Cholesterol News and Research RSS Feed - Cholesterol News and Research

Cholesterol is a waxy, fat-like substance made in the liver, and found in the blood and in all cells of the body. Cholesterol is important for good health and is needed for making cell walls, tissues, hormones, vitamin D, and bile acid. Cholesterol also comes from eating foods taken from animals such as egg yolks, meat, and whole-milk dairy products. Too much cholesterol in the blood may build up in blood vessel walls, block blood flow to tissues and organs, and increase the risk of developing heart disease and stroke.
Obese people experience silent cardiac damage that fuels risk for heart failure

Obese people experience silent cardiac damage that fuels risk for heart failure

Using an ultrasensitive blood test to detect the presence of a protein that heralds heart muscle injury, researchers from Johns Hopkins and elsewhere have found that obese people without overt heart disease experience silent cardiac damage that fuels their risk for heart failure down the road. [More]
Changes in one gene can influence person's cholesterol levels from midlife through late life

Changes in one gene can influence person's cholesterol levels from midlife through late life

It's known that cholesterol levels typically rise as people age and that high cholesterol levels are associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease. What's less known is that cholesterol levels begin to decline the more a person ages. Recently, researchers from the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston and the University of Kentucky found that differences in one gene can influence a person's cholesterol levels from midlife to late life. [More]
Cholesterol efflux appears to be superior indicator of cardiovascular risk

Cholesterol efflux appears to be superior indicator of cardiovascular risk

Groundbreaking research from UT Southwestern Medical Center shows that cholesterol efflux capacity (cholesterol efflux), which measures HDL cholesterol function, appears to be a superior indicator of cardiovascular risk and a better target for therapeutic treatments than standard measurements of HDL. Current measurement methods reflect only the circulating levels of HDL and not the functional properties of this lipoprotein. [More]
Cigna Foundation awards World of Difference grant to improve heart healthy behaviors in women

Cigna Foundation awards World of Difference grant to improve heart healthy behaviors in women

When it comes to hearts, men and women are not created equally. Women who have experienced a heart attack have a higher risk of a subsequent heart attack, or death, compared to men, according to the American Heart Association. [More]
Researchers present results of The Heart of New Ulm Project at AHA Scientific Sessions

Researchers present results of The Heart of New Ulm Project at AHA Scientific Sessions

Researchers from Allina Health and the Minneapolis Heart Institute Foundation have presented on the results and implications of The Heart of New Ulm Project on heart disease risk factors at the American Heart Association Scientific Sessions in Chicago, Ill. [More]
Asthma associated with higher risk of heart attack or stroke

Asthma associated with higher risk of heart attack or stroke

Asthma that requires daily medication is associated with a significantly higher risk of heart attack or stroke, according to a new study from the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health. [More]
Adding ezetimibe to statin therapy reduces cardiovascular events

Adding ezetimibe to statin therapy reduces cardiovascular events

More than a decade ago, researchers from Brigham and Women's Hospital demonstrated that a high dose statin, which lowered cholesterol further than a regular dose statin, provided better clinical outcomes. But questions remained about whether further reducing cholesterol would be even more effective in reducing cardiovascular-related events. [More]
Cholesterol-fighting statins inhibit uterine fibroid tumors that account for 50% of hysterectomies

Cholesterol-fighting statins inhibit uterine fibroid tumors that account for 50% of hysterectomies

Researchers at the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, in collaboration with The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth), Baylor College of Medicine and the Georgia Regents University, report for the first time that the cholesterol-lowering drug simvastatin inhibits the growth of human uterine fibroid tumors. [More]
A single gene mutation can halve the risk of heart disease

A single gene mutation can halve the risk of heart disease

Recent research has shown that inactivation of a single gene reduces the risk of heart attack by 50%. [More]
Exposure to tobacco smoke, roadway air pollution can contribute to obesity

