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Added benefit of crizotinib drug for first-line treatment of advanced bronchial carcinoma not proven

Added benefit of crizotinib drug for first-line treatment of advanced bronchial carcinoma not proven

The drug crizotinib (trade name: Xalkori) has been available since 2012 for patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (bronchial carcinoma) who have a high activity of the enzyme anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) and have already received another treatment. In November 2015, the approval was extended to first-line treatment. [More]
Fertility 'reassurance' for most chemotherapy-treated female childhood cancer survivors

Fertility 'reassurance' for most chemotherapy-treated female childhood cancer survivors

Both female and male chemotherapy-treated survivors of childhood cancer have an increased risk of impaired fertility, but results suggest that the risk in women is limited to those given specific chemotherapy drugs. [More]
Scientists develop triple-stage 'cluster bomb' system to deliver cisplatin drug through nanoparticles

Scientists develop triple-stage 'cluster bomb' system to deliver cisplatin drug through nanoparticles

Scientists have devised a triple-stage "cluster bomb" system for delivering the chemotherapy drug cisplatin, via tiny nanoparticles designed to break up when they reach a tumor. [More]
Women who have survived childhood cancer can become pregnant, shows study

Women who have survived childhood cancer can become pregnant, shows study

For women who have survived childhood cancer, the impact of modern chemotherapy regimens on the likelihood of becoming pregnant is generally small, and most have a good chance of conceiving, according to one of the largest studies of its kind published in The Lancet Oncology. [More]
Conserved gene can act to inhibit lung cancer development, study finds

Conserved gene can act to inhibit lung cancer development, study finds

Scientists believe that "conserved" genes — those found in life forms that range from bacteria to plants, insects and humans — perform vital biological functions across species. And limited research on one of those genes, Nitrilase 1 (Nit1), suggested it acts to inhibit cancer development. [More]
Patients with early-stage NSCLC and low SMARCA4 expression may benefit from platinum-based chemotherapy

Patients with early-stage NSCLC and low SMARCA4 expression may benefit from platinum-based chemotherapy

The activity level of a particular gene in lung tumors might identify lung-cancer patients who will likely be helped by a particular chemotherapy regimen given to prevent recurrence after surgery. [More]
Johns Hopkins Greenberg Bladder Cancer Institute awards grants for 10 bladder cancer research projects

Johns Hopkins Greenberg Bladder Cancer Institute awards grants for 10 bladder cancer research projects

A study of obesity and related metabolic changes on bladder cancer incidence and deaths, and a plan to use stem cells to grow novel urinary tubes are among 10 research projects awarded funding by the Johns Hopkins Greenberg Bladder Cancer Institute. [More]
Commonly used chemo toxins damage eyesight in childhood cancer survivors

Commonly used chemo toxins damage eyesight in childhood cancer survivors

A study from Lund University in Sweden shows that commonly used chemo toxins impair the eyesight in childhood cancer survivors in a way that indicates an impact on the central nervous system. [More]
Combining pain medicine with metal ions could destroy drug-resistant cancer cells

Combining pain medicine with metal ions could destroy drug-resistant cancer cells

Fighting chemoresistant cancer remains a huge challenge that scientists are tackling from as many angles as they can. One alternative approach involves pairing two groups of compounds -- pain medicine and metal ions -- that have individually shown promise as anti-cancer agents. Scientists report in the ACS journal Inorganic Chemistry that combining the two led to new compounds that could destroy drug-resistant cancer cells and leave most normal cells alone in lab tests. [More]
CNIO researchers reveal how combination of dasatinib and demcizumab reduces lung adenocarcinomas

CNIO researchers reveal how combination of dasatinib and demcizumab reduces lung adenocarcinomas

Lung cancer is one of the most prevalent types of cancer, with more than 20,000 new cases diagnosed each year in Spain. Lung adenocarcinomas carrying oncogenic KRAS, the engine driving these tumours in 30% of cases, constitute the most aggressive sub-type because, unlike other types of lung cancer, there are no targeted therapies beyond the standard cisplatin-based treatment. [More]
TSRI scientists reveal workings of key 'relief-valve' in cells

