breast cancer cells using advanced AFM technology

Researchers map physical properties of live breast cancer cells using advanced AFM technology

Researchers who developed a high-speed form of atomic force microscopy have shown how to image the physical properties of live breast cancer cells, for the first time revealing details about how deactivation of a key protein may lead to metastasis. [More]
Three National Laureates selected for 2015 Blavatnik National Awards for Young Scientists

Three National Laureates selected for 2015 Blavatnik National Awards for Young Scientists

A chemist who has made important discoveries in both the human brain and sustainable energy, a neurosurgeon who has done pioneering work mapping the "blueprint" of how humans speak and hear, and a computer scientist who has changed our understanding of the capacity of wireless networks are the three winners of the 2015 Blavatnik National Awards for Young Scientists. [More]
New 3D cell culture system could facilitate search for therapeutic agents for Parkinson's disease

New 3D cell culture system could facilitate search for therapeutic agents for Parkinson's disease

The progressive loss of neurons in the brain of Parkinson's patients is slow yet inexorable. So far, there are no drugs that can halt this insidious process. [More]
DAPK1 protein may be a promising new therapeutic target for most aggressive breast cancers

DAPK1 protein may be a promising new therapeutic target for most aggressive breast cancers

Although traditionally understood to induce death in cancer cells, researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center have discovered that the DAPK1 protein is actually essential for growth in breast and other cancers with mutations in the TP53 gene. This discovery indicates DAPK1 may be a promising new therapeutic target for many of the most aggressive cancers. [More]
Scientists report that mouse with weak bones appears to have strong metabolism

Scientists report that mouse with weak bones appears to have strong metabolism

One mouse with weak bones appears to have a strong metabolism, even on a high-fat diet, scientists report. While weaker bones are clearly not a good thing, scientists suspect that, somewhere in the conversation between the genetically engineered mouse's skeleton and the rest of its body, there may be an answer that helps obese individuals avoid some of the worst ravages of this health epidemic. [More]

Biochemists devise snappy new technique for blueprinting cell membrane proteins

Biochemists from Trinity College Dublin have devised a new technique that will make the difficult but critical job of blueprinting certain proteins considerably faster, cheaper and easier. [More]
Growth of neuronal and vascular networks is controlled by same signaling molecules

Growth of neuronal and vascular networks is controlled by same signaling molecules

Neurons and blood vessels often traverse the body side by side, a fact observed as early as the 16th century by the Flemish anatomist Andreas Vesalius. Only over the last ten years, however, researchers have discovered that the growth of neuronal and vascular networks is controlled by the same molecules. [More]
Danish researchers discover way to map more than one protein at a time

Danish researchers discover way to map more than one protein at a time

Danish researchers at the University of Copenhagen have discovered how to map more than one protein at a time, when proteins repair damaged DNA. It is a discovery that will help accelerate the process of developing better and gentler cancer treatments. [More]
LaVision BioTec announces the first International Users’ Meeting on their UltraMicroscope

LaVision BioTec announces the first International Users’ Meeting on their UltraMicroscope

LaVison BioTec, developers of advanced microscopy solutions for the life sciences, announces the dates and venue of the first international users' meeting on their UltraMicroscope light sheet microscopy products. [More]
LaVision BioTec reports on the research work of the Milan-based Iannacone Laboratory to study virus responses using intravital microscopy

LaVision BioTec reports on the research work of the Milan-based Iannacone Laboratory to study virus responses using intravital microscopy

LaVison BioTec, developers of advanced microscopy solutions for the life sciences, report on the research of Dr Matteo Iannacone of the San Raffaele Scientific Institute in Milan where intravital microscopy is being applied to the study of host-viruses and associated immune responses. [More]
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