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Histones steadily replaced in brain cells throughout life, find Mount Sinai researchers

Histones steadily replaced in brain cells throughout life, find Mount Sinai researchers

For decades, researchers in the genetics field have theorized that the protein spools around which DNA is wound, histones, remain constant in the brain, never changing after development in the womb. [More]
Preventing neutrophils from producing NETs can accelerate wound healing in diabetic mice

Preventing neutrophils from producing NETs can accelerate wound healing in diabetic mice

One of the body's tools for fighting off infection in a wound may actually slow down the healing process, according to new research by a team of Harvard University, Boston Children's Hospital, and Penn State University scientists. [More]
Study demonstrates potential of new approach for sorting out BRCA1 gene variants

Study demonstrates potential of new approach for sorting out BRCA1 gene variants

Patients seeking certainty in genetic tests often receive a perplexing result. Many learn they carry a 'variant of unknown significance' of a disease-linked gene. Such variants might -- or equally might not -- increase disease risk. [More]
EPFL scientists show how a major effector protein binds chromatin and regulates gene expression

EPFL scientists show how a major effector protein binds chromatin and regulates gene expression

Inside the cell, DNA is tightly coiled and packed with several proteins into a structure called "chromatin", which allows DNA to fit in the cell while also preventing genes from being expressed at the wrong time. Guided by a chemical "barcode", specialized effector proteins can bind chromatin and either unwind it or compact further to activate or silence genes. [More]
IDIBELL and IDIPAZ scientists identify epigenetic alterations in CVID

IDIBELL and IDIPAZ scientists identify epigenetic alterations in CVID

Researchers of the Chromatin and Disease Group from the Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute and La Paz Hospital have identified epigenetic alterations in Common Variable Immunodeficiency (CVID), the most common primary immunodeficiency, using as a starting point genetically identical monozygotic twins discordant for the disease. [More]
Melanoma patients with high levels of H2A.Z.2 protein less likely to survive

Melanoma patients with high levels of H2A.Z.2 protein less likely to survive

Melanoma patients with high levels of a protein that controls the expression of pro-growth genes are less likely to survive, according to a study led by researchers at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and published online in the journal Molecular Cell. [More]
Highly efficient ChIP assay kit for FFPE samples

Highly efficient ChIP assay kit for FFPE samples

Chromatrap®, a business unit of Porvair Sciences, has introduced a new Formaldehyde Fixed Paraffin-Embedded (FFPE) ChIP Kit which overcomes the widely acknowledged shortfalls of the technique. [More]
Optimised ChIP protocols for qPCR and sequencing

Optimised ChIP protocols for qPCR and sequencing

Chromatrap®, a business unit of Porvair Sciences, has announced a new web page that brings together protocols developed using their proprietary solid state chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) technology. [More]
Scientists find way to accelerate wound healing in diabetic mice

Scientists find way to accelerate wound healing in diabetic mice

One of the body's own tools for preventing wound infections may actually interfere with wound healing, according to new research from Boston Children's Hospital. In a study published online in Nature Medicine, scientists from the hospital's Program in Cellular and Molecular Medicine found they could speed up wound healing in diabetic mice by keeping immune cells called neutrophils from producing bacteria-trapping neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). [More]
Certain ARID1a mutations sensitize some tumors to PARP inhibitor drugs

Certain ARID1a mutations sensitize some tumors to PARP inhibitor drugs

Mutations in ARID1a, which are common in many cancer types, disrupt DNA damage repair in cancer cells, allowing the cancer to progress. This gene may also be an Achilles' heel when treating certain tumors, according to a team of researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. [More]
Study on how maternal proteins help regulate initial cell divisions during early development

Study on how maternal proteins help regulate initial cell divisions during early development

Researchers in the University of Georgia's Regenerative Bioscience Center are visually capturing the first process of chromosome alignment and separation at the beginning of mouse development. The findings could lead to answers to questions concerning the mechanisms leading to birth defects and chromosome instability in cancer cells. [More]
University of Chicago scientists develop new technique to accurately measure epigenetic changes

