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Better eye discipline may help reduce concussion in female soccer players

Better eye discipline may help reduce concussion in female soccer players

With the ever-growing popularity of women's soccer, attention to sports-related concussions is also a growing concern, as the act of heading the ball is thought to contribute to increased incidence of concussion. [More]
Mapping premature infant's brain after birth may help better predict developmental problems

Mapping premature infant's brain after birth may help better predict developmental problems

Scanning a premature infant's brain shortly after birth to map the location and volume of lesions, small areas of injury in the brain's white matter, may help doctors better predict whether the baby will have disabilities later, according to a new study published in the January 18, 2017, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Concussions accelerate Alzheimer's disease-related brain atrophy and cognitive decline, research finds

Concussions accelerate Alzheimer's disease-related brain atrophy and cognitive decline, research finds

New research has found concussions accelerate Alzheimer's disease-related brain atrophy and cognitive decline in people who are at genetic risk for the condition. [More]
AAN issues new guideline on mapping the brain before epilepsy surgery

AAN issues new guideline on mapping the brain before epilepsy surgery

Before epilepsy surgery, doctors may consider using brain imaging to locate language and memory functions in the brain instead of the more invasive procedure that is commonly used, according to a guideline published by the American Academy of Neurology in the January 11, 2017, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Special issue of Optometry and Vision Science features new research on visual dysfunction after TBI

Special issue of Optometry and Vision Science features new research on visual dysfunction after TBI

Vision problems are a common and sometimes lasting consequence of head injuries—from children and teens with sports-related concussions to military personnel with combat-related traumatic brain injury (TBI). [More]
Elevated levels of brain protein linked to longer recovery period after concussion

Elevated levels of brain protein linked to longer recovery period after concussion

Elevated levels of the brain protein tau following a sport-related concussion are associated with a longer recovery period and delayed return to play for athletes, according to a study published in the January 6, 2017 issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Concussed children with vision abnormalities have academic difficulty, research shows

Concussed children with vision abnormalities have academic difficulty, research shows

A comprehensive vision assessment should be part of return-to-learn protocols to help determine when children are ready to return to the classroom following concussions -- particularly in children reporting academic difficulty. [More]
Mediterranean diet may help provide long-term protection to the brain

Mediterranean diet may help provide long-term protection to the brain

A new study shows that older people who followed a Mediterranean diet retained more brain volume over a three-year period than those who did not follow the diet as closely. [More]
Welders can develop Parkinson's disease-like symptoms that get worse with exposure

Welders can develop Parkinson's disease-like symptoms that get worse with exposure

Welders can develop Parkinson's disease-like symptoms that may get worse the longer and more they are exposed to the chemical element manganese from welding fumes, according to a study published in the December 28, 2016, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Study reports volume and cost of in-home care for children with special medical conditions

Study reports volume and cost of in-home care for children with special medical conditions

U.S. families provide nearly $36 billion annually in uncompensated medical care at home to children who have special health care needs, such as muscular dystrophy and cystic fibrosis, according to a large national study. [More]
Study tracks parents' unpaid time assisting children with special health care needs

Study tracks parents' unpaid time assisting children with special health care needs

About half of U.S. children with special health care needs -- 5.6 million children -- receive medical care from uncompensated family members worth billions of dollars, finds a large national study led by Boston Children's Hospital and the University of Southern California (USC). [More]
Clemson researchers focus on improving overall safety of football helmet facemasks

Clemson researchers focus on improving overall safety of football helmet facemasks

A team of Clemson University researchers and an Upstate businessman believe they can help make football a little safer by creating a facemask that can help reduce the severity of head injuries by increasing overall helmet protection. [More]
Groundbreaking research finds concussion biomarker in auditory system

Groundbreaking research finds concussion biomarker in auditory system

The secret to reliably diagnosing concussions lies in the brain's ability to process sound, according to a new study by researchers from Northwestern University's Auditory Neuroscience Laboratory. [More]
Recovery from TBI appears to go hand-in-hand with improvement of sleep problems

Recovery from TBI appears to go hand-in-hand with improvement of sleep problems

After a traumatic brain injury (TBI), people also experience major sleep problems, including changes in their sleep-wake cycle. [More]
Early physical activity following concussion linked to lower risk of PPCS

Early physical activity following concussion linked to lower risk of PPCS

Among children and adolescents who experienced a concussion, physical activity within 7 days of injury compared with no physical activity was associated with reduced risk of persistent postconcussive symptoms at 28 days, according to a study appearing in the December 20 issue of JAMA. [More]
People with protein in urine more likely to develop memory problems, dementia

People with protein in urine more likely to develop memory problems, dementia

People who have protein in their urine, which is a sign of kidney problems, may also be more likely to later develop problems with thinking and memory skills or even dementia, according to a meta-analysis published in the December 14, 2016, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
High-resolution brain scans could play critical role in helping detect concussions

High-resolution brain scans could play critical role in helping detect concussions

Simon Fraser University researchers have found that high-resolution brain scans, coupled with computational analysis, could play a critical role in helping to detect concussions that conventional scans might miss. [More]
Newborns with low levels of vitamin D may more likely develop multiple sclerosis in later life

Newborns with low levels of vitamin D may more likely develop multiple sclerosis in later life

Babies born with low levels of vitamin D may be more likely to develop multiple sclerosis (MS) later in life than babies with higher levels of vitamin D, according to a study published in the November 30, 2016, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Study finds persistent cortical thinning in former collegiate football players

Study finds persistent cortical thinning in former collegiate football players

A growing body of research continues to raise concerns about the effects of head trauma sustained while participating in popular contact sports, particularly football. [More]
Targeted approach may improve recovery after concussion, experts say

Targeted approach may improve recovery after concussion, experts say

Prescribed rest—both physical and mental—is the standard treatment for concussion. But a growing body of evidence suggests that a more active, targeted approach might provide better outcomes for some patients, reports a special article in the December issue of Neurosurgery, official journal of the Congress of Neurological Surgeons. [More]
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