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Researchers uncover mechanism of resistance used by triple negative breast cancer

Researchers uncover mechanism of resistance used by triple negative breast cancer

Breast cancer cells are evasive, finding ways to bypass drugs designed to stop their unchecked growth. [More]
Researchers develop new high-tech medical device to make brain surgery safer

Researchers develop new high-tech medical device to make brain surgery safer

A new high-tech medical device to make brain surgery safer has been developed by researchers at the University of Adelaide. [More]
Recognition given to BetterYou for sleep assisting product

Recognition given to BetterYou for sleep assisting product

Clean sleeping has been touted as the new wellness trend for 2017, so end restless nights for the whole family with BetterYou magnesium, recently named ‘Best Sleep Brand’ at the Mumii Family Awards 2017. [More]
Northwestern Medicine investigators to lead clinical trial for people with rare cancers

Northwestern Medicine investigators to lead clinical trial for people with rare cancers

A novel national trial for people with no established alternative to treat their rare cancers is being co-led by Northwestern Medicine investigators, who helped conceive of and develop the project. [More]
Interface Clinical Research outlines new model for running primary care trials

Interface Clinical Research outlines new model for running primary care trials

New clinical trials company, Interface Clinical Research, outlined a new model for running primary care clinical trials at their launch yesterday at the Royal Society in London. [More]
Overall survival of advanced NSCLC patients receiving treatment better than untreated patients

Overall survival of advanced NSCLC patients receiving treatment better than untreated patients

Non-small cell lung cancer patients with advanced disease receiving standard of care treatment have a higher overall survival than similar patients not receiving treatment. [More]
Interactive book reading strategy shows promise for treating children with SLI

Interactive book reading strategy shows promise for treating children with SLI

A clinical trial of book reading to help kindergarten children with Specific Language Impairment learn words has determined the number of times a child with SLI needs to hear a word to learn it: that would be 36 times or exposures compared to 12 times for typically developing children. [More]
BetterYou magnesium can raise cellular mineral levels faster than traditional tablets

BetterYou magnesium can raise cellular mineral levels faster than traditional tablets

Low magnesium levels are leading to a worrying level of undissolved calcium and increased heavy metal toxicity which can severely impact on our health and wellbeing, say mineral analysis experts. [More]
People with metabolic syndrome may need more vitamin E, new research shows

People with metabolic syndrome may need more vitamin E, new research shows

New research has shown that people with metabolic syndrome need significantly more vitamin E - which could be a serious public health concern, in light of the millions of people who have this condition that's often related to obesity. [More]
Synthesized steroid prevents lethal protein buildup in animal model of Parkinson's disease

Synthesized steroid prevents lethal protein buildup in animal model of Parkinson's disease

A synthesized steroid mirroring one naturally made by the dogfish shark prevents the buildup of a lethal protein implicated in some neurodegenerative diseases, reports an international research team studying an animal model of Parkinson's disease. [More]
Naturally-occurring compound can inhibit early formation of toxins linked to Parkinson's Disease

Naturally-occurring compound can inhibit early formation of toxins linked to Parkinson's Disease

A naturally-occurring compound has been found to block a molecular process thought to underlie Parkinson's Disease, and to suppress its toxic products, scientists have reported. [More]
Reducing cocaine use can potentially reverse coronary atherosclerosis

Reducing cocaine use can potentially reverse coronary atherosclerosis

People who use cocaine regularly are at high risk of coronary artery disease. A study in the Journal of Addiction Medicine, the official journal of the American Society of Addiction Medicine, reports that stopping or reducing cocaine use can potentially reverse the process of coronary atherosclerosis. The journal is published by Wolters Kluwer. [More]
Could pathogen infection really lead to Alzheimer’s?

Could pathogen infection really lead to Alzheimer’s?

New concepts of infectious disease are evolving with the realization that pathogens are key players in the development of progressive chronic diseases that originally were not thought to be infectious. Infection is well-known to be associated with numerous neurological diseases for which... [More]
Curcumin not likely to have therapeutic benefit, report reveals

Curcumin not likely to have therapeutic benefit, report reveals

Curcumin, a compound in turmeric, continues to be hailed as a natural treatment for a wide range of health conditions, including cancer and Alzheimer's disease [More]
Scientist receives $2.7 million DoD grant for research on veterans with chronic TBI

Scientist receives $2.7 million DoD grant for research on veterans with chronic TBI

A researcher from the Center for BrainHealth at UT Dallas has been awarded a $2.7 million grant from the Department of Defense under the Joint Warfighter Medical Research Program. [More]
Drug that improves blood flow in damaged heart may be possible treatment option for TNBC

Drug that improves blood flow in damaged heart may be possible treatment option for TNBC

Researchers are looking at a drug once used to improve blood flow in damaged hearts in thousands of patients as a possible treatment option for triple negative breast cancer (TNBC). [More]
Unique type of airway inflammation could make African Americans less responsive to asthma treatment

Unique type of airway inflammation could make African Americans less responsive to asthma treatment

African Americans may be less responsive to asthma treatment and more likely to die from the condition, in part, because they have a unique type of airway inflammation, according to a study led by researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago College of Medicine. [More]
Houston Methodist researchers advance potential treatment for metaplastic breast cancer

Houston Methodist researchers advance potential treatment for metaplastic breast cancer

Houston Methodist Hospital researchers have advanced a potential treatment for metaplastic breast cancer--the most aggressive subtype of triple negative breast cancer, into patients in just under four years. [More]
Study shows promising results for treating lymphoma patients with immune cell therapy

Study shows promising results for treating lymphoma patients with immune cell therapy

Lymphoma is the most common blood cancer. The disease occurs when immune cells called lymphocytes multiply uncontrollably. Cancerous lymphocytes can travel throughout the body and form lymph node tumors. [More]
FDA-approved, bioengineered living-cell therapy can shift genomic profile of non-healing wounds

FDA-approved, bioengineered living-cell therapy can shift genomic profile of non-healing wounds

Apligraf - an FDA-approved, bioengineered living-cell therapy from Organogenesis Inc. - has become the first wound-healing therapy to demonstrate a significant change in the genomic profile of a treated non-healing wound, according to new research published in the peer-reviewed journal Science Translational Medicine. [More]
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