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Depression drug can alleviate joint pain in postmenopausal women treated for breast cancer

Depression drug can alleviate joint pain in postmenopausal women treated for breast cancer

A drug typically used to treat depression and anxiety can significantly reduce joint pain in postmenopausal women being treated for early stage breast cancer, according to new SWOG research to be presented Friday at a special plenary presentation at the San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium. [More]
Image-guided percutaneous needle biopsies after NST identify breast cancer patients who achieve pCR

Image-guided percutaneous needle biopsies after NST identify breast cancer patients who achieve pCR

In a pilot study conducted at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, image-guided biopsies identified select breast cancer patients who achieved pathologic complete response (pCR) after chemotherapy and/or targeted therapy, neoadjuvant systemic therapy (NST). [More]
Personalized cancer vaccine improves outcomes for patients with AML, clinical study shows

Personalized cancer vaccine improves outcomes for patients with AML, clinical study shows

A personalized cancer vaccine markedly improved outcomes for patients suffering from acute myeloid leukemia (AML), a potentially lethal blood cancer, in a clinical trial led by investigators at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. [More]
ABIVAX reports preclinical data on first-in-class drug candidate for functional cure of HIV/AIDS patients

ABIVAX reports preclinical data on first-in-class drug candidate for functional cure of HIV/AIDS patients

ABIVAX an innovative biotechnology company targeting the immune system to eliminate viral disease, announced today that the Company presented new preclinical data on ABX464, ABIVAX's first-in-class drug candidate for a functional cure of patients with HIV/AIDS, during this week's HIV DART scientific conference in Los Cabos, Mexico. [More]
Study shows experimental treatment not superior to standard therapy for head and neck cancer

Study shows experimental treatment not superior to standard therapy for head and neck cancer

Results of the largest Canadian clinical trial to date comparing standard treatment for locally advanced squamous cell head and neck cancer with an experimental treatment, did not show the new treatment is superior. [More]
Scientists identify biomarkers to predict patient’s response to breast cancer treatment

Scientists identify biomarkers to predict patient’s response to breast cancer treatment

Why do some breast cancers respond to treatment while others resist it? A study led by researchers at the University of North Carolina Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center may provide insight into this important question. [More]
New contact lens therapy effective in slowing progression of juvenile-onset myopia, study shows

New contact lens therapy effective in slowing progression of juvenile-onset myopia, study shows

A groundbreaking contact lens therapy has potential to impact the fast-growing issue of myopia (nearsightedness) among children, based on research presented at the American Academy of Optometry's 95th Annual Meeting. [More]
Stem cell-based risk scoring tool could predict AML patient’s response to standard treatment

Stem cell-based risk scoring tool could predict AML patient’s response to standard treatment

Leukemia researchers at Princess Margaret Cancer Centre have developed a 17-gene signature derived from leukemia stem cells that can predict at diagnosis if patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) will respond to standard treatment. [More]
Older women with metastatic breast cancer more likely to have genetic alterations in tumors

Older women with metastatic breast cancer more likely to have genetic alterations in tumors

A University of North Carolina Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center-led analysis has found that women who are 65 years or older with metastatic breast cancer were more likely to have a cancer-linked genetic alterations in their tumors, and had a larger total number of genetic alterations, than younger patients overall. [More]
Investigational diabetes drug that impedes Parkinson's progression getting ready for human trials

Investigational diabetes drug that impedes Parkinson's progression getting ready for human trials

A new investigational drug originally developed for type 2 diabetes is being readied for human clinical trials in search of the world's first treatment to impede the progression of Parkinson's disease following publication of research findings today in the journal Science Translational Medicine. [More]
Pathogenic variants in certain genes increase woman's likelihood of developing breast cancer

Pathogenic variants in certain genes increase woman's likelihood of developing breast cancer

Inherited pathogenic variants in protein coding genes BARD1 and RAD51D increase a woman's likelihood of developing breast cancer, according to research conducted at Mayo Clinic and presented today at the 2016 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium. [More]
Brazilian researchers propose new way for treating thalassemia major

Brazilian researchers propose new way for treating thalassemia major

Iron accumulation in myocardial cells, potentially resulting in heart failure or fatal arrhythmia, is one of the complications most feared by patients with thalassemia major, a hereditary disease also known as Mediterranean anemia. [More]
New research reveals role of two genetic mutations in subset of acute myeloid leukemia

New research reveals role of two genetic mutations in subset of acute myeloid leukemia

Two genetic mutations known to play a role in many solid cancers might also help explain why a subset of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients develop the disease, according to new research from The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center - Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute. [More]
Detecting inflammation in diabetic patients

Detecting inflammation in diabetic patients

As well as presenting with high blood glucose, diabetic patients have chronic low-grade inflammation, which can be measured by a range of inflammatory markers such as so-called high-sensitive CRP, TNFa and IL-6 as well as a full blood cell count. [More]
Cedars-Sinai receives $7.3 million grant to test safety of novel cell-based therapy in treating PAH

Cedars-Sinai receives $7.3 million grant to test safety of novel cell-based therapy in treating PAH

Researchers from the Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute and the Cedars-Sinai Department of Medicine are expanding their ongoing evaluation of a novel cell-based therapeutic candidate into the area of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). [More]
Metabolic pathway that shows potential to slow aging may drive brain cancer

Metabolic pathway that shows potential to slow aging may drive brain cancer

While a particular metabolic pathway shows potential to slow down the aging process, new research indicates a downside: That same pathway may drive brain cancer. [More]
Global experts meet at IASLC 17th World Conference on Lung Cancer in Vienna

Global experts meet at IASLC 17th World Conference on Lung Cancer in Vienna

Global lung cancer researchers and patient advocates today emphasized that new models of delivering care and communicating about cancer care play an important role in the fight against lung cancer. [More]
Dual therapy safe and effective in patients with recurrent Hodgkin lymphoma

Dual therapy safe and effective in patients with recurrent Hodgkin lymphoma

The combination of two new drugs that harness the body's immune system is safe and effective, destroying most cancer cells in 64 percent of patients with recurrent Hodgkin lymphoma, according to the results of an early-phase study. [More]
New Penn research shows optimal available method for inducing labor in pregnant women

New Penn research shows optimal available method for inducing labor in pregnant women

Labor induction is one of the most common medical procedures in the world, with nearly one-quarter of women who deliver in the U.S. undergoing the procedure each year. [More]
Researchers develop portable sensor for fast, accurate assessment of blood's clotting ability

Researchers develop portable sensor for fast, accurate assessment of blood's clotting ability

Case Western Reserve University researchers have developed a portable sensor that can assess the clotting ability of a person's blood 95 times faster than current methods—using only a single drop of blood. [More]
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