Cholesterol News and Research RSS Feed - Cholesterol News and Research

Cholesterol is a waxy, fat-like substance made in the liver, and found in the blood and in all cells of the body. Cholesterol is important for good health and is needed for making cell walls, tissues, hormones, vitamin D, and bile acid. Cholesterol also comes from eating foods taken from animals such as egg yolks, meat, and whole-milk dairy products. Too much cholesterol in the blood may build up in blood vessel walls, block blood flow to tissues and organs, and increase the risk of developing heart disease and stroke.
Multifaceted intervention helps bipolar disorder patients lose weight

Multifaceted intervention helps bipolar disorder patients lose weight

An Integrated Risk Reduction Intervention can help overweight and obese patients with bipolar disorder to reduce their body mass index, US researchers report. [More]
Columbia University researchers analyze results of Oregon Health Experiment

Columbia University researchers analyze results of Oregon Health Experiment

Researchers at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health analyzed the results of the Oregon Health Experiment, where eligible uninsured individuals were randomly assigned Medicaid or to stay with their current care. Considered controversial because the experiment found no measurable gains for physical health it did reveal benefits for mental health, financial wellbeing, and preventive screening. [More]
Study: Low glycemic diet does not improve insulin sensitivity or cardiovascular risk factors

Study: Low glycemic diet does not improve insulin sensitivity or cardiovascular risk factors

Nutrition experts are continually debating the nutritional value of carbohydrate-containing foods and whether some are healthier than others. High carbohydrate foods are classified by how much they increase blood sugar; known as glycemic index. In new findings led by researchers at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston and Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, researchers looked at glycemic index' effect on cardiovascular disease (CVD) and diabetes and found that low glycemic diets did not improve insulin sensitivity or cardiovascular risk factors. [More]
Children who skip meals more likely to have excess body fat, increased cardiometabolic risk

Children who skip meals more likely to have excess body fat, increased cardiometabolic risk

Children who skip main meals are more likely to have excess body fat and an increased cardiometabolic risk already at the age of 6 to 8 years, according to a Finnish study. A higher consumption of sugary drinks, red meat and low-fat margarine and a lower consumption of vegetable oil are also related to a higher cardiometabolic risk. [More]
Revolutionising back pain treatments: an interview with Dr Kieran O’Sullivan

Revolutionising back pain treatments: an interview with Dr Kieran O’Sullivan

Back pain is exceptionally common. In fact, to not experience back pain at some point of your life would be thoroughly abnormal. Experiencing back pain is like becoming tired or becoming sad; we don’t necessarily like it, but it’s perfectly common. [More]
UAB neurologist creates clinic to offer personalized Alzheimer's risk assessment service

UAB neurologist creates clinic to offer personalized Alzheimer's risk assessment service

Neurologist David Geldmacher, M.D., who leads the University of Alabama at Birmingham Division of Memory Disorders, sees many older patients with memory loss, dementia or Alzheimer's disease. He also sees their caregivers, who often are spouses or adult children. [More]
Two MinuteClinic walk-in medical clinics open inside CVS/pharmacy stores in Northern Nevada

Two MinuteClinic walk-in medical clinics open inside CVS/pharmacy stores in Northern Nevada

Two MinuteClinic walk-in medical clinics opened today inside CVS/pharmacy stores in Reno and Sparks. They join eight MinuteClinic locations inside select CVS/pharmacy stores in the Las Vegas area in Southern Nevada. [More]
IRCM researchers uncover mechanism that regulates dopamine levels in the brain

IRCM researchers uncover mechanism that regulates dopamine levels in the brain

Researchers in Montréal led by Jacques Drouin, D.Sc., uncovered a mechanism regulating dopamine levels in the brain by working on a mouse model of late onset Parkinson's disease. [More]
Researchers pinpoint rare gene mutations that increase risk of heart attack early in life

Researchers pinpoint rare gene mutations that increase risk of heart attack early in life

