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Study finds no evidence that exercise may lower woman’s risk of developing MS

Study finds no evidence that exercise may lower woman’s risk of developing MS

A large, new study shows no evidence that exercise may reduce a woman's risk of developing multiple sclerosis (MS). [More]
Experimental PET tracer can diagnose concussion-related brain degeneration in living person

Experimental PET tracer can diagnose concussion-related brain degeneration in living person

An experimental positron emission tomography (PET) tracer can effectively diagnose concussion-related brain degeneration while a person is still alive, according to a proof-of-concept study conducted at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and published September 27 in the journal Translational Psychiatry. [More]
NIH grant supports Wake Forest Baptist researchers to study effects of head impacts in young players

NIH grant supports Wake Forest Baptist researchers to study effects of head impacts in young players

Supported by a National Institutes of Health grant worth a projected $3.3 million over five years, Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center investigators have expanded their research into the cumulative effects of head impacts in young football players to the high school level. [More]
Experimental drug may prevent development of multiple sclerosis in mice

Experimental drug may prevent development of multiple sclerosis in mice

The experimental drug laquinimod may prevent the development or reduce the progression of multiple sclerosis (MS) in mice, according to research published in the September 21, 2016, online issue of Neurology Neuroimmunology & Neuroinflammation, a medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
New intervention improves health, wellness outcomes in adolescents with persistent concussion

New intervention improves health, wellness outcomes in adolescents with persistent concussion

Concussions can create a host of symptoms—headache, dizziness, moodiness, upset stomach and other issues. [More]
Loyola Medicine introduces multidisciplinary program to diagnose and treat concussions

Loyola Medicine introduces multidisciplinary program to diagnose and treat concussions

Loyola Medicine has launched a multidisciplinary Concussion Program to diagnose and treat concussions in athletes and other patients. [More]
Graded aerobic treadmill testing useful in evaluating sports-related concussion in children

Graded aerobic treadmill testing useful in evaluating sports-related concussion in children

Graded aerobic treadmill testing is safe, tolerable, and useful in evaluating and managing cases of sports-related concussion in children and adolescents. [More]
Researchers find dramatic increase in rate of soccer-related head injuries among young players

Researchers find dramatic increase in rate of soccer-related head injuries among young players

Soccer is an increasingly popular sport in the United States, both professionally and recreationally, with over 3 million registered soccer players under 19 years of age playing in leagues every year. [More]
Many parents follow outdated advice that may worsen child's recovery from concussion, survey reveals

Many parents follow outdated advice that may worsen child's recovery from concussion, survey reveals

A new national survey, commissioned by UCLA Health, reveals that a vast majority of parents may be following outdated advice when caring for a child with a concussion, and it could be making their child's symptoms worse. [More]
Novel wearable device can track activities of dementia patients, help in combat training

Novel wearable device can track activities of dementia patients, help in combat training

It's like a Fitbit on steroids. Researchers at Missouri University of Science and Technology have developed a multi-modal sensing device that can track the fine-grained activities and behavior of people with dementia — and it could help in Army combat training, too. [More]
Taking two new epilepsy drugs during pregnancy may not harm thinking skills and IQs of children

Taking two new epilepsy drugs during pregnancy may not harm thinking skills and IQs of children

Two epilepsy drugs, levetiracetam and topiramate, may not harm the thinking skills and IQs of school-age children born to women who took them while pregnant, according to a recent study. [More]
People with high levels of four biomarkers may have increased risk for stroke

People with high levels of four biomarkers may have increased risk for stroke

People with high levels of four biomarkers in the blood may be more likely to develop a stroke than people with low levels of the biomarkers, according to a study published in the August 24, 2016, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Medical students developing smart helmet to help diagnose concussions

Medical students developing smart helmet to help diagnose concussions

A smart helmet that can help diagnose concussions in football players is being developed by medical students at Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center El Paso. [More]
Optimal doses of omega-3 fatty acids appear to improve outcomes from traumatic brain injury

Optimal doses of omega-3 fatty acids appear to improve outcomes from traumatic brain injury

The treatment of concussions and traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a clinical challenge. Clinical studies thus far have failed to identify an effective treatment strategy when a combination of targets controlling aspects of neuroprotection, neuroinflammation, and neuroregeneration is needed. [More]
Study suggests limiting tackling drills in youth football practices could reduce risk of head impacts

Study suggests limiting tackling drills in youth football practices could reduce risk of head impacts

Nearly three quarters of the football players in the U.S. are less than 14 years old. But amid growing concern about concussion risk in football, the majority of the head-impact research has focused on college and professional players. [More]
Concussive injury in female athletes elicits long-term changes in the corpus callosum

Concussive injury in female athletes elicits long-term changes in the corpus callosum

Female athletes who have suffered at least one concussion showed structural differences in the corpus callosum, the structure that connects the two hemispheres of the brain, compared to unconcussed female athletes and other women. [More]
Football players sustain more serious head impacts when hitting another player, study shows

Football players sustain more serious head impacts when hitting another player, study shows

In football, player-vs.-player hits will likely cause more severe head impacts than other impacts, according to a new study by a University of Georgia researcher. [More]
Noninvasive computer-based neurotechnology helps improve concussion symptoms in athletes

Noninvasive computer-based neurotechnology helps improve concussion symptoms in athletes

Brain State Technologies announces that a series of young athletes with long-term symptoms after concussion showed a variety of lasting improvements, after using HIRREM neurotechnology. [More]
Concussion during adolescence may be more common than previously thought

Concussion during adolescence may be more common than previously thought

Sustaining a concussion during adolescence may be more common than previous estimates, according to researchers presenting their study at the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine's Annual Meeting in Colorado Springs, CO today. [More]
AAN, ABF and MDA offer new two-year clinical training fellowship in muscular dystrophy

AAN, ABF and MDA offer new two-year clinical training fellowship in muscular dystrophy

The American Academy of Neurology, the American Brain Foundation and the Muscular Dystrophy Association have announced a new Clinical Research Training Fellowship in muscular dystrophy for 2017. [More]
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