Colonoscopy News and Research RSS Feed - Colonoscopy News and Research

Colonoscopy is examination of the inside of the colon using a colonoscope, inserted into the rectum. A colonoscope is a thin, tube-like instrument with a light and a lens for viewing. It may also have a tool to remove tissue to be checked under a microscope for signs of disease.
IU scientists find evidence that invisible war between microorganisms may affect human health

IU scientists find evidence that invisible war between microorganisms may affect human health

Health experts have warned for years that the overuse of antibiotics is creating "superbugs" able to resist drugs treating infection. [More]
New endoscopic probe could facilitate more effective, less painful imaging of internal tissues

New endoscopic probe could facilitate more effective, less painful imaging of internal tissues

Colonoscopy is a safe and effective medical procedure that's proven to saves lives. Used for routine cancer screening, it can help identify colon tumors in their early stages. In addition, it is a key non-surgical imaging technique that allows doctors to spot ulcers, polyps or bleeding inside the large intestines of their patients safely, avoiding complications that an exploratory surgery might induce. [More]
Groundbreaking experimental therapy has ability to suppress ulcerative colitis

Groundbreaking experimental therapy has ability to suppress ulcerative colitis

UCLA scientists have discovered a groundbreaking experimental therapy that has the ability to suppress the development of ulcerative colitis (UC), a disease which causes inflammation in the digestive tract and colon cancer. The treatment utilizes a chemical inhibitor able to block an RNA molecule (microRNA-214) involved in the transmission of genetic information. [More]
Older people who screen positive for dementia refuse subsequent evaluation, study finds

Older people who screen positive for dementia refuse subsequent evaluation, study finds

Two thirds of individuals 65 and older who screened positive for cognitive impairment refused subsequent evaluation according to the first study of its kind to examine older adults' willingness to undergo diagnostic assessment. The Indiana University Center for Aging Research, Regenstrief Institute and Eskenazi Health study of approximately 500 older adults found that individuals living alone were the least likely to agree to diagnostic assessment following a positive screening test for dementia. [More]
Colorectal cancer patients diagnosed during screening colonoscopy survive longer

Colorectal cancer patients diagnosed during screening colonoscopy survive longer

Patients whose colorectal cancer (CRC) is detected during a screening colonoscopy are likely to survive longer than those who wait until they have symptoms before having the test, according to a study in the July issue of GIE: Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, the monthly peer-reviewed scientific journal of the American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. [More]

Patient sues doctors for defamation, medical malpractice

On June 23, 2015 the Washington Post ran a story titled Anesthesiologist trashes sedated patient — and it ends up costing her. While preparing for a colonoscopy, a patient hit "record" on his smartphone to make sure he heard the instructions his doctor would give him after the procedure. [More]
IBI scientists make progress in identifying new biomarkers for preventing colorectal cancer

IBI scientists make progress in identifying new biomarkers for preventing colorectal cancer

Scientists from the Instituto de Investigación Biomédica [Institute of Biomedical Research], in Galicia (Spain), have made progress in the identification of new biomarkers for improving prevention of colorectal cancer. [More]

Higher adenoma detection rates linked to lower lifetime colorectal cancer incidence and death

An analysis that included information from more than 57,000 screening colonoscopies suggests that higher adenoma detection rates may be associated with up to 50 percent to 60 percent lower lifetime colorectal cancer incidence and death without higher overall costs, despite a higher number of colonoscopies and potential complications, according to a study in the June 16 issue of JAMA. [More]
Study identifies unique bacterial signature in people with systemic sclerosis

Study identifies unique bacterial signature in people with systemic sclerosis

The results of a study presented today at the European League Against Rheumatism Annual Congress (EULAR 2015) Press Conference showed that people with systemic sclerosis (SSc) have a unique bacterial signature in their colon, when compared with healthy people. [More]
Frisbie Memorial Hospital now uses low-dose CT scanning for screening colorectal cancer

Frisbie Memorial Hospital now uses low-dose CT scanning for screening colorectal cancer