Exposure to tobacco smoke, roadway air pollution can contribute to obesity

New research from Keck Medicine of the University of Southern California (USC) bolsters evidence that exposure to tobacco smoke and near-roadway air pollution contributes to the development of obesity. [More]
Rare gene mutation linked to lower cholesterol levels, reduced risk of heart attack

Rare gene mutation linked to lower cholesterol levels, reduced risk of heart attack

Rare mutations that shut down a single gene are linked to lower cholesterol levels and a 50 percent reduction in the risk of heart attack, according to new research from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, the Broad Institute at Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Harvard, and other institutions. [More]
Estrogen plays key role in regulating blood pressure, LDL cholesterol levels

Estrogen plays key role in regulating blood pressure, LDL cholesterol levels

What makes some women more susceptible to heart disease than others? To help answer that question, researchers at Western University's Robarts Research Institute have identified that an estrogen receptor, previously shown to regulate blood pressure in women, also plays an important role in regulating low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels. [More]
Metabolic syndrome screening in bipolar disorder warranted

Metabolic syndrome screening in bipolar disorder warranted

The frequency of the metabolic syndrome in patients with bipolar disorder warrants systematic screening, say researchers, particularly among men, older patients and those receiving atypical antipsychotic treatment. [More]
FDA accepts Amgen's evolocumab BLA for review

FDA accepts Amgen's evolocumab BLA for review

Amgen today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has accepted for review Amgen's Biologics License Application (BLA) for evolocumab for the treatment of high cholesterol. [More]
Moderate alcohol consumption can protect against coronary heart disease, but only for some people

Moderate alcohol consumption can protect against coronary heart disease, but only for some people

A new study at Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, confirms that moderate alcohol consumption can protect against coronary heart disease. [More]
Applying lessons learnt from failed Alzheimer's studies for future research

Applying lessons learnt from failed Alzheimer's studies for future research

Disappointing results in clinical Alzheimer's studies discourage doctors and scientists from continuing their research into ɣ-secretases and a possible treatment against Alzheimer's disease. In the prestigious journal Cell, the Alzheimer's expert Bart De Strooper (VIB-KU Leuven) argues that these studies are not pointless, but merely indicate what the next steps should be for the Alzheimer's research. [More]
Obeticholic acid improves liver health in people with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis

Obeticholic acid improves liver health in people with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis

An experimental drug aimed at treating a common liver disease showed promising results and potential problems in a multicenter clinical trial funded by the National Institutes of Health. The FLINT study found that people with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) who took obeticholic acid (OCA) had improved liver health during that period, including decreased inflammation and fat in the liver and decreased body weight versus people receiving a placebo. OCA was also associated with increases in itching and total cholesterol. [More]
Only one in every two young adults with hypertension receives advice on how to lower blood pressure

Only one in every two young adults with hypertension receives advice on how to lower blood pressure

Far too many "teachable moments" are lost in a doctor's office during which young adults with hypertension could have learned how to reduce their blood pressure. In fact, only one in every two hypertensive young Americans does in fact receive such advice and guidance from a healthcare provider within a year from being diagnosed, says Heather M. Johnson of the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health in the US. [More]
IU School of Medicine researchers identify new protein that can control diabetes

IU School of Medicine researchers identify new protein that can control diabetes

Indiana University School of Medicine researchers have identified a small protein with a big role in lowering plasma glucose and increasing insulin sensitivity. [More]
Effects of unhealthy lifestyle persist even after atherosclerosis treatment

Effects of unhealthy lifestyle persist even after atherosclerosis treatment

Almost everyone knows that improving your eating habits will most likely improve your health. What most people may not know, however, is that the effects of poor eating habits persist long after dietary habits are improved. In a new report appearing in the November 2014 issue of the Journal of Leukocyte Biology, scientists use mice to show that even after successful treatment of atherosclerosis (including lowering of blood cholesterol and a change in dietary habits) the effects of an unhealthy lifestyle still affect the way the immune system functions. [More]