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TBX5 gene expression could play key role in congenital heart disease

TBX5 gene expression could play key role in congenital heart disease

Congenital heart disease is the most common birth defect and the leading cause of all infant deaths in the United States. Mutations in the gene TBX5 have been shown to cause both rare and more prevalent forms of congenital heart disease, yet the underlying mechanisms have remained unclear. [More]
ISHLT issues new list of criteria to determine patient eligibility for heart transplant

ISHLT issues new list of criteria to determine patient eligibility for heart transplant

To determine patient eligibility for heart transplant, the International Society for Heart Lung Transplantation maintains a list of criteria, first issued in 2006, that acts as a guideline for physicians. [More]
LifeVest wearable cardioverter defibrillator approved for children at risk for sudden cardiac arrest

LifeVest wearable cardioverter defibrillator approved for children at risk for sudden cardiac arrest

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved a new indication for the LifeVest wearable cardioverter defibrillator. The LifeVest is approved for certain children who are at risk for sudden cardiac arrest, but are not candidates for an implantable defibrillator due to certain medical conditions or lack of parental consent. [More]
CAP2 gene responsible for cardiac conduction disease in mice

CAP2 gene responsible for cardiac conduction disease in mice

The presence or absence of the CAP2 gene causes sudden cardiac death in mice, according to new research from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. In particular, the absence of the gene interrupts the animal's ability to send electrical signals to the heart to tell it to contract, a condition called cardiac conduction disease. [More]
New biobank initiative may help unlock some of the mysteries linked to Down syndrome

New biobank initiative may help unlock some of the mysteries linked to Down syndrome

Nationwide Children's Hospital and research advocacy group DownSyndrome Achieves have joined forces to create the first biobank in the country dedicated to collecting and managing blood samples from people with Down syndrome. [More]

Early promise for pulmonary artery denervation in PAH patients

Pulmonary artery denervation is feasible and may reduce pulmonary arterial pressure in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension, phase II findings suggest. [More]
Study finds link between congenital heart disease and neurodevelopmental disorders

Study finds link between congenital heart disease and neurodevelopmental disorders

Researchers from Columbia University Medical Center, NewYork-Presbyterian, the Pediatric Cardiac Genetics Consortium, and the Pediatric Heart Network have found a number of genetic mutations that explain why many children with congenital heart disease also have other significant health challenges, including neurodevelopmental disorders and other congenital problems. [More]
Gene mutations that cause congenital heart disease also lead to neurodevelopmental delays

Gene mutations that cause congenital heart disease also lead to neurodevelopmental delays

Some of the same gene mutations that cause heart defects in children also lead to neurodevelopmental delays, including learning disabilities. A large study of congenital heart disease (CHD) reveals overlapping genetic influences during early childhood development. [More]
Pregnant women with elevated blood-sugar levels more likely to have babies with heart defects

Pregnant women with elevated blood-sugar levels more likely to have babies with heart defects

Pregnant women with elevated blood-sugar levels are more likely to have babies with congenital heart defects, even if their blood sugar is below the cutoff for diabetes, according to a new study from the Stanford University School of Medicine and Stanford Children's Health. [More]
Invitae announces dramatic expansion of genetic testing menu

Invitae announces dramatic expansion of genetic testing menu

Invitae Corporation (NYSE: NVTA), a genetic information company, has announced that it has more than doubled the size of its genetic testing platform to include more than 600 genes and will begin releasing the new content between now and the end of the year. Invitae is immediately expanding its menu with dozens of new test panels for hereditary cancer, cardiovascular, neuromuscular, pediatric and other rare disorders. [More]
Children with congenital heart disease and ADHD can benefit from stimulant medications

Children with congenital heart disease and ADHD can benefit from stimulant medications

A new study finds that children with congenital heart disease and ADHD can take stimulant medications without fear of significant cardiovascular side effects. [More]
Delayed umbilical cord clamping may benefit extremely preterm infants

