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Alternative treatment options for uterine fibroids

Alternative treatment options for uterine fibroids

A 47-year-old African-American woman has heavy menstrual bleeding and iron-deficiency anemia. She reports the frequent need to urinate during the night and throughout the day. A colonoscopy is negative and an ultrasonography shows a modestly enlarged uterus with three uterine fibroids, noncancerous growths of the uterus. [More]
UofL receives NIH REACH award to create new ExCITE Hub program

UofL receives NIH REACH award to create new ExCITE Hub program

The University of Louisville announced today that a grant from the National Institutes of Health will combine with matching funds from the university to create a new $6.1 million initiative to commercialize discoveries made by UofL researchers. [More]
Cincinnati Children's pediatric allergist offers tips to combat allergies

Cincinnati Children's pediatric allergist offers tips to combat allergies

One of the problems that parents may have during the springtime is deciphering whether their children's sneezing is due to a cold or allergies. [More]
Vascular mimicry can spread breast cancer to other sites

Vascular mimicry can spread breast cancer to other sites

Imitation may be the sincerest form of flattery, but it can also have deadly consequences, at least when it comes to tumor cells. [More]
Researchers identify phenomenon that explains effects of oxidative stress on immune cells

Researchers identify phenomenon that explains effects of oxidative stress on immune cells

You're up in the mountains, the snow is blindingly white, and the sun is blazing down from the sky: ideal skiing conditions - but any skiers carrying the herpes virus might also have to reckon with the onset of cold sores after their day out. [More]
Nielsen BioSciences launches skin test that helps physicians manage Valley Fever infections

Nielsen BioSciences launches skin test that helps physicians manage Valley Fever infections

Nielsen BioSciences announced today the launch of SPHERUSOL (Coccidioides immitis Spherule-Derived Skin Test Antigen), a skin test that provides valuable data to physicians managing Valley Fever infections. SPHERUSOL has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration as the only skin test to detect an immune response to the fungus called Coccidioides, or "cocci," in patients with history of the disease. [More]
Loyola otolaryngologist offers tips to identify, treat ear infection in children

Loyola otolaryngologist offers tips to identify, treat ear infection in children

Earaches in babies are not uncommon. But a baby's inability to communicate symptoms can leave most parents feeling helpless. According to the American Academy of Pediatrics, three-fourths of babies will get at least one ear infection before the age of one. [More]
Not all psychopaths fit the 'cold, callous and untreatable' stereotype, shows study

Not all psychopaths fit the 'cold, callous and untreatable' stereotype, shows study

Movie villains from Norman Bates to Hannibal Lecter have popularized the notion of the psychopath as cold, cruel, lacking in empathy and beyond the reach of treatment. [More]
Scientists identify rhinovirus C receptor associated with severe asthma attacks

Scientists identify rhinovirus C receptor associated with severe asthma attacks

Scientists funded by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health, have identified a cellular receptor for rhinovirus C, a cold-causing virus that is strongly associated with severe asthma attacks. [More]
Scientists isolate energy-burning 'beige' fat from adult humans

Scientists isolate energy-burning 'beige' fat from adult humans

For the first time, a research team, led by a UC San Francisco biologist, has isolated energy-burning "beige" fat from adult humans, which is known to be able to convert unhealthy white fat into healthy brown fat. The scientists also found new genetic markers of this beige fat. [More]
RSV infection rate on the rise among young children

RSV infection rate on the rise among young children

Children with Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV), a common virus that infects the lungs and breathing passageways, has been on the rise across the nation for the last several years. Though it may only produce minor cold symptoms in adults, it can lead to serious illness in young children and those with compromised immune systems. [More]
CSHL professor to be honored with AACR Outstanding Achievement in Cancer Research Award

CSHL professor to be honored with AACR Outstanding Achievement in Cancer Research Award

The American Association for Cancer Research will honor Christopher R. Vakoc, MD, PhD, assistant professor at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory in Cold Spring Harbor, New York, with the 35th annual AACR Outstanding Achievement in Cancer Research Award at the AACR Annual Meeting 2015, to be held in Philadelphia, April 18-22. [More]
Rare genetic mutation explains why flu can kill in rare cases

Rare genetic mutation explains why flu can kill in rare cases

Nobody likes getting the flu, but for some people, fluids and rest aren't enough. A small number of children who catch the influenza virus fall so ill they end up in the hospital — perhaps needing ventilators to breathe — even while their family and friends recover easily. New research by Rockefeller University scientists, published March 26 in Science, helps explain why: a rare genetic mutation. [More]
New Ebola vaccine shows promise in first phase 1 clinical trial

New Ebola vaccine shows promise in first phase 1 clinical trial

Results from the first phase 1 trial of an Ebola vaccine based on the current (2014) strain of the virus are today published in The Lancet. Until now, all tested Ebola virus vaccines have been based on the virus strain from the Zaire outbreak in 1976. The results suggest that the new vaccine is safe, and provokes an immune response in recipients, although further long-term testing will be needed to establish whether it can protect against the Ebola virus. [More]
Novo Nordisk announces U.S. launch of Novoeight for people living with hemophilia A

Novo Nordisk announces U.S. launch of Novoeight for people living with hemophilia A

Novo Nordisk today announced the company will launch Novoeight (Antihemophilic Factor [Recombinant]) in the United States for people living with hemophilia A. [More]
Personalized gene therapy to fight against cancer

Personalized gene therapy to fight against cancer

The fight to treat cancer and eradicate tumors will likely benefit from a new set of treatments if early development phases continue to show promise, according to Kalorama Information. The healthcare market research publisher stated that gene therapies that are able to deliver genetic material to a specific cell population or tumor that will result in the destruction of the tumor. [More]
Montefiore physician offers tips for seasonal allergy sufferers

Montefiore physician offers tips for seasonal allergy sufferers

This winter was one of the coldest on record, but spring allergy season is already beginning and it's time for sufferers to start preparing now. [More]
Austrian Centre of Industrial Biotechnology develops method to reduce production costs of valuable drugs

Austrian Centre of Industrial Biotechnology develops method to reduce production costs of valuable drugs

Imagine a loved relative suffering from cancer - and you could not afford a treatment because the drugs are too expensive. The Austrian Centre of Industrial Biotechnology (acib) developed a method with the power to reduce production costs of highly valued drugs significantly. [More]
Study offers new neurological explanation for variability in roundworm's brain activity

Study offers new neurological explanation for variability in roundworm's brain activity

Even worms have free will. If offered a delicious smell, for example, a roundworm will usually stop its wandering to investigate the source, but sometimes it won't. Just as with humans, the same stimulus does not always provoke the same response, even from the same individual. New research at Rockefeller University, published online today (March 12) in Cell, offers a new neurological explanation for this variability, derived by studying a simple three-cell network within the roundworm brain. [More]
Meta-analysis finds that high dose zinc acetate lozenges may help reduce duration of cold symptoms

Meta-analysis finds that high dose zinc acetate lozenges may help reduce duration of cold symptoms

According to a meta-analysis published in BMC Family Practice, high dose zinc acetate lozenges shortened the duration of common-cold associated nasal discharge by 34%, nasal congestion by 37%, scratchy throat by 33%, and cough by 46%. [More]
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