Cholesterol News and Research RSS Feed - Cholesterol News and Research

Cholesterol is a waxy, fat-like substance made in the liver, and found in the blood and in all cells of the body. Cholesterol is important for good health and is needed for making cell walls, tissues, hormones, vitamin D, and bile acid. Cholesterol also comes from eating foods taken from animals such as egg yolks, meat, and whole-milk dairy products. Too much cholesterol in the blood may build up in blood vessel walls, block blood flow to tissues and organs, and increase the risk of developing heart disease and stroke.
Risk-based treatment approach should be considered for patients with hypertension

Risk-based treatment approach should be considered for patients with hypertension

Blood pressure-lowering treatment should target patients at greatest cardiovascular risk and not just those with the highest baseline levels, suggest findings of a meta-analysis. [More]
Merz Pharmaceuticals launches new CAIDE Dementia Risk App

Merz Pharmaceuticals launches new CAIDE Dementia Risk App

The CAIDE Dementia Risk App from Merz Pharmaceuticals is available free of charge for people from 40 to 65 to calculate their individual risk for getting dementia within the next two decades. Using a traffic light color scheme, the App can also help physicians discuss preventive measures with patients at risk. [More]
Isis Pharmaceuticals begins ISIS-APOCIIIRx Phase 3 study in FCS patients

Isis Pharmaceuticals begins ISIS-APOCIIIRx Phase 3 study in FCS patients

Isis Pharmaceuticals, Inc. announced the initiation of a Phase 3 study evaluating ISIS-APOCIIIRx in patients with familial chylomicronemia syndrome (FCS). FCS is a rare orphan disease, characterized by extremely high triglyceride levels, that affects an estimated 3,000 to 5,000 patients worldwide. [More]
New UCLA study finds that oxidized lipids may also contribute to pulmonary hypertension

New UCLA study finds that oxidized lipids may also contribute to pulmonary hypertension

Oxidized lipids are known to play a key role in inflaming blood vessels and hardening arteries, which causes diseases like atherosclerosis. A new study at UCLA demonstrates that they may also contribute to pulmonary hypertension, a serious lung disease that narrows the small blood vessels in the lungs. [More]
Receiving prescription at discharge improves outcomes in stroke patients

Receiving prescription at discharge improves outcomes in stroke patients

Stroke patients are 70 per cent more likely to continue taking their stroke prevention medications one year later if they have a prescription in hand when discharged - according to researchers at St. Michael's Hospital and the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences. [More]
Amgen's ivabradine receives FDA priority review designation for treatment of chronic heart failure

Amgen's ivabradine receives FDA priority review designation for treatment of chronic heart failure

Amgen today announced the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has granted priority review designation for ivabradine for the treatment of chronic heart failure (HF). [More]
New guidelines can improve the way statin drugs prescribed to patients at cardiovascular risk

New guidelines can improve the way statin drugs prescribed to patients at cardiovascular risk

New national guidelines can improve the way statin drugs are prescribed to patients at risk for cardiovascular disease, a Yale University study has found. [More]
Jardiance (empagliflozin) tablets now available in U.S. for people with diabetes

Jardiance (empagliflozin) tablets now available in U.S. for people with diabetes

Jardiance (empagliflozin) tablets are now available by prescription in pharmacies across the United States, including Walgreens, Rite Aid, Kroger and many other leading chain and independent retailers, according to Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc. and Eli Lilly and Company. [More]
Spanish scientists explore genetic basis of familial extreme longevity

Spanish scientists explore genetic basis of familial extreme longevity

In a recent report in Aging Cell, a multidisciplinary team of Spanish scientists, led by Tim Cash and Manuel Serrano at the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre, identify rare variants in the APOB gene in several families where exceptional longevity (>100 years of age) appears to cluster. [More]

New ingredient in gluten-free products can cause allergic reaction

A popular new ingredient in gluten-free products could be causing an allergic reaction, according to a Kansas State University food safety specialist. [More]
UT Southwestern researchers discover crucial link between high insulin levels and obesity pathways

UT Southwestern researchers discover crucial link between high insulin levels and obesity pathways

UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers have identified a crucial link between high levels of insulin and pathways that lead to obesity, a finding that may have important implications when treating diabetes. [More]
Sanofi, Regeneron present alirocumab Phase 3 trial results at ESC Congress 2014

Sanofi, Regeneron present alirocumab Phase 3 trial results at ESC Congress 2014

Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Inc. and Sanofi today announced that details from four pivotal trials in the alirocumab ODYSSEY clinical program will be presented on Sunday, August 31, during a Hot Line session at ESC Congress 2014 in Barcelona, Spain, the world's largest cardiology meeting. [More]
Study could pave way for preventing brain and cardiac ischemia induced by atherosclerosis

Study could pave way for preventing brain and cardiac ischemia induced by atherosclerosis

A recent Finnish study could pave the way for preventing brain and cardiac ischemia induced by atherosclerosis. Finnish researchers have found that the low-expression variant of fatty acid-binding protein 4 (FABP4), which is particularly common among Finns, reduces the risk of heart attack and stroke. [More]
Research shows long non-coding RNAs regulate circadian clocks

Research shows long non-coding RNAs regulate circadian clocks

Researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center have found a new way that internal body clocks are regulated by a type of molecule known as long non-coding RNA. [More]
Why didn't your health insurance cover your bill?

Why didn't your health insurance cover your bill?

How many times have you gotten a medical bill for more than you were expecting? Chances are, it's happened before, and you're not the only one who's been shocked at the price tag on a service that your insurance should have covered. [More]
New cholesterol guidelines can significantly help reduce cardiovascular events

New cholesterol guidelines can significantly help reduce cardiovascular events

A study from UT-Southwestern researchers found that recently introduced cholesterol guidelines would significantly reduce new cardiovascular events, when compared to treatment based on previous cholesterol guidelines. [More]
First Edition: August 18, 2014

First Edition: August 18, 2014

Today's headlines stories about the pervasive nature of Medicare fraud and the difficulties involved in fighting it. [More]
Patients who rely on pacemakers and defibrillators run risk of serious health complications

Patients who rely on pacemakers and defibrillators run risk of serious health complications

Patients who rely on pacemakers and defibrillators to maintain a normal heart rhythm run the risk of serious health complications if they don't fully understand how the devices work and what to do when they experience an irregular heartbeat. [More]
Researchers study LDLR protein using new, groundbreaking techniques

Researchers study LDLR protein using new, groundbreaking techniques

Researchers from the Copenhagen Center for Glycomics at the University of Copenhagen have studied an important receptor protein called LDLR using new, groundbreaking techniques. The protein plays an important role in the absorption of the bad cholesterol, LDL. [More]
State highlights: TB outbreak in Alabama prisons; court order could force Wash. hospitals to release many psychiatric patients

State highlights: TB outbreak in Alabama prisons; court order could force Wash. hospitals to release many psychiatric patients

Alabama's prison system, badly overcrowded and facing a lawsuit over medical treatment of inmates, is facing its worst outbreak of tuberculosis in five years, a health official said Thursday. Pam Barrett, director of tuberculosis control for the Alabama Department of Public Health, said medical officials have diagnosed nine active cases of the infectious respiratory disease in state prisons so far this year (8/14). [More]