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Cholesterol is a waxy, fat-like substance made in the liver, and found in the blood and in all cells of the body. Cholesterol is important for good health and is needed for making cell walls, tissues, hormones, vitamin D, and bile acid. Cholesterol also comes from eating foods taken from animals such as egg yolks, meat, and whole-milk dairy products. Too much cholesterol in the blood may build up in blood vessel walls, block blood flow to tissues and organs, and increase the risk of developing heart disease and stroke.
New technique could help detect harmful PAMP molecules in certain processed foods

New technique could help detect harmful PAMP molecules in certain processed foods

Our favourite foods could be made healthier thanks to a new technique developed by the University of Leicester which has identified harmful bacterial molecules in certain processed foods such as burgers and ready meals. [More]
Study sheds light on role of red raspberries in metabolically-based chronic diseases

Study sheds light on role of red raspberries in metabolically-based chronic diseases

Components in red raspberries may have anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidative and metabolic stabilizing activity, according to a comprehensive review of the available scientific literature published in the January issue of Advances in Nutrition. [More]
Diet containing unsaturated fats positively impacts weight loss and heart health markers

Diet containing unsaturated fats positively impacts weight loss and heart health markers

A new study published in the Journal of the American Heart Association found that a diet containing unsaturated fats, such as those found in walnuts and olive oil, has similar weight loss effects as a lower fat, higher-carbohydrate diet. [More]
Simple strategies may help people stave off neurodegenerative condition

Simple strategies may help people stave off neurodegenerative condition

Diet, exercise, a good night's sleep -- all sound recommendations for mitigating one's risk for everything from heart disease to diabetes and, as it turns out, Alzheimer's. [More]
Experimental nanoparticle therapy shows promise for fighting primary liver cancer

Experimental nanoparticle therapy shows promise for fighting primary liver cancer

An experimental nanoparticle therapy that combines low-density lipoproteins (LDL) and fish oil preferentially kills primary liver cancer cells without harming healthy cells, UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers report. [More]
Study provides new insight into complex interchange that can raise blood levels of fat in type 1 diabetes

Study provides new insight into complex interchange that can raise blood levels of fat in type 1 diabetes

Researchers have new insight into the complex interchange that can raise blood levels of unhealthy lipids, or fat, in type 1 diabetes, and early evidence that a drug under study to block cancer cell growth can restore healthier levels. [More]
Incidence and severity emerging CVD risk factors may differ between genders

Incidence and severity emerging CVD risk factors may differ between genders

The incidence and severity of both traditional and emerging cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors as well as the response to treatment may differ between genders. In this narrative review, several emerging CVD risk factors (i.e. inflammatory and haemostatic markers, endothelial dysfunction, homocysteine, lipid disorders, microalbuminuria/proteinuria, coronary artery calcium score, arterial stiffness, periodontitis, inflammatory bowel syndrome, obstructive sleep apnea, impaired glucose metabolism, metabolic syndrome and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease) are discussed in the context of gender differences. [More]
Using BMI to measure health incorrectly labels over 54 million Americans as 'unhealthy', study finds

Using BMI to measure health incorrectly labels over 54 million Americans as 'unhealthy', study finds

Over the past few years, body mass index, a ratio of a person's height and weight, has effectively become a proxy for whether a person is considered healthy. Many U.S. companies use their employees' BMIs as a factor in determining workers' health care costs. And people with higher BMIs could soon have to pay higher health insurance premiums, if a rule proposed in April by the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission is adopted. [More]
Texting could promote medication adherence among chronically ill patients

Texting could promote medication adherence among chronically ill patients

Text messages can double the odds of medication adherence in patients with chronic disease. That is the central finding of a new study published today in JAMA Internal Medicine. [More]
New drug cocktail may show promise in NSCLC patients

New drug cocktail may show promise in NSCLC patients

A drug approved by the Food and Drug Administration for melanoma in combination with a common cholesterol-lowering drug may show promise in controlling cancer growth in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), according to new research from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. [More]
Depression symptoms increase risk for heart disease, stroke in middle-aged and older adults

Depression symptoms increase risk for heart disease, stroke in middle-aged and older adults

Depression and its symptoms increase as people age, and have been linked to heart disease and stroke in both middle-aged and older adults. But whether depression and its symptoms are risk factors for these two dangerous conditions has been unclear. [More]
Maternal diet during pregnancy and lactation leads to epigenetic changes in offspring

Maternal diet during pregnancy and lactation leads to epigenetic changes in offspring

As the study shows, a high-fat diet during pregnancy and lactation leads to epigenetic changes in the offspring. These changes affect metabolic pathways regulated by the gut hormone GIP, whereby the adult offspring are more susceptible to obesity and insulin resistance, the precursor to type 2 diabetes. Similar mechanisms cannot be ruled out in humans, according to Pfeiffer. [More]
HealthMine survey: 74% of people say activity trackers help them cope with heart condition

HealthMine survey: 74% of people say activity trackers help them cope with heart condition

Consumers are beginning to embrace mobile tools for heart health—but not enough. A January HealthMine survey of 501 consumers with known heart disease and/or risk found that just 27% of people are using an activity tracker. Only 16% say they are using their tracker to manage their heart condition/risk. Yet 74% of those who do use an activity tracker report the device is helping them cope with their heart condition. [More]
Researchers develop new sensor for continuous monitoring of blood flow in vascular diseases patients

Researchers develop new sensor for continuous monitoring of blood flow in vascular diseases patients

Frequent measurement of blood flow changes could improve the ability of health care providers to diagnose and treat patients with vascular conditions, such as those associated with diabetes and high blood pressure. [More]
NJHA honors several individuals and organizations with Healthcare Leader Awards

NJHA honors several individuals and organizations with Healthcare Leader Awards

The New Jersey Hospital Association, the state's oldest and largest healthcare trade association, today held its annual awards program to honor several individuals and organizations for their commitment to the state's healthcare system and the patients and communities they serve. [More]
Weight loss programs that provide healthy fats have similar impacts on pound-shedding

Weight loss programs that provide healthy fats have similar impacts on pound-shedding

A University of California, San Diego School of Medicine study finds that weight loss programs that provide healthy fats, such as olive oil in the Mediterranean diet, or a low-fat, high-carbohydrate diet have similar impacts on pound-shedding. [More]
LMU researchers reveal how crystalline deposits induce cell death

LMU researchers reveal how crystalline deposits induce cell death

Crystal formation plays a defining role in the pathogenesis of a range of common diseases, such as gout and atherosclerosis. Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich researchers led by Hans-Joachim Anders have now elucidated how the insoluble deposits induce cell death. [More]
Second-hand smoke exposure linked to larger waist, poorer cognition in children

Second-hand smoke exposure linked to larger waist, poorer cognition in children

Exposure to second-hand smoke is associated with a larger waist and poorer cognition in children, researchers say. [More]
Cardiovascular considerations crucial for CML TKI patients

Cardiovascular considerations crucial for CML TKI patients

A review of BCR–ABL1 tyrosine kinase inhibitors highlights the need to consider cardiovascular adverse event risk profiles when prescribing for patients with chronic myeloid leukaemia. [More]
Amgen announces approval of cholesterol-lowering medication Repatha (evolocumab) Injection in Japan

Amgen announces approval of cholesterol-lowering medication Repatha (evolocumab) Injection in Japan

Amgen today announced that the Japanese Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare has approved the cholesterol-lowering medication Repatha (evolocumab) Injection, the first proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) inhibitor to be approved in Japan. [More]
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