A team of investigators from the Broad Institute, Massachusetts General Hospital and other leading biomedical research institutions has pinpointed rare mutations in a gene called APOA5 that increase a person's risk of having a heart attack early in life. These mutations disable the APOA5 gene and also raise the levels in the blood of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins, a type of fat. [More]
Arrhythmia patients who manage lifestyle factors more likely to have long-term survival

Arrhythmia patients who manage lifestyle factors more likely to have long-term survival

Patients suffering from the world's most common heart rhythm disorder can have their long-term outcomes significantly improved with an aggressive management of their underlying cardiac risk factors, according to University of Adelaide researchers. [More]
New technique shows promise for early diagnosis of cardiovascular disease

New technique shows promise for early diagnosis of cardiovascular disease

A new technique developed at Sweden's KTH Royal Institute of Technology shows promise for early diagnosis and treatment of cardiovascular disease. [More]
Triple hormone reduces body weight, improves insulin sensitivity

Triple hormone reduces body weight, improves insulin sensitivity

Recently, the researchers had constructed several single molecules with dual hormone action. Now, for the first time, the researchers succeeded in designing a substance that combines three metabolically active hormone components (GLP-1, GIP and glucagon) and offers unmatched potency to fight metabolic diseases in pre-clinical trials. [More]
Weight-loss surgery may reduce lower urinary tract symptoms

Weight-loss surgery may reduce lower urinary tract symptoms

Metabolic syndrome is linked with an increased frequency and severity of lower urinary tract symptoms, but weight loss surgery may lessen these symptoms. The findings, which come from two studies published in BJU International, indicate that urinary problems may be added to the list of issues that can improve with efforts that address altered metabolism. [More]
Study sheds new light on well-known mechanism required for immune response

Study sheds new light on well-known mechanism required for immune response

A new study published in the scientific journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America sheds new light on a well-known mechanism required for the immune response. Researchers at the IRCM, led by Tarik Möröy, PhD, identified a protein that controls the activity of the p53 tumour suppressor protein known as the "guardian of the genome". [More]
Growth genes seem different in Hunger Winter children

Growth genes seem different in Hunger Winter children

Individuals conceived in the severe Dutch Famine, also called the Hunger Winter, may have adjusted to this horrendous period of World War II by making adaptations to how active their DNA is. Genes involved in growth and development were differentially regulated, according to researchers at the Leiden University Medical Center, Harvard University, and Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health. [More]
Study explores association between statin use and cataracts

Study explores association between statin use and cataracts

Few classes of drugs have had such a transformative effect on the prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD) as have statins, prescribed to reduce total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. [More]
Promising new therapeutic strategy for chronic kidney disease

Promising new therapeutic strategy for chronic kidney disease

Chronic kidney disease (CKD) affects at least one in four Americans who are older than 60 and can significantly shorten lifespan. Yet the few available drugs for CKD can only modestly delay the disease's progress towards kidney failure. Now, however, a team led by researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, has found an aspect of CKD's development that points to a promising new therapeutic strategy. [More]
Australian Prescriber publishes top 10 subsidised drugs in Australia

Australian Prescriber publishes top 10 subsidised drugs in Australia

The annual publication of the top 10 subsidised drugs appears in the December edition of Australian Prescriber. Statins (cholesterol-lowering medicines) top the lists again. [More]
Pivotal Therapeutics announces accomplishments, financial results for Q3 2014

Pivotal Therapeutics announces accomplishments, financial results for Q3 2014

Pivotal Therapeutics Inc., ("Pivotal" or the "Company"), a specialty pharmaceutical company with a focus on Omega-3 therapies for cardiovascular disease (CVD) and overall health, announced its accomplishments and financial results for the three months ended September 30, 2014. [More]
Researchers uncover easily detectable, 'pre-malignant' state in the blood

Researchers uncover easily detectable, 'pre-malignant' state in the blood

Researchers from the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, Harvard Medical School, and Harvard-affiliated hospitals have uncovered an easily detectable, "pre-malignant" state in the blood that significantly increases the likelihood that an individual will go on to develop blood cancers such as leukemia, lymphoma, or myelodysplastic syndrome. [More]