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Dnurse Glucose Meter and Dnurse app gain CE approval

Dnurse Glucose Meter and Dnurse app gain CE approval

Dnurse Technology has announced today that the Dnurse Glucose Meter and Dnurse app for Android and iOS have gained CE approval. It is the first CE approved smart glucose meter in China. CE (European Conformity) marking has been a mandatory conformity marking for certain products sold within the European Economic Area (EEA) since 1985. [More]
Aggression influences new nerve cell production in the brain

Aggression influences new nerve cell production in the brain

A group of neurobiologists from Russia and the USA, including Dmitry Smagin, Tatyana Michurina, and Grigori Enikolopov from Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, have proven experimentally that aggression has an influence on the production of new nerve cells in the brain. [More]
Rockefeller University study shows how herpes virus causes traffic jam in immune system pathway

Rockefeller University study shows how herpes virus causes traffic jam in immune system pathway

With over half the U.S. population infected, most people are familiar with the pesky cold sore outbreaks caused by the herpes virus. The virus outsmarts the immune system by interfering with the process that normally allows immune cells to recognize and destroy foreign invaders. How exactly the herpes simplex 1 virus pulls off its nifty scheme has long been elusive to scientists. [More]
High school wrestlers have highest number of skin infections

High school wrestlers have highest number of skin infections

The first national survey of skin infections among high school athletes has found that wrestlers have the highest number of infections, with football players coming in a distant second, according to researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus. [More]
CMU joins $12 million research project to reverse-engineer the brain's secret algorithms

CMU joins $12 million research project to reverse-engineer the brain's secret algorithms

Carnegie Mellon University is embarking on a five-year, $12 million research effort to reverse-engineer the brain, seeking to unlock the secrets of neural circuitry and the brain's learning methods. Researchers will use these insights to make computers think more like humans. [More]
Block copolymer hydrogels facilitate cryoprotection of red blood cells and increase tissue engineering

Block copolymer hydrogels facilitate cryoprotection of red blood cells and increase tissue engineering

Freezing of medical tissue and cells usually requires the addition of cryopreservatives, although the added compounds can have undesired effects in subsequent applications. [More]
Researchers developing cryotherapy device to reduce tissue damage

Researchers developing cryotherapy device to reduce tissue damage

Cold therapy has long been prescribed for those recovering from orthopedic surgery, muscle inflammation and sports-related injuries, with treatments ranging from ice baths to immersion in whole-body cryotherapy chambers. [More]
Meningitis Now urges schools to protect pupils from deadly meningitis

Meningitis Now urges schools to protect pupils from deadly meningitis

LEADING UK meningitis charity, Meningitis Now, is calling on headteachers to ensure pupils are protected from deadly meningitis. [More]
Panasonic introduces new -40°C freezer with hydrocarbon refrigerant

Panasonic introduces new -40°C freezer with hydrocarbon refrigerant

New MDF-U5412H -40°C Freezers from Panasonic, with hydrocarbon refrigerants for increased efficiency, provide the ideal stable and uniform storage environment for the preservation of plasma [More]
Duke researchers closer to developing rapid blood test for bacterial and viral infections

Duke researchers closer to developing rapid blood test for bacterial and viral infections

Researchers at Duke Health are fine-tuning a test that can determine whether a respiratory illness is caused by infection from a virus or bacteria so that antibiotics can be more precisely prescribed. [More]
NSSA offers tips to avoid winter sports injuries

NSSA offers tips to avoid winter sports injuries

If you're suited up and ready to ski or snowboard, you're not alone. These popular sports draw more than 9.5 million participants a year, according to the National Ski Areas Association, and they accounted for 53.6 million total skier and snowboarder visits to ski areas in the 2014-15 season. [More]
Study explores new approaches to prevent fall asthma exacerbations in pediatric patients

Study explores new approaches to prevent fall asthma exacerbations in pediatric patients

Experts from Children's Hospital Colorado (Children's Colorado) co-led a team of researchers in studying new approaches to reducing fall asthma exacerbations in pediatric patients. [More]
Millercare offers tips to prevent onset of deep vein thrombosis

Millercare offers tips to prevent onset of deep vein thrombosis

We’re set to have one of the coldest Januarys in years. As winds batter the UK, it can be tempting to stay indoors and hide from the chill, particularly for the elderly. [More]
Simple paper test could confirm presence of illnesses even before patients feel symptoms

Simple paper test could confirm presence of illnesses even before patients feel symptoms

A multi-disciplinary team of researchers has developed a new diagnostic test that can change the medical landscape by making it possible for patients to quickly determine if they are infected with an illness, using a simple paper test sensitive enough to detect markers of various illnesses using minute amounts of blood, sweat, or other biological material. [More]
Novel drug shows promise against metastatic breast cancer in mouse models

Novel drug shows promise against metastatic breast cancer in mouse models

A doctor treating a patient with a potentially fatal metastatic breast tumor would be very pleased to find, after administering a round of treatment, that the primary tumor had undergone a change in character - from aggressive to static, and no longer shedding cells that can colonize distant organs of the body. [More]
NIST chemist develops portable kit for recovering traces of chemical evidence

NIST chemist develops portable kit for recovering traces of chemical evidence

A chemist at the National Institute of Standards and Technology has developed a portable version of his method for recovering trace chemicals such as environmental pollutants and forensic evidence including secret graves and arson fire debris. [More]
New model provides images of single cell with micrometer resolution

New model provides images of single cell with micrometer resolution

Thermal properties of cells regulate their ability to store, transport or exchange heat with their environment. So gaining control of these properties is of great interest for optimizing cryopreservation -- the process of freezing and storing blood or tissues, which is also used when transporting organs for transplants. [More]
ORNL's cell-free protein synthesis system can help save lives of soldiers injured in remote locations

ORNL's cell-free protein synthesis system can help save lives of soldiers injured in remote locations

Lives of soldiers and others injured in remote locations could be saved with a cell-free protein synthesis system developed at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory. [More]
Novel drug shows promise in mouse models of human metastatic breast cancer

Novel drug shows promise in mouse models of human metastatic breast cancer

A doctor treating a patient with a potentially fatal metastatic breast tumor would be very pleased to find, after administering a round of treatment, that the primary tumor had undergone a change in character - from aggressive to static, and no longer shedding cells that can colonize distant organs of the body. Indeed, most patients with breast and other forms of cancer who succumb to the illness do so because of the cancer's unstoppable spread. [More]
New vaccine shows promise against Middle East respiratory syndrome in dromedary camels

New vaccine shows promise against Middle East respiratory syndrome in dromedary camels

An international research project with the involvement of Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona and the Animal Health Research Centre (IRTA-CReSA), has designed a vaccine shown to be effective in protecting dromedaries against the coronavirus (CoV) that causes Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS). [More]
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