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Math professor develops scientific model to report ways Zika virus proliferates

Math professor develops scientific model to report ways Zika virus proliferates

A University of Miami math professor has developed a scientific model to address the various ways the Zika virus proliferates. The study, published June 17, 2016 in Scientific Reports, reveals that mosquito control should remain the most important mitigation method to control the virus. [More]
Rare inherited gene mutations may contribute to severe forms of bipolar disorder

Rare inherited gene mutations may contribute to severe forms of bipolar disorder

Using so-called next-generation genome sequencing, researchers at Johns Hopkins have identified 84 potential inherited gene mutations that may contribute to the most severe forms of bipolar disorder. About 5.6 million Americans are estimated to have bipolar disorder. [More]
Researchers develop new formulations for topical treatments of oral mucosal conditions

Researchers develop new formulations for topical treatments of oral mucosal conditions

On June 24, 2016, at the 94th General Session & Exhibition of the International Association for Dental Research, researcher W. Peter Holbrook, University of Iceland, will present a study titled "Development of Drugs for Local Treatment of Oral Conditions." The IADR General Session is being held in conjunction with the 3rd Meeting of the IADR Asia Pacific Region and the 35th Annual Meeting of the IADR Korean Division. [More]
Novel adaptive mechanisms in hibernating animals may provide clues to mitigate cardiac injury

Novel adaptive mechanisms in hibernating animals may provide clues to mitigate cardiac injury

Novel adaptations discovered in hibernating animals may reveal ways to mitigate injuries associated with strokes, heart attacks and organ transplants, according to researchers at the University of Alaska Fairbanks and Duke University. [More]
New method helps analyse how cold viruses penetrate into cells

New method helps analyse how cold viruses penetrate into cells

Cold viruses cause us irritation by penetrating into our cells and transporting their RNA into the cytoplasma of the infected cells. This is the only way they can multiply. The details of how the transfer of the RNA from within the virus occurs are difficult to study. [More]
Molecular diagnostics of the future: an interview with Elaine Warburton, OBE

Molecular diagnostics of the future: an interview with Elaine Warburton, OBE

Firstly, a sample must be transported from the clinic to the laboratory. Simple tests may be undertaken in a small lab within the hospital or clinic, whilst complex testing such as drug susceptibility testing is often done in a large centralized laboratory many miles from the clinic [More]
New research helps better understand role of TIP60 in allowing tumors to survive in low-oxygen environments

New research helps better understand role of TIP60 in allowing tumors to survive in low-oxygen environments

In summer 2011, University of Colorado Cancer Center investigators Joaquín Espinosa, PhD, and Matthew Galbraith, PhD, taught a summer symposium on gene expression at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory in Long Island, New York. [More]
NPS MedicineWise urges Australians to stop expecting antibiotics for colds and flu

NPS MedicineWise urges Australians to stop expecting antibiotics for colds and flu

With new findings launched today showing that antimicrobial use in the community in Australia is higher than in England, Canada, Norway, Denmark, Sweden and the Netherlands—and that the number of antimicrobials being prescribed in Australia continues to grow—NPS MedicineWise is again urging Australians to stop expecting antibiotics for viruses such as colds and flu. [More]
Very hot drinks probably cause cancer, warns WHO

Very hot drinks probably cause cancer, warns WHO

The cancer agency of the World Health Organization says drinking very hot beverages is probably associated with esophageal cancer. [More]
Study opens up new strategy to make immunotherapy more effective for different cancer types

Study opens up new strategy to make immunotherapy more effective for different cancer types

By combining local radiation therapy and anti-cancer vaccines with checkpoint inhibitors, researchers from the University of Chicago, working with mice, were able to increase the response rate for these new immunotherapy agents. [More]
Comprehensive workplace hand hygiene program helps reduce medical insurance claims for illnesses

Comprehensive workplace hand hygiene program helps reduce medical insurance claims for illnesses

A workplace outcome study published in The Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine found that offices equipped with alcohol-based hand sanitizers and hand sanitizing wipes throughout the building and at employees' desks resulted in 24.3 percent fewer healthcare claims for hand hygiene preventable illnesses -- such as cold, flu and respiratory illnesses -- than the office and employees in the control group without these products. [More]
NMR-based metabolomics: an interview with Prof. Claudio Luchinat

NMR-based metabolomics: an interview with Prof. Claudio Luchinat

We started from theoretical inorganic to bioinorganic chemistry, so looking at metals in proteins, enzymes and so on. About 30% of all the proteins that we have are metalloproteins, so it’s a huge contribution that inorganic chemistry is providing for life. [More]
Personlized exercise pattern may help reduce neuropathic symptoms of chemotherapy

Personlized exercise pattern may help reduce neuropathic symptoms of chemotherapy

Researchers at the University of Rochester Wilmot Cancer Institute discovered something simple and inexpensive to reduce neuropathy in hands and feet due to chemotherapy--exercise. [More]
New research explores women’s perspective about medication use during pregnancy

New research explores women’s perspective about medication use during pregnancy

Pregnant women overestimate the risks of taking over the counter and prescribed medication - according to new research from the University of East Anglia. [More]
Scientists examine how common beverages affect people's hydration levels

Scientists examine how common beverages affect people's hydration levels

Scientists at the universities of Stirling, Loughborough and Bangor are calling for the creation of a beverage hydration index to help people understand how different drinks can keep you hydrated. [More]
Dr Anjali Mahto explains how to prevent risk of mosquito bites

Dr Anjali Mahto explains how to prevent risk of mosquito bites

Nobody likes being bitten by mosquitos whether it’s at home or abroad. Consultant Dermatologist & British Skin Foundation spokesperson, Dr Anjali Mahto explains how to deter the summer pests, what to do when bitten and why they are attracted to us in the first place. [More]
Parents need to enlist pediatrician in fight against allergies

Parents need to enlist pediatrician in fight against allergies

It’s time to enlist your St. Luke’s pediatrician in the fight against your children’s allergies. [More]
Zinbryta gets FDA approval for treating adults with relapsing forms of MS

Zinbryta gets FDA approval for treating adults with relapsing forms of MS

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Zinbryta (daclizumab) for the treatment of adults with relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis (MS). Zinbryta is a long-acting injection that is self- administered by the patient monthly. [More]
Scalp cooling provides safe, effective treatment in prevention of chemotherapy-induced alopecia

Scalp cooling provides safe, effective treatment in prevention of chemotherapy-induced alopecia

Scalp cooling is a safe, feasible and an effective treatment in the prevention of chemotherapy induced alopecia (CIA) according to a German study being presented at the American Society of Clinical Oncology Annual meeting (ASCO). [More]
Study reveals males and females exhibit different stress responses

Study reveals males and females exhibit different stress responses

How does stress - which, among other things, causes our bodies to divert resources from non-essential functions - affect the basic exchange of materials that underlies our everyday life? Weizmann Institute of Science researchers investigated this question by looking at a receptor in the brains of mice, and they came up with a surprising answer. [More]
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