TSRI scientists reveal workings of key 'relief-valve' in cells

A team led by scientists at The Scripps Research Institute has solved a long-standing mystery in cell biology by showing essentially how a key "relief-valve" in cells does its job. [More]

Bevacizumab extends survival of pleural mesothelioma patients

Patients with unresectable, malignant pleural mesothelioma derive a significant survival benefit from the addition of bevacizumab to standard treatment according to phase III trial findings published in The Lancet. [More]
Scientists uncover novel strategy to block cancer's spread, restore tumor vulnerability to chemotherapy

Scientists uncover novel strategy to block cancer's spread, restore tumor vulnerability to chemotherapy

St. Jude Children's Research Hospital scientists have discovered how an aggressive tumor of the muscle and soft tissue hijacks an export pathway in cells to lay the groundwork for cancer progression and resistance to chemotherapy. [More]
New study improves understanding of metal-based chemotherapy drugs

New study improves understanding of metal-based chemotherapy drugs

What is the mechanism of action of metal-based chemotherapy drugs (the most widely used for treating common cancers like testicular or ovarian cancer)? How can we improve their effect and reduce their toxicity? A new study combining experiments and theory has broadened our knowledge of the molecular mechanisms of these active drugs to help experimentalists devising increasingly effective drugs with fewer side effects. [More]
Cancer drug may protect kidneys from damage caused by chemotherapy agent cisplatin

Cancer drug may protect kidneys from damage caused by chemotherapy agent cisplatin

A class of drugs used increasingly to help fight cancer may have the additional benefit of protecting the kidneys when packaged with the powerful chemotherapy agent cisplatin. [More]
Portrazza approved to treat patients with advanced squamous non-small cell lung cancer

Portrazza approved to treat patients with advanced squamous non-small cell lung cancer

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Portrazza (necitumumab) in combination with two forms of chemotherapy to treat patients with advanced (metastatic) squamous non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who have not previously received medication specifically for treating their advanced lung cancer. [More]
Lilly, Merck expand oncology clinical trial collaboration

Lilly, Merck expand oncology clinical trial collaboration

Eli Lilly and Company and Merck, known as MSD outside the United States and Canada, today announced the extension of an existing collaboration to evaluate the safety and efficacy of the combination of Lilly's ALIMTA (pemetrexed for injection) and Merck's KEYTRUDA (pembrolizumab) in a pivotal Phase III study in first-line nonsquamous non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). [More]
CK5 protein marks ovarian cancer likely to be resistant to cisplatin

CK5 protein marks ovarian cancer likely to be resistant to cisplatin

A University of Colorado Cancer Center study recently published in the International Journal of Gynecological Cancer shows that protein cytokeratin 5 (CK5), known to be a marker of poor prognosis in breast cancer, also marks ovarian cancers likely to be resistant to the common chemotherapy cisplatin. [More]
Chemotherapy treatment can contribute to long-term neurocognitive deficits in pediatric brain tumor survivors

Chemotherapy treatment can contribute to long-term neurocognitive deficits in pediatric brain tumor survivors

More children are surviving malignant brain tumors than in the past, thanks to the use of intense treatments using platinum-based chemotherapy (cisplatin and high-dose carboplatin). Unfortunately, the therapy has a known side effect of permanent hearing loss, resulting from damage to the inner ear. [More]
Researchers pinpoint mechanisms that cause chemoresistance in ovarian cancer patients

Researchers pinpoint mechanisms that cause chemoresistance in ovarian cancer patients

Resistance to chemotherapy is a major problem for those suffering from ovarian cancer--a problem that prevents a cure from a disease dubbed the "silent killer." University of Georgia researchers are giving patients new hope with recent findings that help pinpoint the mechanisms causing chemoresistance. [More]
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