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Cholesterol is a waxy, fat-like substance made in the liver, and found in the blood and in all cells of the body. Cholesterol is important for good health and is needed for making cell walls, tissues, hormones, vitamin D, and bile acid. Cholesterol also comes from eating foods taken from animals such as egg yolks, meat, and whole-milk dairy products. Too much cholesterol in the blood may build up in blood vessel walls, block blood flow to tissues and organs, and increase the risk of developing heart disease and stroke.
Women who give birth to four or more children at risk of heart disease

Women who give birth to four or more children at risk of heart disease

Women who give birth to four or more children are more likely to have cardiovascular changes that can be early indicators of heart disease than women who have fewer children, new research by UT Southwestern Medical Center cardiologists finds. [More]
Migraine headaches with auras may increase risk of stroke

Migraine headaches with auras may increase risk of stroke

People who suffer migraine headaches with auras are at roughly double the risk of suffering the most common type of stroke. [More]
Study finds clustered cardiometabolic risk factors in children

Study finds clustered cardiometabolic risk factors in children

Lifestyle-related cardiometabolic risk factors cluster already in children in the same way as in adults, according to research from the University of Eastern Finland. A cardiometabolic risk score was used to evaluate cardiometabolic risk in different age groups. [More]
Non-invasive imaging tests may predict healthy adults' future risk of heart attack, stroke or death

Non-invasive imaging tests may predict healthy adults' future risk of heart attack, stroke or death

Adding two non-invasive imaging tests to traditional cardiovascular disease risk factor assessment more precisely predicts a healthy patient's future risk of heart attack, stroke, or premature death, according to a study led by Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and published in the March 24 edition of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. [More]
A new approach to TBI therapy

A new approach to TBI therapy

Innovative angles of attack in research that focus on how the human brain protects and repairs itself will help develop treatments for one of the most common, costly, deadly and scientifically frustrating medical conditions worldwide: traumatic brain injury. [More]
Research suggests genetic predisposition to spontaneous coronary artery disease

Research suggests genetic predisposition to spontaneous coronary artery disease

A Mayo Clinic study has identified a familial association in spontaneous coronary artery dissection, a type of heart attack that most commonly affects younger women, suggesting a genetic predisposition to the condition, researchers say. [More]
Discontinuation of statin therapy may benefit patients with terminal illness

Discontinuation of statin therapy may benefit patients with terminal illness

Discontinuing statin use in patients with late-stage cancer and other terminal illnesses may help improve patients' quality of life without causing other adverse health effects, according to a new study by led by researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus and Duke University and funded by the National Institute of Nursing Research (NINR). [More]
Home-exercise plan for HIV patients

Home-exercise plan for HIV patients

In addition to antiretroviral medications, people with HIV may soon begin receiving a home exercise plan from their doctors, according to a researcher at Case Western Reserve University's Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing. [More]
Glyxambi for Type 2 diabetes treatment now available by prescription across the U.S.

Glyxambi for Type 2 diabetes treatment now available by prescription across the U.S.

Glyxambi® (empagliflozin/linagliptin) tablets are now available by prescription in many leading chain and independent pharmacies across the U.S., including Walgreens and Rite Aid. [More]
Isis Pharmaceuticals announces positive results from ISIS-ANGPTL3Rx Phase 1 study

Isis Pharmaceuticals announces positive results from ISIS-ANGPTL3Rx Phase 1 study

Isis Pharmaceuticals, Inc. announced today positive results from a Phase 1 study with ISIS-ANGPTL3Rx. In this study, healthy volunteers treated with ISIS-ANGPTL3Rx achieved dose-dependent, statistically significant reductions in angiopoietin-like 3 (ANGPTL3) of up to 93 percent with a mean reduction of up to 84 percent from baseline (p<0.001). [More]
UM experts warn of serious risks associated with common IV devices

UM experts warn of serious risks associated with common IV devices

Every day, patients around the country get IV devices placed in their arms, to make it easier to receive medicines or have blood drawn over the course of days or weeks. But these PICC lines, as they're called, also raise the risk of potentially dangerous blood clots. [More]
Copenhagen researchers develop secure way of measuring apo-M protein in human blood

Copenhagen researchers develop secure way of measuring apo-M protein in human blood

Researchers from the University of Copenhagen are the first in the world to develop a secure way of measuring the important protein apo-M. This could prove relevant for research into diseases such as diabetes, arteriosclerosis and sclerosis. [More]
Amgen seeks marketing approval of Repatha (evolocumab) in Japan for treatment of high cholesterol

Amgen seeks marketing approval of Repatha (evolocumab) in Japan for treatment of high cholesterol

Amgen today announced that an application seeking marketing approval of Repatha (evolocumab) for the treatment of high cholesterol has been submitted for review to the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare in Japan. [More]
New in vitro study examines benefits of pear-enriched diet on chronic diseases

New in vitro study examines benefits of pear-enriched diet on chronic diseases

A new in vitro (test tube) study, "Dietary functional benefits of Bartlett and Starkrimson pears for potential management of hyperglycemia, hypertension and ulcer bacteria Helicobacter pylori while supporting beneficial probiotic bacterial response," was published in the March issue of Food Research International. [More]
Vitamin D plays major role in preventing diabetes and atherosclerosis

Vitamin D plays major role in preventing diabetes and atherosclerosis

In recent years, a deficiency of vitamin D has been linked to type 2 diabetes and heart disease, two illnesses that commonly occur together and are the most common cause of illness and death in Western countries. Both disorders are rooted in chronic inflammation, which leads to insulin resistance and the buildup of artery-clogging plaque. [More]
Diet based on UK health guidelines could reduce CVD risk

Diet based on UK health guidelines could reduce CVD risk

Men and women who adapt their daily diet to meet current UK dietary guidelines could reduce their risk of a heart attack or a stroke by up to a third, according to a new study by King's College London. [More]
FDA approves CHOLBAM (cholic acid) for treatment of bile acid synthesis disorders

FDA approves CHOLBAM (cholic acid) for treatment of bile acid synthesis disorders

Asklepion Pharmaceuticals, LLC. today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved CHOLBAM (cholic acid) as a once-daily treatment for cholic acid deficiency in bile acid synthesis disorders due to single enzyme defects. [More]
Simultaneous use of hormones and statins can protect women from heart disease after menopause

Simultaneous use of hormones and statins can protect women from heart disease after menopause

Hormones may not protect women from heart disease or stroke after menopause, but when combined with cholesterol-lowering statin drugs, they may help protect women from these killers, shows a population study from Sweden to be published in the April issue of Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society. [More]
Health care system-level factors may increase likelihood of medication adherence among seniors

Health care system-level factors may increase likelihood of medication adherence among seniors

Specific system-level factors controlled by health care systems - including prescriptions with a medication supply greater than 90 days, mail-order pharmacy use, and lower copayments and out-of-pocket maximums - nearly doubled the likelihood that patients adhered to prescribed heart and diabetes medications, according to a new study published in the journal Medical Care. [More]
Study tracks long-term effects of weight loss on atrial fibrillation burden

Study tracks long-term effects of weight loss on atrial fibrillation burden

Obese patients with atrial fibrillation who lost at least 10 percent of their body weight were six times more likely to achieve long-term freedom from this common heart rhythm disorder compared to those who did not lose weight, according to a study presented at the American College of Cardiology's 64th Annual Scientific Session. [More]
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