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Cognition is a concept used in different ways by different disciplines, but is generally accepted to mean the process of thought. For example, in psychology and cognitive science it refers to an information processing view of an individual's psychological functions.
Vitamin D, omega-3 fatty acids may optimize brain serotonin concentrations and function

Vitamin D, omega-3 fatty acids may optimize brain serotonin concentrations and function

Although essential marine omega-3 fatty acids and vitamin D have been shown to improve cognitive function and behavior in the context of certain brain disorders, the underlying mechanism has been unclear. In a new paper published in FASEB Journal by Rhonda Patrick, PhD and Bruce Ames, PhD of Children's Hospital Oakland Research Institute, serotonin is explained as the possible missing link tying together why vitamin D and marine omega-3 fatty acids might ameliorate the symptoms associated with a broad array of brain disorders. [More]
New study finds that wandering mind can impart distinct cognitive advantage

New study finds that wandering mind can impart distinct cognitive advantage

Does your mind wander when performing monotonous, repetitive tasks? Of course! But daydreaming involves more than just beating back boredom. In fact, according to a new study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, a wandering mind can impart a distinct cognitive advantage. [More]
Formula-fed infants have higher arsenic levels than breast-fed infants

Formula-fed infants have higher arsenic levels than breast-fed infants

In the first U.S. study of urinary arsenic in babies, Dartmouth College researchers found that formula-fed infants had higher arsenic levels than breast-fed infants, and that breast milk itself contained very low arsenic concentrations. [More]
BGRF announces publication of research into personalising nootropic drugs using in silico prediction methods

BGRF announces publication of research into personalising nootropic drugs using in silico prediction methods

The Biogerontology Research Foundation (BGRF), a UK-based charity committed to the support of aging research to address the challenges of a rapidly aging population and to reduce the impact of disease on future generations, announces the publication of research into personalising nootropic drugs using in silico prediction methods. [More]
Study lays groundwork for building consensus on successful aging

Study lays groundwork for building consensus on successful aging

Scholars have long debated what successful aging is, how to measure it, and how to promote it. But the latest issue of The Gerontologist lays the groundwork for building consensus on the topic -- while pointing out that the answer may differ among academics and the general public, as well as across populations and demographic groups. [More]
ATA recommends daily serving of iodine in multivitamin/mineral supplements for pregnant, breastfeeding women

ATA recommends daily serving of iodine in multivitamin/mineral supplements for pregnant, breastfeeding women

The American Thyroid Association has championed the effort to include a daily serving of iodine in multivitamin/mineral supplements intended for pregnant and breastfeeding women, and it applauds the new guidelines released by the U.S. Council for Responsible Nutrition advising manufacturers to include 150 micrograms of iodine to these daily supplements. [More]
New NIEHS grants to support independent biomedical research

New NIEHS grants to support independent biomedical research

New grants totaling $3 million will go to six outstanding early-career scientists, bridging a funding gap to independent biomedical research. The National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, part of the National Institutes of Health, created the award to encourage early stage researchers who want to discover how our environment influences human health. [More]
Study focuses on two natural approaches to preventing breast cancer

Study focuses on two natural approaches to preventing breast cancer

Preventing cancer requires intimate knowledge of how cancer starts, what causes it to grow and flourish, and how to stop it in its tracks. Sometimes this comes in the form of a vaccine (the HPV vaccine for cervical and head and neck cancers), a screening (a colonoscopy for colorectal cancer) or a blood test (the PSA level test for prostate cancer). [More]
Resveratrol found in red grapes, peanuts may help prevent age-related decline in memory

Resveratrol found in red grapes, peanuts may help prevent age-related decline in memory

A compound found in common foods such as red grapes and peanuts may help prevent age-related decline in memory, according to new research published by a faculty member in the Texas A&M Health Science Center College of Medicine. [More]
SuperAgers have distinctly different looking brains