Delayed umbilical cord clamping may benefit extremely preterm infants

Clamping and cutting of the umbilical cord happens within 10 seconds after birth in most cases, in part so members of a medical team can more quickly begin caring for a newborn. But research from Nationwide Children's Hospital shows that waiting 30 to 45 seconds to clamp could have advantages for extremely preterm infants. [More]
Technology enabling fewer invasive cardiac procedures benefits Glasgow children

Technology enabling fewer invasive cardiac procedures benefits Glasgow children

Clinicians at Glasgow’s Royal Hospital for Sick Children are now able to scan patients’ hearts in just one heartbeat thanks to the installation of GE Healthcare’s Revolution* CT. The technology’s ability to freeze the heart’s motion helps to produce high quality diagnostic images, even for patients with erratic or high heart rates which may have led to poor quality images in the past. This helps reduce the need for invasive examination procedures and allows for quick and confident diagnoses of heart disease. [More]
Children's Hospital Los Angeles successfully implants Melody Transcatheter Pulmonary Valve in child actor

Children's Hospital Los Angeles successfully implants Melody Transcatheter Pulmonary Valve in child actor

Cardiologists from Children's Hospital Los Angeles successfully implanted a Melody Transcatheter Pulmonary Valve in child actor Max Page, the boy who made headlines playing mini Darth Vader in a 2011 Super Bowl ad for Volkswagen. [More]
Researchers awarded $6.4 million grant to identify causes of neurodevelopmental disorders in children with CHDs

Researchers awarded $6.4 million grant to identify causes of neurodevelopmental disorders in children with CHDs

As advances in medicine are giving rise to growing numbers of children who are surviving severe heart defects, a phenomenon is emerging that is catching parents and healthcare providers off-guard. Over half of these children also have a seemingly unrelated disability: neurodevelopmental disorders. Some have severe cognitive and motor deficits that arise early. [More]
Seizures are common but not clinically apparent in newborns after cardiac surgery

Seizures are common but not clinically apparent in newborns after cardiac surgery

In 2011, the American Clinical Neurophysiology Society issued a guideline recommending that neonates undergoing cardiac surgery for repair of congenital heart disease be placed on continuous encephalographic (EEG) monitoring after surgery to detect seizures. These recommendations followed reports that seizures are common in this population, may not be detected clinically, and are associated with adverse neurocognitive outcomes. [More]
Johns Hopkins study finds substantial increase in rate, costs of hospitalizations for pediatric pulmonary hypertension

Johns Hopkins study finds substantial increase in rate, costs of hospitalizations for pediatric pulmonary hypertension

A review of 15 years’ worth of data in a national pediatric medical database has documented a substantial increase in the rate of hospitalizations for children with a form of high blood pressure once most common in those with congenital heart disease. [More]
Pitt researchers figure out how to quantify beating action of cilia

Pitt researchers figure out how to quantify beating action of cilia

Researchers at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine have figured out how to objectively quantify the beating action of cilia, the tiny, hair-like projections on cells that line nasal passages, the lungs and almost every other body tissue, according to a study published online today in Science Translational Medicine. [More]
UCLA cardiologists use less invasive approach to replace heart valve

UCLA cardiologists use less invasive approach to replace heart valve

Last summer, after a long career as a successful entrepreneur and a brief retirement, Richard Whitaker was helping to start another new company. Unfortunately, a serious health concern caused a couple of interruptions in his work on the new venture. One of Whitaker's heart valves wasn't working properly, which caused congestive heart failure and led to two hospitalizations within several months. [More]
Helen DeVos Children's Hospital uses two imaging techniques to produce hybrid 3D model of a patient's heart

Helen DeVos Children's Hospital uses two imaging techniques to produce hybrid 3D model of a patient's heart

Congenital heart experts from Spectrum Health Helen DeVos Children's Hospital have successfully integrated two common imaging techniques to produce a three-dimensional anatomic model of a patient's heart. [More]
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