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Cognition is a concept used in different ways by different disciplines, but is generally accepted to mean the process of thought. For example, in psychology and cognitive science it refers to an information processing view of an individual's psychological functions.
Focused therapy may be effective, less toxic way to treat brain tumors

Focused therapy may be effective, less toxic way to treat brain tumors

Physicians from Carolinas HealthCare System's Neurosciences Institute and Levine Cancer Institute are among the authors of a study that was accepted for publication by the Journal of the American Medical Association. The study, released on July 26, 2016, shows that patients with the most common form of brain tumor can be treated in an effective and substantially less toxic way by omitting a widely used portion of radiation therapy. [More]
Stereotactic radiosurgery could be more effective for patients with few metastatic brain tumors

Stereotactic radiosurgery could be more effective for patients with few metastatic brain tumors

Patients with three or fewer metastatic brain tumors who received treatment with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) had less cognitive deterioration three months after treatment than patients who received SRS combined with whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT). [More]
Retained metabolites may contribute to impaired cognitive function in kidney failure patients

Retained metabolites may contribute to impaired cognitive function in kidney failure patients

Retention of certain metabolites in the blood may contribute to cognitive impairment in patients with kidney failure, according to a study appearing in an upcoming issue of the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology. [More]
ASH commits $3 million annual funding to help sustain promising blood disease research

ASH commits $3 million annual funding to help sustain promising blood disease research

With a $3 million annual commitment to support promising blood disease research amid limited National Institutes of Health funding, the American Society of Hematology--the world's largest professional society concerned with the causes and treatment of blood disorders--today announced the formal establishment of the ASH Bridge Grant program after an extended four-year pilot study. [More]
Delirium in older surgical patients may be linked to long-term cognitive decline

Delirium in older surgical patients may be linked to long-term cognitive decline

Researchers from the Harvard Medical School - affiliated Hebrew SeniorLife Institute for Aging Research have found increasing evidence that delirium in older surgical patients may be associated with long-term cognitive decline. [More]
Review highlights lack of consistent assessment tool to assess driving ability in people with Alzheimer's

Review highlights lack of consistent assessment tool to assess driving ability in people with Alzheimer's

No single assessment tool is able to consistently determine driving ability in people with Alzheimer's disease and mild cognitive impairment, a St. Michael's Hospital research review has found. [More]
Extra-coding RNA modulates neuronal DNA methylation patterns

Extra-coding RNA modulates neuronal DNA methylation patterns

The creation of memories in the brain involves addition or removal of methyl groups at precise spots on chromosomal DNA. But what controls the careful targeting of these neuronal DNA methylation dynamics? [More]
Daclizumab drug offers new treatment option for people living with relapsing forms of MS in the UK

Daclizumab drug offers new treatment option for people living with relapsing forms of MS in the UK

A new, first-in-class treatment which is believed to use a double-action approach to fight MS by rebalancing the immune system, has today been authorised in the UK for people living with relapsing forms (the most common type) of the disease. [More]
Tiny micro-vesicle structures may help predict probability of developing Alzheimer's dementia

Tiny micro-vesicle structures may help predict probability of developing Alzheimer's dementia

Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine say tiny micro-vesicle structures used by neurons and other cells to transport materials internally or dispose of them externally carry tell-tale proteins that may help to predict the likelihood of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) developing into full-blown Alzheimer's disease (AD). [More]
New risk calculator can assess individual's risk of developing psychosis

New risk calculator can assess individual's risk of developing psychosis

A new risk calculator can predict an individual's risk of developing psychotic disorders such as schizophrenia, according to a new study published today in The American Journal of Psychiatry. [More]
Brain vessel diseases may contribute to Alzheimer's dementia

Brain vessel diseases may contribute to Alzheimer's dementia

While strokes are known to increase risk for dementia, much less is known about diseases of large and small blood vessels in the brain, separate from stroke, and how they relate to dementia. [More]
Textual communication using smartphones can change rhythm of brain waves

Textual communication using smartphones can change rhythm of brain waves

Sending text messages on a smartphone can change the rhythm of brain waves, according to a new study published in Epilepsy & Behavior. [More]
Two simple measures can help decrease incidence of POCD in older patients

Two simple measures can help decrease incidence of POCD in older patients

Post-operative cognitive dysfunction (POCD), a condition mostly observed in older patients following surgery under general anesthesia, is characterized by impaired memory and concentration. The impairment may be temporary or permanent and incapacitating. [More]
Single, short duration exposure of general anesthesia appears to cause no cognitive harm in healthy, young children

Single, short duration exposure of general anesthesia appears to cause no cognitive harm in healthy, young children

A recent study concluded that very young, healthy children undergoing short surgical procedures requiring a single exposure to general anesthesia did not exhibit any effect on the cognitive outcomes tested, according to SmartTots, a public-private partnership of the International Anesthesia Research Society and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. [More]

Dirty working environment can impact cognitive function of employees

A new study by a Florida State University researcher shows that both a lack of stimulation in the workplace and a dirty working environment can have a long-term cognitive effect on employees. [More]
Cerebral microbleeds linked to increased risk of physical, cognitive disability in MS patients

Cerebral microbleeds linked to increased risk of physical, cognitive disability in MS patients

Leaky blood vessels in the brain called cerebral microbleeds are associated with an increased risk of physical and cognitive disability in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), according to a new study by researchers in the Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences at the University at Buffalo. [More]
New technique may help replace brain cells, restore memory

New technique may help replace brain cells, restore memory

Although brains—even adult brains—are far more malleable than we used to think, they are eventually subject to age-related illnesses, like dementia, and loss of cognitive function. [More]
Gist reasoning training can strengthen cognitive domains in individuals with MCI

Gist reasoning training can strengthen cognitive domains in individuals with MCI

New research from the Center for BrainHealth at The University of Texas at Dallas shows that strategy-based reasoning training can improve the cognitive performance for those with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), a preclinical stage of those at risk for Alzheimer's disease. [More]
U-M researchers explore new way to improve cognitive issues in MS patients

U-M researchers explore new way to improve cognitive issues in MS patients

Multiple sclerosis looks different from person to person. In many individuals, though, the difficulty in maintaining a sense of self and in keeping up intellectually can be the disease's most devastating manifestations. [More]
Study provides new insight into poorly understood effects of high explosive blasts in male soldiers

Study provides new insight into poorly understood effects of high explosive blasts in male soldiers

Scientists have identified a distinctive pattern of injury in the brains of eight deceased military personnel who survived high explosive attacks and died between 4 days and 9 years later from their injuries or other causes. [More]
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