Cholesterol News and Research RSS Feed - Cholesterol News and Research

Cholesterol is a waxy, fat-like substance made in the liver, and found in the blood and in all cells of the body. Cholesterol is important for good health and is needed for making cell walls, tissues, hormones, vitamin D, and bile acid. Cholesterol also comes from eating foods taken from animals such as egg yolks, meat, and whole-milk dairy products. Too much cholesterol in the blood may build up in blood vessel walls, block blood flow to tissues and organs, and increase the risk of developing heart disease and stroke.
Community-based structured weight loss program improves diabetes symptoms

Community-based structured weight loss program improves diabetes symptoms

Weight loss and control of blood sugar can reduce the risk of complications in patients with diabetes but this is difficult for many to achieve. A University of California, San Diego School of Medicine randomized controlled trial of obese adults with type 2 diabetes suggests that participants enrolled in a community-based structured weight loss program are able to shed more pounds, improve blood sugar control and reduce or eliminate insulin use and other medications compared to a control group. [More]
7 in 10 Americans support mandated coverage of birth control medications, shows survey

7 in 10 Americans support mandated coverage of birth control medications, shows survey

Nearly 7 in 10 Americans support mandated coverage of birth control medications, according to a new national survey by researchers at the University of Michigan Health System. [More]
Johns Hopkins scientists find a way to prevent atherosclerosis

Johns Hopkins scientists find a way to prevent atherosclerosis

Working with mice and rabbits, Johns Hopkins scientists have found a way to block abnormal cholesterol production, transport and breakdown, successfully preventing the development of atherosclerosis, the main cause of heart attacks and strokes and the number-one cause of death among humans. The condition develops when fat builds inside blood vessels over time and renders them stiff, narrowed and hardened, greatly reducing their ability to feed oxygen-rich blood to the heart muscle and the brain. [More]
Pfizer reports positive results from two tofacitinib Phase 3 trials for moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis

Pfizer reports positive results from two tofacitinib Phase 3 trials for moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis

Pfizer Inc. announced today top-line results from two pivotal Phase 3 trials from the Oral treatment Psoriasis Trials (OPT) Program, OPT Pivotal #1 (A3921078) and OPT Pivotal #2 (A3921079), evaluating the efficacy and safety of tofacitinib, an oral Janus kinase (JAK) inhibitor, the first in a new class of medicines being investigated for the treatment of moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis. [More]
Narrowing of carotid artery in neck without any symptoms may be linked to memory problems

Narrowing of carotid artery in neck without any symptoms may be linked to memory problems

For the first time, researchers have demonstrated that narrowing of the carotid artery in the neck without any symptoms may be linked to problems in learning, memory, thinking and decision-making, compared to people with similar risk factors but no narrowing in the neck artery, according to a study released today that will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology's 66th Annual Meeting in Philadelphia, April 26 to May 3, 2014. [More]
Scientists examine Gpr109a receptor to find potential treatment for diabetic retinopathy

Scientists examine Gpr109a receptor to find potential treatment for diabetic retinopathy

Like a daily pill to lower cholesterol can reduce heart attack and stroke risk, an easy-to-use agent that reduces eye inflammation could help save the vision of diabetics, scientists say. [More]
Penn study clarifies action of potential new class of pain relievers that may benefit and not hurt heart

Penn study clarifies action of potential new class of pain relievers that may benefit and not hurt heart

Nonsteroidal antinflamatory drugs (NSAIDs) that block an enzyme called COX-2 relieve pain and inflammation but can cause heart attacks, stroke, heart failure, and even sudden cardiac death. [More]
Combination therapy could help prevent cardiovascular disease

Combination therapy could help prevent cardiovascular disease

Taking one pill instead of three could be a powerful ally to prevent cardiovascular disease, according to a new Cochrane systematic review of the latest research on polypills from a team of scientists at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, Warwick Medical School and Northwestern Medicine. [More]

NICE recommends FIRMAGON for treating advanced hormone-dependent prostate cancer in adults with spinal metastases

The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) today issued its Final Appraisal Determination (FAD) recommending FIRMAGON (degarelix) as an option for treating advanced hormone-dependent prostate cancer, only in adults with spinal metastases who present with signs or symptoms of spinal cord compression. [More]
Researchers explore new standard of continuity of care for stroke patients

Researchers explore new standard of continuity of care for stroke patients

A new study from the Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry is looking at nurse- and pharmacist-led interventions to improve the standard of care for patients who have suffered minor stroke or transient ischemic attack, also known as "mini stoke." [More]
Researchers evaluate rice consumption against overall diet quality and key nutrient intakes

Researchers evaluate rice consumption against overall diet quality and key nutrient intakes

New research, partially funded by the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the USA Rice Federation, shows that consumers can improve their diets simply by enjoying white or brown rice as part of their daily meals. [More]

Obeticholic acid meets primary composite endpoint in Phase III study

Results from an international Phase III study presented today at the International Liver CongressTM 2014 have shown obeticholic acid (OCA) given to patients suffering from Primary Biliary Cirrhosis (PBC) who previously had an inadequate response to, or have been unable to tolerate ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA), produced meaningful biochemical and clinical improvements. UDCA is the only therapy currently approved to treat PBC. [More]

Study shows obstructive sleep apnea is associated with increased risk of stroke, cancer and death

‚ÄčA new study shows that moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnea is independently associated with an increased risk of stroke, cancer and death. [More]
RWJUH offers new alternative to open up blocked arteries

RWJUH offers new alternative to open up blocked arteries

Treatment options for high-risk heart patients with severely calcified coronary artery disease (CAD) have been limited for more than 20 years. Now, Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital offers a new alternative to open up blocked arteries. [More]
Two Penn researchers selected as recipients of prestigious Clinical Research Achievement Award

Two Penn researchers selected as recipients of prestigious Clinical Research Achievement Award

Two researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and the Penn Cardiovascular Institute are among the 2014 recipients of the prestigious Clinical Research Achievement Award for their work in cardiovascular science. [More]
Mayo Clinic research shows RA patients more likely to develop chronic kidney disease

Mayo Clinic research shows RA patients more likely to develop chronic kidney disease

Rheumatoid arthritis patients are likelier than the average person to develop chronic kidney disease, and more severe inflammation in the first year of rheumatoid arthritis, corticosteroid use, high blood pressure and obesity are among the risk factors, new Mayo Clinic research shows. [More]

Study describes how overeating causes brown fat cells to "whiten"

Boston University researchers have learned new information about the consequences of overeating high-calorie foods. Not only does this lead to an increase in white fat cell production, the type prominent in obesity, but it also leads to the dysfunction of brown fat cells, the unique type of fat that generates heat and burns energy. [More]
Novel discovery could lead to new therapy to combat obesity, diabetes

Novel discovery could lead to new therapy to combat obesity, diabetes

By manipulating a biochemical process that underlies cells' energy-burning abilities, investigators at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center have made a novel discovery that could lead to a new therapy to combat obesity and diabetes. [More]

Research shows that rheumatoid arthritis patients are at higher risk of kidney disease

Rheumatoid arthritis patients are likelier than the average person to develop chronic kidney disease, and more severe inflammation in the first year of rheumatoid arthritis, corticosteroid use, high blood pressure and obesity are among the risk factors, new Mayo Clinic research shows. [More]

Two endocrinology societies announce comprehensive framework to combat obesity

Calling it the most under-reimbursed major disease in America, two endocrinology societies announced an evidence-based, multidimensional, comprehensive framework to combat the nation's obesity epidemic today. [More]