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TSRI scientists reveal workings of key 'relief-valve' in cells

TSRI scientists reveal workings of key 'relief-valve' in cells

A team led by scientists at The Scripps Research Institute has solved a long-standing mystery in cell biology by showing essentially how a key "relief-valve" in cells does its job. [More]
Bevacizumab extends survival of pleural mesothelioma patients

Bevacizumab extends survival of pleural mesothelioma patients

Patients with unresectable, malignant pleural mesothelioma derive a significant survival benefit from the addition of bevacizumab to standard treatment according to phase III trial findings published in The Lancet. [More]
Scientists uncover novel strategy to block cancer's spread, restore tumor vulnerability to chemotherapy

Scientists uncover novel strategy to block cancer's spread, restore tumor vulnerability to chemotherapy

St. Jude Children's Research Hospital scientists have discovered how an aggressive tumor of the muscle and soft tissue hijacks an export pathway in cells to lay the groundwork for cancer progression and resistance to chemotherapy. [More]
New study improves understanding of metal-based chemotherapy drugs

New study improves understanding of metal-based chemotherapy drugs

What is the mechanism of action of metal-based chemotherapy drugs (the most widely used for treating common cancers like testicular or ovarian cancer)? How can we improve their effect and reduce their toxicity? A new study combining experiments and theory has broadened our knowledge of the molecular mechanisms of these active drugs to help experimentalists devising increasingly effective drugs with fewer side effects. [More]
Cancer drug may protect kidneys from damage caused by chemotherapy agent cisplatin

Cancer drug may protect kidneys from damage caused by chemotherapy agent cisplatin

A class of drugs used increasingly to help fight cancer may have the additional benefit of protecting the kidneys when packaged with the powerful chemotherapy agent cisplatin. [More]
Portrazza approved to treat patients with advanced squamous non-small cell lung cancer

Portrazza approved to treat patients with advanced squamous non-small cell lung cancer

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Portrazza (necitumumab) in combination with two forms of chemotherapy to treat patients with advanced (metastatic) squamous non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who have not previously received medication specifically for treating their advanced lung cancer. [More]
Lilly, Merck expand oncology clinical trial collaboration

Lilly, Merck expand oncology clinical trial collaboration

Eli Lilly and Company and Merck, known as MSD outside the United States and Canada, today announced the extension of an existing collaboration to evaluate the safety and efficacy of the combination of Lilly's ALIMTA (pemetrexed for injection) and Merck's KEYTRUDA (pembrolizumab) in a pivotal Phase III study in first-line nonsquamous non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). [More]
CK5 protein marks ovarian cancer likely to be resistant to cisplatin

CK5 protein marks ovarian cancer likely to be resistant to cisplatin

A University of Colorado Cancer Center study recently published in the International Journal of Gynecological Cancer shows that protein cytokeratin 5 (CK5), known to be a marker of poor prognosis in breast cancer, also marks ovarian cancers likely to be resistant to the common chemotherapy cisplatin. [More]
Chemotherapy treatment can contribute to long-term neurocognitive deficits in pediatric brain tumor survivors

Chemotherapy treatment can contribute to long-term neurocognitive deficits in pediatric brain tumor survivors

More children are surviving malignant brain tumors than in the past, thanks to the use of intense treatments using platinum-based chemotherapy (cisplatin and high-dose carboplatin). Unfortunately, the therapy has a known side effect of permanent hearing loss, resulting from damage to the inner ear. [More]
Researchers pinpoint mechanisms that cause chemoresistance in ovarian cancer patients

Researchers pinpoint mechanisms that cause chemoresistance in ovarian cancer patients

Resistance to chemotherapy is a major problem for those suffering from ovarian cancer--a problem that prevents a cure from a disease dubbed the "silent killer." University of Georgia researchers are giving patients new hope with recent findings that help pinpoint the mechanisms causing chemoresistance. [More]
DelMar reports positive data from preclinical study of VAL-083 for treatment of ovarian cancer

DelMar reports positive data from preclinical study of VAL-083 for treatment of ovarian cancer

DelMar Pharmaceuticals, Inc., a biopharmaceutical company focused on the development and commercialization of new cancer therapies, announced that yesterday it presented positive preclinical data demonstrating the promising potential of its lead product candidate VAL-083 (dianhydrogalactitol) as a treatment for ovarian cancer. [More]
Forces in external environmental and oxidation are greatest threats to DNA, study finds

Forces in external environmental and oxidation are greatest threats to DNA, study finds

A study led by Indiana University biologist Patricia Foster and colleagues has found that forces in the external environment and oxidation are the greatest threats to an organism's ability to repair damage to its own DNA. [More]
Varubi (rolapitant) approved to prevent delayed phase chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting

Varubi (rolapitant) approved to prevent delayed phase chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved Varubi (rolapitant) to prevent delayed phase chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (emesis). Varubi is approved in adults in combination with other drugs (antiemetic agents) that prevent nausea and vomiting associated with initial and repeat courses of vomit-inducing (emetogenic and highly emetogenic) cancer chemotherapy. [More]
Cancer treatment does not affect pregnancy outcome, shows new study

Cancer treatment does not affect pregnancy outcome, shows new study

Women who are pregnant when diagnosed with cancer can start treatment for their disease immediately and do not need to terminate their pregnancy due to worries over the effects of therapy on the development of their child. [More]
Discovery opens door to more targeted, effective treatments for cancer

Discovery opens door to more targeted, effective treatments for cancer

In a discovery that could lead to more targeted and effective treatments for certain lung and prostate cancers, researchers at the University of Virginia School of Medicine have identified two new cancer-causing gene mutations - mutations that may be particularly susceptible to cancer-fighting drugs already approved by the federal Food and Drug Administration. One of the gene mutations also may play a key role in early menopause. [More]
Researchers develop promising metal-based compound to fight kidney cancer

Researchers develop promising metal-based compound to fight kidney cancer

Researchers developed a promising metal-based compound that destroys kidney cancer cells, while leaving normal cells unharmed. The findings may provide a new way of treating kidney cancer, opening the potential for more potent and less toxic therapies that would give cancer patients a better quality of life. [More]
New study may lead to effective treatment to prevent common chemotherapy side effects in cancer patients

New study may lead to effective treatment to prevent common chemotherapy side effects in cancer patients

Annually, hundreds of thousands of patients battling cancer undergo chemotherapy, which often results in poorly tolerated side effects such as nausea, vomiting, and loss of the desire to eat. [More]
FDA, EMA accept filing applications for Boehringer Ingelheim's afatinib to treat patients with advanced SCC of the lung

FDA, EMA accept filing applications for Boehringer Ingelheim's afatinib to treat patients with advanced SCC of the lung

Boehringer Ingelheim today announced that both the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency have accepted filing applications for afatinib for the treatment of patients with advanced squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the lung progressing after treatment with first-line chemotherapy. [More]
Dr. Sharma receives research award from ASCO to continue study on triple-negative breast cancer

Dr. Sharma receives research award from ASCO to continue study on triple-negative breast cancer

Dr. Sharma was awarded the 2015 Advanced Clinical Research Award in Breast Cancer from the American Society of Clinical Oncology to continue her research on triple-negative breast cancer. [More]
Researchers develop new way to personalize treatments for aggressive bladder cancer

Researchers develop new way to personalize treatments for aggressive bladder cancer

Researchers at UC Davis, in collaboration with colleagues at Jackson Laboratory, have developed a new way to personalize treatments for aggressive bladder cancer. [More]
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