Cholesterol News and Research RSS Feed - Cholesterol News and Research

Cholesterol is a waxy, fat-like substance made in the liver, and found in the blood and in all cells of the body. Cholesterol is important for good health and is needed for making cell walls, tissues, hormones, vitamin D, and bile acid. Cholesterol also comes from eating foods taken from animals such as egg yolks, meat, and whole-milk dairy products. Too much cholesterol in the blood may build up in blood vessel walls, block blood flow to tissues and organs, and increase the risk of developing heart disease and stroke.
High cholesterol in mid-life can impact heart health later

High cholesterol in mid-life can impact heart health later

Most young adults might assume they have years before needing to worry about their cholesterol. [More]
Study: Poor psychosocial work environment linked to cardiovascular problems

Study: Poor psychosocial work environment linked to cardiovascular problems

A psychosocially poor work environment means that employees experience highly demanding requirements but have little ability to control their work or not feel sufficiently appreciated for the contributions they make. [More]
Alzheimer's drug Aricept (donepezil) linked to serious side effects

Alzheimer's drug Aricept (donepezil) linked to serious side effects

New warnings have been added to the prescribing information for the Alzheimer's drug Aricept (donepezil) advising of the risk of two rare but potentially serious conditions: muscle breakdown (rhabdomyolysis) and a neurological disorder called neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS). [More]
People hospitalized for pneumonia at greater risk of developing cardiovascular disease

People hospitalized for pneumonia at greater risk of developing cardiovascular disease

Your chance of having a heart attack or stroke increases significantly if you have been hospitalized for pneumonia, according to a paper published today in the influential JAMA (Journal of the American Medical Association). [More]
Physicians in subspecialties report increased satisfaction with concierge medicine model

Physicians in subspecialties report increased satisfaction with concierge medicine model

Attracted to the opportunity to provide concierge medicine's hallmark model of personalized care, physicians in subspecialties such as cardiology, endocrinology, pulmonology, and others are increasingly converting their practices, and reporting increased professional and personal satisfaction, according to Michael Friedlander, Principal at national healthcare consulting firm Specialdocs. [More]
Joining a walking group helps boost overall health

Joining a walking group helps boost overall health

Joining a walking group is one of the best and easiest ways to boost overall health, with virtually no side effects, suggests an analysis of the available evidence, published online in the British Journal of Sports Medicine. [More]
Penn State researchers explore benefits of beet juice

Penn State researchers explore benefits of beet juice

Athletes who down beet juice before exercising to increase blood flow and improve performance may be surprised at the results of a recent study conducted at Penn State's Noll Laboratory. While beetroot juice rich in nitrates did not enhance muscle blood flow or vascular dilation during exercise, researchers found that it did "de-stiffen" blood vessels under resting conditions, potentially easing the workload of the heart. [More]
Moderate drinking may reduce heart failure risk

Moderate drinking may reduce heart failure risk

Evidence already exists for the beneficial effects of drinking moderate amounts of alcohol on the risk of developing a number of heart conditions; however, the role it plays in the risk of developing heart failure has been under-researched with conflicting results. [More]
Regular outdoor walking in groups boosts health, reduces life-threatening conditions

Regular outdoor walking in groups boosts health, reduces life-threatening conditions

Risk of stroke, coronary heart disease, depression and other life-threatening conditions can be reduced through regular outdoor walking in groups, according to research from the University of East Anglia. [More]
Study: Michigan autoworkers are at increased risk for heart disease

Study: Michigan autoworkers are at increased risk for heart disease

A Michigan State University study is the first to indicate that the state's autoworkers are at a higher risk of heart disease compared to the U.S. population overall. [More]
Almost 42% of US drinkers use alcohol-interactive prescription medications, study finds

Almost 42% of US drinkers use alcohol-interactive prescription medications, study finds

Approximately 71 percent of American adults drink alcohol. While alcohol interacts negatively with a number of commonly prescribed medications, little is known on a population level about the use of alcohol-interactive (AI) prescription medication among US drinkers. A new study has found that almost 42 percent of drinkers in the US population have used one or more alcohol-interactive prescription medications. [More]
First medical device approved for treatment of obesity

First medical device approved for treatment of obesity

The United States Food and Drug Administration approved EnteroMedic's VBLOC vagal blocking therapy, delivered via the Maestro System, which is the first medical device approved for obesity treatment that targets the nerve pathway between the brain and the stomach. [More]
UH Case Medical Center researchers find that coenzyme A plays key role in cell metabolism

UH Case Medical Center researchers find that coenzyme A plays key role in cell metabolism

Case Western Reserve and University Hospitals Case Medical Center researchers and physicians have discovered that the molecule known as coenzyme A plays a key role in cell metabolism by regulating the actions of nitric oxide. Cell metabolism is the ongoing process of chemical transformations within the body's cells that sustains life, and alterations in metabolism are a common cause of human disease, including cancer and heart disease. [More]
TSRI scientists identify novel synthetic compound that reduces activity of a cancer-related protein

TSRI scientists identify novel synthetic compound that reduces activity of a cancer-related protein

Scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute have identified a novel synthetic compound that sharply inhibits the activity of a protein that plays an important role in in the progression of breast and pancreatic cancers. [More]
Research findings may lead to new treatment for hypothyroidism

Research findings may lead to new treatment for hypothyroidism

An international research team led by physician-scientists at Rush University Medical Center have gained new insights into hypothyroidism - a condition affecting about 10 million people in the U.S. - that may lead to new treatment protocols for the disease, particularly among the approximately 15 percent of patients for whom standard treatments are less effective. [More]
Duke researchers grow contracting human skeletal muscle in lab

Duke researchers grow contracting human skeletal muscle in lab

In a laboratory first, Duke researchers have grown human skeletal muscle that contracts and responds just like native tissue to external stimuli such as electrical pulses, biochemical signals and pharmaceuticals. [More]
Study: Community-wide CVD prevention programs help reduce hospitalizations, death rates

Study: Community-wide CVD prevention programs help reduce hospitalizations, death rates

In a rural Maine county, sustained, community-wide programs targeting cardiovascular risk factors and behavior changes were associated with reductions in hospitalization and death rates over a 40-year period (1970-2010) compared with the rest of the state. Substantial improvements were seen in control of hypertension and cholesterol, and smoking cessation, according to a study in the January 13 issue of JAMA. [More]
Two new ODYSSEY trials meet primary efficacy endpoints

Two new ODYSSEY trials meet primary efficacy endpoints

Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Inc. and Sanofi today announced that two new ODYSSEY trials, which are the first Phase 3 trials to assess alirocumab administered every four weeks, met their primary efficacy endpoints. [More]
Exposure to nanoparticles can play major role in development of cardiovascular diseases

Exposure to nanoparticles can play major role in development of cardiovascular diseases

Nanoparticles, extremely tiny particles measured in billionths of a meter, are increasingly everywhere, and especially in biomedical products. Their toxicity has been researched in general terms, but now a team of Israeli scientists has for the first time found that exposure nanoparticles (NPs) of silicon dioxide (SiO2) can play a major role in the development of cardiovascular diseases when the NP cross tissue and cellular barriers and also find their way into the circulatory system. [More]
New findings may lay groundwork of novel treatment for people with Huntington's disease

New findings may lay groundwork of novel treatment for people with Huntington's disease

By adjusting the levels of a key signaling protein, researchers improved motor function and brain abnormalities in experimental animals with a form of Huntington's disease, a severe neurodegenerative disorder. [More]