SuperAgers have distinctly different looking brains

SuperAgers, aged 80 and above, have distinctly different looking brains than those of normal older people, according to new Northwestern Medicine research that is beginning to reveal why the memories of these cognitively elite elders don't suffer the usual ravages of time. [More]
Childhood football increases risk of cognitive impairment

Childhood football increases risk of cognitive impairment

The DETECT study, published yesterday, showed that former National Football League (NFL) players who participated in tackle football before the age of 12 years were more likely to have memory and thinking problems in adulthood. [More]
Study: Common pesticide may alter the development of brain's dopamine system

Study: Common pesticide may alter the development of brain's dopamine system

A commonly used pesticide may alter the development of the brain's dopamine system -- responsible for emotional expression and cognitive function - and increase the risk of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder in children, according to a new Rutgers study. [More]
ADDF awards grant to support initiation of AGB101 Phase 3 trial for aMCI treatment

ADDF awards grant to support initiation of AGB101 Phase 3 trial for aMCI treatment

The Alzheimer's Drug Discovery Foundation announced today a $900,000 grant to AgeneBio, a pharmaceutical company developing innovative therapies for neurologic and psychiatric diseases. The grant will support the initiation of an FDA-registered Phase 3 clinical trial of AGB101, a new therapeutic treatment for amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI). [More]
Daily use of Pycnogenol may help improve overall cognitive function

Daily use of Pycnogenol may help improve overall cognitive function

New research delivers exciting news for those seeking natural ways to boost memory and mental performance. A study recently published in the Journal of Neurosurgical Sciences shows daily use of Pycnogenol (pic-noj-en-all), a natural plant extract from French maritime pine tree bark, may help improve attention span, memory, decision-making – including executive-level performance – and overall cognitive function. [More]
Walnuts may improve cognitive function

Walnuts may improve cognitive function

Eating walnuts may improve performance on cognitive function tests, including those for memory, concentration and information processing speed according to new research from the David Geffen School of Medicine at The University of California, Los Angeles, led by Dr. Lenore Arab. Cognitive function was consistently greater in adult participants that consumed walnuts, regardless of age, gender or ethnicity. [More]
Study: Stem cell transplantation improves quality of life in patients with relapsing-remitting MS

Study: Stem cell transplantation improves quality of life in patients with relapsing-remitting MS

Results from a preliminary study indicate that among patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (MS), treatment with nonmyeloablative hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (low intensity stem cell transplantation) was associated with improvement in measures of disability and quality of life, according to a study in the January 20 issue of JAMA. [More]
Vascular and Alzheimer's-related brain abnormalities cause dementia in older people

Vascular and Alzheimer's-related brain abnormalities cause dementia in older people

A growing body of research suggests that the most common cause of dementia in older people is a mix of vascular and Alzheimer's-related brain abnormalities, and that approximately half of people who die with Alzheimer's also have evidence of strokes in their brains. Furthermore, when strokes and hallmark Alzheimer's plaques and tangles are combined, it increases a person's likelihood of experiencing dementia. [More]
Continued exposure to high blood sugars may impact brain function in young diabetic children

Continued exposure to high blood sugars may impact brain function in young diabetic children

Investigators have found that young children with type 1 diabetes (T1D) have slower brain growth compared to children without diabetes. A new study, published in the December issue of Diabetes, now available ahead of print, suggests that continued exposure to hyperglycemia, or high blood sugars, may be detrimental to the developing brain. [More]
Loyola neurologist finds little scientific evidence that brain games improve cognitive function

Loyola neurologist finds little scientific evidence that brain games improve cognitive function

Computerized brain games that are advertised as a way to help boost intelligence and prevent dementia will be popular Christmas gifts this year. [More]
Bipolar brain changes both state- and trait-dependent

Bipolar brain changes both state- and trait-dependent

Some of the alterations in brain activation in patients with bipolar disorder are dependent on their current mood, study findings show. [More]