Colonoscopy News and Research RSS Feed - Colonoscopy News and Research

Colonoscopy is examination of the inside of the colon using a colonoscope, inserted into the rectum. A colonoscope is a thin, tube-like instrument with a light and a lens for viewing. It may also have a tool to remove tissue to be checked under a microscope for signs of disease.
Retrospective study finds overuse of colonoscopies for colorectal cancer screening, surveillance

Retrospective study finds overuse of colonoscopies for colorectal cancer screening, surveillance

A retrospective study led by researchers at Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH), has found an overuse of colonoscopies for colorectal cancer screening and surveillance. [More]
Study assesses effectiveness of UK-wide screening programme for Lynch Syndrome

Study assesses effectiveness of UK-wide screening programme for Lynch Syndrome

Screening families of patients with bowel cancer for a genetic condition would cut their risk of developing bowel, womb, and ovarian cancers, new research has found. [More]
Fecal microbiota transplantation officially recommended for effective treatment of C. difficile infection

Fecal microbiota transplantation officially recommended for effective treatment of C. difficile infection

The transplantation of faecal microbiota from a healthy donor has been shown in recent clinical studies to be a safe and highly effective treatment for recurrent Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) infection and is now recommended in European treatment guidelines. [More]
Fecal occult blood screening increases diagnosis rate of high-risk polyps by 89%

Fecal occult blood screening increases diagnosis rate of high-risk polyps by 89%

The introduction of biennial colorectal cancer screening in a region of France increased the rate of diagnosis of high risk pre-cancerous adenomas (sometimes called polyps) by 89%, researchers have reported at the ESMO 2014 Congress in Madrid. [More]
'Drive-by doctoring' during surgery can add a surprise to the bill

'Drive-by doctoring' during surgery can add a surprise to the bill

The New York Times examines the growing -- and lucrative -- practice among doctors to call in colleagues to consult during a surgery or afterward. The need is sometimes questionable, and patients often don't even know the second doctor was involved until the bill arrives. [More]
Consensus statement on adequate bowel cleansing for colonoscopy

Consensus statement on adequate bowel cleansing for colonoscopy

The success of a colonoscopy is closely linked to good bowel preparation, with poor bowel prep often resulting in missed precancerous lesions, according to new consensus guidelines released by the U.S. Multi-Society Task force on Colorectal Cancer. [More]
Health law may be reducing pressure on some ERs

Health law may be reducing pressure on some ERs

The Affordable Care Act is relieving financial pressures on some hospitals by reducing unpaid emergency room bills and may also be curbing the growth of such visits, CBS News reports. [More]
Findings may help policy makers address barriers to access to care

Findings may help policy makers address barriers to access to care

A recent study has found that in states with higher Medicaid payments for office visits, Medicaid beneficiaries were more likely to be screened for breast, cervical, and colorectal cancer. [More]
Research roundup: Benefits of smaller practices; Rx price growth; fixing Medicare claims reviews

Research roundup: Benefits of smaller practices; Rx price growth; fixing Medicare claims reviews

The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services within the Department of Health and Human Services has taken steps to prevent its contractors from conducting certain duplicative postpayment claims reviews-;reviews of the same claims that are not permitted by the agency-;but CMS neither has reliable data nor provides sufficient oversight and guidance to measure and fully prevent duplication. [More]
VolitionRx installs automated liquid handling system to increase rate of blood sample analysis

VolitionRx installs automated liquid handling system to increase rate of blood sample analysis

VolitionRx Limited, a life sciences company focused on developing blood-based diagnostic tests for different types of cancer, today announced it has installed a Tecan EVO200 automated liquid handling system in its Namur, Belgium laboratory. [More]
Screening with flexible sigmoidoscopy results in reduced incidence, death rate of colorectal cancer

Screening with flexible sigmoidoscopy results in reduced incidence, death rate of colorectal cancer

Among about 100,000 study participants, screening with flexible sigmoidoscopy resulted in a reduced incidence and rate of death of colorectal cancer, compared to no screening, according to a study in the August 13 issue of JAMA. [More]
Screening test for colon cancer wins FDA approval

Screening test for colon cancer wins FDA approval

The test, called Cologuard, can detect genetic mutations in patients' stool samples that are associated with cancerous and precancerous growths. [More]
African Americans less likely to engage in CRC screening in VA healthcare system

African Americans less likely to engage in CRC screening in VA healthcare system

According to researchers in California, African Americans' participation in colorectal cancer screening is low and the use of colonoscopy infrequent despite similar access to care across races in a Veterans Affairs healthcare system. [More]
New guideline recommends genetic testing of tumors for colorectal cancer patients

New guideline recommends genetic testing of tumors for colorectal cancer patients

Of the 143,000 patients diagnosed with colorectal cancer annually in the U.S., up to 25 percent have a familial risk of colorectal cancer. A new guideline from the U.S. Multi-Society Task Force on Colorectal Cancer recommends genetic testing of tumors for all newly diagnosed colorectal cancer patients. [More]
University of Bradford researchers devise simple blood test to diagnose cancer

University of Bradford researchers devise simple blood test to diagnose cancer

Researchers from the University of Bradford, UK, have devised a simple blood test that can be used to diagnose whether people have cancer or not. [More]
Fecal transplantation safe, effective for treating C. difficile in immunocompromised patients

Fecal transplantation safe, effective for treating C. difficile in immunocompromised patients

Researchers have found that fecal transplantation is effective and safe for treating C. difficile in immunocompromised patients. This is the result of a study led by Colleen Kelly, M.D., a gastroenterologist in the Center for Women's Gastrointestinal Medicine at The Women's Medicine Collaborative. [More]
Research roundup: Role of primary care in reducing readmissions; air transport for wounded soldiers; hospital prices

Research roundup: Role of primary care in reducing readmissions; air transport for wounded soldiers; hospital prices

Follow-up with a primary care provider (PCP) in addition to the surgical team is routinely recommended to patients discharged after major surgery despite no clear evidence that it improves outcomes. [More]
Small antioxidant molecules suppress colon cancer associated with colitis

Small antioxidant molecules suppress colon cancer associated with colitis

Researchers from Case Western Reserve and Dartmouth universities have shown that a class of small antioxidant molecules carries enormous promise for supressing colon cancer associated with colitis. [More]
UEG calls for more nurse endoscopy workforce to reduce CRC deaths

UEG calls for more nurse endoscopy workforce to reduce CRC deaths

Colorectal cancer (CRC) is currently estimated to claim the lives of 214,675[1] adults in Europe, equivalent to 1 death every 3 minutes. [More]
Six essential screening tests all men should receive during lifetime

Six essential screening tests all men should receive during lifetime

When it's comes men and health, the numbers don't stack up. Compared to women, men are 24 percent less likely than women to visit the doctor, according to the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services. Yet, men are 28 percent more likely than women to be hospitalized for congestive heart failure and 32 percent more likely to receive care for complication of diabetes. [More]