University of Chicago scientists develop new technique to accurately measure epigenetic changes

One of the most widely used tools in epigenetics research - the study of how DNA packaging affects gene expression - is chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP), a technique that allows researchers to examine interactions between specific proteins and genomic regions. However, ChIP is a relative measurement, and has significant limitations that can lead to errors, poor reproducibility and an inability to be compared between experiments. [More]
Anna Nele Meckler and Armelle Corpet to receive SNSF's 2015 Marie Heim-Vögtlin Prize

Anna Nele Meckler and Armelle Corpet to receive SNSF's 2015 Marie Heim-Vögtlin Prize

The biologist Armelle Corpet and paleo-climatologist Anna Nele Meckler will receive the 2015 Marie Heim-Vögtlin (MHV) Prize. This distinction rewards their remarkable scientific work supported by a MHV grant. The prize will be bestowed on 23 September 2015 at the Swiss National Science Foundation. [More]
New JIC research helps to settle important debate on epigenetic inheritance

New JIC research helps to settle important debate on epigenetic inheritance

New research findings by John Innes Centre scientists have helped to settle an important debate in the field of epigenetic inheritance. Using the flowering plant Arabidopsis thaliana as a model for their research, Professor Martin Howard, Professor Caroline Dean and members of their labs, have been trying to understand how organisms 'remember' past events at the cellular level. [More]
Secret to the life-long activity of a stem cell niche

Secret to the life-long activity of a stem cell niche

The roots of a plant are constantly growing, so that they can provide the plant with water and minerals while also giving it a firm anchor in the ground. Responsible for these functions are pluripotent stem cells. In order to avoid differentiation and to remain pluripotent, these stem cells are dependent on signals from their neighbouring cells. [More]
Researchers uncover critical role for two proteins in chromatin structure

Researchers uncover critical role for two proteins in chromatin structure

A team of researchers at the IRCM led by François Robert, PhD, uncovered a critical role for two proteins in chromatin structure. Their breakthrough, recently published in the scientific journal Molecular Cell, helps explain how DNA is organized in our cells. This discovery could lead to a better understanding of what causes certain types of cancer, such as lymphoma. [More]
Researchers identify gene vital to production of pain-sensing neurons in humans

Researchers identify gene vital to production of pain-sensing neurons in humans

A gene essential to the production of pain-sensing neurons in humans has been identified by an international team of researchers co-led by the University of Cambridge. The discovery, reported today in the journal Nature Genetics, could have implications for the development of new methods of pain relief. [More]
Link between dDsk2 protein and neurodegenerative diseases identified

Link between dDsk2 protein and neurodegenerative diseases identified

Until today, the proteins known as ubiquitin receptors have been associated mainly with protein degradation, a basic cell cleaning process. A new function now described for the protein dDsk2 by the team headed by Ferran Azorín, group leader at the Institute for Research in Biomedicine (IRB Barcelona) and CSIC research professor, links ubiquitin receptors for the first time with the regulation of gene expression. [More]
EMD Millipore launches Magna ChIRP RNA Interactome Kits for analyzing chromatin-associated RNAs

EMD Millipore launches Magna ChIRP RNA Interactome Kits for analyzing chromatin-associated RNAs

EMD Millipore, the Life Science business of Merck KGaA of Darmstadt, Germany, today introduced Magna ChIRP™ RNA Interactome Kits, which allow researchers to more easily identify, recover and analyze regions of chromatin that interact with chromatin-associated RNAs such as long non-coding RNA (lncRNA). [More]
Winners of GSA poster awards announced at 56th Annual Drosophila Research Conference

Winners of GSA poster awards announced at 56th Annual Drosophila Research Conference

The Genetics Society of America (GSA) and the Drosophila research community are pleased to announce the winners of the GSA poster awards at the 56th Annual Drosophila Research Conference, which took place in Chicago, IL, March 4-8, 2015. [More]
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