Chromatin News and Research RSS Feed - Chromatin News and Research

Scientists uncover changes in immediate environment of DNA after fertilization

Scientists uncover changes in immediate environment of DNA after fertilization

A team of scientists at the Helmholtz Zentrum M├╝nchen shows changes in the immediate environment of DNA after the ovum and sperm fuse to form the zygote. The results suggest why all conceivable somatic cells can develop from the germ cells. The study has been published in the journal 'Genes and Development'. [More]
Researchers identify simple, inexpensive tool for assessing prognosis of pediatric brain tumors

Researchers identify simple, inexpensive tool for assessing prognosis of pediatric brain tumors

A multi-institutional group of researchers, led by investigators at Children's Hospital Los Angeles and the University of Michigan, have identified a simple and inexpensive tool for assessing the prognosis of pediatric brain tumors called ependymomas. [More]
Scientists develop new technology that sheds light on HIV infection

Scientists develop new technology that sheds light on HIV infection

A group of researchers at the Centre for Genomic Regulation and the Pompeu Fabra University in Barcelona, Spain, have developed a new technology that sheds light on the HIV infection and offers a first glance at the expression landscape of the HIV in the human genome. [More]
Scientists map reorganization of genetic material in cells using 3-D imaging technique

Scientists map reorganization of genetic material in cells using 3-D imaging technique

Scientists have mapped the reorganization of genetic material that takes place when a stem cell matures into a nerve cell. [More]
Researchers create first mouse model for common form of infant leukemia

Researchers create first mouse model for common form of infant leukemia

After nearly two decades of unsuccessful attempts, researchers from the University of Chicago Medicine and the Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center have created the first mouse model for the most common form of infant leukemia. [More]
Biochemists create first atlas of DNA-binding molecules for use in precision medicine

Biochemists create first atlas of DNA-binding molecules for use in precision medicine

Biochemists at the University of Wisconsin-Madison have created the first atlas that maps where molecular tools that can switch genes on and off will bind to the human genome. [More]
Researchers find certain short junk DNA play key role in development of Ewing sarcoma

Researchers find certain short junk DNA play key role in development of Ewing sarcoma

The stretches of DNA between genes, littered with repeating sequences, were once considered the "junk of the genome," but scientists are learning that some of this junk is far from harmless clutter. [More]
Researchers identify protein linked to negative effects of senescence

Researchers identify protein linked to negative effects of senescence

Cellular senescence is a state in which normal healthy cells do not have the ability to divide. Senescence can occur when cancer-causing genes are activated in normal cells or when chemotherapy is used on cancer cells. [More]
How to improve your chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments

How to improve your chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments

Chromatrap® has published a comprehensive Applications Compendium that includes hints and tips to improve your Chromatin Immunoprecipitation (ChIP) experiments, increase the effectiveness of your ChIP-seq library preparation and brings together its latest application notes in one informative document. [More]
Salk scientist Clodagh O'Shea named recipient of grant from Faculty Scholars Program

Salk scientist Clodagh O'Shea named recipient of grant from Faculty Scholars Program

Clodagh O'Shea, an associate professor in the Salk Institute's Molecular and Cell Biology Laboratory, is among the first recipients of a grant from the Faculty Scholars Program, a new partnership of Howard Hughes Medical Institute, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and the Simons Foundation for early career researchers whose work shows the potential for groundbreaking contributions in their fields. [More]
New Chromatrap ChIP-validated antibodies now available for mammalian epigenetic research

New Chromatrap ChIP-validated antibodies now available for mammalian epigenetic research

Chromatrap announces that seven further popular antibodies have been validated for use in chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays by their UK-based research team. [More]
Researchers use novel technique to unravel key mystery of earliest stage of development

Researchers use novel technique to unravel key mystery of earliest stage of development

A Ludwig Cancer Research study published online September 14th in Nature reports a novel technique to map specific chemical (or "epigenetic") modifications made to the protein packaging of DNA using a small population of cells. [More]
De-bookmarking could be key to better reprogramming of fibroblasts into iPS cells

De-bookmarking could be key to better reprogramming of fibroblasts into iPS cells

In reading, a bookmark tells where you stopped. Cells use bookmarks too, specific proteins that help the cell remember what collection of genes needs to be turned on again after the brief halt of gene expression during cell division. [More]
Chromatrap reports benefits of using ChIP-seq kit for histone methylation applications

Chromatrap reports benefits of using ChIP-seq kit for histone methylation applications

Chromatrap reports on the advantages of using its Chromatin Immunoprecipitation Sequencing (ChIP-seq) assay kits for histone methylation applications. [More]
New study shows variation in junk DNA can affect health

New study shows variation in junk DNA can affect health

All humans are 99.9 percent identical, genetically speaking. But that tiny 0.1 percent variation has big consequences, influencing the color of your eyes, the span of your hips, your risk of getting sick and in some ways even your earning potential. [More]
Chromatrap develops new range of optimised ChIP assay kits for genetic research

Chromatrap develops new range of optimised ChIP assay kits for genetic research

Chromatrap is a pioneer in the development of solid-state filter-based technology that significantly enhances and accelerates the important epigenetic research tool of chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP). [More]
Novel PET radiotracer reveals epigenetic activity in the human brain for the first time

Novel PET radiotracer reveals epigenetic activity in the human brain for the first time

A novel PET radiotracer developed at the Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging at Massachusetts General Hospital is able for the first time to reveal epigenetic activity - the process that determines whether or not genes are expressed - within the human brain. [More]
Scientists identify new genetic variations contributing to onset of APL

Scientists identify new genetic variations contributing to onset of APL

A study led by a team of scientists from the Cancer Science Institute of Singapore at the National University of Singapore has identified new genetic alterations contributing to the onset of Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (APL). [More]
Chromatrap describes methodologies to increase ChIP efficiency

Chromatrap describes methodologies to increase ChIP efficiency

Chromatrap, a business unit of Porvair Sciences, has published a new technical article that discusses and describes methodologies to increase Chromatin Immunoprecipitation efficiency by making sure chromatin in your samples is sheared to the correct size range. [More]
Chromatrap reports benefits of ChIP technology in ground breaking research

Chromatrap reports benefits of ChIP technology in ground breaking research

Chromatrap reports on 3 further customer papers published in different prestigious peer reviewed journals, which cite how its proprietary solid state Chromatin Immunoprecipitation (ChIP) technology has enabled ground breaking research. [More]
Advertisement
Advertisement