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Cholesterol is a waxy, fat-like substance made in the liver, and found in the blood and in all cells of the body. Cholesterol is important for good health and is needed for making cell walls, tissues, hormones, vitamin D, and bile acid. Cholesterol also comes from eating foods taken from animals such as egg yolks, meat, and whole-milk dairy products. Too much cholesterol in the blood may build up in blood vessel walls, block blood flow to tissues and organs, and increase the risk of developing heart disease and stroke.
Most women do not know age heart screenings should start, survey finds

Most women do not know age heart screenings should start, survey finds

A new national survey by Orlando Health found that most women are unaware of the age at which heart screenings should begin. [More]
Lipid content changes as cells age, new study reveals

Lipid content changes as cells age, new study reveals

As cells age and stop dividing, their fat content changes, along with the way they produce and break down fat and other molecules classified as lipids, according to a new University at Buffalo study. [More]
U of I scientists discuss piglet model used for pediatric nutrition and neurodevelopment research

U of I scientists discuss piglet model used for pediatric nutrition and neurodevelopment research

Pediatric nutrition research has sh own the important effects of early-life nutrition on a baby's development--especially the gastrointestinal tract--and more recent research indicates that nutrition may also have an influence on an infant's brain as it develops. [More]
Study provides link between common mutations in blood cells of older adults and atherosclerosis

Study provides link between common mutations in blood cells of older adults and atherosclerosis

A new study provides some of the first links between relatively common mutations in the blood cells of elderly humans and atherosclerosis. [More]
Statins could reduce threat of venous thromboembolism, research shows

Statins could reduce threat of venous thromboembolism, research shows

Statins could hold the key to eradicating one of the most preventable causes of hospital deaths after researchers uncovered a new role for the cholesterol-lowering pill. [More]
Endogenous peptide inhibits atherosclerosis by reducing cholesterol levels

Endogenous peptide inhibits atherosclerosis by reducing cholesterol levels

Cells of the innate immune system that play an important role in development of atherosclerosis contain a protein that reduces levels of cholesterol in mice - and thus helps to inhibit or mitigate the disease. [More]
UIC chemists pinpoint role of cholesterol in cells

UIC chemists pinpoint role of cholesterol in cells

Scientists have long puzzled over cholesterol. It's biologically necessary; it's observably harmful - and nobody knows what it's doing where it's most abundant in cells: in the cell membrane. [More]
Chronic kidney disease patients have high out-of-pocket healthcare expenditures, study finds

Chronic kidney disease patients have high out-of-pocket healthcare expenditures, study finds

Patients who have chronic kidney disease but are not on dialysis have higher out-of-pocket healthcare expenses than even stroke and cancer patients, according to a study by researchers at Loyola University Chicago and Loyola Medicine. [More]
TMDU researchers identify metabolic pathway crucial for embryo development

TMDU researchers identify metabolic pathway crucial for embryo development

Much has been revealed about how a single fertilized cell, the egg, can develop into a complete organism simply via repeated cycles of cell division. However, many gaps remain in our understanding of how these dividing cells are directed to arrange themselves appropriately at each stage of embryonic development. [More]
People with metabolic syndrome may need more vitamin E, new research shows

People with metabolic syndrome may need more vitamin E, new research shows

New research has shown that people with metabolic syndrome need significantly more vitamin E - which could be a serious public health concern, in light of the millions of people who have this condition that's often related to obesity. [More]
Heart CT scans can help personalize treatment for patients with mild high blood pressure

Heart CT scans can help personalize treatment for patients with mild high blood pressure

Using data from a national study, Johns Hopkins researchers determined that using heart CT scans can help personalize treatment in patients whose blood pressure falls in the gray zone of just above normal or mild high blood pressure. [More]
Reducing cocaine use can potentially reverse coronary atherosclerosis

Reducing cocaine use can potentially reverse coronary atherosclerosis

People who use cocaine regularly are at high risk of coronary artery disease. A study in the Journal of Addiction Medicine, the official journal of the American Society of Addiction Medicine, reports that stopping or reducing cocaine use can potentially reverse the process of coronary atherosclerosis. The journal is published by Wolters Kluwer. [More]
Pasta consumption in adults linked to overall better diet quality

Pasta consumption in adults linked to overall better diet quality

New research analyzing the diets of people who eat pasta has revealed more good news about one of America's favorite foods. [More]
Woman's blood pressure before pregnancy may be linked to babies' sex

Woman's blood pressure before pregnancy may be linked to babies' sex

A new paper published in the American Journal of Hypertension suggests that a woman's blood pressure before pregnancy is related to her likelihood of giving birth to a boy or girl. [More]
Skidmore College scientist discovers health benefits of balanced, protein-pacing, low-calorie diet

Skidmore College scientist discovers health benefits of balanced, protein-pacing, low-calorie diet

Research by Skidmore College exercise scientist Paul Arciero has found that a balanced, protein-pacing, low-calorie diet that includes intermittent fasting not only achieves long-term weight loss, but also helps release toxins in the form of PCBs from the body fat stores, in addition to enhancing heart health and reducing oxidative stress. [More]
Experts suggest new five-stage system of classifying patients at risk for heart attack

Experts suggest new five-stage system of classifying patients at risk for heart attack

Experts at Johns Hopkins and New York's Mount Sinai Health System have published a suggested new plan for a five-stage system of classifying the risk of heart attack in those with heart disease, one they say puts much-needed and long-absent focus on the risks faced by millions of Americans who pass so-called stress tests or have less obvious or earlier-stage danger signs. [More]
Blue maize may help protect against metabolic syndrome, rat study shows

Blue maize may help protect against metabolic syndrome, rat study shows

A new study shows that a rat model of metabolic syndrome fed a high-sugar and high-cholesterol diet and given blue maize extract showed significant improvement in systolic blood pressure, high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, and triglyceride levels compared to those not given the extract. [More]
Antioxidant may prevent development of NAFLD in offspring of obese mothers

Antioxidant may prevent development of NAFLD in offspring of obese mothers

In new research published online in The FASEB Journal, scientists show that the antioxidant pyrroloquinoline quinone may prevent the development of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in offspring. [More]
High intake of dietary cholesterol and eggs not linked to elevated risk of memory disorders

High intake of dietary cholesterol and eggs not linked to elevated risk of memory disorders

A new study from the University of Eastern Finland shows that a relatively high intake of dietary cholesterol, or eating one egg every day, are not associated with an elevated risk of dementia or Alzheimer's disease. [More]
Penn study finds evidence of AD neuropathology in post-mortem brains of LBD patients

Penn study finds evidence of AD neuropathology in post-mortem brains of LBD patients

Patients who had a diagnosis of Parkinson's disease (PD) with dementia (PDD) or dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) and had higher levels of Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology in their donated post-mortem brains also had more severe symptoms of these Lewy body diseases (LBD) during their lives, compared to those whose brains had less AD pathology, according to research from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. [More]
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