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PNNL to share variety of research at 2014 American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting

PNNL to share variety of research at 2014 American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting

Scientists from the Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory will present a variety of research at the 2014 American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting, which runs Monday, Dec. 15 through Friday, Dec. 19 at the Moscone Convention Center in San Francisco. [More]
National survey shows decrease in alcohol, cigarette and illicit drug use among U.S. teens

National survey shows decrease in alcohol, cigarette and illicit drug use among U.S. teens

A national survey of students in U.S. middle schools and high schools shows some important improvements in levels of substance use. [More]
Revolutionising back pain treatments: an interview with Dr Kieran O’Sullivan

Revolutionising back pain treatments: an interview with Dr Kieran O’Sullivan

Back pain is exceptionally common. In fact, to not experience back pain at some point of your life would be thoroughly abnormal. Experiencing back pain is like becoming tired or becoming sad; we don’t necessarily like it, but it’s perfectly common. [More]
Tips to allergy sufferers for easy breathing this holiday season

Tips to allergy sufferers for easy breathing this holiday season

The many smells and tastes of the holidays that get so many in a festive mood can sicken others, thanks to allergic reactions. But with some seasonal savvy, allergy sufferers can breathe easy this festive time of year. [More]
Cold 'sensor' hold key to new therapeutic target for treatment of frostbite and hypothermia

Cold 'sensor' hold key to new therapeutic target for treatment of frostbite and hypothermia

A cold 'sensor' which triggers the skin's vascular response to the cold could represent an exciting new therapeutic target for the treatment of frostbite and hypothermia, according to scientists at King's College London. [More]
Infant mortality rates for RSV much lower than previously thought

Infant mortality rates for RSV much lower than previously thought

It's a virus that has long been characterized as dangerous and even deadly, but new research shows infant deaths from respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) are actually quite uncommon in the 21st century. [More]

Unheated high tunnels help bedding plants growers reduce energy costs

Energy costs account for one of the largest expenses in commercial greenhouse production of annual bedding plants. Naturally, bedding plant producers are searching for more energy-efficient production methods that can reduce fuel usage and increase profits. Christopher Currey, Roberto Lopez, and Neil Mattson published a study in HortTechnology that gives growers in northern latitudes valuable information on finishing practices for annual bedding plants. [More]
Verizon announces winners of 2014 Powerful Answers Award

Verizon announces winners of 2014 Powerful Answers Award

The wait is over. Verizon is proud to announce the winners of Verizon's 2014 Powerful Answers Award, three in each of the following categories: education, health care, sustainability and transportation. [More]
Novo Nordisk reports positive data from Novoeight phase 3 study in people with haemophilia A

Novo Nordisk reports positive data from Novoeight phase 3 study in people with haemophilia A

Today, Novo Nordisk announced a new analysis of phase 3 data demonstrating people with haemophilia A who had the highest annualised bleeding rate (ABR) during initial treatment with Novoeight (Antihemophilic Factor [Recombinant]) showed the largest reduction in bleeding over the duration of treatment. [More]
New diagnostic system describes symptoms using the image of patient's tongue

New diagnostic system describes symptoms using the image of patient's tongue

Physicians often ask their patients to "Please stick out your tongue". The tongue can betray signs of illness, which combined with other symptoms such as a cough, fever, presence of jaundice, headache or bowel habits, can help the physician offer a diagnosis. For people in remote areas who do not have ready access to a physician, a new diagnostic system is reported in the International Journal of Biomedical Engineering and Technology that works to combine the soft inputs of described symptoms with a digital analysis of an image of the patient's tongue. [More]
Scientists devise powerful algorithm to improve effectiveness of research technology harnessing RNAi

Scientists devise powerful algorithm to improve effectiveness of research technology harnessing RNAi

Scientists at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory have devised a powerful algorithm that improves the effectiveness of an important research technology harnessing RNA interference, or RNAi. [More]
Empathic partnership: A health care model for marginalized populations

Empathic partnership: A health care model for marginalized populations

Sitting on an exam table in a flimsy gown can intimidate anyone. If you also happen to be lesbian, gay or bisexual, the experience can be even worse. [More]
TSRI scientists identify 'mechanoreceptor' protein that mediates sense of touch in mammals

TSRI scientists identify 'mechanoreceptor' protein that mediates sense of touch in mammals

A team led by biologists at The Scripps Research Institute has solved a long-standing mystery in neuroscience by identifying the "mechanoreceptor" protein that mediates the sense of touch in mammals. [More]
Massage therapy: A natural way to strengthen the immune system this flu season

Massage therapy: A natural way to strengthen the immune system this flu season

As seasons change our bodies become more susceptible to cold and flu. Massage therapy is a natural way to strengthen the immune system at this vulnerable time, especially if it is already weakened by stress, fatigue or poor nutrition. [More]
Restrooms are no more healthy, unhealthy than your home

Restrooms are no more healthy, unhealthy than your home

Microbial succession in a sterilized restroom begins with bacteria from the gut and the vagina, and is followed shortly by microbes from the skin. Restrooms are dominated by a stable community structure of skin and outdoor associated bacteria, with few pathogenic bacteria making them similar to other built environments such as your home. [More]
New blood test could help detect cold-related asthma risk

New blood test could help detect cold-related asthma risk

People who have asthma generally suffer worse with colds caused by rhinoviruses than other people do. There are also asthmatics and patients with the severe lung condition COPD in whom the cold virus can trigger serious flare-ups of their condition. A team of researchers from the Institute of Pathophysiology and Allergy Research at the MedUni Vienna has now discovered how this risk group can be filtered out using a blood test. [More]
CHFA reveals top five healthy holiday gift ideas

CHFA reveals top five healthy holiday gift ideas

Finding that perfect gift for health-conscious friends and family can be hard, but this holiday season, you can put those fears to rest. [More]
Grand Challenges Canada announces $1.2 million in grant for 11 new global health innovations

Grand Challenges Canada announces $1.2 million in grant for 11 new global health innovations

Grand Challenges Canada, funded by the Government of Canada, today announced $1.2 million in funding for 11 new global health innovations implemented in member states of La Francophonie. [More]
Kessler Institute provides tips to help reduce risk of injury during winter months

Kessler Institute provides tips to help reduce risk of injury during winter months

Winter appears to have arrived early, bringing with it record snowfalls and cold temperatures across the country. It also brings an increased risk for injuries. Whether shoveling snow, dealing with icy roads, or simply trying to walk on wet, slippery pavement, caution is the key word. [More]
Experimental Ebola vaccine appears safe, produces immune system responses in NIH phase 1 trial

Experimental Ebola vaccine appears safe, produces immune system responses in NIH phase 1 trial

An experimental vaccine to prevent Ebola virus disease was well-tolerated and produced immune system responses in all 20 healthy adults who received it in a Phase 1 clinical trial conducted by researchers from the National Institutes of Health. The candidate vaccine, which was co-developed by the NIH's National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and GlaxoSmithKline, was tested at the NIH Clinical Center in Bethesda, Maryland. [More]