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New technique allows better understanding of cellular stress reaction

New technique allows better understanding of cellular stress reaction

Stress in the body's cells is both the cause and consequence of inflammatory diseases or cancer. The cells react to stress to protect themselves. Researchers at the University of Zurich have now developed a new technique that allows studying a fundamental response to stress in much more detail than previously possible: the ADP-ribosylation of chromatin. [More]
New research identifies key enzyme linked to age-related increases in cancer and inflammation

New research identifies key enzyme linked to age-related increases in cancer and inflammation

For the first time, researchers have shown that an enzyme key to regulating gene expression -- and also an oncogene when mutated -- is critical for the expression of numerous inflammatory compounds that have been implicated in age-related increases in cancer and tissue degeneration, according to new research from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. [More]
Study provides vital information about mechanisms governing DNA repair

Study provides vital information about mechanisms governing DNA repair

DNA damage can lead to gene inactivation or deregulation and cause various diseases such as cancer; however, many DNA repair mechanisms allow cells to survive against such damage. A study lead by Antoine Simoneau of the laboratory of Dr. Hugo Wurtele, a researcher in immunology-oncology at the Maisonneuve-Rosemont Hospital (CIUSS de l'Est-de-l'Île-de-Montréal) and professor at the Faculty of Medicine, University of Montreal, and recently published in the prestigious journal Nucleic Acids Research, provides valuable information about certain mechanisms governing DNA repair. [More]
CNIO team uses network theory to build and study first epigenetic communication network

CNIO team uses network theory to build and study first epigenetic communication network

One of the big questions for which there is still no clear answer in biology is how, based on the four universal letters that make up DNA, it is possible to generate such different organisms as a fly or a human, or the different organs and tissues they comprise. In recent years, researchers have discovered that the system is much more complicated than was originally thought. [More]
DNA imprinting defect may affect children diagnosed with osteosarcoma

DNA imprinting defect may affect children diagnosed with osteosarcoma

Children diagnosed with osteosarcoma may be impacted by a DNA imprinting defect also found in parents, according to new research from the Masonic Cancer Center, University of Minnesota. DNA imprinting is a phenomenon in which just one of the two inherited genes is active while the other is present but inactive. [More]
Simple & Efficient Protocol for Native Chromatin Immunoprecipitation

Simple & Efficient Protocol for Native Chromatin Immunoprecipitation

Chromatrap, a business unit of Porvair Sciences, announces a new patented protocol that is able to simply, quickly and efficiently enrich transcription factors from Native Chromatin. [More]
DNA-binding protein acts like genetic traffic signal to orchestrate early stage embryonic development

DNA-binding protein acts like genetic traffic signal to orchestrate early stage embryonic development

New research by UC San Francisco stem cell biologists has revealed that a DNA-binding protein called Foxd3 acts like a genetic traffic signal, holding that ball of undifferentiated cells in a state of readiness for its great transformation in the third week of development. [More]
New Penn study shows that social behavior in carpenter ants can be reprogrammed

New Penn study shows that social behavior in carpenter ants can be reprogrammed

In Florida carpenter ant colonies, distinct worker castes called minors and majors exhibit pronounced differences in social behavior throughout their lives. In a new study published today in Science, a multi-institution team anchored at University of Pennsylvania found that these caste-specific behaviors are not set in stone. [More]
3D maps of spatial organization may help find genes involved in hereditary diseases

3D maps of spatial organization may help find genes involved in hereditary diseases

It has now been 15 years since scientists celebrated the completion of the human genome. At that point, scientists had determined the entire sequence of the genetic letters making up our DNA. [More]
Researchers identify underlying molecular mechanism of cardiac hypertrophy

Researchers identify underlying molecular mechanism of cardiac hypertrophy

Specific genes are responsible for determining cell growth and differentiation during the early stages of cardiac development. Reactivation of these genes later in life can lead to an abnormal thickening of the heart muscle. Researchers from Charité -- Universitätsmedizin Berlin lead by Professor Silke Rickert-Sperling have been able to identify the underlying molecular mechanism. [More]
Researchers describe epigenetic mechanisms underlying the development of cerebellum

Researchers describe epigenetic mechanisms underlying the development of cerebellum

From before birth through childhood, connections form between neurons in the brain, ultimately making us who we are. So far, scientists have gained a relatively good understanding of how neural circuits become established, but they know less about the genetic control at play during this crucial developmental process. [More]
New study improves understanding of metal-based chemotherapy drugs

New study improves understanding of metal-based chemotherapy drugs

What is the mechanism of action of metal-based chemotherapy drugs (the most widely used for treating common cancers like testicular or ovarian cancer)? How can we improve their effect and reduce their toxicity? A new study combining experiments and theory has broadened our knowledge of the molecular mechanisms of these active drugs to help experimentalists devising increasingly effective drugs with fewer side effects. [More]
Gene mutations that cause congenital heart disease also lead to neurodevelopmental delays

Gene mutations that cause congenital heart disease also lead to neurodevelopmental delays

Some of the same gene mutations that cause heart defects in children also lead to neurodevelopmental delays, including learning disabilities. A large study of congenital heart disease (CHD) reveals overlapping genetic influences during early childhood development. [More]
IMB scientists unravel complex regulatory mechanism involved in brain development

IMB scientists unravel complex regulatory mechanism involved in brain development

Scientists at the Institute of Molecular Biology in Mainz have unraveled a complex regulatory mechanism that explains how a single gene can drive the formation of brain cells. The research, published in The EMBO Journal, is an important step towards a better understanding of how the brain develops. It also harbors potential for regenerative medicine. [More]
Chromatin Immunoprecipitation validated antibodies launched by Chromatrap

Chromatin Immunoprecipitation validated antibodies launched by Chromatrap

Chromatrap, a business unit of Porvair Sciences Ltd, has announced the launch of its own range of Chromatin Immunoprecipitation (ChIP)-validated antibodies. [More]
New research shows that autophagy can operate in cell nucleus to guard against start of cancer

New research shows that autophagy can operate in cell nucleus to guard against start of cancer

Autophagy, literally self-eating or the degradation of unwanted cellular bits and pieces by the cell itself, has been shown for the first time to also work in the cell nucleus. In addition, in this setting it plays a role in guarding against the start of cancer, according to new research from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. [More]
Improved results yielded from new ChIP-seq protocol

Improved results yielded from new ChIP-seq protocol

Chromatrap®, a business unit of Porvair Sciences, has developed a new protocol that further extends the many advantages of its popular Chromatin Immunoprecipitation Sequencing (ChIP-seq) assay kits. [More]
DNA study reveals basic principle of gene regulation

DNA study reveals basic principle of gene regulation

A study of where and how an enzyme cuts DNA may have inadvertently revealed a basic principle of gene regulation, say researchers in Boston Children's Hospital's Program in Cellular and Molecular Medicine (PCMM). [More]
Active nuclear deformations contribute to formation of intra-nuclear chromosome architectures

Active nuclear deformations contribute to formation of intra-nuclear chromosome architectures

There are two types of chromatin, euchromatin and heterochromatin, that vary with the stages of the cell cycle. In particular, euchromatin with rich active genes localizes to the interior of the nucleus during interphase; heterochromatin usually localizes to the periphery of the nucleus. [More]
Proposed thin-plate model sheds light on structural basis of chromosomal aberrations in cancer cells

Proposed thin-plate model sheds light on structural basis of chromosomal aberrations in cancer cells

During cell division, each metaphase chromosome contains a single enormously long DNA molecule that is associated with histone proteins and forms a long chromatin filament with many nucleosomes. [More]
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