Frisbie Memorial Hospital is now using low-dose CT scanning as a follow-up tool for screening colorectal cancer. This procedure, known as virtual colonoscopy, does not replace the effective and most reliable colorectal cancer screening tool, which is the colonoscopy, but rather it is utilized as a means to obtain additional images of the colon and rectum. [More]
Study finds new colon cancer screening as promising alternative to colonoscopy for African Americans

Study finds new colon cancer screening as promising alternative to colonoscopy for African Americans

In a first-of-its-kind clinical trial, physician-scientists at University Hospitals Case Medical Center Seidman Cancer Center and Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine found that a new non-invasive technology for colon cancer screening is a promising alternative to colonoscopy for African Americans. [More]
International study finds that two-week diet swap for African-Americans may lower colon cancer risk

International study finds that two-week diet swap for African-Americans may lower colon cancer risk

African-Americans and Africans who swapped their typical diets for just two weeks similarly exchanged their respective risks of colon cancer as reflected by alterations of their gut bacteria, according to an international study led by researchers at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine published online today in Nature Communications. [More]
Dramatic effects on colon cancer risk for Americans and Africans when diet swapped

Dramatic effects on colon cancer risk for Americans and Africans when diet swapped

Scientists have found dramatic effects on risk factors for colon cancer when American and African volunteers swapped diets for just two weeks. [More]
Check-Cap announces Notice of Allowance from USPTO for endoscopy capsule technology

Check-Cap announces Notice of Allowance from USPTO for endoscopy capsule technology

Check-Cap Ltd., a clinical stage medical diagnostics company engaged in the development of a preparation-free ingestible imaging capsule that utilizes low-dose X-rays for the screening for colorectal cancer, today announced receipt of a Notice of Allowance from the United States Patent and Trademark Office for patent application U.S. 13/825,018 entitled, "Estimation of Distances and Size of Lesions in the Colon with an Imaging Capsule." [More]
Alternative treatment options for uterine fibroids

Alternative treatment options for uterine fibroids

A 47-year-old African-American woman has heavy menstrual bleeding and iron-deficiency anemia. She reports the frequent need to urinate during the night and throughout the day. A colonoscopy is negative and an ultrasonography shows a modestly enlarged uterus with three uterine fibroids, noncancerous growths of the uterus. [More]
PAION initiates Remimazolam Phase 3 trial in patients undergoing colonoscopy

PAION initiates Remimazolam Phase 3 trial in patients undergoing colonoscopy

PAION, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of PAION AG, today announced the initiation of a U.S. Phase 3 clinical trial of Remimazolam, an ultra-short-acting sedative/anesthetic, for procedural sedation in patients undergoing colonoscopy. [More]
Researchers identify bio-markers that could help detect early stage colorectal cancer

Researchers identify bio-markers that could help detect early stage colorectal cancer

Colorectal cancer is the third most common form of cancer globally and the second most common cause of cancer deaths. The chance of a cure is high if the cancer is detected early enough, but early detection is not a given. Researchers from VIB and KU Leuven - together with various European oncology centers, including UZ Leuven - have identified bio-markers that can be incorporated in a new diagnostic test. [More]
Fecal microbiota transplantation more successful for treating Clostridium difficile infections

Fecal microbiota transplantation more successful for treating Clostridium difficile infections

Distasteful though it sounds, the transplantation of fecal matter is more successful for treating Clostridium difficile infections than previously thought. [More]
Vitamin D3 and metformin show promising results in preventing colorectal cancer

Vitamin D3 and metformin show promising results in preventing colorectal cancer

The concept was simple: If two compounds each individually show promise in preventing colon cancer, surely it's worth trying the two together to see if even greater impact is possible. [More]
New strategies to improve screening rates for colorectal cancer in low-income populations

New strategies to improve screening rates for colorectal cancer in low-income populations

Since the colonoscopy was developed more than four decades ago, the screening procedure for colorectal cancer has undoubtedly saved millions of lives. [More]
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