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Researchers examine genomic landscapes of humans and mice

Researchers examine genomic landscapes of humans and mice

Looking across evolutionary time and the genomic landscapes of humans and mice, an international group of researchers has found powerful clues to why certain processes and systems in the mouse - such as the immune system, metabolism and stress response - are so different from those in people. Building on years of mouse and gene regulation studies, they have developed a resource that can help scientists better understand how similarities and differences between mice and humans are written in their genomes. [More]
Scientists may have discovered new way to repair damaged tissue

Scientists may have discovered new way to repair damaged tissue

By transforming human scar cells into blood vessel cells, scientists at Houston Methodist may have discovered a new way to repair damaged tissue. The method, described in an upcoming issue of Circulation (early online), appeared to improve blood flow, oxygenation, and nutrition to areas in need. [More]
Two major studies newly implicate dozens of genes in autism

Two major studies newly implicate dozens of genes in autism

Two major genetic studies of autism, led in part by UC San Francisco scientists and involving more than 50 laboratories worldwide, have newly implicated dozens of genes in the disorder. The research shows that rare mutations in these genes affect communication networks in the brain and compromise fundamental biological mechanisms that govern whether, when, and how genes are activated overall. [More]
Landmark study provides new insight into function of enzyme related to BRCA1 protein

Landmark study provides new insight into function of enzyme related to BRCA1 protein

A landmark study to be published in the October 30, 2014 print edition of the journal Nature provides new insight into the function of an enzyme related to the BRCA1 breast-cancer protein. The study by a team at Penn State University is the first to produce a detailed working image of an enzyme in the Polycomb Repressive Complex 1 (PRC1) -- a group that regulates cell development and is associated with many types of cancer. [More]
Genetic differences contribute to risk for autism

Genetic differences contribute to risk for autism

Small differences in as many as a thousand genes contribute to risk for autism, according to a study led by Mount Sinai researchers and the Autism Sequencing Consortium, and published today in the journal Nature. [More]
Researchers use DNA sequencing to uncover genes that heighten autism risk

Researchers use DNA sequencing to uncover genes that heighten autism risk

In the largest study of its kind to date, researchers have used DNA sequencing to uncover dozens of genes that heighten the risk for autism. Joseph Buxbaum, Ph.D., Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York City, Mark Daly, Ph.D., Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT, and their colleagues examined more than 14,000 DNA samples from affected children, parents and unrelated people. [More]
BRD4 protein appears to play key role in keeping stem cells in immature "pluripotent" state

BRD4 protein appears to play key role in keeping stem cells in immature "pluripotent" state

A protein implicated in several cancers appears to play a pivotal role in keeping stem cells in an immature "pluripotent" state, according to a new study by NYU Langone Medical Center scientists. [More]

High-throughput ChIP analysis platform introduced in new technical article

Porvair Sciences, in conjunction with researchers at Swansea University (UK) have written a new technical article entitled 'Chromatrap® 96: a new solid-state platform for high-throughput Chromatin Immunoprecipitation (ChIP)'. [More]
New finding could accelerate research to regenerate damaged tissue

New finding could accelerate research to regenerate damaged tissue

Scientists at NYU Langone Medical Center have found a way to boost dramatically the efficiency of the process for turning adult cells into so-called pluripotent stem cells by combining three well-known compounds, including vitamin C. [More]
Collaborative study takes important step toward finding targeted treatments for bladder cancer

Collaborative study takes important step toward finding targeted treatments for bladder cancer

The story of cancer care seems so simple: find the mutated gene that causes cancer and turn it off or fix it. But rarely does a single gene cause cancer. More often, many genes are altered together to drive the disease. So the challenge becomes sorting out which altered genes are the most to blame in which cancers. [More]
New project aims at delivering innovative test to improve safety of chemical products, drugs

New project aims at delivering innovative test to improve safety of chemical products, drugs

The Genotrace project, combining targeted research and technology transfer, aims at delivering an innovative test to improve the safety of chemical products, drugs, human and animal food and the environment. [More]
NanoTracker™ Optical Tweezers system used at Leiden University to study the organisation of genomic DNA

NanoTracker™ Optical Tweezers system used at Leiden University to study the organisation of genomic DNA

JPK Instruments, a world-leading manufacturer of nanoanalytic instrumentation for research in life sciences and soft matter, reports on the use of the NanoTracker™ Optical Tweezers system in the Laboratory of Molecular Genetics in the Leiden Institute of Chemistry at Leiden University. [More]
Chromatin immunoprecipitation informative brochure published by Porvair Sciences

Chromatin immunoprecipitation informative brochure published by Porvair Sciences

Porvair Sciences has published an informative 8-page brochure providing scientists with a background to Chromatin Immunoprecipitation (ChIP), an introduction to Chromatrap® ChIP assay technology and how Chromatrap® compares to traditional bead based methodologies. [More]
Researchers discover how arginine starvation specifically kills cancer cells

Researchers discover how arginine starvation specifically kills cancer cells

Researchers at UC Davis, City of Hope, Taipai Medical University and National Health Research Institutes in Taiwan have discovered how a drug that deprives the cells of a key amino acid specifically kills cancer cells. [More]
New chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing kit developed by Porvair Sciences

New chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing kit developed by Porvair Sciences

Porvair Sciences has developed a new ChIP sequencing assay kit extending the benefits of their proprietary Chromatrap® solid state ChIP technology to preparation of purified Chromatin for the generation of sequencing libraries. [More]
New study explores processes that establish connections between nerve cells in the brain

New study explores processes that establish connections between nerve cells in the brain

New research provides an intriguing glimpse into the processes that establish connections between nerve cells in the brain. These connections, or synapses, allow nerve cells to transmit and process information involved in thinking and moving the body. [More]
Video interview highlights latest research developments in women’s reproductive health using Chromatrap solid state ChIP assay

Video interview highlights latest research developments in women’s reproductive health using Chromatrap solid state ChIP assay

An informative video interview with Professor Steve Conlan of the College of Medicine at Swansea University (UK) highlights the latest research developments in women’s reproductive health using unique molecular biology tools. [More]
Research finding paves way for targeted approaches to treating cancer patients

Research finding paves way for targeted approaches to treating cancer patients

Twelve years ago, UNC School of Medicine researcher Brian Strahl, PhD, found that a protein called Set2 plays a role in how yeast genes are expressed - specifically how DNA gets transcribed into messenger RNA. Now his lab has found that Set2 is also a major player in DNA repair, a complicated and crucial process that can lead to the development of cancer cells if the repair goes wrong. [More]
Researchers uncover several gene networks with potentially important roles in autism

Researchers uncover several gene networks with potentially important roles in autism

A large new analysis of DNA from thousands of patients has uncovered several underlying gene networks with potentially important roles in autism. [More]
Gene networks may offer attractive targets for developing new autism drugs

Gene networks may offer attractive targets for developing new autism drugs

A large new analysis of DNA from thousands of patients has uncovered several underlying gene networks with potentially important roles in autism. [More]